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Oracle® Database Installation and Administration Guide
11g Release 2 (11.2) for Fujitsu BS2000/OSD

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3 Oracle Database Installation and Deinstallation

This chapter describes preinstallation requirements, postinstallation tasks, and the installation and deinstallation of Oracle Database 11g Release 2 on BS2000/OSD. It provides information about the following topics:

3.1 Overview of Oracle Database Installation

The Oracle Database software can be downloaded from Oracle Software Delivery Cloud at https://edelivery.oracle.com.The installation files are included in a Library Maintenance System (LMS) library called staging library.

Download the zip file and extract it to a temporary location on a Windows or UNIX system. Then upload the staging library to the BS2000 system using File Transfer Protocol (FTP). The following sections describe the installation process for Oracle on the Fujitsu BS2000/OSD S Servers. The installation process for Oracle on the Fujitsu BS2000/OSD SQ Servers is identical, except for the name of the staging library. The following are the names of the staging library:

  • ora11202.s390.lib for Fujitsu BS2000/OSD (S Series)

  • ora11202.sq.lib for Fujitsu BS2000/OSD (SQ Series)

3.2 Planning the Installation

The Oracle Database installation process consists of the following steps:

  1. Read the release notes: Read Oracle Database Release Notes for Fujitsu BS2000/OSD in Chapter 1, " Release Notes", before you begin the installation.

  2. Review the licensing information: Although the installation media in the media pack contain many Oracle components, you are permitted to use only those components for which you have purchased licenses. Oracle Support Services does not provide support for components for which licenses have not been purchased.

    See Also:

    Oracle Database Licensing Information for more licensing information
  3. Complete preinstallation tasks: "Oracle Database Preinstallation Requirements" describes preinstallation tasks that you must complete before installing the product.

  4. Install the software: "Installing the Oracle Database Software" describes how to use the Oracle installation procedure for BS2000/OSD to install Oracle Database 11g Release 2.

  5. Complete postinstallation tasks: "Oracle Database Postinstallation Tasks" describes recommended and required postinstallation tasks.

  6. Multiple software installations: "Installing Multiple Oracle Systems" provides informations about multiple installations of Oracle software.

  7. Remove Oracle Database software: "Removing Oracle Database Software" describes how to remove Oracle Database software from your system.

3.3 Oracle Database Preinstallation Requirements

This section describes the tasks that you must complete before you start the installation of Oracle Database 11g Release 2 for BS2000/OSD. It includes information about the following tasks:

3.3.1 Checking Hardware Requirements

The system must meet the following hardware requirements:

3.3.1.1 Memory Requirements

Oracle Database requires at least 2 GB main memory.

The Address Space Limit for the installation user ID should be 512 MB or higher. For the DBA user IDs, it should be at least 1024 MB.

  • To determine the memory size, enter the following command:

    /SHOW-SYSTEM-INFORMATION INFORMATION=*MEMORY-SIZE
    
  • To determine the user address space limit, log in to the desired user ID and enter the following command:

    /SHOW-USER-ATTRIBUTES
    

If the user address space is less than the required size, then ask your BS2000 system administrator to increase the Address Space Limit by using the command:

/MODIFY-USER-ATTRIBUTES USER-IDENTIFICATION=user-id,ADRESS-SPACE-LIMIT={512|1024}

3.3.1.2 System Architecture

Oracle Database 11g Release 2 supports all BS2000/OSD server architectures, such as S Server, SQ Server and SX Server. To determine the architecture on your system, enter the following command:

/SHOW-SYSTEM-INFORMATION INFORMATION=*HSI-ATTRIBUTES

The following is the TYPE output that shows the system architecture:

  • IX: HSI of a S server (/390 architecture)

  • KM: HSI of a SQ server (x86-64 architecture)

  • PM: HSI of a SX server (SPARC architecture)

  • UD: The HSI type is not defined

On S Servers, install the Oracle Database software for the platform Fujitsu BS2000/OSD (S Series). The name of the installation staging library is ora11202.s390.lib.

On SQ Servers, install the Oracle Database software for the platform Fujitsu BS2000/OSD (SQ Series). This software runs in native x86-64 mode. The name of the installation staging library is ora11202.sq.lib.

On SX Servers install the Oracle Database software for the platform Fujitsu BS2000/OSD (S Series). This software runs in emulated mode. The name of the installation staging library is ora11202.s390.lib.

