PK SjUIoa,mimetypeapplication/epub+zipPKSjUIOEBPS/rem_oracle_sw.htm Removing Oracle Database Companion CD Products

6 Removing Oracle Database Companion CD Products

This chapter describes how to remove Oracle software from the system. It includes information about the following tasks:

6.1 Removing Oracle HTML DB Database Objects

When you install Oracle HTML DB, a configuration assistant creates database objects in the database that you specify during the installation. To completely remove Oracle HTML DB, you must remove the database objects from that database after you remove the software. To remove the Oracle HTML DB database objects from a database, follow these steps:

  1. Using SQL*Plus, connect to the database as the SYS or SYSTEM user:

    $ sqlplus "SYS/SYS_password AS SYSDBA"
    
    
  2. Enter the following commands to remove the database objects:

    SQL> ALTER SESSION SET CURRENT_SCHEMA = flows_010600;
    SQL> EXEC wwv_flow_upgrade.drop_public_synonyms;
    SQL> ALTER SESSION SET CURRENT_SCHEMA = SYSTEM;
    SQL> DROP USER flows_010600 CASCADE;
    SQL> DROP USER flows_files CASCADE;
    SQL> DROP USER htmldb_public_user CASCADE;
    

6.2 Removing Oracle Workflow

To remove Oracle Workflow:

  1. Use Oracle Universal Installer to remove Oracle Workflow Server or the Oracle Workflow middle-tier components.

  2. Drop the Oracle Workflow schema from the database.

    Log in to the database as the SYS user, and enter a command such as the following:

    drop user Workflow_schema_name cascade
    
    

    For example:

    drop user owf_mgr cascade
    

6.3 Removing Oracle Software Files

To remove Oracle software by using Oracle Universal Installer:


Note:

Always use Oracle Universal Installer to remove Oracle software. Do not delete any Oracle home directories without first using Oracle Universal Installer to remove the software.

  1. If necessary, log in as the oracle user:

    $ su - oracle
    
    
  2. Set the ORACLE_HOME environment variable to specify the path of the Oracle home that you want to remove:

    • Bourne, Bash, or Korn shell:

      $ ORACLE_HOME=oracle_home_path
      $ export ORACLE_HOME
      
      
    • C shell:

      $ setenv ORACLE_HOME oracle_home_path
      
      
  3. Start Oracle Universal Installer by entering the following command:

    $ORACLE_HOME/oui/bin/runInstaller
    
    
  4. On the Welcome screen, click Deinstall Products.

    The Inventory screen lists all the Oracle homes on the system and the products installed in each Oracle home.

  5. On the Inventory screen, select the Oracle home containing the products that you want to remove.

  6. If you want to delete specific products, then select them in the tree window.

  7. Click Remove.

    Oracle Universal Installer displays a confirmation screen prompting you to confirm that you want to remove the selected products and their dependent components.

  8. Click Yes.

    Oracle Universal Installer displays a progress indicator as it removes the software.

PKMPKSjUIOEBPS/app_nonint.htmr7 Installing Oracle Database Companion CD Products in Noninteractive Mode

B Installing Oracle Database Companion CD Products in Noninteractive Mode

This appendix describes the following advanced installation topics:

B.1 Installing Oracle Components in Noninteractive Mode

Typically, Oracle Universal Installer runs in interactive mode, which means that it prompts you to provide information on graphical user interface (GUI) screens. Alternatively, you can run Oracle Universal Installer in noninteractive mode. This mode is also referred to as silent mode, or silent installation.

You may want to use noninteractive mode to install the Oracle Database Companion CD products in the following scenarios:

This section covers the following topics on how you can use response files to run Oracle Universal Installer in noninteractive mode:

B.1.1 Using Response Files to Install Oracle Components in Noninteractive Mode

To use the noninteractive mode, you run Oracle Universal Installer with a response file. A response file is a text file that contains variables and values that Oracle Universal Installer uses during the installation process. Oracle provides a set of sample response files that you can customize, or you can create your own response file by recording your installation selections.


See Also:

Oracle Universal Installer and OPatch User's Guide for more information about response file formats

B.1.2 Editing a Response File Template

Table B-1 lists the sample response files provided on the installation media.

Table B-1 Response Files

Response File Description

htmldb.HTMLDBONLY.rsp

Oracle HTML DB only installation

htmldb.HTMLDBwithOHS.rsp

Oracle HTML DB with Oracle HTTP Server installation

companionCD.db.rsp

Oracle Database 10g Products installation type

companionCD.midtier.rsp

Oracle Database Companion CD installation type


To modify a response file template:

  1. Copy the response file from the response file directory to a directory on your system as follows:

    $ cp /directory_path/response/response_file.rsp local_directory
    
    

    In this example, directory_path is the path of the companion directory on the installation media or the hard drive. If you have copied the software to a hard drive, then you can also edit the file in the response directory.

  2. Open the response file in a text editor:

    $ vi /local_dir/response_file.rsp
    
    

    In addition to editing settings specific to the Oracle Database installation, check that the FROM_LOCATION path is correct and points to the products.xml file in the stage directory in the installation media. You may want to set this variable to point to an absolute path, for example:

    FROM_LOCATION="/directory_path/response/stage/products.xml"
    
    

    Remember that you can specify sensitive information, such as passwords, at the command line rather than within the response file.


    See Also:

    Oracle Universal Installer and OPatch User's Guide for detailed information on creating response files.

  3. To edit the file, follow the instructions in the file.


    Note:

    Oracle Universal Installer or the configuration assistant fails if you do not correctly configure the response file.

  4. Change the permissions on the file to 700:

    $ chmod 700 /local_dir/response_file.rsp
    
    

    Caution:

    A fully specified response file for an Oracle Database installation contains the passwords for database administrative accounts and for a user that is a member of the OSDBA group (required for automated backups). Ensure that only the Oracle software owner user can view or modify response files or consider deleting them after the installation succeeds.

B.1.3 Recording a Response File

You can use Oracle Universal Installer in interactive mode to record a response file that you can edit and then use to complete silent-mode or suppressed-mode installations. When you are recording the response file, you can either complete the installation, or you can exit from Oracle Universal Installer on the Summary page, before it starts to copy the software to the system.

If you want to use Record mode during a noninteractive installation, then Oracle Universal Installer copies the variable values that were specified in the original source response file into the new response file.

To record a new response file:

  1. Ensure that the computer on which you are creating the response file meets the requirements specified in Chapter 2.

    When you run Oracle Universal Installer to record a response file, it checks the system to verify that it meets the requirements to install the software.

  2. Enter a command similar to the following to start Oracle Universal Installer:


    Note:

    Do not specify a relative path to the response file. If you specify a relative path, then Oracle Universal Installer fails.

    $ /directory_path/runInstaller -record -destinationFile filename
    
    

    In this command:

    • directory_path is the path of the companion directory on the installation media or the hard drive

    • -record specifies that you want to record the responses that you enter in a response file

    • filename is the full path and file name of the response file that you want to record

  3. On each Oracle Universal Installer screen, specify the required information.

  4. When Oracle Universal Installer displays the Summary screen, perform one of the following steps:

    • Click Install to create the response file, and then continue with the installation.

    • Click Cancel, and then click Yes to create the response file but exit from Oracle Universal Installer without installing the software.

    The response file is saved in the location that you specified using the -destinationFile option.

  5. If you do not complete the installation, then delete the Oracle home directory that Oracle Universal Installer created using the path you specified on the Specify File Locations screen.

  6. Before using the recorded response file on another system, use a text editor to edit the file and make any required changes.

    Use the comments in the file as a guide when editing it.

  7. Run the response file by following the instructions in the "Running Oracle Universal Installer in Silent or Suppressed Mode" section.

B.1.4 Running Oracle Universal Installer in Silent or Suppressed Mode

To run Oracle Universal Installer in silent or suppressed mode, follow these steps:

  1. Complete the preinstallation tasks listed in Chapter 2.

  2. Log in as the Oracle software owner user (typically, oracle).

  3. If you are completing a suppressed-mode installation, set the DISPLAY environment variable.


    Note:

    You do not have to set the DISPLAY environment variable if you are completing a silent-mode installation.

  4. To start Oracle Universal Installer in silent or suppressed mode, enter a command similar to the following:


    Note:

    Do not specify a relative path to the response file. If you specify a relative path, then Oracle Universal Installer fails.

    • $ /directory_path/runInstaller [-silent] [-noconfig] -responseFile filename 
      
      

    In this example:

    • directory_path is the path of the companion directory on the installation media or the hard drive

    • -silent indicates that you want to run Oracle Universal Installer in silent mode

    • -noconfig suppresses running the configuration assistants during installation, and a software-only installation is performed instead

    • filename is the full path and file name of the installation response file that you configured


    See Also:

    For more information about other options for the runInstaller command, enter the following command:
    $ /directory_path/runInstaller -help
    

  5. After the installation is completed, log in as the root user and run the root.sh script:

    $ su
    # $ORACLE_HOME/root.sh
    

See Also:

  • The "Installing Oracle Products" section in Oracle Universal Installer and OPatch User's Guide for more information about installing on using response files

  • The "Deinstalling Products" section in Oracle Universal Installer and OPatch User's Guide for more information about removing software by using response files


B.2 Running Oracle Workflow Configuration Assistant in Noninteractive Mode

You can run Oracle Workflow Configuration Assistant in noninteractive mode by entering your configuration parameter settings directly in the Oracle Workflow Configuration Assistant wfinstall.csh script. You must specify all required and conditionally required parameters for the features that you want to use.

To run Oracle Workflow Configuration Assistant in noninteractive mode:

  1. Go to the $ORACLE_HOME/wf/install directory, which is the default location of the wfinstall.csh script.

  2. Open the wfinstall.csh script in a text editor, and locate the line that is similar to the following:

    . . . repository.jar" WorkflowCA /wfdir workflow_directory /orahome oracle_home 
    
    

    For example:

    . . . repository.jar" WorkflowCA /wfdir /d1/iasinstall/m21pw1/wf 
    /orahome /d1/iasinstall/m21pw1
    
    
  3. Edit the script to append your additional parameters after the /wfdir, /orahome, and /ospath parameters. Enter all the parameters on the same line. Otherwise, the script will not run correctly.

    . . . repository.jar" WorkflowCA /wfdir workflow_directory /orahome 
    oracle_home /wfacct workflow_schema
    /instype installation_type /tnsconndesc connection_string
    
    

    In the preceding script line:

    • /wfdir: The Oracle Workflow directory within your Oracle home directory. The default directory is $ORACLE_HOME/wf.

    • /orahome: Your Oracle home directory location. For example, /u01/app/oracle/product/10.2/db_2.

    • /wfacct: Workflow Account.

    • /instype: Specify one of the following installation options:

      • server: Configures Workflow Server only; available in both GUI mode and command-line mode

      • add_language: Sets the language or languages used; available in both GUI mode and command-line mode

    • /tnsconndesc: Connection string to the Oracle Database.


    Note:

    If a parameter can be entered in both user interface mode and noninteractive mode, then this section lists the name of the corresponding field on the Oracle Workflow Configuration Assistant screen alongside the noninteractive mode parameter name.

  4. If you specified add_language for the /instype parameter, then enter the /nlsopt parameter with the languages you want to add.

    Enclose the languages in double quotation marks. For example, to specify Arabic, German, and Danish, enter the following value:

    "ar d dk"
    
    

    To use all available languages, set nlsop to all. Oracle Workflow Server supports all the languages that Oracle Database supports.


    See Also:

    The "Locale Data" section in Oracle Database Globalization Support Guide for a list of standard language abbreviations

  5. If you specified server for the /instype parameter, then enter the following parameters if you want to integrate Oracle Internet Directory as your Oracle Workflow directory service:

    • /ldaphost: LDAP host name

    • /ldapport: LDAP non-SSL port

    • /ldapuser: LDAP admin user name

    • /ldaplogbase: Changelog DN

    • /ldapuserbase: User base (for example, /ldapuserbase cn=Users,dc=us,dc=oracle,dc=com)

    If you are upgrading an existing installation of Oracle Workflow that is already integrated with Oracle Internet Directory, then you can omit the LDAP parameters for Oracle Internet Directory integration if they are already defined in your database.

    In this case, Oracle Workflow Configuration Assistant configures your Oracle Internet Directory integration by using the existing LDAP parameters defined in your database. However, if you specify new LDAP parameters here, then Oracle Workflow Configuration Assistant will update your settings.

  6. If you specified server or all for the /instype parameter, then enter the following parameters if you want to use Oracle Workflow Notification Mailer:

    • /mailserver: Inbound e-mail account: server name

    • /mailuser: Inbound e-mail account: user name

    • /mailhost: Outbound e-mail account: server name

    • /htmlagent: Message generation: HTML agent

    • /mailreply: Message generation: reply-to address

    • /processfolder: E-mail processing: name of processed folder

    • /discardfolder: E-mail processing: name of discard folder

  7. If you specified server for the /instype parameter and if you want to change the tablespace assigned to the Oracle Workflow database account, then set the /tablespace parameter to a valid existing tablespace name.

  8. To control how Oracle Workflow Configuration Assistant writes log information, set the following parameters:

    • /debug: Specify true if you want Oracle Workflow Configuration Assistant to write debug information to the workflow.log file. By default, Oracle Workflow does not log this information.

    • /logdir: Specify the path to the directory in which you want Oracle Workflow Configuration Assistant to write the workflow.log file, or specify nolog if you do not want to create a log file. By default, the log file is written to the $ORACLE_HOME/wf/install directory.

  9. Save your changes, and close the wfinstall.csh file.

  10. To run the wfinstall.csh script, enter the following command:

    $ORACLE_HOME/wf/install/wfinstall.csh
    
    

If the wfinstall.csh script includes the minimum parameters, all entered as a single line of text in the file, then it performs the configuration in noninteractive mode, without displaying the Oracle Workflow Assistant screen. However, as a security precaution, the script may prompt you to enter the following passwords at run time, depending on the installation options that your site uses:

PKrrPKSjUIOEBPS/content.opfB Oracle® Database Companion CD Installation Guide for Linux x86, 10g Release 2 (10.2) en-US B15664-02 Oracle Corporation Oracle Corporation Oracle® Database Companion CD Installation Guide for Linux x86, 10g Release 2 (10.2) Describes how to install and configure the products available on the Oracle Database 10g Companion CD installation media. PKoPKSjUIOEBPS/post_inst_task.htm Oracle Database Companion CD Postinstallation Tasks

4 Oracle Database Companion CD Postinstallation Tasks

This chapter describes the tasks that you may need to perform after you install the software. It includes information about the following:

4.1 Patch Set Information

Oracle recommends installing the latest patch set release after you have successfully installed the Oracle Companion CD components. Doing so ensures that you have the latest update of Oracle Database Companion CD.

You must register online before using OracleMetaLink. After logging in to OracleMetaLink, select Patches from the left-hand column.

To find and download patches:

  1. Log in to OracleMetaLink at

    http://metalink.oracle.com


    Note:

    If you are not an OracleMetaLink registered user, then click Register for MetaLink! and follow the registration instructions.

  2. On the main OracleMetaLink page, click Patches.

  3. Select Simple Search.

  4. Specify the following information, and then click Go:

    • In the Search By field, select Product or Family, and then specify the Companion CD product, such as HTML DB, Oracle HTTP Server (enter Oracle HTTP Server(OHS) and mods), or Oracle Workflow.

    • In the Release field, specify the current release number.

    • In the Patch Type field, specify Patchset/Minipack.

    • In the Platform or Language field, select your platform.

  5. Under Results for Platform, search for the latest patch set for Oracle Database using OracleMetaLink.

  6. From the list of available patches, click the number of the patch that you want to download.

  7. Click View Readme to review the README before proceeding with the download.


    Note:

    Each patch has a README file with installation requirements and instructions. Some patches install with Oracle Universal Installer; others require special procedures. Oracle recommends that you always read the README file before proceeding.

  8. Return to the Patch Set page, and then click Download to download and save the file on your system.

  9. Use an unzip utility to uncompress the patch ZIP file.

4.2 Postinstallation Tasks for Oracle HTTP Server

If you install Oracle HTTP Server, then complete the tasks described in the following sections:

4.2.1 Backing Up Files

Oracle recommends that you back up the root.sh script after you complete an installation. If you install other products in the same Oracle home, then Oracle Universal Installer updates the contents of the existing root.sh script during the installation. If you require information contained in the original root.sh script, then you can recover it from the backed up root.sh file.

It is also recommended that you back up the entire Oracle home before applying a patch.

4.2.2 Migrating From an Earlier Release of Oracle HTTP Server

If you are using Oracle HTTP Server installed with a previous release of Oracle Database on this system, then you can migrate the configuration of that HTTP server to the current release.


Note:

This section does not describe how to migrate from an Oracle HTTP Server release installed as part of Oracle Application Server. Oracle does not support that type of migration.

There are two parts to the migration, as described in the following sections:

4.2.2.1 Migrating the httpd.conf File

To migrate the configuration of an earlier release of Oracle HTTP Server to the current release, you must copy and modify the httpd.conf file used by that release.

The following sections describe how to complete this task:

Step 1: Copying and Opening the httpd.conf File

Copy the httpd.conf file used by the previous release to the current release configuration file directory as follows:

  1. Switch user to the Oracle software owner user (typically, oracle):

    $ su - oracle
    
    
  2. Set the ORACLE_HOME environment variable to specify the path to the Oracle home for the current release:

    • Bourne, Bash, or Korn shell:

      $ ORACLE_HOME=new_oracle_home_path
      $ export ORACLE_HOME
      
      
    • C shell:

      % setenv ORACLE_HOME new_oracle_home_path 
      
      
  3. Back up the configuration file directory for the current release of Oracle HTTP Server as follows:

    $ cp $ORACLE_HOME/Apache/Apache/conf $ORACLE_HOME/Apache/Apache/conf.orig
    
    
  4. Change directory to the configuration file directory:

    $ cd $ORACLE_HOME/Apache/Apache/conf
    
    
  5. Copy the httpd.conf file used by the previous release to the current directory. For example:

    $ cp /old_oracle_home/Apache/Apache/conf/httpd.conf .
    
    
  6. Open the httpd.conf file in any text editor.

Step 2: Making Global Changes

Make the following global changes in the httpd.conf file:

  1. Search for all occurrences of the old Oracle home directory path, and replace them with the current Oracle home directory path.

  2. Change all occurrences of mod_ssl.c to mod_ossl.c.


    Note:

    Oracle recommends that you change the SSL-related directives in the httpd.conf file, even if you do not currently use SSL.

Step 3: Modifying the List of LoadModule Directives

Modify the list of LoadModule directives as follows:

  1. Remove the following directives:

    LoadModule oprocmgr_module    libexec/liboprocmgr.so
    LoadModule rewrite_module     libexec/mod_rewrite.so
    
    

    Note:

    You must add a LoadModule directive for the mod_rewrite module later in the file.

  2. Add the following directive, which loads the onsint module, immediately before the <IfDefine SSL> section:

    LoadModule onsint_module      libexec/mod_onsint.so
    
    
  3. In the LoadModule directive in the <IfDefine SSL> section, change ssl_module to ossl_module and change mod_ssl.so to mod_ossl.so, as follows:

    LoadModule ossl_module      libexec/mod_ossl.so
    
    

Step 4: Removing Directives and Sections for Unsupported Features

You must remove all directives and sections for unsupported features as follows:

  1. Remove the following directives from the <IfModule mod_alias.c> section:

    Alias /jservdocs/ "oracle_home/Apache/Jserv/docs/"
    Alias /soapdocs/ "/oracle_home/soap/"
    
    
  2. Remove the following include directive:

    include "/oracle_home/Apache/Jserv/etc/jserv.conf"
    
    
  3. Remove the <IfModule mod_oprocmgr.c> section.

Step 5: Modifying Port Numbers

The httpd.conf file is used by previous releases of Oracle HTTP Server that were installed with Oracle HTTP Server or Oracle Database. This file specifies different ports for non-SSL (HTTP) requests depending on whether you started an SSL-enabled server. These ports are shown as port1 and port2 in the following example:

Port port1
Listen port1

<IfModule mod_ossl.c>
  Port port2
  Listen port2
  Listen SSL_port
</IfModule>

Oracle recommends that you change these directives as follows:

  1. If you did not use SSL, then remove the following directives:

    Port port2
    Listen port2
    
    

    Oracle HTTP Server will listen for HTTP requests on port port1.

  2. If you used only the ports defined for SSL, then change the directives as shown in the following example:

    Port port2
    Listen port2
    
    <IfModule mod_ossl.c>
      Listen SSL_port
    </IfModule>
    
    

    Oracle HTTP Server will listen for HTTP requests on port port2 and for HTTPS requests on port SSL_port.

  3. If you intend to continue to use the previous version of Oracle HTTP server concurrently with this release, then change the ports specified by the Port and Listen directives to unused ports.

  4. If you changed SSL_port in the previous step, then complete the following steps:

    1. Locate the <VirtualHost _default_:SSL_port> directive and ensure that the value of SSL_port matches the value specified by the Listen directive in the <IfModule mod_ossl.c> section.

    2. In the <VirtualHost _default_:SSL_port> section, ensure that the port number specified by the Port directive is the same as SSL_port.

Step 6: Verifying the Values of the User and Group Directives

If necessary, change the values specified by the User and Group directives as follows:

  • The User directive should specify the user name of the Oracle software owner user that you used to install Oracle HTTP Server. The default value is oracle.

  • The Group directive should specify the name of the Oracle Inventory group on this system. The default value is oinstall.

