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Oracle® Database Installation Guide
11g Release 1 (11.1) for Microsoft Windows

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2 Oracle Database Preinstallation Requirements

This chapter describes the tasks that you must complete before you start Oracle Universal Installer. It includes information about the following tasks:

2.1 Oracle Database Hardware Requirements

This section describes hardware component and hard disk space requirements.

2.1.1 Hardware Component Requirements for Windows 32-Bit

The following table lists the hardware components that are required for Oracle Database on Windows 32-Bit.

Table 2-1 Windows 32-Bit Hardware Requirements

Requirement Value

Physical memory (RAM)

1 GB minimum

Virtual memory

Double the amount of RAM

Disk space

Total: 4.76 GB

See Table 2-3 for details.

Processor

550 MHz minimum

(On Windows Vista, 800 MHz minimum)

Video adapter

256 colors


2.1.2 Hardware Component Requirements for Windows x64

The following table lists the hardware components that are required for Oracle Database on Windows x64.

Table 2-2 Windows x64 Hardware Requirements

Requirement Value

Physical memory (RAM)

1 GB minimum

Virtual memory

Double the amount of RAM

Disk space

Total: 5.22 GB

See Table 2-3 for details.

Processor

AMD64, or Intel Extended memory (EM64T)

Video adapter

256 colors


2.1.3 Hard Disk Space Requirements for Windows 32-Bit

This section lists system requirements for Windows platforms that use the NT File System (NTFS). Oracle recommends installing Oracle components on NTFS. NTFS allows for strong security of database files, trace files, incident data, and so on, stored in the Oracle home.

The NTFS system requirements listed in this section are more accurate than the hard disk values reported by the Oracle Universal Installer Summary window. The Summary window does not include accurate values for disk space, the space required to create a database, or the size of compressed files that are expanded on the hard drive.

The hard disk requirements for Oracle Database components include 32 MB required to install Java Runtime Environment (JRE) and Oracle Universal Installer on the partition where the operating system is installed. If sufficient space is not detected, installation fails and an error message appears.

Table 2-3 lists the disk space requirements on NTFS. The starter database requires 1.55 GB of disk space. The figures in this table include the starter database. FAT32 space requirements are slightly higher.

Table 2-3 Windows 32-Bit Disk Space Requirements on NTFS

Installation Type TEMP Space SYSTEM_DRIVE:\ Program Files\Oracle Oracle Home Data Files * Total

Basic Installation

200 MB

3.1 MB

2.96 GB

1.60 GB

4.76 GB

Advanced Installation: All Editions

200 MB

3.1 MB

2.96 GB **

1.60 GB **

4.76 GB **


* Refers to the contents of the admin, cfgtoollogs, flash_recovery_area, and oradata directories in the ORACLE_BASE directory.

** This size can be higher depending on the installation options selected, such as languages or additional components. If you choose to install Oracle Database with automated backups enabled, include at least 2 GB extra for data file disk space.

See Also:

"NTFS File System and Windows Registry Permissions" in Oracle Database Platform Guide for Microsoft Windows

2.1.4 Hard Disk Space Requirements for Windows x64

This section lists system requirements for Windows platforms that use the NT File System (NTFS). Oracle recommends installing Oracle components on NTFS. NTFS allows for strong security of database files, trace files, incident data, and so on, stored in the Oracle home.

The NTFS system requirements listed in this section are more accurate than the hard disk values reported by the Oracle Universal Installer Summary window. The Summary window does not include accurate values for disk space, the space required to create a database, or the size of compressed files that are expanded on the hard drive.

The hard disk requirements for Oracle Database components include 32 MB required to install Java Runtime Environment (JRE) and Oracle Universal Installer on the partition where the operating system is installed. If sufficient space is not detected, installation fails and an error message appears.

Table 2-4 lists the disk space requirements on NTFS. The starter database requires 720 MB of disk space. The figures in this table include the starter database. FAT32 space requirements are slightly higher.

Table 2-4 Windows x64 Disk Space Requirements on NTFS

Installation Type TEMP Space SYSTEM_DRIVE:\ Program Files\Oracle Oracle Home Data Files * Total

Basic Installation

125 MB

2 MB

3.1 GB

2.0 GB

5.22 GB

Advanced Installation: All Editions

125 MB

2 MB

3.1 GB **

2.0 GB **

5.22 GB **


* Refers to the contents of the admin, cfgtoollogs, flash_recovery_area, and oradata directories in the ORACLE_BASE directory.

** This size can be higher depending on the installation options selected, such as languages or additional components. If you choose to install Oracle Database with automated backups enabled, include at least 2 GB extra for data file disk space.

See Also:

"NTFS File System and Windows Registry Permissions" in Oracle Database Platform Guide for Microsoft Windows

2.1.5 Verifying Hardware Requirements

To ensure that the system meets these requirements, follow these steps:

  1. Determine the physical RAM size. For example, on a Windows 2003 computer, double-click System in the Windows Control Panel and click the General tab. If the size of the physical RAM installed in the system is less than the required size, then you must install more memory before continuing.

  2. Determine the size of the configured virtual memory (also known as paging file size). For example, on a Windows 2003 computer, double-click System, click the Advanced tab, and click Settings in the Performance section. Then click the Advanced tab. The virtual memory is listed in the Virtual Memory section.

    If necessary, see your operating system documentation for information about how to configure additional virtual memory.

  3. Determine the amount of free disk space on the system. For example, on a Windows 2003 computer, double-click My Computer, right-click the drive where the Oracle software is to be installed, and select Properties.

  4. Determine the amount of disk space available in the temp directory. This is equivalent to the total amount of free disk space, minus what will be needed for the Oracle software to be installed.

    On Windows 32-Bit, if there is less than 200 MB of disk space available in the temp directory, then delete all unnecessary files. If the temp disk space is still less than 200 MB, then set the TEMP or TMP environment variable to point to a different hard drive location.

    On Windows x64, if there is less than 125 MB of disk space available in the temp directory, then delete all unnecessary files. If the temp disk space is still less than 125 MB, then set the TEMP or TMP environment variable to point to a different hard drive location.

    For example, to change the environment variables on a Windows 2003 computer, double-click System, click the Advanced tab, and click Environment Variables.

2.2 Oracle Database Software Requirements

Table 2-5 lists the software requirements for Oracle Database on Windows 32-Bit.

Table 2-6 lists the software requirements for Oracle Database on Windows x64.

Table 2-5 Windows 32-Bit Software Requirements

Requirement Value

System Architecture

Processor: Intel (x86), AMD64, and Intel EM64T

Note: Oracle provides 32-bit (x86) and 64-bit (x64) versions of Oracle Database for Microsoft Windows. The 32-bit database version, which this installation guide describes, runs on the 32-bit version of Windows on either x86 or x64 hardware. Oracle provides limited certification for 32-bit Oracle Database Client on 64-bit Windows (x64). For additional information, visit the My Oracle Support (formerly OracleMetaLink) at:

https://support.oracle.com

Operating System

Oracle Database for 32-bit Windows is supported on the following operating systems:

  • Windows 2000 with Service Pack 1 or later. All editions, including Terminal Services and Microsoft Windows 2000 MultiLanguage Edition (MLE), are supported.

