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Oracle® Warehouse Builder Installation and Administration Guide
11g Release 1 (11.1) for Windows and UNIX

B31280-06
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8 Creating Custom Objects and Properties

This chapter describes how to extend the workspace by creating custom objects and custom properties. This chapter includes the following topics:

Extending the Workspace With User Defined Objects

As an administrator, you may encounter scenarios that require you to add new types of objects or properties to an existing workspace. Any objects you add to the workspace are known as user defined objects (UDOs) and any properties you add are known as user defined properties (UDPs).

For example, as you use Warehouse Builder in conjunction with other applications, you may want to document how the data and metadata you manage in Warehouse Builder interacts with other applications. To facilitate this documentation, you can introduce new metadata objects and associate those objects with existing workspace objects. These custom objects appear in the Design Center with the icon of your choice. You can edit them with a basic editor and preform lineage and impact analysis.

Administration users can extend the workspace by adding new properties and objects.

For the sake of clarity, this chapter refers to the objects native to the workspace as workspace objects. Any objects you introduce to the workspace are UDOs and any new properties are UDPs.

About Oracle Metabase (OMB) Plus

To define custom objects and properties, you must use the scripting utility Oracle Metabase (OMB) Plus. After you specify the UDO and UDP definitions through scripting, you can then create instances of those objects either through scripting or using the graphical user interface.

OMB Plus is the flexible, high-level command-line metadata access tool for Oracle Warehouse Builder. It is an extension of the Tcl programming language and you can use it on UNIX and Windows platforms. The section "Using OMB Plus Scripts to Specify UDOs and UDPs" describes how to write the syntactic constructs such as variable support, conditional and looping control structures, error handling, and standard library procedures. Using OMB Plus, you can navigate through workspaces and manage and manipulate metadata in workspaces.

For more information about using OMB Plus to specify UDOs and UDPs, see Oracle Warehouse Builder API and Scripting Reference.

Using OMB Plus Scripts to Specify UDOs and UDPs

OMB Plus scripts enable you to define new objects, add and remove properties, as well as view the attributes for existing objects. The syntax is case sensitive and must be in upper case. While creating UDOs and UDPs, follow the guidelines in "Naming Conventions for UDOs and UDPs".

OMBDEFINE

OMBDEFINE CLASS_DEFINITION enables you to create new object definitions in the workspace.

To create a new module definition, use the following command:

OMBDEFINE MODULE CLASS_DEFINITION 'UD_TABLEMODULE' SET PROPERTIES (BUSINESS_NAME, PLURAL_NAME) VALUES ('Table Module', 'Table Modules')

This creates a new module definition called UD_TABLEMODULE.

OMBREDEFINE

OMBREDEFINE CLASS_DEFINITION enables you to redefine workspace objects to include custom properties.

To create a UDP on the Dimension object, use the following command:

OMBREDEFINE CLASS_DEFINITION 'DIMENSION' 
     ADD PROPERTY_DEFINITION 'UD_DOCID' SET PROPERTIES (TYPE, DEFAULT_VALUE)
     VALUES ('INTEGER', '100')

This adds a new property definition called UD_DOCID to class definition DIMENSION.

The following command adds a new property definition for notes for the COLUMN type. Because columns exist in tables, views, materialized view, external tables and sequences, the following command adds the definition of this property to columns for all of those metadata objects:

OMBREDEFINE CLASS_DEFINITION 'COLUMN' 
     ADD PROPERTY_DEFINITION 'UD_COL_NOTE' SET PROPERTIES (TYPE, DEFAULT_VALUE)
     VALUES ('STRING', 'notes')

When you create and save a new property definition, OMB Plus performs the following validations:

  • A user access check ensuring that you have single-user access to the current workspace.

  • A name space check ensuring that you did not define two identically named property definitions within the same class hierarchy.

  • A property value check ensuring that you defined default values consistent with the data types that you specified.