Step 7: Modifying Existing Sections and Directives

You must modify the existing sections and directives as follows:

  1. In the default directory section, <Directory />, add the MultiViews option to the Options directive. For example:

    <Directory />
        Options FollowSymLinks MultiViews
        AllowOverride None
    </Directory>
    
    
  2. In the <IfModule mod_alias.c> section, create a <IfModule mod_perl.c> section and move the Alias directive that defines the /perl/ alias into this section. For example:

    <IfModule mod_alias.c>
    ...
        <IfModule mod_perl.c>
            Alias /perl/ "/oracle_home/Apache/Apache/cgi-bin/"
        </IfModule>
    ...
    </IfModule>
    
    
  3. Modify the <IfModule mod_dms.c> section as shown in the following example, substituting the appropriate values for the hostname and domain variables:

    <IfModule mod_dms.c>
      <Location /dms0>
        SetHandler dms-handler
        Order deny,allow
        Deny from all
        Allow from localhost hostname.domain hostname
      </Location>
    </IfModule>
    
    
  4. In the directive that sets the PERL5LIB environment variable, edit the Perl directory location and version, as shown in the following example:

    SetEnv PERL5LIB "/oracle_home/perl/lib/5.6.1:/oracle_home/perl/lib/site_perl/5.6.1"
    

Step 8: Adding New Sections and Directives

You must add new sections and directives to the file as follows:

  1. Add the following section to protect the WEB-INF directories:

    #Protect WEB-INF directory
    
    <DirectoryMatch /WEB-INF/>
     Order deny,allow
     Deny from all
    </DirectoryMatch>
    
    
  2. Include the following lines before the line that includes the oracle_apache.conf file:

    # Include the configuration files needed for mod_oc4j
    include "/oracle_home/Apache/Apache/conf/mod_oc4j.conf"
    
    # Loading mod_rewrite module here as it has to load before mod_oc4j
    LoadModule rewrite_module     libexec/mod_rewrite.so
    

Step 9: Migrating Your Server Certificate and Private Key

If you use SSL and have an existing server certificate and private key, then you must migrate them to the format required by mod_ossl before using them with this release of Oracle HTTP Server.

To migrate an existing server certificate and private key:

  1. Enter a command similar to the following in a separate terminal window:

    $ /new_oracle_home/Apache/Apache/bin/ssl2ossl -cert cert_file \
                                                  -key key_file \
                                               {[ -chain chain_file] |
                                                [ -cafile CA_file] |
                                                [ -capath CA_path] }\
                                                  -wallet wallet_path \
                                                [ -certpass key_file_pwd] \
                                                [ -wltpass wallet_pwd] \
                                                [ -ssowallet yes] \
                                                [ -validate yes]
    
    

    The following table lists the recommended value for each option available with this command:


    Note:

    You must specify at least one of the following options: -chain, -cafile, or -capath.

    Option Recommended Value
    -cert Use the value specified by the SSLCertificateFile directive in the httpd.conf file for the previous release.
    -key Use the value specified by the SSLCertificateKeyFile directive in the httpd.conf file for the previous release.
    -chain Use the value specified by the SSLCertificateChainFile directive in the httpd.conf file for the previous release, if this directive is not preceded by the comment character (#).

    Note: If the SSLCertificateChainFile directive is not specified or is preceded by a comment character, then do not specify the -chain option.

    -cafile Use the value specified by the SSLCACertificateFile directive in the httpd.conf file for the previous release, if this directive is not preceded by the comment character (#).

    Note: If the SSLCACertificateFile directive is not specified or is preceded by a comment character, then do not specify the -cafile option.

    -capath Use the value specified by the SSLCACertificatePath directive in the httpd.conf file for the previous release, if this directive is not preceded by the comment character (#).

    Note: If the SSLCACertificatePath directive is not specified or is preceded by a comment character, then do not specify the -capath option.

    -wallet Specify the path to the directory in which you want to create the wallet. The default value is:
    /new_oracle_home/Apache/Apache/conf/ssl.wlt/default
    
    -certpass Specify the password for your private key file, if it is encrypted.
    -wltpass Specify a password for your new wallet.

    If you do not specify this option, then the ssl2ossl utility prompts you to enter and verify the wallet password.

    -ssowallet Specify the value yes to create a wallet that is compatible with Oracle Single Sign-On.
    -validate Specify the value yes to verify that the wallet will be converted successfully. If you specify this option with the value yes, then the wallet is not created.

  2. If required, enter a command similar to the following to generate an encrypted version of the wallet password you specified in the ssl2ossl command:


    Note:

    If you specify the -ssowallet option in the ssl2ossl command, then you do not need to complete this step. Otherwise, because the password must be specified in the httpd.conf file, Oracle recommends that you encrypt it.

    $ $ORACLE_HOME/Apache/Apache/bin/iasobf -p wallet_pwd
    
    

    The output from this command is the encrypted version of the password specified by the -p option. In the following section, you must specify this value for the SSLWalletPassword directive.

Step 10: Modifying the SSL Sections and Directives


Note:

Oracle recommends that you change the SSL-related sections and directives in the httpd.conf file, even if you do not currently use SSL.

Make the following changes to the directives contained in the <IfModule mod_ossl.c> sections:

  1. Change the setting for the SSLSessionCache directive as follows:

    SSLSessionCache shmcb:/oracle_home/Apache/Apache/logs/ssl_scache(512000)
    
    
  2. Change the setting for the SSLCipherSuite directive as follows:

    SSLCipherSuite SSL_RSA_WITH_RC4_128_MD5:SSL_RSA_WITH_RC4_128_SHA:
    SSL_RSA_WITH_3DES_EDE_CBC_SHA:SSL_RSA_WITH_DES_CBC_SHA:
    SSL_RSA_EXPORT_WITH_RC4_40_MD5:SSL_RSA_EXPORT_WITH_DES40_CBC_SHA
    
    
  3. Remove the following directives and their associated comments:

    SSLRandomSeed
    SSLCertificateFile
    SSLCertificateKeyFile
    SSLCertificateChainFile
    SSLCACertificateFile
    SSLCACertificatePath
    SSLVerifyDepth
    
    
  4. In the <VirtualHost _default_:SSL_port> section, add the following lines:

    #   Server Wallet:
    #   The server wallet contains the server's certificate, private key
    #   and trusted certificates. Set SSLWallet at the wallet directory
    #   using the syntax:  file:path_to_wallet_directory
    SSLWallet file:/oracle_home/Apache/Apache/conf/ssl.wlt/default
    
    #   Server Wallet Password:
    #   Both clear text wallet password and obfuscated password are allowed
    #   here. An obfuscated one is recommended.
    #   Examples:
    #   SSLWalletPassword clear_pass
    #   SSLWalletPassword obfuscated_pass
    #SSLWalletPassword ...
    
    
  5. If you migrated a server certificate and private key, then perform the following steps:

    1. Change the value specified by the SSLWallet directive to specify the wallet path, if it is different from the default value.

    2. If you did not create a wallet that is compatible with Oracle Single Sign-On (using the -ssowallet yes option in the previous section), then remove the comment from the SSLWalletPassword directive and specify the clear-text or encrypted wallet password as its value.

Step 11: Copying or Moving the Required Files to New Directories

Copy or move any scripts for files from the document root and script directories to the equivalent directories for the new release. Copy the following files, as appropriate:


Note:

You need to copy only files that are located in subdirectories of the previous release Oracle home directory. Alias directories in other locations continue to be accessible as long as the permissions on these directories and their contents allow the server to read them. If you changed the User or Group directive, then you may need to change these permissions.

  • Files and subdirectories in directories specified by a DocumentRoot or Alias directive

  • CGI, Perl, and FastCGI programs and scripts and their associated files in directories specified by a ScriptAlias directive

4.2.2.2 Migrating DADs Used by mod_plsql

If you used mod_plsql to access a database with the previous release of Oracle HTTP Server, then you must migrate the database access descriptors (DADs) to the format required by mod_plsql in the current release. You can use the dadTool.pl Perl script to complete this migration. To run this script, follow these steps:

  1. If necessary, switch user to the Oracle software owner user (typically, oracle):

    $ su - oracle
    
    
  2. Set the ORACLE_HOME environment variable to specify the path to the Oracle home for the current release, and set the PATH environment variable to include the directory containing the perl executable:

    • Bourne, Bash, or Korn shell:

      $ ORACLE_HOME=new_oracle_home_path 
      $ PATH=${ORACLE_HOME}/perl/bin:${PATH} 
      $ PATH=${ORACLE_HOME}/Apache/modplsql/conf:${PATH} 
      $ export ORACLE_HOME PATH
      
      
    • C shell:

      % setenv ORACLE_HOME new_oracle_home_path
      % setenv PATH ${ORACLE_HOME}/perl/bin:${PATH}
      % setenv PATH ${ORACLE_HOME}/Apache/modplsql/conf:${PATH}
      
      
  3. Set the SHLD_LIBRARY_PATH shared library path environment variable for your platform to include the $ORACLE_HOME/lib directory.

    For example, to set the LD_LIBRARY_PATH environment variable in the Bourne shell, enter the following command:

    $ LD_LIBRARY_PATH=$ORACLE_HOME/lib:${LD_LIBRARY_PATH}; export LD_LIBRARY_PATH
    
    
  4. Change directory to the mod_plsql configuration directory for the current release of Oracle HTTP Server as follows:

    $ cd $ORACLE_HOME/Apache/modplsql/conf
    
    
  5. Copy the DAD configuration file (wdbsvr.app) used by the previous release to this directory as follows:

    $ cp /old_oracle_home/Apache/modplsql/cfg/wdbsvr.app .
    
    
  6. Enter the following command to run the script:

    $ perl dadTool.pl -m
    
    

    The script reads the DAD information from the wdbsvr.app file and creates equivalent DADs in the dads.conf file.

4.2.3 Enabling the High Availability Features of Oracle HTTP Server

If you want to enable the high-availability features of Oracle HTTP Server, you must use Oracle Process Manager and Notification server (OPMN) with Oracle HTTP Server. To use OPMN, you must first start the OPMN service. To start the OPMN service and the Oracle HTTP Server processes together, enter the following command:

$ORACLE_HOME/opmn/bin/opmnctl startall

Note:

In this release, the apachectl utility is not supported for starting and stopping Oracle HTTP Server.

When the OPMN service is running, you can start, stop, or restart Oracle HTTP Server.

To stop the OPMN service and the Oracle HTTP Server processes, enter the following command:

$ORACLE_HOME/opmn/bin/opmnctl stopall

4.3 Postinstallation Tasks for Oracle HTML DB

If you installed Oracle HTML DB, then complete the following tasks:

4.3.1 Restarting Processes

You must restart the processes, such as listener processes, that you stopped before you began the installation. If you installed Oracle HTML DB in an existing Oracle home, then you must restart Oracle HTTP Server. To restart Oracle HTTP Server, enter the following command:

$ORACLE_HOME/opmn/bin/opmnctl restartproc ias-component=HTTP_Server

4.3.2 Configuring Oracle HTTP Server for a New Oracle HTML DB Installation

Oracle HTML DB must have access to Oracle HTTP Server with mod_plsql. The instructions that follow explain how to configure three different versions of Oracle HTTP Server with mod_plsql.

This section contains the following topics:

4.3.2.1 Oracle HTTP Server Release 9.0.3

The wdbsvr.app file contains information about DADs. A DAD is a set of values that specify how the Oracle HTTP Server component mod_plsql connects to the database server to fulfill an HTTP request. You create a DAD to specify how to connect to an Oracle HTML DB instance.

Modifying the Oracle9i wdbsvr.app File

To create the DAD, you modify the wdbsvr.app file and add an entry for Oracle HTML DB.

To modify the wdbsvr.app file:

  1. Use a text editor to open the wdbsvr.app file, which is located in the following directory:

    $ORACLE_HOME/Apache/modplsql/cfg
    
    
  2. Add an entry for Oracle HTML DB using the following syntax. You must change the settings indicated in italic font.

    [DAD_htmldb] 
     connect_string = localhost:1521:orcl 
     password = htmldb 
     username = htmldb_public_user 
     default_page = htmldb 
     document_table = wwv_flow_file_objects$ 
     document_path = docs 
     document_proc = wwv_flow_file_mgr.process_download 
     reuse = Yes 
     enablesso = No 
     stateful = STATELESS_RESET 
     nls_lang = American_America.AL32UTF8
    
    

    In this syntax:

    • connect_string refers to the host ID, port number, and Oracle9i Database on which Oracle HTML DB was installed. Use the format host:port:sid.

      If the 9i version of Oracle HTTP Server that you want to use is installed in the same Oracle home as the database you specified for use with Oracle HTML DB, then leave this parameter blank.

    • password is the HTML DB password specified during installation.

    • nls_lang refers to the language setting. It must match the Globalization Support settings of the database. For example:

      American_America.AL32UTF8
      
      

      If either the territory portion or the language portion of the Globalization Support settings contain a space, then you must enclose the value in double quotation marks, as shown in the following example:

      nls_lang = "ENGLISH_UNITED KINGDOM.AL32UTF8"
      
      

      You can find information about the Globalization Support settings for your database by querying the view NLS_DATABASE_PARAMETERS as shown in the following example:

      SELECT parameter,value 
      FROM nls_database_parameters 
      WHERE PARAMETER IN ('NLS_CHARACTERSET','NLS_LANGUAGE','NLS_TERRITORY');
      
      
  3. Leave the remaining settings, including the user name setting, as they appear in the previous example.

  4. Save and exit the wdbsvr.app file.

Modifying the Oracle9i httpd.conf File

You need to modify the httpd.conf file to include an alias that points to the file system path where you copied the images directory.


See Also:

Oracle HTTP Server Administrator's Guide

  1. Use a text editor to open the httpd.conf file, which is located in the following directory:

    $ORACLE_HOME/Apache/Apache/conf
    
    
  2. Add an entry for the file system path where you copied the images directory, using /i/ as the images directory alias. For example:

    Alias /i/ "$ORACLE_HOME/Apache/Apache/images/"
    
    

    Include the forward slash (/) at the end of the path.

  3. Save and exit the httpd.conf file.

  4. Stop and restart Oracle HTTP Server:

    • To stop Oracle HTTP Server, enter the following command:

      $ORACLE_HOME/opmn/bin/opmnctl stopproc ias-component=HTTP_Server
      
      
    • To restart Oracle HTTP Server, enter the following command:

      $ORACLE_HOME/opmn/bin/opmnctl restartproc ias-component=HTTP_Server
      

4.3.2.2 Oracle HTTP Server 10g Release 1 or Oracle Application Server 10g

You need to modify the dads.conf file to include an alias that points to the file system path where you copied the images directory.

To modify the dads.conf file to include an alias that points to the location of the images directory:

  1. Use a text editor to open the dads.conf file, which by default is located in the following directory:

    $ORACLE_HOME/Apache/modplsql/conf/
    
    
  2. Add an entry for the file system path where you copied the images directory, using /i/ as the images directory alias. For example:

    Alias /i/ "$ORACLE_HOME/Apache/Apache/images/"
    
    

    Include the forward slash (/) at the end of the path.

  3. Add a DAD entry for Oracle HTML DB using the following syntax. Replace the values PlsqlDatabasePassword, PlsqlDatabaseConnectString, and PlsqlNLSLanguage with appropriate values for your environment.

    <Location /pls/htmldb>
     SetHandler pls_handler
     Order deny,allow
     Allow from all
     AllowOverride None
     PlsqlDatabaseUsername      HTMLDB_PUBLIC_USER
     PlsqlDatabasePassword      htmldb
     PlsqlDatabaseConnectString localhost:1521:htmldbdv ServiceNameFormat
     PlsqlDefaultPage           htmldb
     PlsqlDocumentTablename     wwv_flow_file_objects$
     PlsqlDocumentPath          docs
     PlsqlDocumentProcedure     wwv_flow_file_mgr.process_download
     PlsqlAuthenticationMode    Basic
     PlsqlNLSLanguage           AMERICAN_AMERICA.AL32UTF8
    </Location> 
    
    

    If either the territory portion or the language portion of the Globalization Support settings contains a space, then you must wrap the value in double quotation marks, as shown in the following example:

    PlsqlNLSLanguage     "ENGLISH_UNITED KINGDOM.AL32UTF8"
    
    
  4. Save and exit the dads.conf file.

  5. Oracle Application Server only: Enter the following command:

    $ORACLE_HOME/dcm/bin/dcmctl updateConfig -ct ohs
    
    
  6. Stop and restart Oracle HTTP Server:

    $ORACLE_HOME/opmn/bin/opmnctl stopproc ias-component=HTTP_Server
    $ORACLE_HOME/opmn/bin/opmnctl restartproc ias-component=HTTP_Server
    
    

See Also:

"Obfuscating the PlsqlDatabasePassword Parameter" and Oracle HTTP Server Administrator's Guide

4.3.3 Configuring Oracle HTTP Server for an Oracle HTML DB Upgrade

If you are upgrading Oracle HTML DB from release 1 (10.1) and the password you provided during your initial installation differs from the one you specified during this installation, then you need to modify the file that contains the DADs. The following sections describe the parameter you need to modify depending upon the type of Oracle HTTP Server in your environment.

This section covers the following topics:


Note:

Perform the tasks that follow only if the password you provided during your initial installation differs from the one you specified during this installation.

4.3.3.1 Oracle HTTP Server Release 9.0.3

If you are upgrading Oracle HTML DB and are running the version of Oracle HTTP Server included with Oracle Database release 9.2.0.x, then you must modify the password parameter in the wdbsvr.app file.

To modify the password parameter in the wdbsvr.app file:

  1. Use a text editor to open the wdbsvr.app file, which is located in the following directory:

    $ORACLE_HOME/Apache/modplsql/cfg
    
    
  2. Find the DAD settings for Oracle HTML DB by searching for the following:

    DAD_htmldb
    
    
  3. Edit the value next to the password parameter to match the password you provided during the installation.

  4. Save your changes.

  5. Stop and restart Oracle HTTP Server:

    $ORACLE_HOME/opmn/bin/opmnctl stopproc ias-component=HTTP_Server
    $ORACLE_HOME/opmn/bin/opmnctl restartproc ias-component=HTTP_Server
    
    

See Also:

Oracle HTTP Server Administrator's Guide

4.3.3.2 Oracle HTTP Server 10g Release 1 or Oracle Application Server 10g

If you are upgrading Oracle HTML DB and are running Oracle HTTP Server 10g Release 1 or Oracle Application Server 10g, then you must modify the PlsqlDatabasePassword parameter in the marvel.conf file.

To modify the PlsqlDatabasePassword parameter in the marvel.conf file:

  1. Use a text editor to open the marvel.conf file, which is located in the following directory:

    $ORACLE_HOME/Apache/modplsql/conf
    
    
  2. Find the DAD settings for Oracle HTML DB by searching for the following:

    /pls/htmldb
    
    
  3. Modify the value of the parameter PlsqlDatabasePassword to match the password you provided during installation.

  4. Save your changes.

  5. For Oracle Application Server 10g, enter the following command:

    $ORACLE_HOME/dcm/bin/dcmctl updateConfig -ct ohs
    
    
  6. Stop and restart Oracle HTTP Server:

    $ORACLE_HOME/opmn/bin/opmnctl stopproc ias-component=HTTP_Server
    $ORACLE_HOME/opmn/bin/opmnctl restartproc ias-component=HTTP_Server
    
    

See Also:

"Obfuscating the PlsqlDatabasePassword Parameter" and Oracle HTTP Server Administrator's Guide

4.3.4 Obfuscating the PlsqlDatabasePassword Parameter

The PlsqlDatabasePassword parameter specifies the password for logging in to the database. You can use the dadTool.pl utility to obfuscate passwords in the dads.conf file.

The dadTool.pl utility is in the following directory:

$ORACLE_HOME/Apache/modplsql/conf

4.3.4.1 Obfuscating Passwords in a New Oracle HTML DB Installation

In a new Oracle HTML DB installation, the PlsqlDatabasePassword parameter is in the dads.conf file. To obfuscate passwords in a new installation, run the dadTool.pl utility by following the instructions in the dadTool.README file.

4.3.4.2 Obfuscating Passwords if Upgrading Oracle HTML DB

If you have upgraded from a previous release of Oracle HTML DB, then the DAD information is in the marvel.conf file. Before you can run the dadTool.pl utility, you must copy the DAD entry from the marvel.conf file to the dads.conf file.

To obfuscate passwords when upgrading:

  1. Use a text editor to copy the entry for /pls/htmldb from the marvel.conf file into the dads.conf file, which is located in the following directory:

    $ORACLE_HOME/Apache/modplsql/conf
    
    
  2. Run dadTool.pl by following the instructions in the dadTool.README file.

  3. Copy the entry for /pls/htmldb from the dads.conf file back into marvel.conf.

  4. Remove the entry for /pls/htmldb from the dads.conf file.

4.3.5 Installing and Configuring Oracle HTML DB on a Remote Oracle Database

You can use the htmldbca command-line tool to perform the following procedures:

  • Install and configure Oracle HTML DB in a remote Oracle Database

  • Upgrade an existing Oracle HTML DB in a remote Oracle Database

  • Add languages to an existing Oracle HTML DB in a remote Oracle Database

This section contains the following topics:

4.3.5.1 Requirements for Running htmldbca

To use htmldbca, the system must have the following:

  • A local Oracle Database Companion CD installation that has HTML DB installed

    Oracle Universal Installer places the htmldbca executable in the bin directory in the same Oracle home as Oracle HTML DB.

  • A remote database

    This database can be on the same computer as the Oracle HTML DB home or on an Oracle Database installation on a remote computer. You must have a valid connection to this remote Oracle Database installation.

  • Connection privileges to the remote database

    You need to be able to connect as SYS by using the SYSDBA role. htmldbca will prompt you for the password for SYS user.