  • Windows Server 2003 - all editions

  • Windows Server 2003 R2 - all editions

  • Windows XP Professional

  • Windows Vista - Business, Enterprise, and Ultimate editions

Windows NT is not supported.

Windows Multilingual User Interface Pack is supported on Windows Server 2003, Windows Server 2003 R2, Windows XP Professional, and Windows Vista.

Compiler

Pro*Cobol has been tested and certified with Net Express 5.0.

Object Oriented COBOL (OOCOBOL) specifications are not supported.

Note: This version of Pro*Cobol has also been tested and certified on Windows x64 with Net Express 5.0.

The following components are supported with the Microsoft Visual C++ .NET 2002 7.0 and Microsoft Visual C++ .NET 2003 7.1 compilers:

  • Oracle Call Interface

  • External callouts

  • Pro*C/C++

  • XDK

Oracle C++ Call Interface is supported with

  • Microsoft Visual C++ .NET 2003 7.1

  • Microsoft Visual C++ .NET 2005 8.0 - OCCI libraries are installed under ORACLE_BASE\ORACLE_HOME\oci\lib\msvc\vc8. When developing OCCI applications with MSVC++ 8.0, ensure that the OCCI libraries are correctly selected from this directory for linking and executing.

Network Protocol

The Oracle Net foundation layer uses Oracle protocol support to communicate with the following industry-standard network protocols:

  • TCP/IP

  • TCP/IP with SSL

  • Named Pipes

Oracle Database Client

If you plan to connect to Oracle Database 11g Release 1 (11.1) from a release of Oracle Database Client that is earlier than 11g Release 1 (11.1), the following conditions apply:

  • Oracle Database Client is version 9.2.0.4 or higher. See Note 207303.1 on My Oracle Support (formerly OracleMetaLink) for more details and up to date information.

  • If the earlier Oracle Database Client is running on the same computer as Oracle Database 11g Release 1 (11.1), a bequeath connection cannot be used.

Oracle recommends upgrading Oracle Database Client to the latest patchset (9.2.0.8, 10.2.0.5, or later). You can download the patchset from the Patches and Updates section of My Oracle Support (formerly OracleMetaLink) at:

https://support.oracle.com

Table 2-6 Windows x64 Software Requirements

Requirement Value

System Architecture

Processor: AMD64, or Intel EM64T

Note: Oracle provides 32-bit (x86) and 64-bit (x64) versions of Oracle Database for Microsoft Windows. The 64-bit (x64) database version, which this installation guide describes, runs on the 64-bit version of Windows on AMD64 and EM64T hardware. Oracle provides limited certification for 32-bit Oracle Database Client on 64-bit Windows (x64). For additional information, visit the My Oracle Support (formerly OracleMetaLink) at:

https://support.oracle.com

Operating System

Oracle Database for x64 Windows is supported on the following operating systems:

  • Windows Server 2003 - all x64 editions

  • Windows Server 2003 R2 - all x64 editions

  • Windows XP Professional x64 Edition

  • Windows Vista x64 - Business, Enterprise, and Ultimate editions

Windows Multilingual User Interface Pack is supported on Windows Server 2003, Windows Server 2003 R2, Windows XP Professional, and Windows Vista.

Compiler

Pro*Cobol is supported with Net Express 5.0.

The following components are supported with the Windows 2003 Microsoft Platform SDK (or later) and Intel compiler version 8.1:

  • Oracle C++ Call Interface

  • Oracle Call Interface

  • External callouts

  • Pro*C/C++

  • XDK

Microsoft Visual C++ 8 (Visual Studio 2005) is supported for Oracle C++ Call Interface. GNU Compiler Collection (GCC) and Object Oriented COBOL (OOCOBOL) specifications are not supported.

OCCI libraries are installed under ORACLE_BASE\ORACLE_HOME\oci\lib\msvc\vc8. When developing OCCI applications with MSVC++ 8.0, ensure that the OCCI libraries are correctly selected from this directory for linking and executing.

Network Protocol

The Oracle Net foundation layer uses Oracle protocol support to communicate with the following industry-standard network protocols:

  • TCP/IP

  • TCP/IP with SSL

  • Named Pipes

Oracle Database Client

If you plan to connect to Oracle Database 11g Release 1 (11.1) from a release of Oracle Database Client that is earlier than 11g Release 1 (11.1), the following conditions apply:

  • Oracle Database Client is version 9.2.0.4 or higher. See Note 207303.1 on My Oracle Support (formerly OracleMetaLink) for more details and up to date information.

  • If the earlier Oracle Database Client is running on the same computer as Oracle Database 11g Release 1 (11.1), a bequeath connection cannot be used.

Oracle recommends upgrading Oracle Database Client to the latest patchset (9.2.0.8, 10.2.0.5, or later). You can download the patchset from the Patches and Updates section of My Oracle Support (formerly OracleMetaLink) at:

https://support.oracle.com

2.3 Preinstallation Requirements for Oracle Configuration Manager

During installation, you are prompted to provide information required to enable Oracle Configuration Manager. In the event that you need to place a service request with Oracle Support, the configuration information can help to provide a more rapid resolution to the service issue.

You can enable Oracle Configuration Manager during or after installation, or choose not to enable it. To enable it during installation, you must have the following information available:

See My Oracle Support (formerly OracleMetaLink) (https://support.oracle.com) if you encounter registration failures and are uncertain that the correct country code has been specified. You can find the country associated with your My Oracle Support (formerly OracleMetaLink) account in the Profile section under the Licenses link.

2.4 Preinstallation Tasks for Oracle Application Express

This section describes the tasks that you need to take care of before you install the software:

2.4.1 Browser Requirements

To view or develop Oracle Application Express applications, Web browsers must support Java Script and the HTML 4.0, and CSS 1.0 standards. The following browsers meet this requirement:

  • Microsoft Internet Explorer 6.0 or later version

  • Firefox 1.0 or a later version

2.4.2 Oracle XML DB Requirement

Oracle XML DB must be installed in the Oracle database that you want to use. If you are using a preconfigured database created either during an installation or by Database Configuration Assistant (DBCA), then Oracle XML DB is already installed and configured.

See Also:

Oracle XML DB Developer's Guide for more information about manually adding Oracle XML DB to an existing database

2.4.3 Oracle Text Requirement

Oracle Text must be installed so that you can use the searchable online Help in Oracle Application Express. By default, Oracle Text is installed as part of Oracle Database.

See Also:

Oracle Text Application Developer's Guide for more information on Oracle Text

2.4.4 PL/SQL Web Toolkit

Oracle Application Express requires the PL/SQL Web Toolkit version 10.1.2.0.6 or later. For instructions on determining the current version of the PL/SQL Web Toolkit, and for instructions on installing version 10.1.2.0.6, please review the README.txt file contained in the directory apex/owa.