To change the name or the default value of a given property definition, use a command as follows:

OMBREDEFINE CLASS_DEFINITION 'TABLE' MODIFY PROPERTY_DEFINITION 'UD_TBL_NOTE'
     SET PROPERTIES (DEFAULT_VALUE, BUSINESS_NAME) 
     VALUES ('99', 'Table Note') 

To delete a UDP, use a command such as

OMBREDEFINE CLASS_DEFINITION 'TABLE' DELETE PROPERTY_DEFINITION 'UD_TBL_NOTE'

which deletes the UD_TBL_NOTE property definition from the Table class. Deleting a UDP is a destructive action and should generally be done with caution because it cannot be undone. It renders irretrievable all custom property values made for this property definition in your workspace.

OMBDESCRIBE

You can use OMBDESCRIBE on any class definition to view the attributes for a metadata element. Among other tasks, use OMBDESCRIBE to list the UDPs for a given object type. For instance, the following command lists the UDPs for dimensions:

OMBDESCRIBE CLASS_DEFINITION 'DIMENSION' GET PROPERTY_DEFINITIONS

You can also use OMBDESCRIBE to inspect the properties of a property definition. For instance, for a UDP called UD_DOCID, you can know its data type, default value, and business name using the following command:

OMBDESCRIBE CLASS_DEFINITION 'DIMENSION' PROPERTY_DEFINITION  'UD_DOCID' 
     GET PROPERTIES (TYPE, DEFAULT_VALUE, BUSINESS_NAME)

Naming Conventions for UDOs and UDPs

It is mandatory to include the prefix UD_ while naming UDOs and UDPs. This ensures that the names of UDOs and UDPs are not identical to the names of predefined objects in the workspace.

Note: If in a previous release you named a UDP with the prefix UDP_, then it is still valid. However, for all subsequent UDOs and UDPs, use the UD_ prefix.

Adding New Properties to Workspace Objects

To define new properties on Workspace objects, complete the following steps:

  1. Carefully plan the new additions to the workspace.

    If possible, you should define all user-defined properties into the workspace before enabling end users to access it. In doing so, you avoid the task of supplying values for UDPs on existing objects.

  2. Log in as the workspace owner, in single user mode.

    If another user is logged on within the GUI or OMB Plus, then you will be prevented from running commands that alter the structure of the workspace.

    If already logged into the Design Center, then you can start OMB Plus from the Window option on the main menu of Design Center. To ensure that no other users access the workspace, connect to the workspace and issue the command OMBSWITCHMODE SINGLE_USER_MODE.

  3. Use the command OMBREDEFINE on the workspace object to which you want to add a custom property definition.

    For examples on how to use this command, see the section OMBREDEFINE.

  4. To view the changes in OMB Plus, use the command OMBDESCRIBE.

  5. Once you create the UDP using scripting, users can view and assign values to the new property in the graphical user interface.

  6. Notify users that they can log in to the Design Center.

Creating UDPs: An Example

To create UDPs for an object, complete the following steps:

  1. Log in to the client as an administrator.

  2. Open the OMB Plus client.

  3. Ensure that you are in single user mode. You can verify this with the command OMBDISPLAYCURRENTMODE. If you are in multiple user mode, then switch to single user mode by using the command:

    OMBSWITCHMODE SINGLE_USER_MODE
    
  4. In the OMB Plus client, enter the following command to create four UDPs for the object View:

    • OMBREDEFINE CLASS_DEFINITION 'VIEW' \
      ADD PROPERTY_DEFINITION 'UD_OWNER' SET PROPERTIES \ 
      (TYPE, DEFAULT_VALUE, BUSINESS_NAME) VALUES \ 
      ('STRING', 'REP_OWNER', 'Object Owner')  
      
    • OMBREDEFINE CLASS_DEFINITION 'VIEW' \ 
      ADD PROPERTY_DEFINITION 'UD_FILE' SET PROPERTIES \ 
      (TYPE, DEFAULT_VALUE) VALUES ('FILE', 'C:\\vw.sql')
      
    • OMBREDEFINE CLASS_DEFINITION 'VIEW' \ 
      ADD PROPERTY_DEFINITION 'UD_LINK' SET PROPERTIES \ 
      (TYPE, DEFAULT_VALUE) VALUES ('URL', 'http://www.oracle.com')
      
    • OMBREDEFINE CLASS_DEFINITION 'VIEW' \ 
      ADD PROPERTY_DEFINITION 'UD_VERSION' SET PROPERTIES \ 
      (TYPE, DEFAULT_VALUE) VALUES ('DATE', '2006-1-7')
      
    • OMBSAVE
      

    This creates the following UDPs: UD_OWNER, UD_FILE, UD_LINK, and UD_VERSION.