    See Also:

    Oracle Database Net Services Administrator's Guide for information about connecting to another Oracle Database instance

4.3.5.2 Syntax for htmldbca

The syntax for htmldbca is as follows:

htmldbca [optQIions]

In this syntax, the options are:

  • -oracle_home string: Location of the Oracle home in which Oracle HTML DB is installed

    If you do not specify this Oracle home, then htmldbca tries to use the ORACLE_HOME environment variable setting. If ORACLE_HOME is not set or is unusable, and if you do not specify the oracle_home option, then htmldbca prompts for the Oracle home.

    This option is required.

    The following is an example:

    htmldbca -oracle_home /u01/app/oracle/product/10.2.0/db_2
    
    
  • -db_host string: Host name of the remote Oracle Database

    This option is required, but if you do not specify it, then htmldbca prompts for it.

    The following is an example:

    htmldbca -db_host shobeen
    
    
  • -db_servicename string: Oracle Database service name

    This option is required, but if you do not specify it, then htmldbca prompts for it.

    The following is an example:

    htmldbca -db_servicename welcome
    
    
  • sys_password | -sys_obfuscatedPassword string: Remote password or obfuscated password for SYS

    This option is required, but if you do not specify either of these parameters, then htmldbca prompts for the sys_password. In that case, sys_obfuscatedPassword becomes optional.

    The following is an example:

    htmldbca -sys_password welcome
    
    
  • -htmldb_password | -htmldb_obfuscatedPassword string: Password or obfuscated password for Oracle HTML DB

    This option is required, but if you do not specify either of these passwords, htmldbca prompts for the htmldb_password. If you are upgrading from an earlier version of Oracle HTML DB, then enter the password that you had created for that version of the HTMLDB_PUBLIC_USER schema.

    The following is an example:

    htmldbca -htmldb_password htmldb_welcome
    
    

    After the installation, you can use this password to connect to Oracle HTML DB as the administrative user. The password that you specify is also used for the HTMLDB_PUBLIC_USER schema, which is used by mod_plsql to connect to the database, and for the FLOWS_010600 and FLOWS_FILES schemas.


    See Also:

    "Obfuscating Passwords in a New Oracle HTML DB Installation" for information about obfuscating the password after installation

  • -ts_htmldb string: Specifies the name of the HTML DB tablespace to be created for the remote HTML DB

    This option is required, but if you do not specify it, then htmldbca prompts for it.

    The following is an example:

    htmldbca -ts_htmldb sysaux
     
    
  • -ts_files string: HTML DB Files tablespace. By default, htmldbca uses the ts_htmldb value.

    This option is not mandatory, but if you enter an invalid value, then htmldbca prompts for a valid one.

    The following is an example:

    htmldbca -ts_files sysaux
    
    
  • -ts_temp string: Oracle HTML DB Temporary tablespace. The default value is set to use temp tablespace.

    This option is not mandatory, but if you enter an invalid value, then htmldbca prompts for a valid one.

    The following is an example:

    htmldbca -ts_temp sysaux
    
    
  • -load_lang string [,string[,string[...]]]: Specifies one or more additional languages to install.

    This option is not mandatory, but if you enter an invalid value, then htmldbca prompts for a valid response. In this case, you can only enter one language. If you do not enter a value, then English is selected.

    The following is an example:

    htmldbca -load_lang de, fr, it
    
    

    The following are the language choices:

    • de: German

    • en: English, which is the default. If the English version of Oracle HTML DB is already installed in the remote Oracle Database, then htmldbca displays a notification message and exits.

    • es: Spanish

    • fr: French

    • it: Italian

    • ja: Japanese

    • ko: Korean

    • pt-br: Brazilian Portuguese

    • zh-cn: PRC Chinese

    • zh-tw: Taiwan Chinese


    See Also:

    Oracle Database Globalization Support Guide for information about language support for Oracle Database

  • -DAD_name string: Creates a new DAD name for Oracle HTML DB. The default value is htmldb. htmldbca will update the $ORACLE_HOME/Apache/modplsql/conf/marvel.conf file with the new DAD value.

    This option is not mandatory, but if you enter a duplicate value, then htmldbca prompts for a valid one. For the changes to take effect, you must restart Oracle HTTP Server, in which case you can use the -restart parameter, described in the next section.

    The following is an example:

    htmldbca -DAD_name my_htmldb -restart
    
    

    Alternatively, after you run htmldbca, you can enter the following command to restart Oracle HTTP Server:

    $ORACLE_HOME/opmn/bin/opmnctl restartproc ias-component=HTTP_Server
    
    

    After this is done, users can access this instance by entering a URL that has the following format:

    http://host:port/pls/DAD_name
    
    

    For example:

    http://mycompany:7778/pls/my_html
    
    
  • -restart: Restarts Oracle HTTP Server after the configuration completes. It is optional, and you will not be prompted to specify it. The following is an example:

    htmldbca -restart
    
    
  • -interactive on|off: Turns interactive mode on or off. When interactive mode is on, htmldbca prompts for missing or incorrect parameter values. When interactive mode is off, no prompts appear. Therefore, you must specify all the required prompt values at the command line when you run htmldbca. By default, htmldbca runs in interactive mode.

    This option is not mandatory. The following is an example:

    htmldbca -interactive off
    
    
  • -help: Displays brief usage description for htmldbca.

    This option is not mandatory. The following is an example:

    htmldbca -help
    

4.3.5.3 Running htmldbca

To run htmldbca, run the htmldbca command, either by itself or with a combination of the options described in the previous section.

Unless the -interactive mode is set to off, htmldbca will prompt you for any required information that you do not specify at the command line.

4.4 Postinstallation Tasks for Oracle Workflow Server

This section contains the following topics:

4.4.1 Checking Initialization Parameter Values

Verify that the initialization parameters listed in the following table are set to the values shown or higher, and if necessary, change the values.


Note:

If a current value is higher than the required value, then do not change the current value.

Parameter Required Value
AQ_TM_PROCESSES Greater than 1
JOB_QUEUE_PROCESSES 10 or greater

To check the values of these initialization parameters and change them if necessary, follow these steps:

  1. Log in to the database as the SYS user:

    SQL> CONNECT SYS/SYS_password 
    
    
  2. To determine the current value of the initialization parameters, use the following command for each initialization parameter:

    SQL> SHOW PARAMETER parameter_name
    
    
  3. To alter the value of an initialization parameter, enter a command similar to the following:

    SQL> ALTER SYSTEM SET parameter_name=value
    
    
  4. If the database is not using a server parameter file, then edit the value specified for the parameter in the initialization parameter file, initsid.ora.

4.4.2 Compiling Invalid Objects

To compile any invalid objects in the SYS schema, first log in to Oracle Database. Then, run the utlrp.sql script as follows:

@$ORACLE_HOME/rdbms/admin/utlrp.sql

See Also:

  • The "Configuring New or Upgraded Databases" section of Oracle Database Installation Guide

  • Oracle Database Reference


4.4.3 Configuring Oracle Workflow HTML Help

Oracle Workflow provides access to context-sensitive HTML Help from the Help button on each of its Web pages. Before you can view the Oracle Workflow HTML Help, you must extract the doc directory tree from the $ORACLE_HOME/wf/wfdoc.zip file to your file system.

  1. Use an unzip utility to extract the doc directory tree from the ZIP file in the Workflow directory in your middle-tier Oracle home.

    This extraction requires at least 5 MB of free disk space. After extracting the doc directory tree, you can, if required, remove the wfdoc.zip file.

  2. Click the Help button on any Oracle Workflow Web page to access the HTML Help.

    You can also access any HTML Help file directly by appending its virtual path to your Web listener base URL. The URL for the contents page of the Oracle Workflow Help is similar to the following:

    http://hostname:portID/OA_DOC/lang/wf/toc.htm
    
    
  3. If you want to add custom Help, then replace the following placeholder file with your own Help material:

    $ORACLE_HOME/wf/doc/lang/wfcust/wfcust.htm
    
    

    The HTM file that is the main entry point for your custom Help must be named wfcust.htm and must contain an anchor named contents. Your custom Help will be accessible through the Custom Help link on the contents page of the Oracle Workflow Help. Alternatively, you can access your custom Help directly by using the following URL:

    http://hostname:portID/OA_DOC/lang/wfcust/wfcust.htm
    

4.4.4 Completing Other Setup Tasks

After you complete the Oracle Workflow Server and middle tier installation process, you must perform some additional steps to set up Oracle Workflow for your site.

Refer to the "Setting Up Oracle Workflow" section in Oracle Workflow Administrator's Guide for instructions on performing these steps.

PK`IQIPKSjUIOEBPS/app_ts.htmbG Troubleshooting the Oracle Database Companion CD Installation

A Troubleshooting the Oracle Database Companion CD Installation

This appendix contains information about troubleshooting. It contains the following sections:

A.1 Verifying Requirements

Before performing any of the troubleshooting steps in this appendix, ensure that the system meets the requirements and that you have completed all of the preinstallation tasks specified in Chapter 2.

A.2 X Window Display Errors

If you are running Oracle Universal Installer on a remote system and you want to display the user interface of the Oracle Universal Installer on your local system, then you may see error messages similar to the following:

Failed to connect to server
Connection refused by server
Can't open display

If you see one of these error messages, then perform the following steps:


Note:

This procedure applies only to users of UNIX-based workstations. If you are using a PC or other system with X server software installed, then refer to the X server documentation for information about how to permit remote systems to display X applications on the local system.

  1. In a local terminal window, log in as the user that started the X Window session.

  2. Enter the following command to enable the remote host to display X applications on the local X server:

    $ xhost fully_qualified_remote_host_name
    
    

    For example:

    $ xhost somehost.us.acme.com
    
    
  3. Enter the following commands, where workstation_name is the host name or IP address of your workstation:

    • Bourne, Bash, or Korn shell:

      $ DISPLAY=workstation_name:0.0
      $ export DISPLAY
      
      
    • C shell:

      % setenv DISPLAY workstation_name:0.0
      
      
  4. To determine if X Window applications display correctly on the local system, enter the following command:

    $ xclock
    
    

    The X clock should appear on your monitor.

  5. If the X clock appears, then close X clock and start Oracle Universal Installer again.

A.3 What to Do If an Installation Error Occurs

If you encounter an error during installation, then:

A.4 Reviewing the Log of an Installation Session

During an installation, Oracle Universal Installer records all of the actions that it performs in a log file. If you encounter problems during the installation, then review the log file for information about possible causes of the problem.

To view the contents of the log file, follow these steps:

  1. If necessary, enter the following command to determine the location of the oraInventory directory:

    
    

    The inventory_loc parameter in this file specifies the location of the oraInventory directory.

  2. Enter the following command to change directory to the Oracle Universal Installer log file directory, where orainventory_location is the location of the oraInventory directory:

    $ cd /orainventory_location/logs
    
    
  3. Enter the following command to determine the name of the log file:

    $ ls -ltr
    
    

    This command lists the files in the order of creation, with the most recent file shown last. Installer log files have names similar to the following, where date_time indicates the date and time that the installation started:

    installActionsdate_time.log
    
    
  4. To view the most recent entries in the log file, in which information about a problem is most likely to appear, enter a command similar to the following:

    $ tail -50 installActionsdate_time.log | more
    
    

    This command displays the last 50 lines in the log file.

  5. If the error displayed by Oracle Universal Installer or listed in the log file indicates a relinking problem, then refer to the following file for more information:

    $ORACLE_HOME/install/make.log
    

A.5 Troubleshooting Configuration Assistants

To troubleshoot an installation error that occurred when a configuration assistant was running:

A.5.1 Configuration Assistant Failure

Oracle configuration assistant failures are noted at the bottom of the installation screen. The configuration assistant interface displays additional information, if available. The configuration assistant execution status is stored in the following file:

oraInventory_location/logs/installActionsdate_time.log

A.5.2 Fatal Errors

If you receive a fatal error while a configuration assistant is running, then you must remove the current installation and reinstall the Oracle software, as follows:

  1. Remove the failed installation as described in the "Cleaning Up After a Failed Installation" section.

  2. Correct the cause of the fatal error.

  3. Reinstall the Oracle software.

A.6 Cleaning Up After a Failed Installation

If an installation fails, then you must remove files that Oracle Universal Installer created during the attempted installation and remove the Oracle home directory. To do this:

  1. Start Oracle Universal Installer as described in the "Installing Oracle Database 10g Products" section.

  2. Click Deinstall Products on the Welcome screen, or click Installed Products on any Oracle Universal Installer screen.

    The Inventory screen appears, listing installed products.

  3. Select the products that you want to remove, and then click Remove.

  4. Manually remove the Oracle home directory created during the failed installation.

  5. Reinstall the Oracle software.

A.7 Silent-Mode Response File Error Handling

To determine whether a silent-mode installation succeeds or fails, refer to the following log file:

/oraInventory_location/logs/silentInstalldate_time.log

If necessary, refer to the previous section for information about determining the location of the oraInventory directory.

A silent installation fails if:

Oracle Universal Installer or configuration assistant validates the response file at run time. If the validation fails, the silent-mode installation or configuration process ends. Oracle Universal Installer treats values for parameters that are of the wrong context, format, or type as if no value was specified in the file.

A.8 Images Displayed Incorrectly in Oracle HTML DB

In the "Configuring Oracle HTTP Server for a New Oracle HTML DB Installation" section, you added an alias entry that points to the file system path where you copied the images directory. If images in Oracle HTML DB do not display correctly, then you may have more than one definition of the /i/ alias. To address this problem:

A.9 Oracle HTML DB Online Help Not Working

If users are accessing Oracle HTML DB through a virtual host, then the online Help will not work. Consider the following example:

The host name of the Oracle HTTP Server on which the Oracle HTML DB DAD resides is internal.server.com and the port is 7777. Users access Oracle HTML DB through a virtual host. In their Web browsers, users see external.server.com and the port 80.

In this example, Oracle HTML DB online Help will not work if the users cannot access internal.server.com. To resolve this issue, add the following lines to the Oracle HTML DB DAD to override the CGI environment variables SERVER_NAME and SERVER_PORT:

PlsqlCGIEnvironmentList SERVER_NAME=external.server.com
PlsqlCGIEnvironmentList SERVER_PORT=80


See Also:

Oracle Application Server mod_plsql User's Guide for information about overriding the CGI environment variables

PKgGbGPKSjUIOEBPS/app_ports.htmC Managing Oracle Database Companion CD Port Numbers

D Managing Oracle Database Companion CD Port Numbers

During installation, Oracle Universal Installer assigns port numbers to components from a set of default port numbers. This appendix lists the default port numbers and describes how to change the assigned port after installation. It includes information about the following sections:

D.1 About Managing Ports

Many Oracle Database components and services use ports. As an administrator, it is important to know the port numbers used by these services, and to ensure that a port number is not used by more than one service on your host.

Most port numbers are assigned during installation. Every component and service has an allotted port range, which is the set of port numbers Oracle Database attempts to use when assigning a port. Oracle Database starts with the lowest number in the range and performs the following checks:

If the answer to any of the preceding questions is yes, then Oracle Database moves to the next highest port in the allotted port range and continues checking until it finds a free port.

D.2 Viewing Port Numbers and Access URLs

In most cases, the port number of the Oracle Database component is listed in the tool used to configure the port. In addition, ports for some Oracle Database applications are listed in the portlist.ini file. This file is located in the $ORACLE_HOME/install directory.

When you change a port number, it is not updated automatically in the portlist.ini file. Therefore, you can rely on the information in this file for only as long as the port numbers are not changed. To change a port number, use the methods described in this appendix.

D.3 Port Numbers and Protocols of Oracle Components

The following table lists the port numbers and protocols used by components that are configured during the installation. By default, the first port in the range is assigned to the component, if it is available.

Table D-1 Ports Used in Oracle Components

Component and Description Port Number Port Range Protocol

Oracle HTTP Server

Enables Oracle applications, such as Oracle HTML DB, to communicate with the Web server through this port. It is configured during installation. "Changing the Oracle HTTP Server Port" explains how to modify this port.

7777

7777–7877

HTTP

Oracle Workflow Component Container

HTTP port for Oracle Workflow. It is configured automatically during installation. "Changing the Oracle Workflow Container Ports" explains how to change its ports.

6010

6010–6020

TCP/HTTP

Oracle Workflow Component Container

JMS port for Oracle Workflow. It is configured automatically during installation. "Changing the Oracle Workflow Container Ports" explains how to change its ports

6030

6030–6040

TCP

Oracle Workflow Component Container

RMI port for Oracle Workflow. It is configured automatically during installation. "Changing the Oracle Workflow Container Ports" explains how to change its ports

6110

6050–6060

TCP

Oracle Workflow Management Container

HTTP port for Oracle Workflow Management. It is configured automatically during installation. "Changing the Oracle Workflow Container Ports" explains how to change its ports

6070

6070-6080

TCP/HTTP

Oracle Workflow Management Container

JMS port for Oracle Workflow Management. It is configured automatically during installation. "Changing the Oracle Workflow Container Ports" explains how to change its ports

6090

6090–6100

TCP

Oracle Workflow Management Container

RMI port for Oracle Workflow Management. It is configured automatically during installation. "Changing the Oracle Workflow Container Ports" explains how to change its ports

6110

6110–6120

TCP

Oracle Ultra Search

HTTP port for Oracle Ultra Search. Its port number is assigned automatically when you install Oracle Ultra Search, by using the Custom installation type. "Changing the Oracle Ultra Search Ports" explains how to change its port number.

5620

5620–5639

TCP/HTTP

Oracle Ultra Search

RMI port for Oracle Ultra Search. Its port number is assigned automatically when you install Oracle Ultra Search, by using the Custom installation type. "Changing the Oracle Ultra Search Ports" explains how to change its port number.

5640

5640–5659

TCP

Oracle Ultra Search

JMS port for Oracle Ultra Search. Its port number is assigned automatically when you install Oracle Ultra Search, by using the Custom installation type. "Changing the Oracle Ultra Search Ports" explains how to change its port number.

5660

5660–5679

TCP


D.4 Changing the Oracle HTTP Server Port

To change the Oracle HTTP Server port:

  1. In the Oracle HTTP Server home, modify the following settings in the $ORACLE_HOME/Apache/Apache/conf/httpd.conf file:

    Port port
    Listen listener
    
    
  2. Restart Oracle HTTP Server:

    $ORACLE_HOME/opmn/bin/opmnctl restartproc ias-component=HTTP_Server
    

D.5 Changing the Oracle Workflow Container Ports

The following sections explain how to change the HTTP, RMI, and JMS ports for the Oracle Workflow Component Containers and Management Containers.

Changing the HTTP Port

To change the HTTP port, edit the following files:

Changing the RMI Port

To change the RMI port for Oracle Workflow Component Container, modify the port attribute of the rmi-server element in the $ORACLE_HOME/oc4j/j2ee/OC4J_Workflow_Component_Container/config/rmi.xml file:

<rmi-server port="6041">

For Oracle Workflow Management Container, modify the port attribute of the rmi-server element in the $ORACLE_HOME/oc4j/j2ee/OC4J_Workflow_Management_Container/config/rmi.xml file:

<rmi-server port="6101">

Changing the JMS Port

To change the JMS port for Oracle Workflow Component Container, modify the port attribute of the jms-server element in the $ORACLE_HOME/oc4j/j2ee/OC4J_Workflow_Management_Container/config/jms.xml file:

<jms-server port="6021">

For Oracle Workflow Management Container, modify the port attribute of the jms-server element in the $ORACLE_HOME/oc4j/j2ee/OC4J_Workflow_Management_Container/config/jms.xml file:

<jms-server port="6080">

D.6 Changing the Oracle Ultra Search Ports

The following sections describe how to change the Oracle Ultra Search ports.

Changing the HTTP Port

To change the HTTP port, modify the port attribute of the web-site element in the $ORACLE_HOME/oc4j/j2ee/OC4J_SEARCH/config/http-web-site.xml file:

<web-site port="5620"...>

Changing the RMI Port

To change the RMI port, modify the port attribute of the rmi-server element in the $ORACLE_HOME/oc4j/j2ee/OC4J_SEARCH/config/rmi.xml file:

<rmi-server port="5640"...>

Changing the JMS Port

To change the JMS port, modify the port attribute of the jms-server element in the $ORACLE_HOME/oc4j/j2ee/OC4J_SEARCH/config/jms.xml file:

<jms-server port="5660"...>
PKdlCCPKSjUIOEBPS/cover.htm Cover

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PK;PKSjUIOEBPS/dcommon/cpyr.htmd Oracle Legal Notices

Oracle Legal Notices

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Preface

This guide describes how to install and configure the products available on the Oracle Database 10g Companion CD installation media.

Audience

This guide is intended for anyone responsible for installing the products available on the Oracle Database 10g Companion CD installation media.

Documentation Accessibility

Our goal is to make Oracle products, services, and supporting documentation accessible, with good usability, to the disabled community. To that end, our documentation includes features that make information available to users of assistive technology. This documentation is available in HTML format, and contains markup to facilitate access by the disabled community. Accessibility standards will continue to evolve over time, and Oracle is actively engaged with other market-leading technology vendors to address technical obstacles so that our documentation can be accessible to all of our customers. For more information, visit the Oracle Accessibility Program Web site at

http://www.oracle.com/accessibility/

Accessibility of Code Examples in Documentation

Screen readers may not always correctly read the code examples in this document. The conventions for writing code require that closing braces should appear on an otherwise empty line; however, some screen readers may not always read a line of text that consists solely of a bracket or brace.

Accessibility of Links to External Web Sites in Documentation

This documentation may contain links to Web sites of other companies or organizations that Oracle does not own or control. Oracle neither evaluates nor makes any representations regarding the accessibility of these Web sites.

TTY Access to Oracle Support Services

Oracle provides dedicated Text Telephone (TTY) access to Oracle Support Services within the United States of America 24 hours a day, seven days a week. For TTY support, call 800.446.2398.