2.5 Windows Certification and Web Browser Support

The following sections provide certification information:

2.5.1 Windows Telnet Services Support

Windows 2000, Windows 2003, Windows Server 2003 R2, Windows XP, and Windows Vista include a Telnet Service that allows remote users to log on to the operating system and run console programs using the command line. Oracle supports database command line utilities such as sqlplus, sqlldr, import, and export using this feature on Windows 32-Bit and SQL*Plus, Export, Import, and SQL*Loader on Windows x64, but does not support the database GUI tools such as Oracle Universal Installer, Database Configuration Assistant, and Oracle Net Configuration Assistant.

Note:

Ensure that the Telnet service is started on the Windows Services utility.

2.5.2 Windows Terminal Services and Remote Desktop Support

Oracle supports installing, configuring, and running Oracle Database through Terminal Services on Windows 2000, Windows 2003, Windows Server 2003 R2, Windows XP, and Windows Vista. To install Oracle Database, Oracle recommends that you start all configuration tools from the Terminal Server console session of the server (using mstsc/console).

Platform-specific support information is as follows:

  • Windows 2000: Oracle supports installing, configuring, and running Oracle Database from a remote Terminal Services Client.

  • Windows 2003 and Windows Server 2003 R2: You can configure Windows 2003 and Windows Server 2003 R2 to use Terminal Services in Remote Desktop for Administration Mode or Terminal Server Mode.

  • Windows XP and Windows Vista: The Remote Desktop is only available in Single User Mode.

See Also:

2.5.3 Components Supported on Windows XP and Windows Vista (32-Bit)

All Oracle Database components are supported on Windows XP and Windows Vista with the following exceptions:

  • DCE Adapter Support

  • Entrust PKI Support

  • Oracle Messaging Gateway

  • Oracle RAC, including Cluster File System and Server Management

  • Oracle Clusterware

  • nCipher Accelerator Support

  • Oracle Services for Microsoft Transaction Server are not supported on Windows Vista. As a result, all Oracle Windows data access drivers on Windows Vista that use Oracle Services for Microsoft Transaction Server to enlist in Microsoft Distributed Transaction Coordinator (MSDTC) coordinated transactions cannot participate in those coordinated transactions. These data access drivers include Oracle Data Provider for .NET, Oracle Provider for OLE DB, Oracle Objects for OLE, and ODBC. Check My Oracle Support (formerly OracleMetaLink) Web site for up to date information on Oracle Services for Microsoft Transaction Server certification with Windows Vista.

  • Oracle Fail Safe Server is not supported on Windows XP and Windows Vista. Oracle Fail Safe Manager Console is supported on Windows XP but not on Windows Vista.

  • Oracle HTTP Server is not supported on Windows Vista.

Additional Components Supporting Windows Vista (32-Bit)

Oracle Developer Tools for Visual Studio .NET 10.2.0.2.20 or higher is certified for Microsoft Vista beginning with Oracle Data Access Components (ODAC) 10.2.0.2.21. Oracle Data Access Components bundle Windows data access products and tools together in a single installation and are available for download from Oracle Technology Network:

http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/indexes/downloads/index.html

The tools provide support for Microsoft Visual Studio 2005 and Microsoft Visual Studio .NET 2003 users.

2.5.4 Components Supported on Windows x64

All Oracle Database components are supported on Windows x64 with the following exceptions:

  • DCE Adapter

  • GNU Compiler Collection (GCC)

  • Oracle Developer Tools

  • Oracle HTTP Server

  • Business Components for Java (BC4J)

  • CyberSafe Adapter Support

  • Entrust PKI Support

  • Java Server Pages

  • nCipher Accelerator Support

  • Oracle Messaging Gateway

  • Oracle Fail Safe Manager Console

  • Oracle Objects for OLE

  • Oracle Services for Microsoft Transaction Server are not supported on Windows Vista. As a result, all Oracle Windows data access drivers on Windows Vista that use Oracle Services for Microsoft Transaction Server to enlist in Microsoft Distributed Transaction Coordinator (MSDTC) coordinated transactions cannot participate in those coordinated transactions. These data access drivers include Oracle Data Provider for .NET, Oracle Provider for OLE DB, Oracle Objects for OLE, and ODBC. Check My Oracle Support (formerly OracleMetaLink) Web site for up to date information on Oracle Services for Microsoft Transaction Server certification with Windows Vista.

  • Database Gateway for ODBC

  • Oracle Database Gateway for APPC

  • Oracle Database Gateway for WebSphere MQ

  • Oracle Database Gateway for Informix

  • Oracle Database Gateway for DRDA

  • Oracle Database Gateway for IMS

  • Oracle Database Gateway for VSAM

  • Oracle Database Gateway for Adabas

  • Oracle Database Gateway for Sybase

  • Oracle Database Gateway for SQL Server

  • Oracle Database Gateway for Teradata

2.5.5 Web Browser Support

The following Web browsers are supported for Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Control:

  • Netscape Navigator 7.2

  • Netscape Navigator 8.1

  • Mozilla version 1.7

  • Microsoft Internet Explorer 6.0 SP2

  • Microsoft Internet Explorer 7.0 or later

  • Firefox 1.0.4

  • Firefox 1.5

  • Firefox 2.0

Note:

Microsoft Internet Explorer 7.0 is the only web browser certified on Windows Vista.

2.6 Oracle Database Network Topics

Typically, the computer on which you want to install Oracle Database is connected to the network, has local storage to contain the Oracle Database installation, has a display monitor, and has a media drive.

This section describes how to install Oracle Database on computers that do not meet the typical scenario. It covers the following topics:

2.6.1 Installing Oracle Database on DHCP Computers

Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) assigns dynamic IP addresses on a network. Dynamic addressing allows a computer to have a different IP address each time it connects to the network. In some cases, the IP address can change while the computer is still connected. You can have a mixture of static and dynamic IP addressing in a DHCP system.

In a DHCP setup, the software tracks IP addresses, which simplifies network administration. This lets you add a new computer to the network without having to manually assign that computer a unique IP address. However, before installing Oracle Database onto a computer that uses the DHCP protocol, you need to install a loopback adapter to assign a local IP address to that computer.

2.6.2 Installing Oracle Database on Computers with Multiple IP Addresses

You can install Oracle Database on a computer that has multiple IP addresses, also known as a multihomed computer. Typically, a multihomed computer has multiple network cards. Each IP address is associated with a host name; additionally, you can set up aliases for the host name. By default, Oracle Universal Installer uses the ORACLE_HOSTNAME environment variable setting to find the host name. If ORACLE_HOSTNAME is not set and you are installing on a computer that has multiple network cards, Oracle Universal Installer determines the host name by using the first name in the hosts file, typically located in DRIVE_LETTER:\ WINDOWS\system32\drivers\etc on Windows 2003, Windows Server 2003 R2, Windows XP, and Windows Vista or DRIVE_LETTER:\WINNT\system32\drivers\etc on Windows 2000.

Clients must be able to access the computer using this host name, or using aliases for this host name. To check, ping the host name from the client computers using the short name (host name only) and the full name (host name and domain name). Both must work.