3.3.1.3 Disk Space Requirements

Due to some new features, Oracle Database 11g Release 2 requires an installation in the BS2000 file system (DMS) and in the POSIX file system. Oracle recommends using a separate POSIX file system for the Oracle Database software installation.

See Also:

For more information about creating an additional POSIX file system, refer to the Fujitsu guide for BS2000/OSD mainframes, namely POSIX Basics for Users and System Administrators at:
http://manuals.ts.fujitsu.com/file/8521/posix_g.pdf

When the POSIX administrator or BS2000 system administrator creates a new POSIX file system by using the START-POSIX-INSTALLATION command, a new POSIX container file similar to a UNIX disk partition is allocated in the BS2000 file system. The POSIX file system is created in this container file. If the desired mount point, for example, /u01, is not yet available in the root system, then it is created and the file system is mounted.

Oracle Database 11g Release 2 software for Fujitsu BS2000/OSD (S Series) requires the following disk space:

  • BS2000 file system:

    Item Disk Space
    Software 1.000.000 PAM pages
    Staging library 820.000 PAM pages
    Recommended (in total) 2.000.000 PAM pages

  • POSIX file system:

    Requirement Disk Space
    Minimum 400 MB
    Recommended 1 GB

Note:

The diagnostic data of the Automatic Diagnostic Repository (ADR) reside in the POSIX file system. The disk space required for the Automatic Diagnostic Repository depends on the number of Oracle instances and the amount of diagnostic data created for incidents. So you may need significantly more disk space in the POSIX file system than recommended.

The extracted files occupy about 1.000.000 PAM pages in the BS2000 file system. The files installed in the POSIX file system occupy about 200 MB.

The staging library does not have to reside in your installation user ID.

3.3.1.4 Display Requirements

Oracle Database supports 9750 compatible terminals. In addition, Oracle Database supports X-terminals in the POSIX environment if you logged in to POSIX using rlogin or ssh.

The minimum resolution for Java based tools with a Graphical User Interface shipped with Oracle Database 11g Release 2 is 1024 x 768 or higher.

3.3.2 Checking Software Requirements

Before installing the Oracle Database software, it is recommended that you check if your system meets the following software requirements.

3.3.2.1 Operating System and Communication System Requirements

The following operating system and communication system versions or higher, are required for Oracle Database 11g Release 2:

  • BS2000/OSD V7.0

  • openNet Server V3.3

    This includes BCAM V20.0 and Sockets V2.4.

Oracle recommends that you regularly install the most current correction packages for BS2000/OSD.

Check the version of your BS2000/OSD system with the following command:

/SHOW-SYSTEM-INFORMATION INFORMATION=*BS2000-ID

Note:

The correction level of the POSIX subsystem must be A41 or higher. You can check the POSIX correction level with the following command:
/EXECUTE-POSIX-CMD CMD='uname -v'

You can check the version of your openNet Server software by checking the version of the software component BCAM with the following command:

/SHOW-INSTALLATION-PATH INSTALLATION-UNIT=BCAM

Or you can ask your BS2000 system administrator to check the BCAM version with the command:

/BCSHOW SHOW=BCAM

Note:

The BCAM version must be V20 or higher.

3.3.2.2 POSIX Parameters

The following POSIX parameters must be checked for the recommended values for Oracle Database 11g Release 2:

Parameter Name Description Recommended Value
HDSTNI Number of hard disk server tasks 4
NPBUF Number of physical I/O buffers 20
NPROC Maximum number of processes 800
NBUF Number of I/O buffers 200
MAXUP Maximum number of processes per user 200
NOTTY Maximum number of ttys 512
NOPTY Maximum number of ptys 512
NOSTTY Maximum number of sttys 512
DBLSTATE Initial state of POSIX loader 1
DBLPOOL Size of pool in MB for POSIX loader 30

The POSIX administrator or BS2000 system administrator can check the values in the file $TSOS.SYSSSI.POSIX-BC.version, for example, version = 070|080|090. The values can also be checked by using the POSIX command usp:

# usp -s nproc

You can update the value with the following command:

# usp -P parameter -v value

Note:

  • If you edit the parameters in the file $TSOS.SYSSSI.POSIX-BC.version, then you must restart the POSIX subsystem.

  • The parameter values depend on the overall load of the BS2000 system and must be adjusted to this load. The values listed previously are minimal recommendations.