Related Documentation

The platform-specific documentation for Oracle Database 10g products includes the following manuals:

  • Oracle Database

    • Oracle Database Release Notes for Linux x86-64

    • Oracle Database Installation Guide for Linux x86-64

    • Oracle Database Quick Installation Guide for Linux x86-64

    • Oracle Database Oracle Clusterware and Oracle Real Application Clusters Installation Guide for Linux

    • Oracle Database Administrator's Reference for UNIX-Based Operating Systems

  • Oracle Database Client

    • Oracle Database Client Installation Guide for Linux x86-64

    • Oracle Database Client Quick Installation Guide for Linux x86-64

  • Oracle Database Companion CD

    • Oracle Database Companion CD Installation Guide for Linux x86-64

    • Oracle Database Companion CD Quick Installation Guide for Linux x86-64

Refer to Oracle Database Release Notes for Linux x86-64 for important information that was not available when this book was released. The release notes for Oracle Database 10g are updated regularly. You can get the most recent version from Oracle Technology Network at

http://www.oracle.com/technology/documentation/index.html

Conventions

The following text conventions are used in this document:

Convention Meaning
boldface Boldface type indicates graphical user interface elements associated with an action, or terms defined in text or the glossary.
italic Italic type indicates book titles, emphasis, or placeholder variables for which you supply particular values.
monospace Monospace type indicates commands within a paragraph, URLs, code in examples, text that appears on the screen, or text that you enter.

Command Syntax

UNIX command syntax appears in monospace font. The dollar character ($), number sign (#), or percent character (%) are UNIX command prompts. Do not enter them as part of the command.

Convention Description
backslash \ A backslash indicates a command that is too long to fit on a single line. Enter the line as displayed (with a backslash) or enter it on a single line without a backslash:
dd if=/dev/rdsk/c0t1d0s6 of=/dev/rst0 bs=10b \ 
count=10000
braces { } Braces indicate required items: .DEFINE {macro1}
brackets [ ] Brackets indicate optional items: cvtcrt termname [outfile]
ellipses ... Ellipses indicate an arbitrary number of similar items: CHKVAL fieldname value1 value2 ... valueN
italics Italic type indicates a variable. Substitute a value for the variable: library_name
vertical line | A vertical line indicates a choice within braces or brackets: SIZE filesize [K|M]

Terminology

In this guide, the term Companion CD products has been used to refer to the products available on the Oracle Database Companion CD installation media. In contrast, the term Oracle Database 10g Companion Products has been used to refer to the products available in the Oracle Database 10g Companion Products installation type.

The formal name of the operating system, Linux x86-64, has been shortened to Linux in this guide.

Accessing Documentation

The documentation for Oracle Database 10g release 2 (10.2) includes platform-specific documentation and generic product documentation.

Platform-Specific Documentation

Platform-specific documentation includes information about installing and using Oracle products on particular platforms. The platform-specific documentation for this product is available in both Adobe portable document format (PDF) and HTML format on the product disc. To access the platform-specific documentation on the disc:

  1. Use a Web browser to open the welcome.htm file in the top-level directory of the disc.

  2. Select the appropriate product link.

  3. Select the Documentation tab.

If you prefer paper documentation, then open and print the PDF files.

Product Documentation

Product documentation includes information about configuring, using, or administering Oracle products on any platform. The product documentation for Oracle Database 10g products is available in both HTML and PDF formats in the Oracle Database 10g Release 2 (10.2) Online Documentation Library. This library is on the Oracle Technology Network Web site at

http://www.oracle.com/technology/documentation/index.html

Third Party Software Notices

This program contains third party software from HP. The Oracle program license that accompanied this product determines your right to use the Oracle program, including the HP software. Notwithstanding anything to the contrary in the Oracle program license, the HP software is provided "AS IS" and without intellectual property indemnities, warranties, or support of any kind from Oracle or HP.

This program also contains third party software from International Business Machines Corporation (IBM). The Oracle program license that accompanied this product determines your right to use the Oracle program, including the IBM software.

Notwithstanding anything to the contrary in the Oracle program license, the IBM software is provided "AS IS" and without intellectual property indemnities, warranties, or support of any kind from Oracle or IBM.

PK )03+3PKSjUIOEBPS/index.htm Index

Index

A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  R  S  T  U  V  W  X 

A

aliases, multiple, 2.6.3
Apache HTTP Server, 1.2.2
Apache JServ, 1.2.2.1
apachectl utility, 1.2.2.1, 4.2.3
architecture, checking, 2.3.1.2

B

backup
Oracle Database Recovery Manager
base directory
See Oracle base directory
Bash shell
default user startup file, 2.2.4
.bash_profile file, 2.2.4
Bourne shell
default user startup file, 2.2.4

C

C compiler
requirement on Linux x86, 2.3.1.3, 2.3.1.3
C shell
default user startup file, 2.2.4
certification
hardware, 2.1
software, 2.1
checking requirements
software, 2.3.1.3
system architecture, 2.3.1.2
chmod command, 2.2.3, B.1.2
chown command, 2.2.3
commands, 2.2.4
chmod, 2.2.3, B.1.2
chown, 2.2.3
env, 2.2.4
getconf, 2.3.1.2
groupadd, 2.2.2.1
id, 2.2.2.2
isainfo, 2.3.1.2
mkdir, 2.2.3
more, 2.2.3
passwd, 2.2.2.2
rpm, 2.3.1.3
umask, 2.2.4
unset, 2.2.4
unsetenv, 2.2.4
useradd, 2.2.2.2
usermod, 2.2.2.2
xterm, 2.2.1
companionCD.db.rsp response file, B.1.2
companionCD.midtier.rsp response file, B.1.2
configuration assistants
errors, A.5.1
troubleshooting, A.5, A.5
configuring
Oracle HTTP Server 10g, 4.3.2.2
CSD
requirements
on Linux, 2.3.1.3

D

DADs, 1.4.1, 3.4, 3.6, 3.6, 4.3.2.2, 4.3.3, 4.3.4.2, A.9
about, 5.3.1
configuration file, 4.2.2.2, 4.3.2.1
creating during Oracle HTML DB installation, 3.4
migrating those used by mod_plsql, 4.2.2.2
new names for Oracle HTML DB, 4.3.5.2
dads.conf file, 4.3.4.2
dadTool.pl utility, 4.3.4, 4.3.4.2
database access descriptors
See DADs
Database Configuration Assistant
troubleshooting, A.5
database objects
removing Oracle HTML DB, 6.1
dcmctl utility, 1.2.2.1
default file mode creation mask
setting, 2.2.4
DHCP computers, installing on, 2.6.1
directories
Oracle base, 2.2.3, 2.2.3
Oracle Inventory
directory
Oracle home, 2.2.3
Oracle home directory, 2.2.3
Oracle Inventory directory, 2.2.3
oraInventory, 2.2.3
disk space requirements, 2.5.3
DISPLAY environment variable, 3.4, 3.5, 3.6, A.2, B.1.4
setting, 2.2.4, 2.2.4
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol
See DHCP

E

env command, 2.2.4
environment
checking settings, 2.2.4
configuring for oracle user, 2.2.4
environment variables
DISPLAY, 2.2.4, 2.2.4, 3.4, 3.5, 3.6, A.2, B.1.4
NLS_LANG, C.2
ORACLE_BASE, 2.2.3, 2.2.3
ORACLE_HOME, 2.2.4
ORACLE_HOSTNAME, 2.6.2, 2.6.3
removing from shell startup file, 2.2.4
SHELL, 2.2.4
TMP and TMPDIR, 2.3.1.2
TNS_ADMIN, 2.2.4
errata
Red Hat kernel errata download location, 2.3.1.3
errors
configuration assistants, A.5.1
installation, A.5.2
noninteractive installation, A.7
silent mode, A.7
examples
Oracle base directories, 2.2.3

F

failure
configuration assistants, A.5.1
fatal errors, A.5.2
file mode creation mask
setting, 2.2.4
file system
for Oracle base directory, 2.2.3
files
.bash_profile file, 2.2.4
dads.conf, 4.3.4.2
.login file, 2.2.4
marvel.conf, 4.3.4.2
oraInst.loc, 2.2.2.1
oraInst.loc file, 2.2.3
oratab file, 2.2.3
portlist.ini, D.2
.profile, 2.2.4
shell startup file, 2.2.4
wdbsvr.app, 4.2.2.2, 4.3.2.1, 4.3.2.1

G

getconf command, 2.3.1.2
globalization support, C
groupadd command, 2.2.2.1
groups
See operating system groups

H

home directory
See Oracle home directory
HTML DB
See Oracle HTML DB
htmldbdca utility, 4.3.5
htmldb.HTMLDBONLY.rsp response file, B.1.2
htmldb.HTMLDBwithOHS.rsp response file, B.1.2
HTTP Server
See Oracle HTTP Server
httpd.conf file, migrating, 4.2.2.1

I

IBM WebSphere MQ
requirement on Linux, 2.3.1.3
id command, 2.2.2.2
installation
errors, A.5.2
silent mode, A.7
log files, A.3, A.3
noninteractive
error handling, A.7
noninteractive mode, B.1
Oracle Database 10g Companion Products, 3.6
Oracle Database 10g Products, 3.5
Oracle HTML DB Products, 3.4
overview, 1.1
response files
silent mode, A.7
silent mode, B.1.3, B.1.4
installation log, A.4
installation media
mounting, 3.3
installation types
Oracle Database 10g Companion Products, 1.4
Oracle Database 10g Products, 1.3
Oracle HTML DB, 1.2
IP addresses, multiple, 2.6.2
isainfo command, 2.3.1.2

J

JAccelerator, 1.3.7
JPublisher
about, 1.3.8
Oracle SQLJ Runtime, 1.3.8
Oracle SQLJ Translator, 1.3.8

K

kernel
Red Hat errata
download location, 2.3.1.3
Korn shell
default user startup file, 2.2.4

L

languages
installing Oracle components in different languages, C.1.3
installing Oracle HTML DB in different languages, C.1.1
installing Oracle Workflow in different languages, C.1.2
using Oracle components in different languages, C.1.4
Legato Single Server Version
See LSSV
log
installation, A.4
log files, A.3, A.3
troubleshooting, A.4
.login file, 2.2.4
LSSV, 1.3

M

marvel.conf file, 4.3.4.2
mask
setting default file mode creation mask, 2.2.4
mkdir command, 2.2.3
mod_fastcgi, 1.2.2
mod_ossl, 1.2.2.1
mod_osso, 1.2.2
mod_perl, 1.2.2
mod_plsql, 1.2.2, 4.2.2.2
mod_ssl, 1.2.2.1
mode
setting default file mode creation mask, 2.2.4
more command, 2.2.3
multihomed computers, installing on, 2.6.2
multiple aliases, computers with, 2.6.3

N

natively compiled Java libraries
about, 1.3.7
NCOMP
See natively compiled Java libraries
nested table types, 1.3.8
Net Configuration Assistant
troubleshooting, A.5
network adapters
computers with multiple aliases, 2.6.3
primary, on computers with multiple aliases, 2.6.3
See also loopback adapters, primary network adapters
network cards, multiple, 2.6.2
Network Information Services
See NIS
network setup
about, 2.6
computers with multiple aliases, 2.6.3
network topics
DHCP computers, 2.6.1
multiple network cards, 2.6.2
new installation
configuring Oracle HTTP Server 9.0.3, 4.3.2.1
modifying httpd.conf file, 4.3.2.1
modifying wdbsvr.app, 4.3.2.1
obfuscating password, 4.3.4.1
NIS
alternative to local users and groups, 2.2.2
NLS_LANG environment variable, C.2
noninteractive installation
silent mode, B.1.3, B.1.4
errors, A.7
noninteractive Oracle Database installation
about, B.1
procedure, B.1
Record mode, B.1.3
See also response files
noninteractive Oracle Workflow configuration, B.2

O

obfuscate passwords, 4.3.4
OC4J_Workflow_Component_Container, 5.4.2
OC4J_Workflow_Management_Container, 5.4.2
OFA
See Optimal Flexible Architecture
oinstall group
checking for existing, 2.2.2.1
See Oracle Inventory group
operating system
checking distribution of, 2.3.1.3
checking version of, 2.3.1.3
operating system groups
checking for existing oinstall group, 2.2.2.1
Oracle Inventory, 2.2.2.1
required for oracle user, 2.2.2
requirements, 2.2.2
using NIS, 2.2.2
operating system users
oracle, 2.2.2
Oracle software owner user, 2.2.2.2, 2.2.2.2, 2.2.2.2, 2.2.2.2
requirements, 2.2.2
using NIS, 2.2.2
OPMN
See Oracle Process Manager and Notification server
Optimal Flexible Architecture
recommendations for Oracle base directory, 2.2.3
recommended path for Oracle base directory, 2.2.3
recommended path for Oracle home directory, 2.2.3
recommended path for Oracle Inventory directory, 2.2.3
Oracle Application Server OC4J containers
OC4J_Workflow_Component_Container, 5.4.2
OC4J_Workflow_Management_Container, 5.4.2
Oracle base directory
and ORACLE_BASE environment variable, 2.2.3
appropriate file system, 2.2.3
creating, 2.2.3
creating new, 2.2.3
description, 2.2.3
examples, 2.2.3
identifying existing, 2.2.3
recommended path, 2.2.3
relationship with Oracle software owner user, 2.2.3
requirement for, 2.2.3
Oracle components
using in different languages, C.1.4
Oracle Database 10g Companion Products
installation, 3.6
Oracle HTTP Server, 1.4.2
Oracle Workflow middle-tier components, 1.4.1
requirements, 2.5
Oracle Database 10g Companion Products installation type
products available in, 1.4
Oracle Database 10g Companion Products requirements, 2.5.1, 2.5.2, 2.5.3
Oracle Database 10g Products
installation, 3.5
JPublisher, 1.3.8
natively compiled Java libraries, 1.3.7
Oracle Database Examples, 1.3.3
Oracle JDBC development drivers, 1.3.1
Oracle SQLJ, 1.3.2
Oracle Text supplied knowledge bases, 1.3.4
Oracle Ultra Search, 1.3.6
Oracle Workflow Server, 1.3.5
Oracle Database 10g Products installation type
products available in, 1.3
Oracle Database 10g Products preinstallation tasks, 2.4
Oracle Database Examples
about, 1.3.3
required products, 1.3.3
Sample Schemas, 1.3.3
Oracle Database Recovery Manager
Oracle Enterprise Manager
Oracle Workflow Manager component, 5.4.2
Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Control
logging in to Oracle Workflow Manager, 5.4.2
Oracle home directory
description, 2.2.3
multiple homes, network considerations, 2.6.2
recommended path, 2.2.3
requirement for, 2.2.3
requirements, 2.2.3
using to identify Oracle base directory, 2.2.3
Oracle home name, 2.2.3
Oracle HTML DB
about, 1.2.1
administrative setup tasks, 5.3.2
configuring on a remote database, 4.3.5
installing in different languages, C.1.1
installing on a remote database, 4.3.5
logging in to, 5.3.1
Oracle Text k)requirement, 2.3.2.5
ports
See Oracle HTTP Server ports
postinstallation tasks, 4.3
restarting Oracle HTTP Server, 4.3.1
preinstallation tasks
checking for Oracle XML DB, 2.3.2.4
removing database objects, 6.1, 6.1
requirments
checking disk space requirements, 2.3.2.2
where to install, 1.2.1
Oracle HTML DB installation type
products available in, 1.2
Oracle HTML DB Products
installation, 3.4
Oracle HTML DB products requirements, 2.3
Oracle HTTP Server, 2.3.1.2
about, 1.2.2
Apache HTTP Server version used, 1.2.2
differences from other releases, 1.2.2.1
hardware requirements, 2.3.1.2
memory requirements, 2.3.1.2
migrating, 4.2.2
Oracle Database requirements, 2.3.1.1
Oracle Process Manager and Notification server, 4.2.3
physical RAM requirements, 2.3.1.2
port, changing, D.4
ports
default, D.3
postinstallation tasks, 4.2
release 9.0.3
configuring (upgrade), 4.3.3.1
software requirements, 2.3.1.3
starting, 5.2.1
stopping, 5.2.1
swap space requirements, 2.3.1.2
temporary disk space requirements, 2.3.1.2, 2.3.1.3
version required, 2.3.2.3
where to install, 1.2.2.2
Oracle HTTP Server postinstallation tasks
backing up files, 4.2.1
Oracle HTTP Server requirements, 2.5.2
Oracle Identity Management, 2.5.2
Oracle interMedia Image Accelerator, 1.3.7
Oracle Internet Directory
integrated with Oracle Workflow, 3.5
synchronizing Oracle Workflow directory service, 3.5
Oracle Inventory
description, 2.2.3
Oracle Inventory directory
description, 2.2.3
recommended path, 2.2.3
Oracle Inventory group
checking for existing, 2.2.2.1
creating, 2.2.2.1
Oracle JDBC development drivers, 1.3.1
about, 1.3.1
Oracle JDBC drivers, 1.3.1
Oracle JVM, 1.3.7
Oracle Messaging Gateway
CSD requirements
on Linux, 2.3.1.3
requirements on Linux, 2.3.1.3
Oracle MetaLink Web site
patches, 4.1
Oracle Process Manager and Notification server, 1.2.2
replacement for apachectl utility, 1.2.2.1
Oracle Process Manager and Notification server (OPMN), 4.2.3
Oracle software files
removing, 6.3
Oracle software owner user, 2.2.2.2
configuring environment for, 2.2.4
creating, 2.2.2.2
description, 2.2.2
determining default shell, 2.2.4
determining existence of, 2.2.2.2
modifying, 2.2.2.2
relationship with Oracle base directory, 2.2.3
required group membership, 2.2.2
Oracle SQLJ
about, 1.3.2
Oracle SQLJ Runtime, 1.3.8
Oracle SQLJ Translator, 1.3.8
Oracle Text
default language scripts, 2.3.2.5
requirement for Oracle HTML DB, 2.3.2.5
Oracle Text supplied knowledge bases
about, 1.3.4
Oracle Ultra Search
about, 1.3.6
changing, D.6
ports
changing, D.6
Oracle Universal Installer
running in different languages, C.1.3
running in noninteractive mode, B.1
oracle user
configuring environment for, 2.2.4
description, 2.2.2
determining default shell, 2.2.4
relationship with Oracle base directory, 2.2.3
required group membership, 2.2.2
Oracle Workflow
administrative setup tasks, 5.4.3
directory service, 3.5
getting started, 5.4
HTML Help configuration, 4.4.3
installation alternatives, 1.3.5
logging in to home page, 5.4.1
logging in to Oracle Workflow Manager, 5.4.2
OC4J_Workflow_Component_Container, 5.4.2
OC4J_Workflow_Management_Container, 5.4.2
Oracle Internet Directory integration, 3.5
ports
changing, D.5
default, D.3
postinstallation tasks, 4.4, 4.4.4
removing, 6.2
tablespaces, changing, 3.5
See also Oracle Workflow Client, Oracle Workflow Manager, Oracle Workflow middle-tier components, Oracle Workflow Server, Oracle Workflow Configuration Assistant
Oracle Workflow Configuration Assistant, 3.5
running in noninteractive mode, B.2
Oracle Workflow installing in different languages, C.1.2
Oracle Workflow Manager
logging in, 5.4.2
Oracle Enterprise Manager, 5.4.2
Oracle Workflow middle-tier components
about, 1.4.1
Oracle Workflow postinstallation tasks
additional setup tasks, 4.4.4
configuring Oracle Workflow HTML Help, 4.4.3
verifying requirements, 4.4.1
Oracle Workflow Server
about, 1.3.5
configuring, 3.5
preparing for Oracle Workflow Middle Tier installation, 3.5
Oracle Workflow Server requirements, 2.5.1
Oracle XML DB, 2.3.2.4
ORACLE_BASE environment variable, 2.2.3, 2.2.3
removing from shell startup file, 2.2.4
ORACLE_HOME environment variable
removing from shell startup file, 2.2.4
unsetting, 2.2.4
ORACLE_HOSTNAME environment variable
about, 2.6.2
computers with multiple aliases, 2.6.3
multihomed computers, 2.6.2
setting before installation, 2.6.2
ORACLE_SID environment variable
removing from shell startup file, 2.2.4
OracleMetaLink, 2.1
oraInst.loc file, 2.2.2.1, 2.2.3
oraInventory directory
See Oracle Inventory directory
oratab file
format, 2.2.3

P

packages
checking, 2.3.1.3
passwd command, 2.2.2.2
passwords
obfuscating, 4.3.4
patches
downloading for Oracle Companion CD products, 4.1
permissions
for Oracle base directory, 2.2.3
platforms
checking architecture support, 2.3.1.2
PlsqlDatabasePassword parameter, 4.3.4
portlist.ini file, D.2
ports, D.6
access URLs, D.2
configured for applications, D.2
default ranges, D
Oracle HTTP Server
changing, D.4
default, D.3
Oracle Workflow
changing, D.5
default, D.3
postinstallation tasks, 4
Oracle HTML DB, 4.3
Oracle HTTP Server, 4.2
Oracle Workflow, 4.4, 4.4.4
Precompilers
requirements on Linux x86, 2.3.1.3
preinstallation tasks
Oracle Database 10g Products, 2.4
Pro*C/C++
requirements on Linux x86, 2.3.1.3
processor
checking system architecture, 2.3.1.2
.profile file, 2.2.4