Setting the ORACLE_HOSTNAME Environment Variable

To set the ORACLE_HOSTNAME environment variable:

  1. Display System in the Windows Control Panel.

  2. In the System Properties dialog box, click Advanced.

  3. In the Advanced tab, click Environment Variables.

  4. In the Environment Variables dialog box, under System Variables, click New.

  5. In the New System Variable dialog box, enter the following information:

    • Variable name: ORACLE_HOSTNAME

    • Variable value: The host name of the computer that you want to use.

  6. Click OK, then in the Environment Variables dialog box, click OK.

  7. Click OK in the Environment Variables dialog box, then in the System Properties dialog box, click OK.

2.6.3 Installing Oracle Database on Computers with Multiple Aliases

A computer with multiple aliases is registered with the naming service under a single IP address but with multiple aliases. The naming service resolves any of those aliases to the same computer. Before installing Oracle Database on such a computer, set the ORACLE_HOSTNAME environment variable to the computer whose host name you want to use.

2.6.4 Installing Oracle Database on Non-Networked Computers

You can install Oracle Database on a non-networked computer. If the computer, such as a laptop, is configured for DHCP and you plan to connect the computer to the network after the Oracle Database installation, perform these steps before you install Oracle Database on the non-networked computer.

  1. Install a loopback adapter on the computer.

    The loopback adapter and local IP address simulate a networked computer. If you connect the computer to the network, Oracle Database still uses the local IP address and host name.

  2. Ping the computer from itself, using only the host name and using the fully qualified name, which should be in the DRIVE_LETTER:\system32\drivers\etc\hosts file.

    For example, if you installed a loopback adapter on a computer called mycomputer on the mydomain.com domain, check the following:

    DRIVE_LETTER:\>ping mycomputer                Ping itself using just the hostname.
    Reply from 10.10.10.10                    Returns local IP.
    DRIVE_LETTER:\>ping mycomputer.mydomain.com   Ping using a fully qualified name.
    Reply from 10.10.10.10                    Returns local IP.
    

    Note:

    When you ping a computer from itself, the ping command should return the local IP address (the IP address of the loopback adapter).

    If the ping command fails, contact your network administrator.

Connecting the Computer to the Network after Installation

If you connect the computer to a network after installation, the Oracle Database instance on your computer can work with other instances on the network. Remember that you must have installed a loopback adapter on your computer. Your computer can use a static IP or DHCP, depending on the network to which you are connected.

2.6.5 Installing a Loopback Adapter

When you install a loopback adapter, the loopback adapter assigns a local IP address for your computer. After the loopback adapter is installed, there are at least two network adapters on your computer: your own network adapter and the loopback adapter. To run Oracle Database on Windows, set the loopback adapter as the primary adapter.

You can change the bind order for the adapters without reinstalling the loopback adapter. The bind order of the adapters to the protocol indicates the order in which the adapters are used. When the loopback adapter is used first for the TCP/IP protocol, all programs that access TCP/IP will first probe the loopback adapter. The local address is used for tools, such as Oracle Enterprise Manager. Any other applications that use a different Ethernet segment will be routed to the network card.

A loopback adapter is required if:

This section covers the following topics:

2.6.5.1 Checking if a Loopback Adapter Is Installed on Your Computer

To check if a loopback adapter is installed on your computer, run the ipconfig /all command:

DRIVE_LETTER:\>ipconfig /all

Note:

Loopback Adapter installed on the computer should be made the Primary Network Adapter.

If there is a loopback adapter installed, you would see a section that lists the values for the loopback adapter. For example:

Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection 2:
Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :
Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Microsoft Loopback Adapter
Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 02-00-4C-4F-4F-50
DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No
IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : 169.254.25.129
Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.0.0

2.6.5.2 Installing a Loopback Adapter on Windows 2000

Windows 2000 reports on the first network adapter installed. This means that if you install additional network adapters after you install the loopback adapter, you need to remove and reinstall the loopback adapter. The loopback adapter must be the last network adapter installed on the computer.

To install a loopback adapter on Windows 2000:

  1. From the Start menu, select Settings, then Control Panel.

  2. Double-click Add/Remove Hardware to start the Add/Remove Hardware wizard.

  3. In the Welcome window, click Next.

  4. In the Choose a Hardware Task window, select Add/Troubleshoot a device, and click Next.

  5. In the Choose a Hardware Device window, select Add a new device, and click Next.

  6. In the Find New Hardware window, select No, I want to select the hardware from a list, and click Next.

  7. In the Hardware Type window, select Network adapters, and click Next.

  8. In the Select Network Adapter window, do the following:

    1. Manufacturers: Select Microsoft.

    2. Network Adapter: Select Microsoft Loopback Adapter.

    3. Click Next.

  9. In the Start Hardware Installation window, click Next.

  10. In the Completing the Add/Remove Hardware Wizard window, click Finish.

  11. Right-click My Network Places on the desktop and select Properties. This displays the Network and Dial-up Connections control panel.

  12. Right-click the connection that was just created. This is usually "Local Area Connection 2". Select Properties.

  13. On the General tab, select Internet Protocol (TCP/IP), and click Properties.

  14. In the Properties dialog box, click Use the following IP address and do the following:

    1. IP Address: Enter a non-routable IP address for the loopback adapter. Oracle recommends the following non-routable addresses:

      • 192.168.x.x (x is any value between 0 and 255)

      • 10.10.10.10

    2. Subnet mask: Enter 255.255.255.0.

    3. Record the values you entered, which you will need later in this procedure.

    4. Leave all other fields empty.

    5. Click OK.

  15. Close the Network Connections window.

  16. Restart the computer.

  17. Add a line to the DRIVE_LETTER:\WINNT\system32\drivers\etc\hosts file with the following format, right after the localhost line:

    IP_address   hostname.domainname   hostname
    

    where:

    • IP_address is the non-routable IP address you entered in step 14.

    • hostname is the name of the computer.

    • domainname is the name of the domain.

    For example:

    10.10.10.10   mycomputer.mydomain.com   mycomputer
    
  18. Check the network configuration:

    Note:

    Domain name is optional.
    1. Open System in the Control Panel, and select the Network Identification tab.

      In Full computer name, make sure you see the host name and the domain name, for example, sales.us.mycompany.com.

    2. Click Properties.

      In Computer name, you should see the host name, and in Full computer name, you should see the host name and domain name. Using the previous example, the host name would be sales and the domain would be us.mycompany.com.

    3. Click More. In Primary DNS suffix of this computer, the domain name, for example, us.mycompany.com, should appear.

    4. Exit the System Control Panel item.

2.6.5.3 Installing a Loopback Adapter on Windows 2003, Windows Server 2003 R2, or Windows XP

To install a loopback adapter on Windows 2003, Windows Server 2003 R2, or Windows XP:

  1. Open the Windows Control Panel.

  2. Double-click Add Hardware to start the Add Hardware wizard.

  3. In the Welcome window, click Next.

  4. In the Is the hardware connected? window, select Yes, I have already connected the hardware, and click Next.

  5. In the The following hardware is already installed on your computer window, in the list of installed hardware, select Add a new hardware device, and click Next.

  6. In the The wizard can help you install other hardware window, select Install the hardware that I manually select from a list, and click Next.