3.3.2.3 Package Requirements

The following POSIX packages with the specified versions or higher are required for Oracle Database 11g Release 2:

  • POSIX-SH V7.0

  • JENV V6.0

  • APACHE V2.2, including correction package 2/2012

  • PERL V5.8, including correction package 2/2012

  • BCAM V20.0

To check the installed packages, use the following POSIX command:

$ pkginfo package name

Note:

  • Ensure that the packages POSIX-SH and JENV are installed before starting the Oracle Database software installation.

  • The packages APACHE, Perl and BCAM are required by the Oracle Management Agent. Although these packages are optional for Oracle Database 11g Release 2, it is recommended that you install these packages.

3.3.2.4 Additional BS2000 Software Components

The following additional software is required by Oracle Database 11g Release 2. Install the required or higher versions:

  • CRTE-BASYS V1.7F or CRTE-BASYS V1.8E or CRTE-BASYS V1.9A

  • SDF V4.7

  • SDF-P V2.5

  • SDF-A V4.1

  • EDT V17.0A

  • LMS V3.4

  • openSM2 V7.0

  • PTHREADS V1.3

  • ORACLE-TOOLS V1.0

    The Oracle Database utility ADRCI requires the zip utility in the POSIX environment for creating ADR incident packages, that can be uploaded to Oracle Support.

    Currently, the zip utility is not part of the supply unit of POSIX of Fujitsu BS2000/OSD. So you must download it separately from the download area of the Fujitsu Support website:

    http://support.ts.fujitsu.com/Download
    

    Download the software package called ORACLE-TOOLS. This software package contains the utilities zip and unzip. You can find this software package by entering the package name ORACLE-TOOLS into the search box of the download area. Install the software package ORACLE-TOOLS as described in the readme file.

Note:

  • The subsystem CRTEBASY must be loaded. On SQ server, the subsystem CRTEBASK must also be loaded.

  • SDF-A is optional. SDF-A is only required to update the SDF user syntax files for Oracle. If SDF-A is not available, then the update of the SDF user syntax files for Oracle is skipped. If the SDF syntax files for Oracle are not updated, then you can start Oracle utilities with BS2000 SDF commands in UNIX-style, only if the installation user ID is the default installation user ID ORAC1120.

  • The software components openSM2 and PTHREADS are required by the Oracle Management Agent.

3.3.2.5 Compiler and CRTE Requirements for Oracle Database Applications

If high-level languages, such as C or COBOL, are used to interface with the Oracle Database, then the following versions or higher are supported:

  • COBOL85 V2.3

  • COBOL2000 V1.2

  • CPP V3.0

  • CRTE V2.7F

  • CRTE V2.8E

  • CRTE V2.9

3.3.2.6 Additional Software Requirements

openUTM V6.0 or higher is required if you want to use Oracle Database in configurations with the transaction monitor openUTM.

3.3.3 Checking Network Setup

Typically, the computer on which you want to install Oracle Database is connected to the network as a member of a network domain. Besides the BCAM host name, the host should have a full qualified name (hostname.domain) that can be resolved by a DNS. This section describes the most important issues on a BS2000/OSD computer.

3.3.3.1 Checking Sockets subsystem

On S servers, the sockets subsystem SOC6 must be created and running. On SQ servers, the sockets subsystem SOC6-X8 must also be created and running. You can check the sockets subsystems with the following command:

/SHOW-SUBSYSTEM-STATUS SOC6*

3.3.3.2 Checking BCAM Timer

It is recommended to check the BCAM connection and letter timer. Your BS2000 system administrator can display the timer values with the following command:

/SHOW-BCAM-TIMER

The value for the connection timer, also called CONN in the output of the ISO section, should be set to a minimum of 600 seconds. It is recommended that the letter timer, also known as LETT in the STD section, should be set to a large value. The value 0 in the output indicates an infinite letter time.

3.3.3.3 Checking LWRESD

It is recommended to use the Light Weight Resolver (LWRESD) for host name resolution operations. The tasks for checking and administrating the LWRESD require the BS2000 system administrator privilege. Ask your BS2000 system administrator to check if the LWRESD is running by using the following command:

/SHOW-LWRESD-PARAMETERS

For example, the following output shows the parameter file in use:

RESOLV-FILE : :PVS1:$TSOS.SYSDAT.LWRESD.011.RESOLV.CONF

This parameter file must contain valid nameserver IP-addresses and a domain or search list of domains.