R

readme.txt file, D.2
recovery
Oracle Database Recovery Manager, 1.3
Red Hat
kernel errata download location, 2.3.1.3
operating system requirements, 2.3.1.3
Red Hat Package Manager
See RPM
Rendezvous
requirement on Linux, 2.3.1.3
requirements
Oracle Database 10g Companion Products, 2.5
Oracle HTML DB
Oracle Text requirement, 2.3.2.5
Oracle HTML DB products, 2.3
Oracle HTTP Server, 2.3.1.1, 2.3.1.2, 2.3.1.3
requirements for Oracle Database 10g Products
disk space requirements, 2.4.2
Oracle Database requirement, 2.4.1
Oracle Workflow Server requirements, 2.4.3
response files
companionCD.db.rsp, B.1.2
companionCD.midtier.rsp, B.1.2
creating, B.1.3
customizing, B.1.2
htmldb.HTMLDBONLY.rsp, B.1.2
htmldb.HTMLDBwithOHS.rsp, B.1.2
on the media, B.1
specifying during installation, B.1.4
templates, B.1.2
using, B.1
See also noninteractive installation
RMAN
See Oracle Database Recovery Manager
root user, 2.2.1
root.sh script, backing up, 4.2.1
RPM
checking, 2.3.1.3
rpm command, 2.3.1.3

S

Sample Schemas, 1.3.3, 1.3.3
Secure Sockets Layer
See SSL
security
Oracle Identity Management, 2.5.2
shell
determining default shell for oracle user, 2.2.4
SHELL environment variable
checking value of, 2.2.4
shell startup file
editing, 2.2.4
removing environment variables, 2.2.4
silent installation
See noninteractive installation
silent mode installation, B.1.3, B.1.4
software requirements
checking, 2.3.1.3
SSL
starting Oracle HTTP Server, 5.2.1
startup file
for shell, 2.2.4
stopping Oracle HTTP Server, 5.2.1
SUSE
operating system requirements, 2.3.1.3
system architecture, checking, 2.3.1.2

T

tablespaces, changing, 3.5
temporary directory, 2.3.1.2
temporary disk space
checking, 2.3.1.2
freeing, 2.3.1.2
TIBCO Rendezvous
requirement on Linux, 2.3.1.3
tmp directory
checking space in, 2.3.1.2
freeing space in, 2.3.1.2
TMP environment variable, 2.3.1.2
TMPDIR environment variable, 2.3.1.2
TNS_ADMIN environment variable
unsetting, 2.2.4
troubleshooting, A
fatal errors, A.5.2

U

umask, 2.2.4
umask command, 2.2.4, 2.2.4
unset command, 2.2.4
unsetenv command, 2.2.4
upgrading
configuring Oracle HTTP Server 9.0.3, 4.3.3.1
modifying wdbsvr.app, 4.3.3.1
obfuscating password, 4.3.4.2
See patches
useradd command, 2.2.2.2
usermod command, 2.2.2.2
users
Oracle software owner, 2.2.2
root, 2.2.1
utilities
dadTool.pl, 4.3.4.2

V

VARRAY types, 1.3.8

W

wdbsvr.app file, 4.2.2.2, 4.3.2.1, 4.3.2.1
WebSphere MQ
CSDs required
on Linux, 2.3.1.3
requirement on Linux, 2.3.1.3

X

X terminal, 2.2.1
X Window
display errors, A.2
X window system
enabling remote hosts, 2.2.1
X Window system workstation, 2.2.1
xterm command, 2.2.1
PK VPKSjUIOEBPS/install_sw.htm Installing the Oracle Database Companion CD Software

3 Installing the Oracle Database Companion CD Software

This chapter describes how to start Oracle Universal Installer and install the products available on the Oracle Database Companion CD installation media. It contains the following sections:

3.1 General Steps for Installing Companion CD Products

After completing the tasks in Chapter 1 and Chapter 2, follow these general steps to install the Companion CD products:

  1. Consider the following issues:

  2. Follow the procedures described in "Accessing the Installation Software" if you want to install the software from a hard drive or install remotely. If you are copying or directly installing from the installation media, then refer to the instructions in the "Mounting Discs" section.

  3. Depending on the products that you want to install, follow the procedures described in the following sections to complete the installation:

3.2 Accessing the Installation Software

The Oracle Database Companion CD software is available on the installation media, or you can download it from the Oracle Technology Network Web site.

When you are ready to install the software, you can access it by any one of the following methods:

  • Download the software to the hard disk

  • Copy the software from the installation media to the hard disk

  • Access the software by using a remote drive

  • Install on a remote computer by using remote access software

3.3 Mounting Discs

On most UNIX-based systems, the disc mounts automatically when you insert it into the disc drive. If the disc does not mount automatically, then perform the procedure described in this section.

To mount a disc:

  1. Switch user to root:

    $ su - root
    
    
  2. If required, enter a command similar to the following to unmount the currently mounted disc, then remove it from the drive:

    • Red Hat:

      # eject /mnt/dvd
      
      
    • SUSE:

      # eject /media/dvd
      
      

    In these examples, /mnt/dvd and /media/dvd are the mount point directories for the disc drive.

  3. Insert the disc into the disc drive.

  4. If Oracle Universal Installer displays the Disk Location screen, then enter the disc mount point directory path.

  5. To verify that the disc mounted automatically, enter the following command:

    • Red Hat:

      # ls /mnt/dvd
      
      
    • SUSE:

      # ls /media/dvd
      
      
  6. If the contents of the disc are not displayed by this step of the procedure, then enter a command similar to the following to mount the disc:

    • Red Hat:

      # mount -t iso9660 /dev/dvd /mnt/dvd
      
      
    • SUSE:

      # mount -t iso9660 /dev/dvd /media/dvd
      
      
  7. If Oracle Universal Installer displays the Disk Location screen, then enter the disc mount point directory path. For example:

    /mnt/dvd
    
    

To continue, refer to one of the following sections:

3.4 Installing Oracle HTML DB

This section explains how to install Oracle HTML DB by using one of the following options:

  • Installing Oracle HTML DB with Oracle HTTP Server: If you select this option, then Oracle HTML DB is installed with Oracle HTTP Server in a new Oracle home.

  • Installing or upgrading Oracle HTML DB in an existing Oracle HTTP Server home: If you select this option, then depending on the preinstallation conditions, either Oracle HTML DB is installed or the existing Oracle HTML DB installation is upgraded.

To install Oracle HTML DB:

  1. If you are installing from the installation media, then mount the disc if it is not already mounted.

  2. If required, log in as the Oracle software owner user (oracle) and set the DISPLAY environment variable.

  3. Verify that the Oracle Database that you plan to use for Oracle HTML DB is accessible and running.

  4. To start Oracle Universal Installer, enter the following commands:

    $ cd /tmp
    $ /directory_path/runInstaller
    
    

    In the preceding command, directory_path is the path of the companion directory on the installation media or the hard drive.

  5. On the Welcome screen, click Next.

  6. If this is the first installation of Oracle products on this system, then Oracle Universal Installer displays the Specify Inventory Directory and Credentials screen. Specify the following information, and then click Next:

    • Enter the full path of the inventory directory:

      Verify that the path is similar to the following, where oracle_base is the value you specified for the ORACLE_BASE environment variable:

      oracle_base/oraInventory
      
      
    • Specify operating system group name:

      Verify that the group specified is the Oracle Inventory group, oinstall.

  7. On the Select a Product to Install screen, select Oracle HTML DB and then click Next.

  8. On the Select Installation Type screen, select one of the following and then click Next.

    • Oracle HTML DB and Oracle HTTP Server: Select this option to install Oracle HTML DB with Oracle HTTP Server in a new Oracle home.

    • Oracle HTML DB only: Select this option to install a new Oracle HTML DB in an existing Oracle HTTP Server home, or to upgrade an existing Oracle HTML DB installation.

  9. On the Specify Home Details screen, enter the following:

    • Name: If you select Oracle HTML DB and Oracle HTTP Server in the previous step, then specify the name for a new Oracle home. If you select Oracle HTML DB only, then select the name of the existing Oracle HTTP Server home. If you select Oracle HTML DB only and if there is an existing Oracle HTML DB installation, then specify the name of the Oracle home of this existing installation.

    • Path: Enter the directory location for the Oracle home that you specified under Name. If the directory does not exist, then Oracle Universal Installer creates it for you.


    See Also:

    "Oracle Database Requirement" for information about finding the Oracle home. Select each home and search for Apache Standalone. Oracle HTTP Server is listed as Apache Standalone on the Specify Home Details screen

  10. On the Product-specific Prerequisite Checks screen, check for and correct any errors that may have occurred while Oracle Universal Installer was checking your system. Then, click Next.

    When you click Next, a warning message may be displayed. If there is an existing Oracle HTML DB installation, then this message informs you that the database access descriptors (DADs) associated with this installation have insufficient or incorrect values for some of the required directives. This makes them unsuitable for upgrade. If you want to upgrade Oracle HTML DB under these conditions, then you must first fix the problem. If you want to install Oracle HTML DB, then continue with this installation session.

    Click OK to continue.

  11. The screen displayed for this installation step depends on whether Oracle HTML DB is to be installed or the existing Oracle HTML DB installation is to be upgraded:

    • Installing Oracle HTML DB

      On the Specify HTML DB Database Details screen, enter the information required to configure Oracle HTML DB.

      Host Name

      Specify the host name of the system where the database is installed. If the host name is the local host, then enter the name of the computer, not localhost.

      Port

      Specify the TCP/IP port number for the Oracle Net listener on the database system. The default port number is 1521. To find the default port number for your Oracle Database installation, check its tnsnames.ora file, which by default is located in the $ORACLE_HOME/network/admin directory.

      Database Service Name

      Specify the database service name for the database in which you want to install the Oracle HTML DB database objects, for example, sales. Alternatively, you can enter the domain name, which is usually the same as the global database name, for example, sales.us.mycompany.com.

      To configure Oracle HTML DB, you must install the Oracle HTML DB database objects in a release 9.2.0.3 or later Oracle Database. If you plan to use the 10g release of Oracle HTTP Server, then based on the information that you specify during installation, Oracle Universal Installer automatically creates a database access descriptor (DAD) in the mod_plsql configuration file and directory aliases in httpd.conf, the Oracle HTTP Server configuration file. However, if you plan to use an Oracle9i HTTP Server release 2 installation, then you must create these settings manually by using the postinstallation steps described in Chapter 4.

      Tablespace Name

      Enter the name of the tablespace where you want to load the Oracle HTML DB database objects, or accept the default (SYSAUX).

      SYS Password

      Specify the password for the SYS user in the database.

      HTML DB Password

      Specify the password that you want to use for the Oracle HTML DB schemas (users), which are created in the database during the installation.

      After the installation, you can use this password to connect to Oracle HTML DB as the administrative user. The password that you specify is also used for the HTMLDB_PUBLIC_USER schema, which is used by mod_plsql to connect to the database, and for the FLOWS_010600 and FLOWS_FILES schemas.

      Confirm HTML DB Password

      Enter the password again to verify that you have specified it correctly.

    • Upgrading an existing Oracle HTML DB installation

      On the Specify HTML DB Upgrade Information screen, select the Oracle HTML DB installation that you want to upgrade from the list of available DADs.

      When you specify the Oracle HTML DB installation that you want to upgrade, the host name, port, and database service name values are automatically displayed in their respective fields. You cannot change these values. The remaining fields are the same as those displayed on the Specify HTML DB Database Details screen.

  12. Click Next.

  13. On the Summary screen, check the list of products that will be installed, and then click Install.

  14. If prompted, run the following scripts in a separate terminal window as the root user:

    oracle_base/oraInventory/orainstRoot.sh
    oracle_home/root.sh
    
    

    Then, click OK.

  15. When the installation completes, click Exit and then click Yes to exit from Oracle Universal Installer.


    See Also:


  16. Follow the instructions in "Starting, Stopping, and Restarting Oracle HTTP Server" to start Oracle HTTP Server.

3.5 Installing Oracle Database 10g Products

You must install Oracle Database 10g Products in an existing Oracle Database 10g release 2 (10.2) Oracle home.


See Also:

"Products Available in the Oracle Database 10g Products Installation Type" for information about the products that can be installed from this installation type

To install Oracle Database 10g Products, you first run Oracle Universal Installer. You then configure Oracle Workflow Server before you install the Oracle Workflow middle-tier components.

To install Oracle Database 10g Products:

  1. If you are installing from the installation media, then mount the disc if it is not already mounted.

  2. If required, log in as the Oracle software owner user (oracle) and set the DISPLAY environment variable.

  3. Verify that the Oracle Database that you plan to use for Oracle HTML DB is accessible and running.

  4. To start Oracle Universal Installer, enter the following commands:

    $ cd /tmp
    $ /directory_path/runInstaller
    
    

    In the preceding command, directory_path is the path of the companion directory on the installation media or the hard drive.

  5. On the Welcome screen, click Next.

  6. If this is the first installation of Oracle products on this system, then Oracle Universal Installer displays the Specify Inventory Directory and Credentials screen. Specify the following information, and then click Next:

    • Enter the full path of the inventory directory:

      Verify that the path is similar to the following, where oracle_base is the value you specified for the ORACLE_BASE environment variable:

      oracle_base/oraInventory
      
      
    • Specify operating system group name:

      Verify that the group specified is the Oracle Inventory group, oinstall.

  7. On the Select a Product to Install screen, select Oracle Database 10g Products and then click Next.

  8. On the Specify Home Details screen, enter the following:

    • Name: In this field, the default Oracle home is displayed. Verify that the Oracle home specified is the Oracle Database Oracle home.

    • Path: In this field, the directory of the default Oracle home is displayed. Enter the directory location of the Oracle Database Oracle home in which you want to install the Oracle home files.


    See Also:

    "Oracle Database Requirement" for information about finding the Oracle home

    If Oracle Real Application Clusters (RAC) is installed in the Oracle home that you select, then Oracle Universal Installer displays the Selected Nodes screen. Click Next to continue.


    Note:

    On a RAC installation, the software is installed on all the cluster nodes.

  9. On the Product-specific Prerequisite Checks screen, check for and correct any errors that may have occurred while Oracle Universal Installer was checking your system.

  10. When the installation completes, click Exit, and then click Yes to exit from Oracle Universal Installer.

  11. Follow the instructions in "Starting, Stopping, and Restarting Oracle HTTP Server" to start Oracle HTTP Server.

Preparing Oracle Workflow Server for the Oracle Workflow Middle Tier Installation

After you install Oracle Workflow Server, you must configure it before you install the Oracle Workflow middle-tier components. You can use Oracle Workflow Configuration Assistant to configure Oracle Workflow. The following steps explain how to run Oracle Workflow Configuration Assistant by using its graphical user interface (GUI):


See Also:

The "Running Oracle Workflow Configuration Assistant in Noninteractive Mode" section for information about running Oracle Workflow Configuration Assistant in noninteractive mode

  1. Ensure that the Oracle Database that you plan to use for Oracle Workflow is accessible and running.

  2. To start Oracle Workflow Configuration Assistant, enter the following command:

    $ORACLE_HOME/wf/install/wfinstall.csh
    
    
  3. On the Welcome to Oracle Workflow Configuration Assistant screen, specify the following:

    • Install Option: Select the Server Only or Add Language installation option.

      If you select the Server Only option, then Oracle Workflow Configuration Assistant installs Oracle Workflow into the Oracle Database.


      Note:

      To upgrade to Oracle Workflow release 2.6.4, ensure that the existing Oracle Workflow Server is release 2.6.2 or later.

      If you chose the Add Language installation option, then select the language abbreviation for the language that you want to add. You must install Oracle Workflow before you can add a language.


      See Also:

      Oracle Database Globalization Support Guide for a list of language abbreviations used by Oracle Database

    • Workflow Account: Enter the name that you want to use for the Oracle Workflow database account or accept the default name, which is typically owf_mgr.

      The default tablespace for this account is USERS and the temporary tablespace is TEMP. You can change the tablespace if required.


      Note:

      If you are upgrading an existing installation of Oracle Workflow, then enter the name and password for the existing Oracle Workflow database account.

    • Workflow Password: Enter a password for the Oracle Workflow account.

    • SYS Password: Enter the password for the SYS account of the Oracle Database installation on the system.

    • TNS Connect Descriptor: Specify the database connection string, in TNS format:

      (DESCRIPTION =(ADDRESS_LIST = (ADDRESS = (PROTOCOL = TCP)(HOST = host_name)(PORT = port_number))) (CONNECT_DATA = (SERVICE_NAME = database_service_name)))
      
      

      The connection string is stored in the tnsnames.ora file, which by default is located in the $ORACLE_HOME/network/admin directory.

  4. If you want to integrate Oracle Internet Directory as the directory repository for Oracle Workflow, then select Enter LDAP Parameters and select Get LDAP Values.


    Note:

    If you are upgrading an existing Oracle Workflow installation in which you have already implemented Oracle Internet Directory integration, then you must reenter the Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) values here to preserve the Oracle Internet Directory integration during the upgrade.

    Enter the following LDAP server information for the LDAP directory to which you want to connect, and then click OK. After the installation, you can update these values, if required, on the Global Workflow preferences Web page.


    See Also:

    The "Setting Up Oracle Workflow" section in Oracle Workflow Administrator's Guide for more information

    • LDAP Host Name: Enter the name of the host on which the LDAP directory is installed.

    • LDAP Non-SSL Port: Enter the port number that the host uses. This port must not be a Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) port.

    • LDAP Admin Username: Enter the user name used to connect to the LDAP server. This user name must have write privileges and is required to bind to the LDAP directory. For example:

      cn=orcladmin
      
      
    • LDAP Admin Password: Enter the Oracle Internet Directory password for the LDAP user account. LDAP password values are masked as asterisks (*) in the display and are stored in encrypted form.

    • Changelog DN: Enter the LDAP node where change log files are located. For example:

      cn=changelog
      
      
    • User Base: Enter the LDAP node under which user records can be found. For example:

      cn=Base, cn=OracleSchemaVersion
      

      Note:

      After setting up integration with Oracle Internet Directory during installation, you must use the WF_LDAP APIs to synchronize the Oracle Workflow directory service with Oracle Internet Directory. For instructions, refer to Oracle Workflow Administrator's Guide.

  5. To enter configuration parameters for the seeded Java-based notification mailer service component Workflow Notification Mailer, select Enter Mailer Parameters and select Get Mailer Values.

    Enter values for the following parameters, and then click OK.

    • Inbound Email Account: Server Name: Enter the name of the inbound IMAP mail server.

    • Inbound Email Account: Username: Enter the user name of the mail account where the notification mailer receives e-mail messages.

    • Inbound Email Account: Password: Enter the password of the mail account specified in the Username field.

    • Outbound Email Account: Server Name: Enter the name of the outbound SMTP mail server.

    • Email Processing: Processed Folder: Enter the name of the mail folder in the inbound e-mail account where the notification mailer places successfully processed notification messages.

    • Email Processing: Discard Folder: Enter the name of the mail folder in the inbound e-mail account where the notification mailer places incoming messages that are not recognized as notification messages.

    • Message Generation: HTML Agent: Enter the base URL that identifies the Web agent defined for Oracle Workflow in Oracle HTTP Server. The notification mailer uses this URL to support e-mail notifications with HTML attachments. By default, this parameter is set to the following placeholder value:

      http://localhost.com/pls/wf
      
      

      If you have already installed Oracle HTTP Server, then replace localhost.com with the server and TCP/IP port number on which the Web listener accepts requests. Otherwise, leave this parameter set to the placeholder value. In this case, you must set this parameter in the notification mailer configuration wizard in Oracle Workflow Manager after you install Oracle HTTP Server and Oracle Workflow.


      See Also:

      Chapter 2, "Setting Up Oracle Workflow" in Oracle Workflow Administrator's Guide

    • Message Generation: Reply-To Address: Enter the address of the e-mail account that receives incoming messages, to which notification responses should be sent.

    After the initial installation, you can, if required, update the notification mailer configuration values in the Oracle Workflow Manager. You can also update the HTML agent value for Oracle Workflow on the Global Workflow preferences Web page.


    See Also:

    The "Setting Up Oracle Workflow" section in Oracle Workflow Administrator's Guide and Oracle Workflow Manager online Help for more information

  6. To change the tablespace assigned to the Oracle Workflow database account, first select Change Tablespace and then select an existing tablespace from the list of values.

  7. Select Submit to begin the configuration.

  8. When the configuration is complete, a confirmation window appears. Click OK.

    You can check the status of the configuration by reviewing the $ORACLE_HOME/wf/install/workflow.log file.


Note:

After running Oracle Workflow Configuration Assistant with the Server Only install option, you can only rerun it with the Add Language install option. You must not rerun the configuration assistant with the Server Only install option because you can only install one Oracle Workflow schema in any given Oracle home. If you do not follow this guideline, then you may encounter errors in the Oracle Workflow middle-tier services.

If you want to re-create the Oracle Workflow schema, then you must first drop the existing schema and remove Oracle Workflow. Then, follow the instructions in this chapter to reinstall Oracle Workflow and create a new Oracle Workflow schema by using Oracle Workflow Configuration Assistant.


3.6 Installing Oracle Database 10g Companion Products

The Oracle Database 10g Companion Products are:

  • Oracle HTTP Server

  • Oracle Workflow middle-tier components


    Note:

    You can install the Oracle Workflow middle-tier components into either a new Oracle home or an existing Oracle HTTP Server home. Ensure that you have first installed Oracle Workflow Server from the Oracle Database 10g Products installation type and run Workflow Configuration Assistant to configure Oracle Workflow.

To install Oracle Database 10g Companion Products in a new Oracle home:

  1. If you are installing from the installation media, then mount the disc if it is not already mounted.

  2. If required, log in as the Oracle software owner user (oracle) and set the DISPLAY environment variable.

  3. To start Oracle Universal Installer, enter the following commands:

    $ cd /tmp
    $ /directory_path/runInstaller
    
    

    In the preceding command, directory_path is the path of the companion directory on the installation media or the hard drive.