    Note that the valid UDP types are: integer, string, float, double, date, timestamp, boolean, long, file, and url.

  5. From the Project Explorer create a view in any module.

  6. Open the property inspector for the view by right-clicking the view and selecting Properties.

  7. Click the User Defined tab and select the view in the left-hand panel. The newly created UDPs are displayed.

    You can modify the values of any of the UDPs from the graphical user interface.

    Figure 8-1 displays the UDP that was created in the User Defined tab.

    Figure 8-1 UDPs for TEST_VIEW

    Description of Figure 8-1 follows
    Description of "Figure 8-1 UDPs for TEST_VIEW "

To remove a UDP from the workspace, use the DELETE clause. For example, to delete UD_VERSION, use the following command:

OMBREDEFINE CLASS_DEFINITION 'VIEW' DELETE PROPERTY_DEFINITION 'UD_VERSION' 

Adding UDOs to the Workspace

UDOs are objects that you define and add to the workspace in addition to existing workspace objects.

All UDOs must belong to a module, and the module itself is a UDO. This module acts as the topmost container holding other objects within it. A module can contain folders, first class objects (FCOs), and second class objects (SCOs). Similarly, a folder can contain other folders, FCOs, and SCOs. An FCO can contain one or more SCOs.

UDOs exhibit a parent-child relationship. The module is the topmost parent. An FCO within a module is a child element of the module. Similarly, an SCO within an FCO is a child element of the FCO. For example, an Oracle module is a parent module. A table within this module is an FCO and a column within the table is an SCO.

To define new objects for the workspace, complete the following steps:

  1. Carefully plan the new additions to the workspace.

    Before you begin, fully review the remainder of this chapter and become familiar with the necessary scripting commands.

  2. Log in to the client as an administrator and in single user mode.

  3. Design the UDO based on the steps described in "Writing Scripts to Define UDOs".

  4. Use the OMBDEFINE command to create a new module definition, and FCOs and SCOs within that module. Use the OMBREDEFINE command to make any changes to the UDOs or to set properties for these objects.

    Once you create the UDO through scripting, you can use the graphical user interface to create and edit the objects it contains.

  5. Log in to the Design Center and view the new objects as described in "Working with UDOs and UDPs".

    Verify that the new objects display as intended.

  6. (Optional) Assign a new icon to the UDO, as described in"Creating New Icons for Workspace Objects".

  7. Notify users that they can log in to the client.

Writing Scripts to Define UDOs

To define a UDO, write a script that completes the following steps:

  • Create a user defined module: This will be the parent module.

  • Define the object type: Define the module as a folder that can contain other objects.

  • Define FCOs and SCOs: Create user-defined FCOs and SCOs for the UDO, and assign physical names to these objects. For example, UD_WORKBOOK is a valid physical name. You can also indicate a business name and plural name, both of which are displayed in the Design Center and in editors. Continuing the previous example, Workbook and Workbooks are likely entries for the business name and plural name, respectively. If you do not specify these values, then they default to the physical name.

  • Define object properties: Define the properties for all the objects you create. Some properties, such as Name, Business_Name, Plural_Name, and Description, are assigned automatically to any newly created object.

  • Add component definition: All parent objects need to be assigned a component definition. The child elements have to be added to the component definition. The component definition determines the lifetime of child elements. For example, a column cannot exist if the parent table is deleted.

  • Define association types: Create association types to indicate the types of relationships a UDO can have with workspace objects and other UDOs. You need to perform this step only if you want end users to later relate the UDO to specific instances of objects. For instance, in your script you could associate the UDO with tables and views. In the Design Center, end users could then relate instances of the UDO with specific tables and views. Warehouse Builder displays these relationships in impact and lineage analysis reports.

