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Named Cursor Attribute

Every named cursor (explicit cursor or cursor variable) has four attributes, each of which returns information about the execution of a DML statement.

Note:

You can use cursor attributes only in procedural statements, not in SQL statements.

Topics

Semantics

named_cursor_attribute

%ISOPEN

named_cursor%ISOPEN has the value TRUE if the cursor is open, and FALSE if it is not open.

%FOUND

named_cursor%FOUND has one of these values:

  • If the cursor is not open, INVALID_CURSOR

  • If cursor is open but no fetch was attempted, NULL.

  • If the most recent fetch returned a row, TRUE.

  • If the most recent fetch did not return a row, FALSE.

%NOTFOUND

named_cursor%NOTFOUND has one of these values:

  • If cursor is not open, INVALID_CURSOR.

  • If cursor is open but no fetch was attempted, NULL.

  • If the most recent fetch returned a row, FALSE.

  • If the most recent fetch did not return a row, TRUE.

%ROWCOUNT

named_cursor%ROWCOUNT has one of these values:

  • If cursor is not open, INVALID_CURSOR.

  • If cursor is open, the number of rows fetched so far.

named_cursor

explicit_cursor

Name of an explicit cursor.

cursor_parameter

Name of a formal cursor parameter.

cursor_variable

Name of a cursor variable.

:host_cursor_variable

Name of a cursor variable that was declared in a PL/SQL host environment and passed to PL/SQL as a bind variable. Do not put space between the colon (:) and host_cursor_variable.