  4. On the Welcome screen, click Next.

  5. If this is the first installation of Oracle products on this system, then Oracle Universal Installer displays the Specify Inventory Directory and Credentials screen. Specify the following information, and then click Next:

    • Enter the full path of the inventory directory:

      Verify that the path is similar to the following, where oracle_base is the value you specified for the ORACLE_BASE environment variable:

      oracle_base/oraInventory
      
      
    • Specify operating system group name:

      Verify that the group specified is the Oracle Inventory group, oinstall.

  6. On the Select a Product to Install screen, select Oracle Database 10g Companion Products and then click Next.

  7. On the Specify Home Details screen, enter the following:

    • Name: Enter a name for the Oracle home. You can install the Oracle Database 10g Companion Products in a new Oracle home. Alternatively, you can install Oracle Workflow middle tier only in an existing Oracle HTTP Server Oracle home. You cannot install the Oracle Database 10g Companion Products in an existing Oracle Database home.

    • Path: Enter the directory location for the Oracle home. If the directory does not exist, then Oracle Universal Installer creates it for you.

  8. On the Available Product Components screen, select one of the following products:

    • Apache Standalone

    • Oracle Workflow Middle Tier


    Note:

    The Apache Standalone option installs Oracle HTTP Server. If you are installing Oracle Workflow middle tier in a new Oracle home, then you must select the Apache Standalone option.

  9. On the Product-Specific Prerequisite Checks screen, check for and correct any errors that may have occurred while Oracle Universal Installer was checking your system.

    If you are installing Oracle Workflow middle tier only in an existing Oracle HTTP Server Oracle home, then you may need to manually verify that the selected Oracle home exists. Then, click Next.

  10. On the Oracle Workflow Middle Tier Configuration screen, specify the configuration settings needed for the Oracle Workflow middle tier.

    To configure the Oracle Workflow middle tier, you must create a database access descriptor (DAD) in the mod_plsql configuration files and directory aliases in the Oracle HTTP Server configuration file. Oracle Universal Installer completes these tasks for you using the information that you specify. Enter the following information:

    • Workflow Schema

      Specify the user (schema) name that you used when installing the Oracle Workflow Server database objects in the database. The default user name is owf_mgr.

    • DB Hostname

      Specify the host name of the system on which the database is installed. If the host name is the local host, then enter the name of the computer, not localhost.

    • Port Number

      Specify the TCP/IP port number for the Oracle Net listener on the database system. The default port number is 1521.

    • Oracle SID

      Specify the database instance identifier (SID) for the database on which you installed the Oracle Workflow Server database objects.

  11. On the Oracle Workflow Middle Tier Configuration screen, enter a password for the Oracle Workflow schema that you created in the previous step. Then, click Next.

  12. On the Oracle Apache Installation screen, enter the following information and then click Next.

    • Enter Password

      Specify the password for the Workflow user (typically, owf_mgr) that you specified on the previous screen. This password is used for the mod_plsql DAD.

    • Confirm Password

      Enter the password again to verify that you have specified it correctly.

  13. On the Summary screen, check the list of products that will be installed, and then click Install.

  14. If prompted, run the following scripts in a new terminal window as the root user:

    oracle_base/oraInventory/orainstRoot.sh
    oracle_home/root.sh
    
    

    Then, click OK.

  15. On the End of Installation screen, make a note of the URLs used by Oracle HTTP Server.


    Note:

    These URLs are also listed in the following file:
    $ORACLE_HOME/Apache/Apache/setupinfo.txt
    

  16. Click Exit, and then click Yes to exit from Oracle Universal Installer.

  17. Follow the instructions in "Starting, Stopping, and Restarting Oracle HTTP Server" to start Oracle HTTP Server.

PKb PKSjUIOEBPS/app_glblsupp.htmPA Configuring Oracle Database Companion CD Globalization Support

C Configuring Oracle Database Companion CD Globalization Support

This appendix describes the following Globalization Support topics:

C.1 Installing and Using Oracle Components in Different Languages

This section describes the following procedures:

C.1.1 Installing Oracle HTML DB in Different Languages

The Oracle HTML DB interface is translated into German, Spanish, French, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Brazilian Portuguese, Simplified Chinese, and Traditional Chinese. A single instance of Oracle HTML DB can be installed with one or more of these translated versions. At run time, each user's Web browser language settings determine the specific language version.

The translated version of Oracle HTML DB should be installed in a database that has a character set that can support the specific language.


Caution:

If you attempt to install a translated version of Oracle HTML DB in a database that does not support the character encoding of the language, then the installation may fail or the translated Oracle HTML DB instance may appear corrupted when run.

The database character set AL32UTF8 supports all the translated versions of Oracle HTML DB.

You can manually install translated versions of Oracle HTML DB by using SQL*Plus. The installation files are encoded in UTF8.


Caution:

AL32UTF8 is the Oracle Database character set that is appropriate for XMLType data. It is equivalent to the IANA registered standard UTF-8 encoding, which supports all valid XML characters.

Do not confuse the Oracle Database database character set UTF8 (no hyphen) with the database character set AL32UTF8 or with character encoding UTF-8. Database character set UTF8 has been superseded by AL32UTF8. Do not use UTF8 for XML data. UTF8 supports only Unicode version 3.1 and earlier; it does not support all valid XML characters. AL32UTF8 has no such limitation.

Using database character set UTF8 for XML data could potentially cause a fatal error or affect security negatively. If a character that is not supported by the database character set appears in an input-document element name, a replacement character (usually, the question mark (?)) is substituted for it. This will terminate parsing and raise an exception.



Note:

Regardless of the target database character set, to install a translated version of Oracle HTML DB, you must set the character set value of the NLS_LANG environment variable to AL32UTF8 before starting SQL*Plus.

The following examples illustrates valid NLS_LANG settings for loading Oracle HTML DB translations:

American_America.AL32UTF8
Japanese_Japan.AL32UTF8 

To install a translated version of Oracle HTML DB:

  1. Set the NLS_LANG environment variable. The character set must be AL32UTF8. For example:

    set NLS_LANG=American_America.AL32UTF8
    
    
  2. Start SQL*Plus, and connect to the target database as SYS.

  3. Run the following statement:

    ALTER SESSION SET CURRENT_SCHEMA = FLOWS_010600;
    
    
  4. Run the appropriate language-specific script. For example:

    @load_de.sql
    
    

    The installation scripts are located in subdirectories identified by a language code in the unzipped distribution /htmldb/builder. For example, the German version is located in /htmldb/builder/de and the Japanese version is located in /htmldb/builder/ja. In each of these directories, there is a language loading script identified by the language code. For example, load_de.sql or load_ja.sql.

C.1.2 Installing Oracle Workflow in Different Languages

Use the Add Language option in Oracle Workflow Configuration Assistant to install Oracle Workflow in a different language.


See Also:

"Preparing Oracle Workflow Server for the Oracle Workflow Middle Tier Installation" for instructions on starting Oracle Workflow Configuration Assistant

C.1.3 Running Oracle Universal Installer in Different Languages

Oracle Universal Installer runs by default in the selected language of your operating system. You can also run Oracle Universal Installer in the following languages:

  • Brazilian Portuguese

  • German

  • Japanese

  • Simplified Chinese

  • Traditional Chinese

  • French

  • Italian

  • Korean

  • Spanish

To run Oracle Universal Installer in a different language, change the language in which your operating system is running before you run Oracle Universal Installer.


See Also:

Oracle Universal Installer and OPatch User's Guide for information about running Oracle Universal Installer in different languages

C.1.4 Using Oracle Components in Different Languages

You can specify the language in which you want to use Oracle components (such as Oracle Net Configuration Assistant and Oracle Database Configuration Assistant). Note that this does not change the language in which Oracle Universal Installer is run. For the Oracle component to run in the selected language, it must be the same as the language set for your operating system. You can change your operating system language in the Regional Settings window from the Control Panel.

To use components in different languages:

  1. Start Oracle Universal Installer.

  2. On the Select Installation Type screen, click Product Languages.

  3. On the Language Selection screen, select the language in which you want to use Oracle components from the Available Languages field.

  4. Use the > arrow to move the selected language to the Selected Languages field, and then click OK.

  5. Select the products you want, and then click Next.

    After installation is complete, the dialog box text, messages, and online Help for the installed components are displayed in the language you select.

C.2 Configuring Locale and Character Sets by Using the NLS_LANG Environment Variable

Oracle provides Globalization Support that enables users to interact with a database in their preferred locale and character set settings. Setting the NLS_LANG environment variable specifies locale behavior for Oracle software. It sets the language and territory used by the client application and the database. It also sets the character set for entering and displaying data by a client program, such as SQL*Plus.

The NLS_LANG environment variable uses the following format:

NLS_LANG=language_territory.characterset

In this format:

  • language_territory specifies the language used for displaying Oracle messages, sorting, day names, and month names

  • territory specifies the conventions for default date, monetary and numeric formats

  • characterset specifies the encoding used by the client application

    In most cases, this is the Oracle character set that corresponds to the character set of the user terminal or the operating system.

The NLS_LANG environment variable is set as a local environment variable for the shell on all UNIX-based platforms. For example, if the operating system locale setting is en_US.UTF-8, then the corresponding NLS_LANG environment variable should be set to AMERICAN_AMERICA.AL32UTF8.


See Also:

Oracle Database Globalization Support Guide for information about the NLS_LANG parameter and Globalization Support initialization parameters

The following table lists some of the valid values for the NLS_LANG environment variable.


Note:

Refer to the operating system documentation on how to determine the operating system locale environment setting.

Operating System Locale NLS_LANG Values
French (France)
FRENCH_FRANCE.WE8ISO8859P15
FRENCH_FRANCE.WE8ISO8859P1
FRENCH_FRANCE.WE8MSWIN1252
FRENCH_FRANCE.AL32UTF8
Japanese (Japan)
JAPANESE_JAPAN.JA16EUC
JAPANESE_JAPAN.JA16SJIS
JAPANESE_JAPAN.AL32UTF8

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text-align: center; width: 1%; vertical-align: top; padding-left: 4px; padding-right: 4px; margin-top: 0ex; padding-top: 0ex; } a.zz-nav-button-link { font-size: 0.9em; } div.zz-nav-footer-menu { width: 100%; text-align: center; margin-top: 2ex; margin-bottom: 4ex; } p.zz-legal-notice, a.zz-legal-notice-link { font-size: 0.85em; /* display: none; */ /* Uncomment to hide legal notice */ } /*************************************/ /* Begin DARB Formats */ /*************************************/ h5, h6 { font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; color: #369; background-color: white; font-size: 0.95em; font-weight: bold; } h6 { font-weight: normal; } td li p { display: inline; } /* lose the h1 underscore */ /* h1 { border-width : 0px 0px 0px 0px; } */ /* Increase contrast between visited and unvisited links. */ /* a:visited { color: #a30; background-color: white; } */ .bold, .codeinlinebold, .syntaxinlinebold, .term, .glossterm, .glossaryterm, .keyword, .msg, .msgexplankw, .msgactionkw, .notep1 { font-weight: bold; } .italic, .codeinlineitalic, .syntaxinlineitalic, .variable { font-style: italic; } .bolditalic, .codeinlineboldital, .syntaxinlineboldital, .titleinfigure, .titleinexample, .titleintable, .titleinequation { font-weight: bold; font-style: italic; } .bridgehead, .titleinrefsubsect, .subhead1, .subhead2, .subhead3 { font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; color: #369; background-color: white; font-weight: bold; } .titleinrefsubsect, .subhead1 { font-size: 1.1em; } .subhead2 { font-size: 1.0em; } .subhead3 { font-size: 0.95em; display: inline; } .underline { text-decoration: underline; } .superscript { vertical-align: super; } .subscript { vertical-align: sub; } .listofeft { border: none; } .betadraft { color: #f00; background-color: white; } .betadraftsubtitle { text-align: center; font-weight: bold; color: #f00; background-color: white; } .comment { color: #080; background-color: white; font-weight: bold; } .copyrightlogo { text-align: center; font-size: 0.85em; border-style: none; } .tocsubheader { list-style-type: none; } /*************************************/ /* End DARB Formats */ /*************************************/ @media all { * { background-color: transparent; line-height: 1.2; } body { color: black; background-color: white; } /* dd { margin-bottom: 2ex; } dl:first-child { margin-top: 2ex; } */ } @media print { body, p, table, td, th, ol, ul, a, dl, dt, dd, blockquote, caption { font-family: "Times New Roman", Times, serif; font-size: 11pt; } h1, h2, h3, h4, h5, h6, th, thead td { font-family: Arial, Helvetica, serif; color: black; background-color: white; } div.zz-skip-header { display: none; } code, a:link, a:visited, a:hover, a:active { color: black; background-color: white; text-decoration: none; } } PKri$PKSjUI OEBPS/toc.htmjO Table of Contents

Contents

Title and Copyright Information

Preface

1 Oracle Database Companion CD Installation Overview

2 Oracle Database Companion CD Requirements

3 Installing the Oracle Database Companion CD Software

4 Oracle Database Companion CD Postinstallation Tasks

5 Getting Started with the Oracle Database Companion CD Products

6 Removing Oracle Database Companion CD Products

A Troubleshooting the Oracle Database Companion CD Installation

B Installing Oracle Database Companion CD Products in Noninteractive Mode

C Configuring Oracle Database Companion CD Globalization Support

D Managing Oracle Database Companion CD Port Numbers

Index

PKRyoOjOPKSjUIOEBPS/install_overview.htmZ| Oracle Database Companion CD Installation Overview

1 Oracle Database Companion CD Installation Overview

This chapter provides an overview of the products available on the Oracle Database Companion CD installation media and describes issues that you must consider before installing them. It includes the following sections:

1.1 Overview of Oracle Database Companion CD Installation

The installation process consists of the following steps:

  1. Read the release notes: Read Oracle Database Release Notes for Linux x86-64 before you begin the installation. The release notes are available with the platform-specific documentation. The latest version of the release notes is available on Oracle Technology Network at

    http://www.oracle.com/technology/documentation/index.html

  2. Plan the installation: This chapter describes the products that you can install and provides information that you must know before installing the software.


    See Also:

    The "Frequently Asked Questions About Installation" appendix of Oracle Database Installation Guide for Linux x86-64 for information about the best way to install Oracle products depending on the requirements of your site

  3. Verify system requirements: Chapter 2 describes the minimum system requirements for installing Companion CD products.

  4. Installing the software: The following chapter and appendixes provide information about installing Companion CD products:

  5. Completing postinstallation tasks: Chapter 4 describes required and recommended postinstallation tasks. If you need to check or modify port numbers, refer to Appendix D for information.

  6. Getting started on using the Companion CD products: Chapter 5 provides information about using the Companion CD products.

1.2 Products Available in the Oracle HTML DB Installation Type

The following sections describe the products available in the Oracle HTML DB installation type:

  • Oracle HTML DB

  • Oracle HTTP Server


    Note:

    The Summary screen of Oracle Universal Installer provides a detailed list of the products available in the Oracle HTML DB installation type.

1.2.1 Oracle HTML DB

Oracle HTML DB is a tool for rapid development and deployment of Web applications on an Oracle Database installation. It provides the productivity benefits of a desktop database, and the security, reliability, and performance of Oracle Database. With little programming or scripting and only a Web browser, you can build reporting and data entry applications on existing tables, views, or data imported from spreadsheets.

Where to Install Oracle HTML DB

You can install Oracle HTML DB with Oracle HTTP Server in a new Oracle home. Alternatively, you can install this product in an existing Oracle home that contains Oracle HTTP Server, which you installed from the installation media. If you have an existing Oracle HTML DB installation, then this installation is upgraded to the current release of Oracle HTML DB. Do not install Oracle HTML DB in any other Oracle HTTP Server Oracle home.


Note:

Installations of Oracle HTML DB in other Oracle homes that may include Oracle HTTP Server are not supported.

1.2.2 Oracle HTTP Server

Oracle HTTP Server is a Web server that is based on Apache Standalone 10.1.2.0.0. You can use the Oracle HTML DB installation type to install Oracle HTTP Server in a new Oracle home.


Note:

If you are installing Oracle Workflow middle-tier components, then Oracle HTTP Server is available in the Oracle Database 10g Companion Products installation type.

This standalone release of Oracle HTTP Server provides the following features:

  • A robust and reliable Web server that you can use to serve Web pages

  • Support for Perl and Fast CGI scripts using mod_perl and mod_fastcgi

  • Support for PL/SQL applications using mod_plsql

  • High availability, through the use of Oracle Process Manager and Notification server (OPMN)

    OPMN monitors Oracle HTTP Server processes and restarts them if they fail.

  • Support for secure transactions using Secure Sockets Layer (SSL)

  • Single sign-on capabilities using mod_osso

    To enable single sign-on, you must use Oracle HTTP Server in conjunction with Oracle Internet Directory and Single Sign-On Server, both of which are available with Oracle Application Server 10g.

  • Many standard Apache modules, in addition to modules provided by Oracle


See Also:

Oracle Application Server Installation Guide for more information about Oracle Internet Directory and Single Sign-On Server

1.2.2.1 Differences Between This Release and Other Oracle HTTP Server Releases

The following are the differences between the standalone version of Oracle HTTP Server and the version shipped with other releases of Oracle software:

  • Oracle9i release 2 or earlier, and Oracle9iAS release 1

    • Apache JServ is not shipped with this release of Oracle HTTP Server, nor does this release support Apache JServ. Because Apache JServ is not supported, the mod_oprocmgr module is not loaded in the default configuration.

    • In this release, mod_ossl, which Oracle developed, replaces mod_ssl.

    • The apachectl utility is no longer supported for starting, stopping, or restarting Oracle HTTP Server. You must use OPMN to start, stop, or restart Oracle HTTP Server.


      See Also:


  • Oracle9iAS release 2 or later

    • You cannot configure the standalone release of Oracle HTTP Server in an Oracle9iAS or Oracle Application Server 10g cluster.

      For this reason, you cannot use the dcmctl utility to start, stop, or restart processes associated with this release of Oracle HTTP Server.

    • You cannot use the Oracle Enterprise Manager Application Server Control to administer this release of Oracle HTTP Server.

1.2.2.2 Where to Install Oracle HTTP Server

You must install Oracle HTTP Server in a new Oracle home. Do not install it in an existing Oracle home. You can install Oracle HTTP Server more than once on the same system, as long as each installation uses a separate Oracle home.

1.3 Products Available in the Oracle Database 10g Products Installation Type

The following sections describe the products that are installed by the Oracle Database 10g Products installation type. You must install these products in an existing Oracle Database 10g release 2 (10.2) Oracle home:


Note:

  • The Summary screen of Oracle Universal Installer provides a detailed list of the products available in the Oracle Database 10g Products installation type.

  • Legato Single Server Version (LSSV) is no longer supported on Oracle Database. Oracle Database Recovery Manager (RMAN), which is a backup and recovery tool, is integrated into Oracle Database.

    Refer to Oracle Database Backup and Recovery Basics for more information about RMAN.


1.3.1 Oracle JDBC Development Drivers

Oracle provides a set of JDBC drivers that you can use for debugging your code and other deployment scenarios. These drivers can access Oracle Database release 8.1.7 or later.

1.3.2 Oracle SQLJ

Oracle SQLJ enables application programmers to embed SQL operations in Java code in a way that is compatible with the Java design philosophy. A SQLJ program is a Java program containing embedded SQL statements. Oracle SQLJ offers extensions to support dynamic SQL operations, which are operations that can change in real time. It is also possible to use dynamic SQL operations through JDBC code or PL/SQL code within a SQLJ application. Typical applications contain much more static SQL than dynamic SQL. SQLJ consists of both a translator and a run-time component and is smoothly integrated into your development environment.

1.3.3 Oracle Database Examples

Oracle Database Examples include a variety of examples and product demonstrations that you can use to learn about the products, options, and features of Oracle Database. Many of these examples are designed to work with the Sample Schemas, which you can install in any Oracle Database. Many of the documents in the Oracle Documentation Library use the example programs and scripts provided with the Oracle Database Examples.

Required Products

Before you can use the Oracle Database Examples, you must install the Sample Schemas in an Oracle Database. When you install Oracle Database, or use Database Configuration Assistant (DBCA) to create a new database, you can choose to include the Sample Schemas when you create the database. You can also manually install the Sample Schemas in an existing database.


See Also:

Oracle Database Sample Schemas for information about manually installing the Sample Schemas in an existing database

1.3.4 Oracle Text Supplied Knowledge Bases

The Oracle Database 10g Products installation type installs two Oracle Text knowledge bases, English and French. You can extend the supplied knowledge bases depending on your requirements. Alternatively, you can create your own knowledge bases, in languages other than English and French.


See Also:

Oracle Text Reference for more information about creating and extending knowledge bases

1.3.5 Oracle Workflow Server

Oracle Workflow provides a complete workflow management system that supports business process-based integration. It also enables modeling, automation, and continuous improvement of business processes, routing information of any type according to user-defined business rules. The Oracle Workflow installation includes Oracle Workflow Server and Oracle Workflow Manager in the Oracle Database 10g Products installation type and the Oracle Workflow middle-tier components on the Companion Products installation type.

In this release, starting the Oracle Application Server Containers for J2EE (OC4J) instances for Oracle Workflow Manager has been simplified to running two scripts.


Note:

Do not install Oracle Workflow Server in an Oracle E-Business Suite database. If you want to use the version of Oracle Workflow available with Oracle Database 10g, or any Oracle Database components that depend on this version of Oracle Workflow, then you must install the Oracle Workflow Server in a database that is not used for an Oracle E-Business Suite instance.

For an Oracle E-Business Suite database, you can continue to use the version of the Oracle Workflow Server embedded in Oracle E-Business Suite.