  • Assign icons (optional): See "Creating New Icons for Workspace Objects".

  • Save the changes.

Creating UDOs: An Example

This section provides an example to create UDOs modeled on a Java application. The Java application acts as a module. This module contains classes (FCOs), and those classes contain methods (SCOs). Within a method, you can model the lines of code. From a business standpoint, this is of interest because a particular line of code in an application may be impacted by a change in a database table if it is used within a SQL (JDBC) statement.

Figure 8-2 displays the structure of the UDO.

Figure 8-2 Structure of the UDOs

Description of Figure 8-2 follows
Description of "Figure 8-2 Structure of the UDOs"

To create the UDOs, perform the following steps:

  1. Log in to the Oracle Warehouse Builder client as an administrator and open the OMB Plus window. Make sure that you are logged in single user mode.

  2. First create a module definition and set properties for this module:

    OMBDEFINE MODULE CLASS_DEFINITION 'UD_JAVA_APP' \ 
    SET PROPERTIES (BUSINESS_NAME, PLURAL_NAME) \ 
    VALUES ('Java Application', 'Java Applications')
    

    This defines the module definition and sets certain properties common to all objects. BUSINESS_NAME is the user-friendly name for an object. If the Naming mode preference for the Design Center is switched to Business mode, then the value set for BUSINESS_NAME is displayed for the object. PLURAL_NAME is the label that is used to show where multiple instances of an object are shown, such as the label used for a tree node in the Design Center that contains several instances of the object.

  3. Now create a folder definition with the same name as the module so that the module assumes the role of a folder:

    OMBDEFINE FOLDER_DEFINITION 'UD_JAVA_APP'
    
  4. Now create an FCO:

    OMBDEFINE FIRST_CLASS_OBJECT CLASS_DEFINITION \ 
    'UD_JCLASS' SET PROPERTIES (BUSINESS_NAME, PLURAL_NAME) \ 
    VALUES ('Java Class File', 'Java Class Files')
    
  5. Add the FCO as a child of the folder class:

    OMBREDEFINE CLASS_DEFINITION 'UD_JAVA_APP' \ 
    ADD CHILD_TYPE 'UD_JCLASS'
    
  6. Create a component definition for the FCO:

    OMBDEFINE COMPONENT_DEFINITION 'UD_JCLASS'
    
  7. Add the component definition to the folder definition:

    OMBREDEFINE FOLDER_DEFINITION 'UD_JAVA_APP' \ 
    ADD 'UD_JCLASS'
    
  8. Create an SCO and set its properties:

    OMBDEFINE SECOND_CLASS_OBJECT \ 
    CLASS_DEFINITION 'UD_JMETHOD' \ 
    SET PROPERTIES (BUSINESS_NAME, PLURAL_NAME) \ 
    VALUES ('Method', 'Methods')
    
  9. Add the SCO as a child of the FCO:

    OMBREDEFINE CLASS_DEFINITION 'UD_JCLASS' \ 
    ADD CHILD_TYPE 'UD_JMETHOD'
    
  10. Add the SCO to the component definition:

    OMBREDEFINE COMPONENT_DEFINITION 'UD_JCLASS' \ 
    ADD 'UD_JMETHOD' 
    
  11. Create an SCO and set its properties:

    OMBDEFINE SECOND_CLASS_OBJECT \ 
    CLASS_DEFINITION 'UD_JMETHOD_LINE' \ 
    SET PROPERTIES (BUSINESS_NAME, PLURAL_NAME) \ 
    VALUES ('Java Method Line', 'Java Method Lines') 
    
  12. Add this SCO as a child of the initially created SCO:

    OMBREDEFINE CLASS_DEFINITION 'UD_JMETHOD' \ 
    ADD CHILD_TYPE 'UD_JMETHOD_LINE' 
    
  13. Add this SCO to the component definition:

    OMBREDEFINE COMPONENT_DEFINITION 'UD_JCLASS' \ 
    ADD 'UD_JMETHOD_LINE'
    

This creates the following UDOs:

  • A module folder called UD_JAVA_APP

  • An FCO named UD_JCLASS, within the module

  • An SCO named UD_JMETHOD, which is the child of UD_JCLASS

  • Another SCO named UD_JMETHOD_LINE, which is the child of UD_JMETHOD

You can access the UDOs from the Project Explorer under the User Defined Modules icon. To create a new instance of the UDO, right-click the UDO and select New. You can create new modules and SCOs as well as edit these modules and SCOs.