  7. From the list of common hardware types, select Network adapters, and click Next.

  8. In the Select Network Adapter window, make the following selections:

    • Manufacturer: Select Microsoft.

    • Network Adapter: Select Microsoft Loopback Adapter.

  9. Click Next.

  10. In the The wizard is ready to install your hardware window, click Next.

  11. In the Completing the Add Hardware Wizard window, click Finish.

  12. If you are using Windows 2003, restart your computer.

  13. Right-click My Network Places on the desktop and choose Properties. This displays the Network Connections Control Panel item.

  14. Right-click the connection that was just created. This is usually named "Local Area Connection 2". Choose Properties.

  15. On the General tab, select Internet Protocol (TCP/IP), and click Properties.

  16. In the Properties dialog box, click Use the following IP address and do the following:

    1. IP Address: Enter a non-routable IP for the loopback adapter. Oracle recommends the following non-routable addresses:

      • 192.168.x.x (x is any value between 0 and 255)

      • 10.10.10.10

    2. Subnet mask: Enter 255.255.255.0.

    3. Record the values you entered, which you will need later in this procedure.

    4. Leave all other fields empty.

    5. Click OK.

  17. Click Close.

  18. Close Network Connections.

  19. Restart the computer.

  20. Add a line to the DRIVE_LETTER:\ WINDOWS\system32\drivers\etc\hosts file with the following format, after the localhost line:

    IP_address   hostname.domainname   hostname
    

    where:

    • IP_address is the non-routable IP address you entered in step 16.

    • hostname is the name of the computer.

    • domainname is the name of the domain.

    For example:

    10.10.10.10   mycomputer.mydomain.com   mycomputer
    
  21. Check the network configuration:

    Note:

    Domain name is optional.
    1. Open System in the Control Panel, and select the Computer Name tab. In Full computer name, make sure you see the host name and the domain name, for example, sales.us.mycompany.com.

    2. Click Change. In Computer name, you should see the host name, and in Full computer name, you should see the host name and domain name. Using the previous example, the host name would be sales and the domain would be us.mycompany.com.

    3. Click More. In Primary DNS suffix of this computer, you should see the domain name, for example, us.mycompany.com.

2.6.5.4 Installing a Loopback Adapter on Windows Vista

To install a loopback adapter on Windows Vista:

  1. Open the Windows Control Panel.

  2. Double-click Add Hardware to start the Add Hardware wizard.

  3. In the Welcome window, click Next.

  4. In the The wizard can help you install other hardware window, select Install the hardware that I manually select from a list, and click Next.

  5. From the list of hardware types, select the type of hardware you are installing window, select Network adapters, and click Next.

  6. In the Select Network Adapter window, make the following selections:

    • Manufacturer: Select Microsoft.

    • Network Adapter: Select Microsoft Loopback Adapter.

  7. Click Next.

  8. In the The wizard is ready to install your hardware window, click Next.

  9. In the Completing the Add Hardware Wizard window, click Finish.

The remaining steps are same as given for Windows XP.

2.6.5.5 Removing a Loopback Adapter

To remove a loopback adapter:

  1. Display System in the Windows Control Panel.

  2. In the Hardware tab, click Device Manager.

  3. In the Device Manager window, expand Network adapters. You should see Microsoft Loopback Adapter.

  4. Right-click Microsoft Loopback Adapter and select Uninstall.

  5. Click OK.

  6. Restart the computer.

  7. Remove the line from the

    DRIVE_LETTER:\WINNT\system32\drivers\etc\hosts file, added after the localhost line while installing the loopback adapter on Windows 2000 and

    DRIVE_LETTER:\WINDOWS\system32\drivers\etc\hosts file, added after the localhost line while installing the loopback adapter on other Windows operating systems.

2.7 Individual Component Requirements

This section contains these topics:

2.7.1 Configuring Disk Storage for Oracle Data Files and Recovery Files

This section describes the storage options for storing Oracle data files and, optionally, Oracle database recovery files. After you choose the storage method that you want to use for each file type, use the following sections to configure the required storage:

Note:

You do not have to use the same storage option for each type of file.

2.7.1.1 Choosing a Storage Option for Oracle Data Files

If you want to create a database during the installation, you must choose one of the following storage options for the data files:

  • File system

  • Automatic Storage Management

2.7.1.2 Choosing a Storage Option for Oracle Database Recovery Files

If you want to enable automated backups during the installation, you must choose one of the following storage options for recovery files (the flash recovery area):

  • File system

  • Automatic Storage Management

The storage option that you choose for recovery files can be the same as or different to the option you choose for the data files.

2.7.1.3 Configuring Disk Storage

For more information about these options, see the "Database Storage Options" section. For information about how to configure disk storage before you start the installation, see one of the following sections depending on your choice:

2.7.2 Creating Directories for Oracle Data Files or Recovery Files

If you decide to place the Oracle database or recovery files on a file system, use the following guidelines when deciding where to place them:

2.7.2.1 Guidelines for Placing Oracle Data Files on a File System

  • You can choose either a single file system or more than one file system to store the data files:

    • If you want to use a single file system, choose a file system on a physical device that is dedicated to the database.

      For best performance and reliability, choose a redundant array of independent disks (RAID) device or a logical volume on more than one physical device and implement the stripe and mirror everything (SAME) methodology.

    • If you want to use more than one file system, choose file systems on separate physical devices that are dedicated to the database.

      Select this method to distribute physical I/O and create separate control files on different devices for increased reliability. It also enables full implementation of the Optimal Flexible Architecture guidelines described in Appendix B, "Optimal Flexible Architecture". You must choose either the Advanced database creation option or the Custom installation type during the installation to implement this method.

  • If you intend to create a preconfigured database during the installation, the file system (or file systems) that you choose must have at least 950 MB of free disk space.

    For production databases, you must estimate the disk space requirement depending how you plan to use database.

  • For optimum performance, the file systems that you choose should be on physical devices that are used only by the database.

  • The default location suggested by Oracle Universal Installer for the database file directory is a subdirectory of the Oracle base directory. However, this default location is not recommended for production databases.

2.7.2.2 Guidelines for Placing Oracle Recovery Files on a File System

Note:

You must choose a location for recovery files only if you intend to enable automated backups during the installation.

If you place the Oracle recovery files on a file system, use the following guidelines when deciding where to place them:

  • To prevent disk failure from making both the data files and the recovery files unavailable, place the recovery files in a file system on a different physical disk from the data files.

    Note:

    Alternatively, for both data files and recovery files, use an Automatic Storage Management disk group.
  • The file system that you choose should have at least 2 GB of free disk space.

    The disk space requirement is the default disk quota configured for the flash recovery area (specified by the DB_RECOVERY_FILE_DEST_SIZE initialization parameter).

    If you choose the Custom installation type or the Advanced database configuration option, you can specify a different disk quota value. After you create the database, you can also use Oracle Enterprise Manager Grid Control or Database Control to specify a different value.

    See Also:

    Oracle Database Backup and Recovery User's Guide for more information about the flash recovery area
  • The default location suggested by Oracle Universal Installer for the database file directory is a subdirectory of the Oracle base directory. However, this default location is not recommended for production databases.