See Also:

The Oracle Workflow Client installation software is available on the Oracle Technology Network Web site at

http://www.oracle.com/technology/products/ias/workflow/index.html


Other Installation Types That Install Oracle Workflow

Oracle Workflow is also installed by some installation types of the following products:

  • Oracle Application Server 10g

  • Oracle Content Management SDK 10g

If you installed either of these products, then you may have already installed Oracle Workflow. In this case, you do not need to install Oracle Workflow again.

1.3.6 Oracle Ultra Search

Oracle Ultra Search lets you index and search Web sites, database tables, files, mailing lists, Oracle Application Server Portals, and user-defined data sources. You can use Oracle Ultra Search to build different kinds of search applications.

1.3.7 Natively Compiled Java Libraries

The Oracle Database 10g Products installation type installs JAccelerator and Oracle interMedia Image Accelerator, which contains the natively compiled Java libraries (NCOMPs) for Oracle JVM and Oracle interMedia. These libraries are required to improve the performance of these products on your platform.

1.3.8 JPublisher

JPublisher is a Java utility that generates Java classes to represent the following user-defined database entities in a Java program:

  • SQL object types

  • Object reference types (REF types)

  • SQL collection types (VARRAY types or nested table types)

  • PL/SQL packages

  • Server-side Java classes

  • SQL queries and DML statements

You can use JPublisher to specify and customize the mapping of SQL object types, object reference types, and collection types (VARRAYs or nested tables) to Java classes in a strongly typed paradigm.

JPublisher can also generate classes for PL/SQL packages. These classes have wrapper methods to invoke the stored procedures in the PL/SQL packages.

In addition, JPublisher simplifies access to PL/SQL-only types from Java. You can employ predefined or user-defined mappings between PL/SQL and SQL types. You can also use PL/SQL conversion functions between such types. With such type correspondences in place, JPublisher can automatically generate the required Java and PL/SQL code.

Just like SQL and PL/SQL entities publish to Java, you can also publish server-side Java classes to client-side Java classes. Doing this enables applications to make direct calls to Java classes in the database.

JPublisher lets you expose generated Java classes as Web services, for example. You can publish either SQL or PL/SQL entities, or server-side Java entities.

JPublisher uses SQLJ code in most Java classes that it generates, so it includes Oracle SQLJ Translator and Oracle SQLJ Runtime. Oracle SQLJ is a standard way to embed SQL statements in Java programs.

Oracle SQLJ Translator

Because JPublisher uses SQLJ code in its generated classes, it automatically calls the Oracle SQLJ translator during the code generation process, as required. The translator converts embedded SQL statements into JDBC calls.

Oracle SQLJ Runtime

Oracle SQLJ Runtime is used during program run time to run most classes that were generated by JPublisher. SQLJ Runtime is a thin layer of pure Java code that runs above the JDBC driver. It acts as an intermediary that reads information about SQL operations and passes instructions to the JDBC driver.


See Also:

Oracle Database JPublisher User's Guide

1.4 Products Available in the Oracle Database 10g Companion Products Installation Type

The following sections describe the products that you can install with the Oracle Database 10g Companion Products installation type:

1.4.1 Oracle Workflow Middle-Tier Components

Oracle Workflow middle-tier components enable the Oracle Workflow user interface Web pages, including the database access descriptor (DAD) and virtual directory mappings for Oracle Workflow. Before you can use Oracle Workflow Server, you must install Oracle Workflow middle-tier components.

You can use the Oracle Database 10g Companion Products installation type to install the Oracle Workflow middle-tier components after you install Oracle Workflow Server.

1.4.2 Oracle HTTP Server

Refer to "Oracle HTTP Server" for information about Oracle HTTP Server.

PKY_|Z|PKSjUIOEBPS/getting_started.htmI6 Getting Started with the Oracle Database Companion CD Products

5 Getting Started with the Oracle Database Companion CD Products

This chapter describes how to check the installation contents and launch Oracle HTTP Server and Oracle HTML DB after you have installed the software and completed the postinstallation tasks.

This chapter contains the following sections:

5.1 Checking the Installation Contents

You can check the installation contents of your Oracle software by using Oracle Universal Installer:

  1. Start Oracle Universal Installer.

  2. When the Welcome screen appears, click Installed Products.

    The Inventory screen appears, listing all of the Oracle homes on the system and the products installed in each Oracle home. To check the paths of the products, click the Environment tab.

5.2 Getting Started with Oracle HTTP Server

This section covers the following topics:

5.2.1 Starting, Stopping, and Restarting Oracle HTTP Server

If you have just installed Oracle Workflow or Oracle Workflow middle-tier components, then you need to restart Oracle HTTP Server before you can use these components.

ou can use the following commands to start, stop, and restart Oracle HTTP Server:

  • To start Oracle HTTP Server:

    $ORACLE_HOME/opmn/bin/opmnctl startproc ias-component=HTTP_Server
    
    
  • To restart Oracle HTTP Server:

    $ORACLE_HOME/opmn/bin/opmnctl restartproc ias-component=HTTP_Server
    
    
  • To stop Oracle HTTP Server:

    $ORACLE_HOME/opmn/bin/opmnctl stopproc ias-component=HTTP_Server
    

5.2.2 Logging In to Oracle HTTP Server

To log in to Oracle HTTP Server, in a browser, enter a URL similar to the following:

http://server:port/

In this URL format:

  • server is the computer on which you have installed Oracle HTTP Server, for example, mycomputer.us.mycompany.com.

  • port is the port number assigned to Oracle HTTP Server. In a default installation, this number is 7777. You can find information about the port number of your Oracle HTTP Server installation from either of the following files:

    • $ORACLE_HOME/install/portlist.ini

    • $ORACLE_HOME/Apache/Apache/conf/httpd.conf

After you have logged in, you can find Oracle HTTP Server product demonstrations and a listing of new features for this release. This link also provides access to the Oracle Technology Network.

5.3 Getting Started with Oracle HTML DB

This section covers the following topics:

5.3.1 Logging In to Oracle HTML DB

To view or develop Oracle HTML DB applications, the Web browser must support JavaScript and the HTML 4.0 and CSS 1.0 standards.


See Also:

"Browser Requirements" for a list of supported Web browsers

To log in to Oracle HTML DB:


Note:

Before you can log in to Oracle HTML DB, an administrator must grant you access to a workspace.

  1. Open the following page in a Web browser:

    http://hostname:port/pls/database_access_descriptor/htmldb_admin
    
    

    In this URL format:

    • hostname is the name of the system on which Oracle HTTP Server is installed.

    • port is the port number assigned to Oracle HTTP Server. In a default installation, this number is 7777. You can find information about the port number of your Oracle HTTP Server installation from either of the following files:

      • $ORACLE_HOME/install/portlist.ini

      • $ORACLE_HOME/Apache/Apache/conf/httpd.conf

    • database_access_descriptor describes how Oracle HTTP Server connects to the database so that it can fulfill an HTTP request. The default value is htmldb.


    See Also:

    $ORACLE_HOME/Apache/modplsql/conf/dads.readme for more information about how DADs work

    The Oracle HTML DB Login page is displayed.

  2. In the Username field, enter admin.

  3. In the Password field, enter the Oracle HTML DB administrator account password that you specified when you installed Oracle HTML DB.

  4. Click Login. The Oracle HTML DB Administration Service page is displayed.

5.3.2 Setup Tasks for Oracle HTML DB Administrators

If you are an Oracle HTML DB administrator, then you need to:

  • Log in to Oracle HTML DB Administration Services: Oracle HTML DB Administration Services is a separate application for managing an entire Oracle HTML DB instance.

  • Specify a provisioning mode: In Oracle HTML DB Administration Services, you need to determine how the process of creating (or provisioning) a workspace will work in your development environment.

  • Create a Workspace: A workspace is a shared work area within the Oracle HTML DB development environment that has a unique ID and name. An Oracle HTML DB administrator can create a workspace manually or have users submit requests.

  • Log in to a Workspace: After you create a workspace in Oracle HTML DB Administration Services, return to the Oracle HTML DB Login page and log in to that workspace.


See Also:

Oracle HTML DB User's Guide for more information about using, developing applications with, and administering Oracle HTML DB

5.4 Getting Started with Oracle Workflow

This section covers the following topics:

5.4.1 Logging In to the Oracle Workflow Home Page

To access the Oracle Workflow home page in a Web browser, you must be a valid user in the Workflow directory service. Depending on the settings you selected during the installation and configuration, the directory service is based on either Oracle Internet Directory or the native database users.

To access the Oracle Workflow home page, connect as a valid Oracle Workflow user to a URL similar to the following:

http://hostname:port/pls/wf/wfa_html.home

See Also:

$ORACLE_HOME/oc4j/j2ee/deploy_db_wf.ini if you are not sure about which server and port number to use

5.4.2 Logging In to Oracle Workflow Manager

The Oracle Workflow Server installation includes the Oracle Workflow Manager component of Oracle Enterprise Manager. This component provides administrative and management tools for Oracle Workflow. When you install Oracle Workflow in your Oracle Database home, Oracle Workflow Configuration Assistant configures Oracle Workflow Manager. It creates two Oracle Application Server Containers for Java 2 Enterprise Edition (OC4J) instances:

  • OC4J_Workflow_Component_Container: Oracle Workflow Configuration Assistant deploys two applications within this instance. One application runs the agent listener service components and the other runs notification mailer service components.

  • OC4J_Workflow_Management_Container: Oracle Workflow Configuration Assistant deploys one application within this instance to implement the Oracle Workflow Manager user interface.

Starting, Stopping, or Restarting the OC4J Instances

To start the OC4J instances, run the following scripts:

$ORACLE_HOME/wf/admin/wfmgrstart.csh
$ORACLE_HOME/wf/admin/wfsvcstart.csh

You can stop and restart the OC4J instances in which Oracle Workflow Manager is deployed. To stop the instances, run the following scripts:

$ORACLE_HOME/wf/admin/wfmgrstop.csh
$ORACLE_HOME/wf/admin/wfsvcstop.csh

Accessing the Oracle Workflow Manager User Instance

To access the Oracle Workflow Manager user interface:

  1. Log in to Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Control by using a URL such as the following:

    http://server:port/em
    
    

    For example:

    http://myserver.mycompany:5500/em
    
    
  2. On the Home page, navigate to the Related Links section.

  3. In the Related Links section, select Workflow Manager.

  4. Log in using your Oracle Workflow database user name (typically, owf_mgr) and password.


See Also:

  • Oracle Workflow Administrator's Guide

  • Oracle Workflow Developer's Guide

  • Oracle Workflow User's Guide

  • Oracle Workflow API Reference


5.4.3 Setup Tasks for Oracle Workflow Administrators

If you are an Oracle Workflow administrator, then complete the tasks described in the "Setting Up Oracle Workflow" chapter of Oracle Workflow Administrator's Guide.

PKaIIPKSjUI OEBPS/toc.ncxS Oracle® Database Companion CD Installation Guide for Linux x86, 10g Release 2 (10.2) Cover Title and Copyright Information Contents Preface 1 Oracle Database Companion CD Installation Overview 2 Oracle Database Companion CD Requirements 3 Installing the Oracle Database Companion CD Software 4 Oracle Database Companion CD Postinstallation Tasks 5 Getting Started with the Oracle Database Companion CD Products 6 Removing Oracle Database Companion CD Products A Troubleshooting the Oracle Database Companion CD Installation B Installing Oracle Database Companion CD Products in Noninteractive Mode C Configuring Oracle Database Companion CD Globalization Support D Managing Oracle Database Companion CD Port Numbers Index Copyright PK]UX S PKSjUIOEBPS/title.htmv Oracle Database Companion CD Installation Guide, 10g Release 2 (10.2) for Linux x86

Oracle® Database

Companion CD Installation Guide

10g Release 2 (10.2) for Linux x86

B15664-02

November 2005


Oracle Database Companion CD Installation Guide, 10g Release 2 (10.2) for Linux x86

B15664-02

Copyright © 2005, Oracle. All rights reserved.

Primary Authors:  Apolina Das, Sanjay Sharma, Lyju Vadassery

Contributing Authors:  Kevin Flood, Pat Huey, Clara Jaeckel, Emily Murphy, Terri Winters

Contributors:  David Austin, Subhranshu Banerjee, Mark Bauer, Robert Chang, Jonathan Creighton, Sudip Datta, Padmanabhan Ganapathy, Thirumaleshwara Hasandka, Joel Kallman, George Kotsovolos, Richard Long, Rolly Lv, Padmanabhan Manavazhi, Matthew McKerley, Sreejith Minnanghat, Krishna Mohan, Santhana Natarajan, Rajendra Pingte, Srinivas Poovala, Hanlin Qian, Janelle Simmons, Preeti Shukla, Roy Swonger, Douglas Williams

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PKPڎPKSjUIOEBPS/pre_install.htm Oracle Database Companion CD Requirements

2 Oracle Database Companion CD Requirements

This chapter describes the requirements for installing the products from the Oracle Database 10g Companion CD installation media. It contains the following sections:

2.1 Hardware and Software Certification

The platform-specific hardware and software requirements included in this installation guide were current at the time this guide was published. However, because new platforms and operating system software versions may be certified after this guide is published, you must review the certification information on the OracleMetaLink Web site. This Web site provides the most up-to-date list of certified hardware platforms and operating system versions. You can visit the OracleMetaLink Web site at

http://metalink.oracle.com

If you do not have a current Oracle Support Services contract, then you can access the same information on the Oracle Technology Network Web site at

http://www.oracle.com/technology/support/metalink/content.html

2.2 General Requirements for Installing Oracle Software

The following sections describe the general requirements for installing Oracle software:

2.2.1 Logging In to the System as root

Before you install Oracle software, you must complete several tasks as the root user. To log in as the root user, complete one of the following procedures:


Note:

Unless you intend to complete a silent installation, you must install the software from an X Window System workstation, an X terminal, or a PC or other system with X server software installed.

  • If you are installing the software from an X Window System workstation or X terminal, then:

    1. Start a local terminal session, for example, an X terminal (xterm).

    2. If you are not installing the software on the local system, then enter the following command to enable the remote host to display X applications on the local X server:

      $ xhost fully_qualified_remote_host_name
      
      
    3. If you are not installing the software on the local system, then use the ssh, rlogin, or telnet command to connect to the system on which you want to install the software:

      $ telnet remote_host
      
      
    4. If you are not logged in as the root user, then enter the following command to switch user to root:

      $ su - root
      
      
  • If you are installing the software from a PC or other system with X server software installed, then:


    Note:

    If required, refer to your X server documentation for more information about completing this procedure. Depending on the X server software that you are using, you may need to complete the tasks in a different order.

    1. Start the X server software.

    2. Configure the security settings of the X server software to permit remote hosts to display X applications on the local system.

    3. Connect to the remote system on which you want to install the software and start a terminal session on that system, for example, an X terminal (xterm).

    4. If you are not logged in as the root user on the remote system, then enter the following command to switch user to root:

      $ su - root
      

2.2.2 Required Operating System Group and User

Depending on whether this is the first time Oracle software is being installed on this system and on the products that you are installing, you may need to create the following operating system group and user:

  • Oracle Inventory group (typically, oinstall)

    You must create the Oracle Inventory group the first time you install Oracle software on the system. The usual name chosen for this group is oinstall. This group owns the Oracle inventory, which is a catalog of all Oracle software installed on the system.


    Note:

    If Oracle software is already installed on the system, then the existing Oracle Inventory group must be the primary group of the operating system user that you use to install new Oracle software.

  • Oracle software owner user (typically, oracle)

    You must create the Oracle software owner user the first time you install Oracle software on the system. This user owns all of the software installed during a given installation. This user must have the Oracle Inventory group as its primary group.


    Note:

    In Oracle documentation, the Oracle software owner user is referred to as the oracle user.

A single Oracle Inventory group is required for all installations of Oracle software on the system. After the first installation of Oracle software, you must use the same Oracle Inventory group for all subsequent Oracle software installations on that system. However, you can choose to create different Oracle software owner users for different installations.


Note:

As an alternative to creating local users and groups, you can create the appropriate users and groups in a directory service. For example, Network Information Services (NIS). Contact your system administrator or refer to your operating system documentation for information about using directory services.

The following sections describe how to create the Oracle Inventory group and the Oracle software owner user:

2.2.2.1 Oracle Inventory Group

If Oracle software is already installed on the system, then the existing Oracle Inventory group must be the primary group of the operating system user that you use to install new Oracle software. The following sections describe how to identify an existing Oracle Inventory group and, if required, to create it.

Determining If the Oracle Inventory Group Exists

When you install Oracle software on the system for the first time, Oracle Universal Installer creates the oraInst.loc file. This file identifies the name of the Oracle Inventory group and the path of the Oracle Inventory directory. To determine if the Oracle Inventory group exists, enter the following command:

more /etc/oraInst.loc

If the output of this command shows the oinstall group name, then the group already exists.

If the oraInst.loc file exists, then the output from this command is similar to the following:

inventory_loc=/u01/app/oracle/oraInventory
inst_group=oinstall

The inst_group parameter shows the name of the Oracle Inventory group, oinstall.

Creating the Oracle Inventory Group


Note:

Oracle recommends that you use the group name oinstall for the Oracle Inventory group.

If the oraInst.loc file does not exist, then enter the following command to create the oinstall group:

# /usr/sbin/groupadd oinstall

2.2.2.2 Oracle Software Owner User

You must create an Oracle software owner user if any of the following conditions is true:

  • An Oracle software owner user does not exist; for example, if this is the first installation of Oracle software on the system.

  • An Oracle software owner user exists, but you want to use a different operating system user.


Note:

In this document, the Oracle software owner user is referred to as oracle.

Determining If an Oracle Software Owner User Exists

To determine if an Oracle software owner user named oracle exists, enter the following command:

# id oracle

If the oracle user exists, then the output from this command is similar to the following:

uid=440(oracle) gid=200(oinstall) groups=201(dba),202(oper)

If the user exists, then determine whether you want to use the existing user or create a user. If you want to use the existing user, then ensure that the user's primary group is the Oracle Inventory group.

Refer to one of the following sections for more information:


Note:

If necessary, contact your system administrator before using or modifying an existing user.

Creating an Oracle Software Owner User

If the Oracle software owner user does not exist or if you require a new Oracle software owner user, then create it as follows:


Note:

In the following procedure, use the user name oracle unless a user with that name already exists.

  1. To create the oracle user, enter a command similar to the following:

    # /usr/sbin/useradd -g oinstall[ -G dba] oracle
    
    

    In this command:

    • The -g option specifies the primary group, which must be the Oracle Inventory group, for example oinstall.

    • The -G option specifies optional secondary groups.

  2. Set the password of the oracle user as follows:

    # passwd oracle
    
    

To continue, refer to the "Required Software Directories" section.

Modifying an Existing Oracle Software Owner User

If the oracle user exists, but its primary group is not oinstall, then enter a command similar to the following, specifying the primary group using the -g option and any required secondary groups using the -G option:

# /usr/sbin/usermod -g oinstall -G dba oracle

2.2.3 Required Software Directories

This section describes the following directories, which you must identify or create for the Oracle software:

  • Oracle base directory

  • Oracle Inventory directory

  • Oracle home directory

Oracle Base Directory

The Oracle base directory acts as a top-level directory for Oracle software installations. It is analogous to the C:\Oracle directory used for Oracle software installations on Microsoft Windows systems. On UNIX-based systems, the Optimal Flexible Architecture (OFA) guidelines recommend that you use a path similar to the following for the Oracle base directory:

/mount_point/app/oracle_sw_owner

In this example:

  • mount_point is the mount point directory for the file system that will contain the Oracle software.

    The examples in this guide use /u01 for the mount point directory. However, you can choose another mount point directory. For example, /oracle or /opt/oracle.

  • oracle_sw_owner is the operating system user name of the Oracle software owner, for example oracle.

You can use the same Oracle base directory for more than one installation or you can create separate Oracle base directories for different installations. If different operating system users install Oracle software on the same system, then each user must create a separate Oracle base directory. For example, the following Oracle base directories can exist on the same system at the same time:

/u01/app/oracle
/u01/app/orauser
/opt/oracle/app/oracle

Regardless of whether you create an Oracle base directory or decide to use an existing one, you must set the ORACLE_BASE environment variable to specify the full path to this directory.


Note:

You can create an Oracle base directory even if other Oracle base directories exist on the system.

Identifying an Existing Oracle Base Directory

Existing Oracle base directories may not have paths that comply with Oracle Flexible Architecture (OFA) guidelines. However, if you identify an existing Oracle Inventory directory or existing Oracle home directories, then you can usually identify the Oracle base directories, as follows:

  • Identify an existing Oracle Inventory directory

    Enter the following command to view the contents of the oraInst.loc file:

    # more /etc/oraInst.loc
    
    

    If the oraInst.loc file exists, then the output from this command is similar to the following:

    inventory_loc=/u01/app/oracle/oraInventory
    inst_group=oinstall
    
    

    The inventory_loc parameter identifies the Oracle Inventory directory (oraInventory). The parent directory of the oraInventory directory is typically an Oracle base directory. In the previous example, /u01/app/oracle is an Oracle base directory.

  • Identifying existing Oracle home directories

    Enter the following command to view the contents of the oratab file:

    # more /etc/oratab
    
    

    If the oratab file exists, then it contains lines similar to the following:

    *:/u03/app/oracle/product/10.2.0/db_1:N
    *:/opt/orauser/infra_904:N
    *:/oracle/9.2.0:N
    
    

    The directory paths specified on each line identify Oracle home directories. Directory paths that end with the user name of the Oracle software owner that you want to use are valid choices for an Oracle base directory. If you intend to use the oracle user to install the software, then you can choose one of the following directories from the previous example:

    /u03/app/oracle
    /oracle
    

    Note:

    If possible, choose a directory path similar to the first (/u03/app/oracle). This path complies with the OFA guidelines.