Note:

For the newly created UDO to be visible in the Project Explorer, you must shut down Oracle Warehouse Builder completely, and then start it up again, saving any changes if prompted.

Associating UDOs with Objects

UDOs can be associated with other objects. By creating these associations, UDOs become a part of Lineage and Impact Analysis diagram just like any other object.

Associating a Java Application with a Table

This example associates the SCO, UD_JMETHOD, with one or more tables. This is modeling the fact that a method could be referencing tables in JDBC calls.

To associate the Java method to table, use the command:

OMBDEFINE ASSOCIATION_DEFINITION 'UD_XJMETHOD2TABLE' \ 
SET PROPERTIES (CLASS_1,CLASS_2,ROLE_1,ROLE_2 \ 
,ROLE_1_MAX_CARDINALITY,ROLE_1_NAVIGABLE) \ 
VALUES ('UD_JMETHOD','TABLE','TABLEUSED','JM2TABLE' \ 
,'INFINITE','true') ADD DEPENDENCY_DEFINITION 'DATAFLOW' 

CLASS_1 and CLASS_2 can be any classes (FCO or SCO). At least one of the classes should be a user defined class. The other class can be either a user defined class or one of the main Oracle Warehouse Builder classes, such as table or column. In this example, the association is between the UDO, UD_JMETHOD, and table.

Role_1 and Role_2 are the names you use to identify Class_1 from the point of view of this association. A class may have multiple associations and it plays a role in each one of them.

MAX_CARDINALITY allows you to limit the number of objects of that class which participate in that association. For example, consider the association between uniqueKey and foreignKey. The max_cardinality of uniqueKey is 1, because a given foreignKey object can be associated with at most one uniqueKey object. MAX_CARDINALITY can be set to any positive integer, or the reserved word INFINITE.

ROLE_1_NAVIGABLE is used by Lineage/Impact analyzer. If set to TRUE, it means that the analyzer can traverse the association in either direction between Class_1 and Class_2. If the property is set to FALSE, it means that the analyzer can traverse the relationship from Class_1 to Class_2, but not the other way around.

DEPENDENCY_DEFINITION is a mandatory parameter of an association and must always be set to DATAFLOW.

To associate the UDO to a table, complete the following steps:

  1. In the Project Explorer, expand the node User Defined Modules.

  2. Right-click Java Applications and select New.

  3. Specify a name for the application.

  4. Right-click the node Java Class Files and select New.

  5. Specify a name for the Java class.

    Figure 8-3 shows a new user defined module created from the Project Explorer.

    Figure 8-3 Creating User Defined Modules from the Project Explorer

    Description of Figure 8-3 follows
    Description of "Figure 8-3 Creating User Defined Modules from the Project Explorer"

  6. Right-click the object you just created, and select Open Editor to open the UDO Editor.

  7. Click the Object and Association Tree tab and select CUSTOMERUPDATE. You can see the properties for the FCO, UD_JCLASS.

    Figure 8-4 displays the editor for an FCO.

    Figure 8-4 Editor for UD_JCLASS

    Description of Figure 8-4 follows
    Description of "Figure 8-4 Editor for UD_JCLASS"

  8. Right-click Methods and select Create.

    An SCO called JMETHOD_1 is created.

  9. JMETHOD_1 contains two nodes: Java Method Lines, which is the child SCO, and TABLEUSED, which is the value specified for ROLE_1 when the association UD_XJMETHOD2TABLE was created.

    Figure 8-5 displays the nodes in an SCO.