2.7.2.3 Creating Required Directories

Note:

You must complete this procedure only if you want to place the Oracle database or recovery files on a separate file system from the Oracle base directory.

To create directories for the Oracle database or recovery files on separate file systems from the Oracle base directory, follow these steps:

  1. Use Windows Explorer to determine the free disk space on the file system.

  2. From the display, identify the file systems that you want to use:

    File Type File System Requirements
    Data files Choose either:
    • A single file system with at least 950 MB of free disk space.

    • Two or more file systems with at least 950 MB of free disk space in total.

    Recovery files Choose a file system with at least 2 GB of free disk space.

    If you are using the same file system for more than one type of file, add the disk space requirements for each type to determine the total disk space requirement.

  3. Note the names of the directories for the file systems that you identified.

  4. If you also want to use Automatic Storage Management, see "Preparing Disk Groups for an Automatic Storage Management Installation" for instructions. Otherwise see the "Stopping Existing Oracle Services" section.

2.7.3 Preparing Disk Groups for an Automatic Storage Management Installation

If you plan to use Automatic Storage Management to manage database files for your databases, use the procedures in this section to prepare disk groups before you install an Automatic Storage Management instance.

This section covers the following topics:

2.7.3.1 General Steps for Preparing Disk Groups for an Automatic Storage Management Installation

You will follow these general steps to configure Automatic Storage Management:

  1. Identify your site's storage requirements.

  2. Optionally, use an existing Automatic Storage Management disk group.

  3. If you are creating a new Automatic Storage Management disk group, create partitions for direct attached storage (DAS) or storage area network (SAN) disks.

  4. Use one of the following methods to complete the Automatic Storage Management configuration:

    • If you plan to install Oracle Database using interactive mode, Oracle Universal Installer prompts you for the Automatic Storage Management disk configuration information during the installation.

    • If you plan to install Oracle Database using silent or noninteractive mode, you will need to manually configure the disks before performing the installation.

2.7.3.2 Step 1: Identifying Storage Requirements for Automatic Storage Management

To identify the storage requirements for using Automatic Storage Management, you must determine how many devices and the amount of free disk space that you require. To complete this task, follow these steps:

  1. Determine whether you want to use Automatic Storage Management for Oracle data files, recovery files, or both.

    Note:

    You do not have to use the same storage mechanism for data file and recovery files. One storage mechanism can use the file system while the other uses Automatic Storage Management. If you plan to use Automatic Storage Management for both data files and recovery files, you should create separate Automatic Storage Management disk groups for the data files and the recovery files.

    If you plan to enable automated backups during the installation, you can choose Automatic Storage Management as the storage mechanism for recovery files by specifying an Automatic Storage Management disk group for the flash recovery area. Depending how you choose to create a database during the installation, you have the following options:

    • If you select an installation method that runs Oracle Database Configuration Assistant in interactive mode, by choosing the Advanced database configuration option for example, then you can decide whether you want to use the same Automatic Storage Management disk group for data files and recovery files, or you can choose to use different disk groups for each file type. Ideally, you should create separate Automatic Storage Management disk groups for data files and recovery files.

      The same choice is available to you if you use Oracle Database Configuration Assistant after the installation to create a database.

    • If you select an installation type that runs Oracle Database Configuration Assistant in noninteractive mode, then you must use the same Automatic Storage Management disk group for data files and recovery files.

  2. Decide on the Automatic Storage Management redundancy level that you want to use for each Automatic Storage Management disk group you will create.

    The redundancy level that you choose for the Automatic Storage Management disk group determines how Automatic Storage Management mirrors files in the disk group and determines the number of disks and amount of disk space that you require. The redundancy levels are as follows:

    • External redundancy

      An external redundancy disk group requires a minimum of one disk device. The effective disk space in an external redundancy disk group is the sum of the disk space in all of its devices.

      Because Automatic Storage Management does not mirror data in an external redundancy disk group, Oracle recommends that you use only RAID or similar devices that provide their own data protection mechanisms as disk devices in this type of disk group.

    • Normal redundancy

      In a normal redundancy disk group, by default Automatic Storage Management uses two-way mirroring for data files and three-way mirroring for control files, to increase performance and reliability. Alternatively, you can use two-way mirroring or no mirroring. A normal redundancy disk group requires a minimum of two failure groups (or two disk devices) if you are using two-way mirroring. The effective disk space in a normal redundancy disk group is half the sum of the disk space in all of its devices.

      For most installations, Oracle recommends that you use normal redundancy disk groups.

    • High redundancy

      In a high redundancy disk group, Automatic Storage Management uses three-way mirroring to increase performance and provide the highest level of reliability. A high redundancy disk group requires a minimum of three disk devices (or three failure groups). The effective disk space in a high redundancy disk group is one-third the sum of the disk space in all of its devices.

      While high redundancy disk groups do provide a high level of data protection, you must consider the higher cost of additional storage devices before deciding to use this redundancy level.

  3. Determine the total amount of disk space that you require for the data files and recovery files.

    Use the following table to determine the minimum number of disks and the minimum disk space requirements for the installation:

    Redundancy Level Minimum Number of Disks Data Files Recovery FIles Both File Types
    External 1 1.6 GB 2.95 GB 4.55 GB
    Normal 2 3.2 GB 5.90 GB 9.10 GB
    High 3 4.8 GB 8.85 GB 13.65 GB

    If an Automatic Storage Management instance is already on the system, you can use an existing disk group to meet these storage requirements. If necessary, you can add disks to an existing disk group during the installation.

    The following step describes how to identify existing disk groups and determine the free disk space that they contain.

  4. Optionally identify failure groups for the Automatic Storage Management disk group devices.

    Note:

    You need to complete this step only if you intend to use an installation method that runs Oracle Database Configuration Assistant in interactive mode, for example, if you intend to choose the Custom installation type or the Advanced database configuration option. Other installation types do not allow you to specify failure groups.

    If you intend to use a normal or high redundancy disk group, you can further protect your database against hardware failure by associating a set of disk devices in a custom failure group. By default, each device comprises its own failure group. However, if two disk devices in a normal redundancy disk group are attached to the same SCSI controller, the disk group becomes unavailable if the controller fails. The controller in this example is a single point of failure.

    To avoid failures of this type, you could use two SCSI controllers, each with two disks, and define a failure group for the disks attached to each controller. This configuration would enable the disk group to tolerate the failure of one SCSI controller.

    Note:

    If you define custom failure groups, you must specify a minimum of two failure groups for normal redundancy disk groups and three failure groups for high redundancy disk groups.
  5. If you are sure that a suitable disk group does not exist on the system, install or identify appropriate disk devices to add to a new disk group. Use the following guidelines when identifying appropriate disk devices:

    • All of the devices in an Automatic Storage Management disk group should be the same size and have the same performance characteristics.

    • Do not specify more than one partition on a single physical disk as a disk group device. Automatic Storage Management expects each disk group device to be on a separate physical disk.