To continue:

  • If an Oracle base directory exists and you want to use it, then refer to the "Configuring the oracle User's Environment" section.

    When you are configuring the oracle user's environment later in this chapter, set the ORACLE_BASE environment variable to specify the directory you chose.

  • If an Oracle base directory does not exist on the system or if you want to create an Oracle base directory, then refer to the following section.

Creating an Oracle Base Directory

To identify an appropriate file system:

  1. Use the df -k command to determine the free disk space on each mounted file system.

  2. From the display, identify a file system that has sufficient free space.

  3. Note the name of the mount point directory for the file system that you identified.

To create the Oracle base directory and specify the correct owner, group, and permissions for it:

  1. Enter commands similar to the following to create the recommended subdirectories in the mount point directory that you identified and set the appropriate owner, group, and permissions for them:

    # mkdir -p /mount_point/app/oracle_sw_owner
    # chown -R oracle:oinstall /mount_point/app/oracle_sw_owner
    # chmod -R 775 /mount_point/app/oracle_sw_owner
    
    

    If the mount point you identified is /u01 and oracle is the user name of the Oracle software owner, then the recommended Oracle base directory path is as follows:

    /u01/app/oracle
    
    
  2. When you are configuring the oracle user's environment later in this chapter, set the ORACLE_BASE environment variable to specify this directory.

Oracle Inventory Directory

The Oracle Inventory directory (oraInventory) stores an inventory of all software installed on the system. It is required by, and shared by, all Oracle software installations on a single system. The first time you install Oracle software on a system, Oracle Universal Installer prompts you to specify the path to this directory. Oracle recommends that you choose the following path:

oracle_base/oraInventory

Oracle Universal Installer creates the directory that you specify and sets the correct owner, group, and permissions on it. You do not need to create it.


Caution:

All Oracle software installations rely on this directory. Ensure that you back it up regularly.

Do not delete this directory unless you have completely removed all Oracle software from the system.


Oracle Home Directory

The Oracle home directory is the directory in which you choose to install the software for a particular Oracle product. You must install different Oracle products, or different releases of the same Oracle product, in separate Oracle home directories. When you run Oracle Universal Installer, it prompts you to specify the path to this directory, as well as a name that identifies it. The directory that you specify must be a subdirectory of the Oracle base directory. Oracle recommends that you specify a path similar to the following for the Oracle home directory:

oracle_base/product/10.2.0/companion_1

Oracle Universal Installer creates the directory path that you specify under the Oracle base directory. It also sets the correct owner, group, and permissions on it. You do not need to create this directory.

2.2.4 Configuring the oracle User's Environment

You run Oracle Universal Installer from the oracle account. However, before you start Oracle Universal Installer, you must configure the environment of the oracle user. To configure the environment, you must:

  • Set the default file mode creation mask (umask) to 022 in the shell startup file.

  • Set the DISPLAY environment variable.

To set the oracle user's environment, follow these steps:

  1. Start a new terminal session; for example, an X terminal (xterm).

  2. Enter the following command to ensure that X Window applications running on the remote host can display on this system:

    $ xhost fully_qualified_remote_host_name
    
    
  3. If you are not already logged in to the system on which you want to install the software, then log in to that system as the oracle user.

  4. If you are not logged in as the oracle user, then switch user to oracle:

    $ su - oracle
    
    
  5. To determine the default shell for the oracle user, enter the following command:

    $ echo $SHELL
    
    
  6. Open the oracle user's shell startup file in any text editor:

    • Bash (bash) shell:

      $ vi .bash_profile
      
      
    • Bourne shell (sh), or Korn shell (ksh):

      $ vi .profile
      
      
    • C shell (csh or tcsh):

      % vi .login
      
      
  7. Enter or edit the following line, specifying a value of 022 for the default file mode creation mask:

    umask 022
    
    
  8. If the ORACLE_SID, ORACLE_HOME, or ORACLE_BASE environment variable are set in the file, then remove the appropriate lines from the file.

  9. Save the file, and exit from the editor.

  10. To run the shell startup script, enter one of the following commands:

    • Bash shell on Red Hat Enterprise Linux:

      $ . ./.bash_profile
      
      
    • Bourne, Bash, or Korn shell:

      $ . ./.profile
      
      
    • C shell:

      % source ./.login
      
      
  11. If you are not installing the software on the local system, then enter a command similar to the following to direct X applications to display on the local system:

    • Bourne, Bash, or Korn shell:

      $ DISPLAY=local_host:0.0 ; export DISPLAY
      
      
    • C shell:

      % setenv DISPLAY local_host:0.0
      
      

    In this example, local_host is the host name or IP address of the system you want to use to display Oracle Universal Installer (your workstation or PC).

  12. If you determined that the /tmp directory has less than the required free disk space, then identify a file system with the required amount of free space and set the TMP and TMPDIR environment variables to specify a temporary directory on this file system. To do this:

    1. Use the df -k command to identify a suitable file system with sufficient free space.

    2. If necessary, enter commands similar to the following to create a temporary directory on the file system that you identified and to set the appropriate permissions on the directory:

      $ su - root
      # mkdir /mount_point/tmp
      # chmod a+wr /mount_point/tmp
      # exit
      
    3. Enter commands similar to the following to set the TMP and TMPDIR environment variables:

      • Bourne, Bash, or Korn shell:

        $ TMPDIR=/mount_point/tmp
        $ TMP=/mount_point/tmp
        $ export TEMP TMPDIR
        
        
      • C shell:

        % setenv TMPDIR /mount_point/tmp
        % setenv TMP /mount_point/tmp
        
        
  13. Enter the following command to ensure that the ORACLE_HOME and TNS_ADMIN environment variables are not set:

    • Bourne, Bash, or Korn shell:

      $ unset ORACLE_HOME
      $ unset TNS_ADMIN
      
      
    • C shell:

      % unsetenv ORACLE_HOME
      % unsetenv TNS_ADMIN
      
      
  14. To verify that the environment has been set correctly, enter the following commands:

    $ umask
    $ env | more
    
    

    Verify that the umask command displays a value of 22, 022, or 0022 and the environment variables that you set in this section have the correct values.

2.3 Requirements for Installing Oracle HTML DB Products

When you install the Oracle HTML DB installation type, you can install Oracle HTML DB, Oracle HTTP Server, or Oracle HTML DB with Oracle HTTP Server.


Note:

You must install the Oracle HTML DB Products in an Oracle home that is different from the Oracle home used for Oracle Database.

The requirements for the Oracle HTML DB Products installation type can be categorized as follows:

2.3.1 Oracle HTTP Server Requirements

You must install Oracle HTTP Server in a new Oracle home. You can install Oracle HTTP Server more than once on the same system, as long as each installation uses a separate Oracle home directory.

Before you install Oracle HTTP Server in a new Oracle home, ensure that your system meets the following requirements:

2.3.1.1 Oracle Database Requirement

Oracle HTTP Server must have access to an instance of Oracle9i Database release 9.2.0.3 or later in order to run. Oracle Database can be on a separate system from Oracle HTTP Server, as long as it is accessible by using Oracle*Net. However, Oracle HTTP Server must be in its own home.

For example, suppose Oracle Database is installed in OraDB10g_Home1. When you run Oracle Universal Installer to install Oracle HTML DB, you can specify the Oracle Database installed in OraDB10g_Home1. However, you need to install Oracle HTML DB in a different Oracle home that contains Oracle HTTP Server, for example, OraDB10g_Home2.

2.3.1.2 Hardware Requirements

The system must meet the following minimum hardware requirements:

  • 512 MB of physical RAM

  • 512 MB of swap space

  • 125 MB of free disk space in the /tmp directory

  • 530 MB of free disk space for the software files

To ensure that the system meets these requirements:

  1. To determine the physical RAM size, enter the following command:

    # grep MemTotal /proc/meminfo
    
    

    If the size of the physical RAM installed on the system is less than the required size, then you must install more memory before continuing.

  2. To determine the size of the configured swap space, enter the following command:

    # grep SwapTotal /proc/meminfo
    
    

    If necessary, refer to your operating system documentation for information about how to configure additional swap space.

  3. To determine the amount of free disk space in the /tmp directory, enter the following command:

    # df -k /tmp
    
    

    If there is less than 125 MB of free disk space in the /tmp directory, then complete one of the following steps:

    • Delete unnecessary files from the /tmp directory.

    • Set the TEMP and TMPDIR environment variables when setting the oracle user's environment.

    • Extend the file system that contains the /tmp directory. If necessary, contact your system administrator for information about extending file systems.

  4. To determine the amount of free disk space on the system, enter the following command:

    # df -k
    
    
  5. To determine if the system architecture can run the software, enter the following command:

    # grep "model name" /proc/cpuinfo
    
    

    The expected output of this command is the processor type. Verify that the processor architecture matches the requirement for the current release.


    Note:

    If you do not see the expected output, then you cannot install the software on this system.

2.3.1.3 Software Requirements

Verify that the following software is installed on the system. The procedure following the table describes how to check these requirements.

Item Requirement
Operating system One of the following operating system versions:
  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux AS/ES 3.0 (Update 4 or later)

  • Red Hat Linux 4.0

  • SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 9.0 with SP 2 or later

  • Asianux 1.0

  • Asianux 2.0

Kernel version The system must be running the following kernel version (or a later version):

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3.0 and Asianux 1.0:

2.4.21-27.EL

Note: This is the default kernel version.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4.0 and Asianux 2.0:

2.6.9-5.EL

SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 9.0:

2.6.5-7.201

Packages The following packages (or later versions) must be installed:

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3.0 and Asianux 1.0:

make-3.79.1
gcc-3.2.3-34
glibc-2.3.2-95.20
compat-db-4.0.14-5
compat-gcc-7.3-2.96.128
compat-gcc-c++-7.3-2.96.128
compat-libstdc++-7.3-2.96.128
compat-libstdc++-devel-7.3-2.96.128
openmotif21-2.1.30-8
setarch-1.3-1

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4.0 and Asianux 2.0:

binutils-2.15.92.0.2-13.EL4
compat-db-4.1.25-9
compat-libstdc++-296-2.96-132.7.2
control-center-2.8.0-12
gcc-3.4.3-22.1.EL4
gcc-c++-3.4.3-22.1.EL44
glibc-2.3.4-2.9
glibc-common-2.3.4-2.9
gnome-libs-1.4.1.2.90-44.1
libstdc++-3.4.3-22.1
libstdc++-devel-3.4.3-22.1
make-3.80-5
pdksh-5.2.14-30
sysstat-5.0.5-1
xscreensaver-4.18-5.rhel4.2
setarch-1.6-1

SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 9:

binutils-2.15.90.0.1.1-32.5
gcc-3.3.3-43.24
gcc-c++-3.3.3-43.24
glibc-2.3.3-98.28
gnome-libs-1.4.1.7-671.1
libstdc++-3.3.3-43.24
libstdc++-devel-3.3.3-43.24
make-3.80-184.1
pdksh-5.2.14-780.1
sysstat-5.0.1-35.1
xscreensaver-4.16-2.6
Oracle Messaging Gateway Oracle Messaging Gateway supports the integration of Oracle Streams Advanced Queuing (AQ) with the following software:
  • IBM WebSphere MQ V5.3, client and server, with corrective service diskette 5 (CSD05) or later:

    MQSeriesClient
    MQSeriesServer
    MQSeriesRuntime
    
  • TIBCO Rendezvous 7.2

PL/SQL native compilation, Pro*C/C++, Oracle Call Interface, Oracle C++ Call Interface, Oracle XML Developer's Kit (XDK) The version of GNU C and C++ compilers listed previously for the distribution are supported for use with these products.

Notes: Intel C++ Compiler v7.1.0.28 or later is also supported, however it is not required for installation. On Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3, OCCI is supported with both version 2.96-128 and version 3.2 of the GNU C++ compiler, however, version 3.2 is the default compiler version. OCCI is also supported with Intel Compiler v8.0 with gcc 3.2.3 standard template libraries. Intel C++ Compiler v7 does not support OCCI.

Oracle JDBC/OCI Drivers You can use the following optional JDK version with the Oracle JDBC/OCI drivers; however, it is not required for the installation:
  • Sun JDK 1.4.2_08 with the JNDI extension

Note: JDK 1.4.2 is installed with this release.


To ensure that the system meets these requirements:

  1. To determine the distribution and version of the operating system, enter the following command:

    # cat /etc/issue
    
    
  2. To determine if the required kernel is installed, enter the following command:

    # uname -r
    
    

    On a Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3.0 system, the output is similar to the following:

    2.4.21-27.EL
    
    

    In this example, the output shows the kernel version (2.4.21) and errata level (27.EL). If the errata level is less than 27, then install the latest kernel update. Kernel updates are available from the Red Hat Network.

    On a SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 9 system, the output is similar to the following:

    2.6.5-7.201
    
    

    In this example, the output shows the kernel version on the system. If the kernel version is less than 2.6.5-7.201, then contact your operating system vendor for information about obtaining and installing the kernel updates.

  3. To determine if the required packages are installed, enter a command similar to the following for each package that you want to check:

    # rpm -q package_name
    
    

    If a package is not installed, then install it from your Linux distribution media or download the required package version from your Linux vendor's Web site.

2.3.2 Oracle HTML DB Requirements

The requirements for Oracle HTML DB are as follows:

2.3.2.1 Oracle Database Requirement

Oracle HTML DB requires an installation of release 9.2.0.3 or later of Oracle Database. You must install Oracle HTML DB in an Oracle home that contains Oracle HTTP Server. This Oracle home, with both Oracle HTML DB and Oracle HTTP Server, is referred to as the Companion CD Oracle home. The Companion CD Oracle home can be on a different physical server from the Oracle Database home, as long as Oracle HTML DB can access this database by using Oracle*Net.

For example, suppose Oracle Database is installed in OraDB10g_Home1. When you run Oracle Universal Installer to install Oracle HTML DB, you can specify the Oracle Database installed in OraDB10g_Home1. However, you need to install Oracle HTML DB in a different Oracle home that contains Oracle HTTP Server, for example, OraDB10g_Home2.

During the installation, you must specify the following information about the database:

  • The host name of the database system

  • The port number of the Oracle Net listener

  • The service name of the database

  • The password of the SYS user

Ensure that you have this information before starting the installation.

2.3.2.2 Disk Space Requirements

Verify that the file system in which the Oracle home is located contains at least 355 MB of free disk space.

To check that the Oracle home directory has enough space, enter the following command:

# df -k /httpserver_oracle_home_path

2.3.2.3 Oracle HTTP Server Requirement

Oracle HTML DB must have access to Oracle HTTP Server and mod_plsql in order to run. The following products include the versions of HTTP Server and mod_plsql that meet this requirement:

  • Oracle9i Database release 2 (9.2) or later

  • Oracle9i Application Server release 1 (1.0.2.2) or later

If the system does not meet these requirements, then you must install Oracle HTTP Server 10g when you install the Oracle Database 10g Companion Products.

2.3.2.4 Oracle XML DB Requirement

Oracle XML DB must be installed in the database that you want to use. If you are using a preconfigured database created either during an installation or by running Oracle Database Configuration Assistant, then Oracle XML DB is already installed and configured.


See Also:

Oracle XML DB Developer's Guide for information about manually adding Oracle XML DB to an existing database

2.3.2.5 Oracle Text Requirement

Oracle Text must be installed so that you can use the searchable online Help in Oracle HTML DB. By default, Oracle Text is installed as part of Oracle Database.

In addition, ensure that the default language preferences for Oracle Text have been installed. To install the Oracle Text default language, run the appropriate drdeflang.sql script (for example, drdefus.sql for US English) from the following directory:

$ORACLE_HOME/ctx/admin/defaults

See Also :

Oracle Text Application Developer's Guide for more information about Oracle Text

2.3.2.6 Browser Requirements

To view or develop Oracle HTML DB applications, the Web browser you use must support JavaScript and the HTML 4.0 and CSS 1.0 standards. The following browsers meet this requirement:

  • Netscape Communicator 7.0 or later

  • Microsoft Internet Explorer 5.5 or later

  • Mozilla 1.2 or later

  • Mozilla Firefox 1.0 or later

2.4 Requirements for Installing Oracle Database 10g Products

The requirements for the Oracle Database 10g Products installation type are as follows:

2.4.1 Oracle Database Requirement

Before you install products from the Oracle Database 10g Products installation type, you must ensure that your system has access to an Oracle Database 10g release 2 (10.2) Oracle home. If required, you must first install or upgrade to this release of Oracle Database.


See Also:

Oracle Database Installation Guide for information about installing Oracle Database

Identify the Oracle home directory used by the Oracle Database installation. To do this, you can check the contents of the oratab file by using the following command:

# more /etc/oratab

2.4.2 Disk Space Requirements

Verify that the file system that contains the Oracle home directory has at least 1194 MB of free disk space.

To check that the Oracle home directory has enough space, enter the following command:

# df -k oracle_home_path

2.4.3 Oracle Workflow Server Requirements

Requirements for Oracle Workflow Server are as follows:

  • A Web browser that supports frames, JavaScript, Java Development Kit (JDK) version 1.3.1, and AWT, such as Netscape Communicator version 4.76 or a later 4.7x version, or Microsoft Internet Explorer version 5.0x or 5.5x

  • An unzip utility to extract the Workflow HTML Help from the wfdoc.zip file.

  • Java Development Kit (JDK) version 1.4, to run the Oracle Workflow Java Function Activity Agent and the Workflow XML Loader.

  • An outbound SMTP mail server and an inbound IMAP mail server, if you want to send and receive e-mail notifications using an Oracle Workflow notification mailer.

During the installation, you must specify the following information about the Oracle Database installation:

  • Host name

  • Port

  • Service name

  • User name and password of the Oracle Workflow Server (typically, owf_mgr)

2.5 Requirements for Installing Oracle Database 10g Companion Products

The Oracle Database 10g Companion Products installation type lets you install Oracle HTTP Server, Oracle Workflow middle-tier components, or both Oracle HTTP Server and Oracle Workflow middle-tier components. You must install these products in a separate Oracle home from Oracle Database.

The requirements for Oracle Workflow middle-tier components are as follows.

2.5.1 Oracle Workflow Server Requirements

Before you install Oracle Workflow middle-tier components, you must verify that Oracle Workflow Server is installed in an Oracle Database 10g Oracle home. You can use Oracle Universal Installer to check the contents of an Oracle home. Alternatively, open the /etc/oratab file to see details of the Oracle homes created for the Oracle Database installation on the system.

If Oracle Workflow Server is not installed, then follow the instructions in this guide for installing Oracle Database 10g Products. After you install Oracle Workflow, you need to configure it by using Oracle Workflow Configuration Assistant.

2.5.2 Oracle HTTP Server Requirements

Oracle Workflow middle-tier components need access to Oracle HTTP Server in order to run. You can install Oracle Workflow middle-tier components with Oracle HTTP Server in a new Oracle home directory. Alternatively, you can install this product in an existing Oracle HTTP Server Oracle home that contains Oracle HTTP Server with mod_plsql. Oracle home directories for the following products meet this requirement:

  • Oracle HTTP Server 10g

  • Oracle Identity Management 10g (part of Oracle Application Server 10g)


See Also:

"Oracle HTTP Server Requirements" if you plan to use the Oracle HTTP Server available with this release of Oracle Database Companion CD

2.5.3 Disk Space Requirements

The disk space requirements for the Oracle Database 10g Companion Products are shown in the following table.

Products for Installation Disk Space Required (MB)
Oracle HTTP Server 2100
Oracle HTTP Server and Oracle Workflow 2400

2.6 Network Setup

Typically, the computer on which you want to install Oracle Database is connected to the network, has local storage to contain the Oracle Database installation, has a display monitor, and has a CD-ROM or DVD drive.

This section describes how to install Oracle Database on computers that do not meet the typical scenario. It covers the following cases:

2.6.1 Installing on DHCP Computers

Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) assigns dynamic IP addresses on a network. Dynamic addressing enables a computer to have a different IP address each time it connects to the network. In some cases, the IP address can change while the computer is still connected. You can have a combination of static and dynamic IP addressing in a DHCP system.

In a DHCP setup, the software tracks IP addresses, which simplifies network administration. This lets you add a new computer to the network without having to manually assign that computer a unique IP address.

2.6.2 Installing on Multihomed Computers

You can install Companion CD products on a multihomed computer. A multihomed computer is associated with multiple IP addresses. This is typically achieved by having multiple network cards on the computer. Each IP address is associated with a host name. In addition, you can set up aliases for the host name. By default, Oracle Universal Installer uses the ORACLE_HOSTNAME environment variable setting to find the host name. If ORACLE_HOSTNAME is not set and you are installing on a computer that has multiple network cards, then Oracle Universal Installer determines the host name by using the first entry in the /etc/hosts file.

Clients must be able to access the computer either by using this host name or by using aliases for this host name. To verify this, ping the host name from the client computers using the short name (host name only) and the full name (host name and domain name). Both tests must be successful.

Setting the ORACLE_HOSTNAME Environment Variable

Use the following procedure to set the ORACLE_HOSTNAME environment variable.

If, for example, the fully qualified host name is somehost.us.acme.com, then enter one of the following commands:

Bourne, Bash, or Korn shell:

$ ORACLE_HOSTNAME=somehost.us.acme.com
$ export ORACLE_HOSTNAME

C shell:

% setenv ORACLE_HOSTNAME somehost.us.acme.com

2.6.3 Installing on Computers with Multiple Aliases

A computer with multiple aliases is registered with the naming service under a single IP but with multiple aliases. The naming service resolves any of those aliases to the same computer. Before installing Oracle Database on such a computer, set the ORACLE_HOSTNAME environment variable to the computer whose host name you want to use.

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