    Figure 8-5 Nodes Within an SCO

    Description of Figure 8-5 follows
    Description of "Figure 8-5 Nodes Within an SCO"

  10. Right-click TABLEUSED and select Reference.

    The Object Selector dialog box is displayed, and allows you to select the table to which you want to connect the UDO.

    Figure 8-6 displays the Object selector dialog box.

    Figure 8-6 The Object Selector Dialog Box

    Description of Figure 8-6 follows
    Description of "Figure 8-6 The Object Selector Dialog Box"

Working with UDOs and UDPs

In the graphical user interface, you can view UDOs and UPDs in the Project Explorer and in the Repository Design Browser. However, in the Project Explorer, you can also edit the UDOs and UDPs.

Repository Design Browser

The Repository Browser is a metadata management and reporting portal. This browser displays objects, object properties, object relationships, including UDOs and UDPs. The browser also displays lineage and impact analysis reports for all objects including UDOs.

If you define a UDP for a given object, then the browser lists the UDP name and values as Extended Property Name and Extended Property Value.

Figure 8-7 displays the sample properties sheet.

Figure 8-7 Sample Properties Sheet with User-Defined Properties

Description of Figure 8-7 follows
Description of "Figure 8-7 Sample Properties Sheet with User-Defined Properties"

Propagating UDOs and UDPs to Other Workspaces

The primary method for propagating changes from one workspace to another is by using MDL. MDL enables you to export and import the metadata definition of the UDP and its contents.

Exporting UDOs and UDPs

You can export UDOs and UDPs as any other object.

In the MDL Control file, the option is DEFINITIONFILE=filename to export the metadata definition. For example:

## Sample Export file 
USERID=UserName/Password@HostName:PortID:OracleServiceName
#
DEFINITIONFILE=Drive:\DirectoryName\filename.mdd

FILE=Drive:\DirectoryName\filename.mdl
LOG=Drive:\DirectoryName\filename.log

Importing UDOs and UDPs

You can import UDPs from the command line only. During import, MDL updates the UDPs for all objects. In the MDL Control file, the option is DEFINITIONFILE=filename to import the metadata definition. For example:

## Sample Import file 
USERID=UserName/Password@HostName:PortID:OracleServiceName
#
DEFINITIONFILE=Drive:\DirectoryName\filename.mdd

FILE=Drive:\DirectoryName\filename.mdl
LOG=Drive:\DirectoryName\filename.log

You can import UDPs using one of the following search criteria:

  • Universal ID: The metadata definition contains a Universal Object ID (UOID). The UOID uniquely identifies objects across workspaces. If you import the MDL file by UOID, then MDL looks up the metadata definition by UOID. If the metadata definition name in the source MDL file is different from the metadata definition in the workspace, then MDL renames it.

  • Physical Name: MDL looks up the metadata definition by physical name.

Regardless of the import mode, MDL either adds the metadata definition if it does not exist in the workspace, or updates the metadata definition if it already exists. MDL does not delete metadata definitions in the workspace.

When updating the metadata definition, MDL only renames the object if the names are different (search criteria is by UOID), and updates the default value. MDL does not change the data type.

Creating New Icons for Workspace Objects

Icons are graphics that visually suggest the availability of a function or type of an object to end users. There are many types of pre-defined workspace objects, each with their own icon. You may want to change the icon associated with an existing object or instance of an object to something more recognizable. For example, you could visually highlight a particular table by altering its icon. Additionally, for UDOs, you may want to change the default icon to something representative of the object. You can create your own icons using a graphics editor or third-party software.

In the Design Center, you can associate icon sets with an instance of an object. Or, use the OMB Plus scripting language to associate icon sets at the object type level (and thus inherited by any instance of that object).

Note:

You can assign new icons to most workspace objects with the exception of pre-defined objects like public transformations and public data rules and DEFAULT_CONFIGURATION, DEFAULT_CONTROL_CENTER, and OWB_REPOSITORY_LOCATION.

Every object has a set of icons of varying sizes to represent it throughout the various editors and toolbars. Each icon set includes a canvas icon, palette icon, and a tree icon as described in Table 8-1. When you define a new icon set, follow the sizing guidelines. If you specify a new icon with an incorrect size, it is automatically resized, which may distort your intended design.