    • Although you can specify a logical volume as a device in an Automatic Storage Management disk group, Oracle does not recommend their use. Logical volume managers can hide the physical disk architecture, preventing Automatic Storage Management from optimizing I/O across the physical devices.

    See Also:

    "Step 4: Manually Configuring Disks for Automatic Storage Management" for information about completing this task

2.7.3.3 Step 2 (Optional): Using an Existing Automatic Storage Management Disk Group

If you want to use Automatic Storage Management as the storage option for either database or recovery files, and an existing Automatic Storage Management disk group exists, you have the following choices, depending on the installation method that you select:

  • If you select an installation method that runs Oracle Database Configuration Assistant in interactive mode, by choosing the Advanced database configuration option for example, you can decide whether you want to create a new disk group or use an existing one.

    The same choice is available to you if you use Oracle Database Configuration Assistant after the installation to create a database.

  • If you select an installation type that runs Oracle Database Configuration Assistant in noninteractive mode, you must choose an existing disk group for the new database. You cannot create a new disk group. However, you can add disk devices to an existing disk group if it has insufficient free space for your requirements.

Note:

The Automatic Storage Management instance that manages the existing disk group can be running in a different Oracle home directory.

To determine whether an existing Automatic Storage Management disk group exists, or to determine whether there is sufficient disk space in a disk group, you can use Oracle Enterprise Manager Grid Control or Database Controlon Windows-32 Bit systems. You can use Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Control only on Windows x64 systems.. Alternatively, you can use the following procedure:

  1. In the Services Control Panel, make sure that the OracleASMService+ASM service has started.

  2. Open a Windows command prompt and temporarily set the ORACLE_SID environment variable to specify the appropriate value for the Automatic Storage Management instance that you want to use.

    For example, if the Automatic Storage Management SID, which is named +ASM, is located in the asm directory, you would enter the following setting:

    DRIVE_LETTER:\>set ORACLE_SID=+ASM
    
  3. Connect to the Automatic Storage Management instance as the SYS user with the SYSASM privilege and start the instance if necessary:

    DRIVE_LETTER:\>sqlplus /nolog
    SQL> CONNECT SYS as SYSASM
    Enter password: SYS_password 
    SQL> STARTUP
    
  4. Enter the following command to view the existing disk groups, their redundancy level, and the amount of free disk space in each one:

    SQL> SELECT NAME,TYPE,TOTAL_MB,FREE_MB FROM V$ASM_DISKGROUP;
    
  5. From the output, identify a disk group with the appropriate redundancy level and note the free space that it contains.

  6. If necessary, install, or identify the additional disk devices required to meet the storage requirements listed in the previous section.

    Note:

    If you are adding devices to an existing disk group, Oracle recommends that you use devices that have the same size and performance characteristics as the existing devices in that disk group.

2.7.3.4 Step 3: Creating DAS or SAN Disk Partitions for an Automatic Storage Management Instance

In order to use a DAS or SAN disk in Automatic Storage Management, the disk must have a partition table. Oracle recommends creating exactly one partition for each disk containing the entire disk.

Note:

You can use any physical disk for Automatic Storage Management, as long as it is partitioned. However, you cannot use NAS or Microsoft dynamic disks.

This section covers the following topics.

Step 1: Enabling Disk Automounting for Windows Server 2003 or Windows Server 2003 R2

Before you can configure partitions or logical drives on Windows Server 2003 or Windows Server 2003 R2, you must enable disk automounting. Enable disk automounting when using:

  • Disk partitions on both single-instance and Oracle RAC installations

  • Cluster file system for Oracle RAC

  • Oracle Clusterware

  • Raw partitions for a single-node database installation

  • Primary or logical partitions for Automatic Storage Management

To enable automounting:

  1. Enter the following commands at a command prompt:

    DRIVE_LETTER:\> diskpart
    DISKPART> automount enable
    DISKPART> exit
    
  2. Restart your computer.

Step 2: Creating the Disk Partitions

To create disk partitions, use the disk administration tools provided by the operating system or third party vendors. The following administration tools are provided by the operating system:

  • The graphical user interface Disk Management snap-in to manage disks.

    To access this tool, type diskmgmt.msc at the command prompt. Alternatively, from the Start menu, select Programs, then Administrative Tools, then Computer Management. Then select the Disk Management node in the Storage tree.

    On Windows Vista, create primary partitions and logical drives in extended partitions by selecting the New Simple Volume option. To create a raw device, assign a drive letter and remove the letter after the partition is created. For other Windows, there is no need to assign the drive letter. You must select Do not format this partition to specify raw partition. Do not use spanned volumes or striped volumes. These options will convert the volume to a dynamic disk. Automatic Storage Management does not support dynamic disks.

    For other Windows, create primary partitions by selecting the New Partition option. Create the logical drives by selecting the New Logical Drive option.

  • The command line tool diskpart.exe, which lets you create primary partitions, extended partitions, and logical drives.

    Diskpart.exe is supported on Windows 2000, Windows 2003, Windows Server 2003 R2, Windows XP, and Windows Vista. This tool is not included with the Windows 2000 operating system. You can download it from the Microsoft Windows 2000 Resource Kit. The examples in this section use diskpart.exe.

    To access this tool, enter diskpart.exe at the command prompt. The syntax for using diskpart.exe for the procedures in this section is as follows:

    DRIVE_LETTER:\> diskpart
    DISKPART> select disk diskn
    DISKPART> create partition primary | extended | logical size=sizen
    DISKPART> 
    

    where:

    • diskpart.exe is the command line tool for managing disks.

    • diskn is the disk number where the partitions are created.

    • sizen is the size of the partition, for example 500 represents 500 MB.

See Also:

The online help or documentation for the administration tool you are using

You can enter the diskpart.exe commands directly at the command line; alternatively, you can enter the commands in a text file, and then run diskpart /s using this file as a script.

You cannot create more than four primary disk partitions per disk. If you need more, you can get around this limitation by creating three primary partitions and then creating the fourth partition as an extended partition with as many logical partitions within as you need.

For example, on Windows x86-based systems, to create the disk partitions on Disk 5 and assign them each a size:

DISKPART> select disk 5
DISKPART> create partition primary size=500
DISKPART> ...
DISKPART> create partition extended
DISKPART> create partition logical size=800
DISKPART> ...
DISKPART> create partition logical size=500
DISKPART> select disk 5
DISKPART> create partition primary size=500
DISKPART> ... 
DISKPART> create partition primary size=800

If you prefer to use logical drives, you can create an extended partition and then assign the logical drives within it. For example:

DISKPART> create partition extended
DISKPART> create partition logical size=500
DISKPART> create partition logical size=700

2.7.3.5 Step 4: Manually Configuring Disks for Automatic Storage Management

To use Automatic Storage Management with direct attached storage (DAS) or storage area network (SAN) storage, the disks must be stamped with a header. If you install Oracle Database in interactive mode, Oracle Universal Installer configures the disks' headers during the installation process. However, if you plan to install Oracle Database in noninteractive mode, you need to manually configure the disks before installation by using either asmtoolg (GUI version) or asmtool (command-line version). You can also use these tools to reconfigure the disks later on after installation. The asmtoolg and asmtool utilities only work on partitioned disks—you cannot use Automatic Storage Management on unpartitioned disks.