Table 8-1 Icon Sets

Type Description

Canvas Icon

Represents instances of objects in the canvas of an editor. For example, it displays a table icon in the canvas of the Mapping Editor or in a Lineage Report. The correct size is 32 x 32 pixels in GIF or JPEG format.

Palette Icon

Represents types of objects in editor palettes. For example, it displays the table operator in the Mapping Editor operator palette. The correct size is 18 x 18 pixels in GIF or JPEG format.

Tree Icon

Represents types and instances of objects in navigation trees such as the Project Explorer in the Design Center. The correct size is 16 x 16 pixels in GIF or JPEG format.


Creating Icon Sets

To create a new icon set, complete the following steps:

  1. Log in to the client as an administrator.

  2. In the Global Explorer, right-click the Icon Sets node and select New.

  3. The Create Icon Set dialog box is displayed. For details on the values to be entered on this page, see "Create Icon Set Dialog Box" .

Create Icon Set Dialog Box

The Create Icon Set dialog box enables you to specify values for the Icon Set. Enter the following values and click OK to define a new Icon Set:

  • Name: The name of the Icon Set.

  • Group: You can assign the Icon Set to any of the groups available in the list. This is useful when you are creating a large number of icon sets and want to organize them into different groups.

  • Description: A description of the Icon Set.

  • File Name: Navigate and select the image that you want to assign to the new Icon Set. You need to select an image for Canvas, Palette, and Tree Icon.

    Note:

    You can use any image of your choice to represent the new icon.

The newly created icon set will be available under Icon Sets in the Global Explorer.

Assigning New Icon Sets to Workspace Objects

You can change the default icon setting for any object by editing its properties. In any of the Explorers in the Design Center, right-click an object and select Properties to assign a new icon set to an object. When you save your changes, the new icon set appears throughout the user interface.

To revert back to the original icon, select Use Product Default Icon.

For more information about icon sets, see "Creating New Icons for Workspace Objects" .

Assigning a New Icon Set to an Object

Complete the following steps to assign a newly created icon set, CSV_ICONSET, to an instance of an object.

  1. Right-click any instance of an object and select Properties to open Property Inspector.

  2. On the General tab, click the field Use Product Default Icon.

    An Ellipsis button is displayed in this field as shown in Figure 8-8.

    Figure 8-8 Properties Inspector for EXPENSE_CATEGORIES_CSV

    Description of Figure 8-8 follows
    Description of "Figure 8-8 Properties Inspector for EXPENSE_CATEGORIES_CSV"

  3. Click the Ellipsis button to open the Icon Object dialog box.

  4. Select CSV_ICONSET and click OK.

  5. CSV_ICONSET is now assigned to the instance EXPENSE_CATEGORIES_CSV.

    Figure 8-9 shows the Project Explorer in which the icon set is assigned to the instance.

    Figure 8-9 Icon Set for EXPENSE_CATEGORIES_CSV

    Description of Figure 8-9 follows
    Description of "Figure 8-9 Icon Set for EXPENSE_CATEGORIES_CSV"

Assigning New Icon Sets to Activities in Process Flow

You can assign new icon sets to the activities in a process flow. The Explorer panel of the Process Flow Editor contains the Select Icon button at the top. This button is enabled when you select an activity.

To assign a new icon set to an activity:

  1. Select the activity and click the Select Icon button. The Select Icon Set dialog box displays.

  2. Select an icon from the list and click Select.

The icon set is assigned to the activity.

Assigning New Icon Sets to Tasks in Expert Editor

You can assign new icon sets to the tasks in Expert Editor using the Select Icon button available on the Expert Editor. This is similar to assigning icon sets to activities in a process flow.

To assign a new icon set to a task:

  1. Select the task and click the Select Icon button. The Select Icon Set dialog box displays.

  2. Select an icon from the list and click Select.

The icon set is assigned to the task.

For information about experts, see Oracle Warehouse Builder API and Scripting Reference.