The asmtoolg and asmtool tools associate meaningful, persistent names with disks to facilitate using those disks with Automatic Storage Management. Automatic Storage Management uses disk strings to more easily operate on groups of disks at once, so the names that asmtoolg or asmtool creates make this easier than using Windows drive letters.

All disk names created by asmtoolg or asmtool begin with the prefix ORCLDISK followed by a user-defined prefix (the default is DATA) and a disk number for identification purposes.

Using the asmtoolg Tool (Graphical User Interface)

The asmtoolg tool is a graphical interface for creating device names. Use asmtoolg to add, change, delete, and examine the devices available for use in Automatic Storage Management.

To add or change disk stamps:

  1. In the installation media labeled Oracle Database 11g Release 1 (11.1), from the media root, go to asmtool directory and double-click asmtoolg.

    If Oracle Database is already installed, go to ORACLE_BASE\ORACLE_HOME\bin and double-click asmtoolg.

    On Windows Vista, if UAC is enabled, then you need to create a desktop shortcut to a DOS command window. Open the command window through the Run as Administrator, right-click context menu, and launch asmtoolg.

  2. Select the Add or change label option, then click Next.

    The asmtoolg tool will show the devices available on the system. Unrecognized disks are labeled as "Candidate device", stamped Automatic Storage Management disks as "Stamped ASM disk", and unstamped Automatic Storage Management disks as "Unstamped ASM disks." The tool also shows disks that are recognized by Windows as a file system (such as NTFS). These are not available for use as disks and cannot be selected. In addition, Microsoft Dynamic disks are not available for use as ASM disks.

    If necessary, follow the steps under "Step 3: Creating DAS or SAN Disk Partitions for an Automatic Storage Management Instance" to create a disk partition for the ASM instance.

  3. In the Stamp Disks window, select the disks to stamp.

    Automatic Storage Management can generate unique stamps for all of the devices selected for a given prefix. The stamps are generated by concatenating a number with the prefix specified. For example, if the prefix is DATA, then the first Automatic Storage Management link name is ORCLDISKDATA0.

    You can also specify the stamps of individual devices.

  4. Optionally, select a disk to edit the individual stamp (Automatic Storage Management link name).

  5. Click Next.

  6. Click Finish.

To delete disk stamps:

  1. Select the Delete labels option, then click Next.

    The delete option is only available if disks exist with stamps. The delete window shows all stamped Automatic Storage Management disks.

  2. In the Delete Stamps window, select the disks to unstamp.

  3. Click Next.

  4. Click Finish.

Using the asmtool Utility (Command Line)

The asmtool utility is a command-line interface for stamping disks. On Windows Vista, if UAC is enabled, then you need to create a desktop shortcut to a DOS command window. Open the command window through the Run as Administrator, right-click context menu, and launch asmtool. It has the following options:

Option                  Description Example
-add Adds or changes stamps. You must specify the hard disk, partition, and new stamp name. If the disk is a raw device or has an existing Automatic Storage Management stamp, then you must specify the -force option. Also sets ASM instances to rescan the available disks.

If you need to partition a disk, follow the procedures under "Step 3: Creating DAS or SAN Disk Partitions for an Automatic Storage Management Instance".

asmtool -add [-force]
\Device\Harddisk1\Partition1 ORCLDISKASM0
\Device\Harddisk2\Partition1 ORCLDISKASM2...
-addprefix Adds or changes stamps using a common prefix to generate stamps automatically. The stamps are generated by concatenating a number with the prefix specified. If the disk is a raw device or has an existing Automatic Storage Management stamp, then you must specify the -force option. Also sets ASM instances to rescan the available disks
asmtool -addprefix ORCLDISKASM [-force]
\Device\Harddisk1\Partition1
\Device\Harddisk2\Partition1...
-list List available disks. The stamp, windows device name, and disk size in megabytes are shown. Some disks may be file systems, and cannot be stamped. If the disk is a raw device or has an existing ASM stamp, then you must specify the -force option.
asmtool -list [-force]
-delete Removes existing stamps from disks. Also sets ASM instances to rescan the available disks
asmtool -delete ORCLDISKASM0 ORCLDISKASM1...

2.7.4 Stopping Existing Oracle Services

Note:

If you are installing additional Oracle Database components in an existing Oracle home, stop all processes running in the Oracle home. You must complete this task to enable Oracle Universal Installer to relink certain executables and libraries.

If you choose to create a database during the installation, most installation types configure and start a default Oracle Net listener using TCP/IP port 1521 and the IPC key value EXTPROC. However, if an existing Oracle Net listener process is using the same port or key value, Oracle Universal Installer can only configure the new listener; it cannot start it. To ensure that the new listener process starts during the installation, you must shut down any existing listeners before starting Oracle Universal Installer.

2.7.5 Oracle Advanced Security Requirements

Satisfy hardware and software requirements so that you can use authentication support with Oracle components. Some Oracle Advanced Security components can use a Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) directory such as Oracle Internet Directory.

2.7.6 Oracle Enterprise Manager Requirements

All Oracle Enterprise Manager products must be the same release. Older versions of Enterprise Manager are not supported with the new release.

Note:

All Oracle Enterprise Manager products, except Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Control, are released on the Enterprise Manager Grid Control installation media. Enterprise Manager Database Control is available on the Oracle Database installation media.

See Also:

Oracle Enterprise Manager Grid Control Installation and Basic Configuration available on the Enterprise Manager Grid Control installation media for Oracle Database installation on Windows 32-bit -based systems

2.7.7 Oracle Managed Files Requirements

If you choose the Custom installation type or the Advanced database creation option, you can use the Oracle Managed Files feature with the new database. If you use this feature, you need only specify the database object name instead of file names when creating or deleting database files. Configuration procedures are required to enable Oracle Managed Files.

See Also:

"Using Oracle Managed Files" in Oracle Database Administrator's Guide

2.7.8 Oracle Real Application Clusters (Oracle RAC)

If you plan to install Oracle RAC, you must first install Oracle Clusterware.

2.7.9 Oracle Volume Shadow Copy Service (VSS) Writer

Oracle Volume Shadow Copy Service Writer is supported on Windows 2003 and Windows Server 2003 R2. If user has only one database per system, it works with Windows 2003 server even if Service Pack 1 is not installed. If user has more than one Oracle database on a system, then Service Pack 1 is required.

See Also:

"Performing Database Backup and Recovery with VSS" in Oracle Database Platform Guide for Microsoft Windows

2.7.10 Recommended System Requirements for SQL Developer

Following are the recommended CPU, memory, and display requirements on the supported systems for SQL Developer:

Resource Recommended
Operating System Windows 2000-Service Pack 4 (32-Bit only)

Windows Server 2003 R2

Windows XP-Service Pack 2

CPU Type and Speed Pentium IV 2 GHz or faster
Memory 1 GB RAM
Display 65536 colors, set to at least 1024 X 768 resolution
Java SDK JDK 5.0 Update 6 or later