3.3.3.4 Checking Loopback Address

Check if the file $TSOS.SYSDAT.BCAM.ETC.HOSTS contains an entry for the loopback address. For example:

127.0.0.1                localhost loopback           # local address

3.3.3.5 Checking the Configuration Files in the POSIX File System

Check the network configuration files /etc/hosts and /etc/resolv.conf. These files must have the same contents as the corresponding files in the BS2000 administrator user ID TSOS. If there are any mismatches, then ask your BS2000 system administrator to synchronize the files.

3.3.4 Creating Required Operating System Users and Groups

If this is the first time Oracle software is installed on your system and depending on the installation of the Oracle Management Agent, you may have to create several BS2000 user IDs, POSIX users and groups. The BS2000 user ID for the Oracle Database 11g Release 2 software is called the installation user ID and the user ID where an Oracle database is stored is called the DBA user ID.

3.3.4.1 Creating the BS2000 Installation User ID

The BS2000 System Administrator must create a user ID under which you want the Oracle Database 11g Release 2 software to reside. This user ID is called the Oracle installation user ID or Oracle software owner. Throughout this guide, we refer to this user ID as ORAC1120. This user ID does not require any special BS2000 privileges.

When the BS2000 system administrator creates the installation user ID with the following command, the corresponding POSIX user is also created. The POSIX user attributes, namely, user number, group number, login directory and program, are assigned default values.

/ADD-USER ORAC1120,…

3.3.4.2 Creating the POSIX System Group

For installation under POSIX, the POSIX administrator or BS2000 System Administrator must create system groups in POSIX. As distinguished from other UNIX systems, the installation user ID (Oracle software owner) and the DBA user ID of an Oracle database are not identical. Therefore, the POSIX installation uses only one group, such as oracle, for Oracle software owner and Oracle database. This group is called Oracle installation group.

  • If this is not the first Oracle Database installation under POSIX, then you can determine the group name by using the following POSIX command:

    $ more /var/opt/oracle/oraInst.loc
    

    If the oraInst.loc file exists, then the output from this command is similar to the following:

    inventory_loc=/u01/app/oraInventory
    inst_group=oracle
    

    The inst_group parameter shows the group name of your former Oracle Database installation, here oracle.

  • To determine if this group is defined with a unique group-id, enter the following command:

    $ grep 'oracle' /etc/group
     
    

    If the output shows the group name and a group-id greater than 100, then the group exists.

    If the group-id is 100, then you must change the id to a distinct value greater than 100, for example, 104.

    If the group cannot be found in /etc/group,then ask your POSIX administrator or BS2000 system administrator to add the group name and a unique group number to the file /etc/group. The administrator must use a text editor, such as edt or vi to add a new line with the following specifications:

    groupname::groupnumber:user-id[,user-id,...]
    

    The following example shows a line in the file /etc/group for the group oracle:

    oracle::104:ORAC1120,ORADB11G
    

    Add further installation user IDs and all DBA user IDs to the line with the Oracle group-id.

3.3.4.3 Initializing the POSIX User

Before using the installation user ID as a POSIX user, the POSIX administrator or BS2000 system administrator must initialize the POSIX user with the following command:

/ADD-POSIX-USER USER-NAME=user-id,USER-NUMBER=nnn,GROUP-NUMBER=oracle group number,HOME-DIRECTORY=path[,RLOGIN-ACCOUNT=account]

Consider the following requirements:

  • The USER-NAME is the installation user ID.

  • The USER-NUMBER must be unique and greater than 100.

  • The GROUP-NUMBER must be the number of the Oracle installation group and greater than 100.

  • The HOME-DIRECTORY must be a valid path. Do not use a path which resides in the root or var file system. It is strictly recommended to create a separate file system for the POSIX users. An example for a valid HOME-DIRECTORY is /home/orac1120 where /home is the mount point of a POSIX file system.

  • The RLOGIN-ACCOUNT can be specified if you allow the remote access by using rlogin or ssh.

3.3.4.4 Creating Users and Groups for Oracle Databases

Typically Oracle databases in BS2000/OSD reside in BS2000 user IDs not equal to the Oracle database installation user ID. If you create a new DBA user ID for a new Oracle database, then you must also initialize the POSIX user in the same way as described in "Initializing the POSIX User". If you want to upgrade an existing Oracle database, then you must check if the POSIX user is initialized for the DBA user ID with the following BS2000 command:

/SHOW-POSIX-USER-ATTRIBUTES

If the output shows default values and the directory is /home/gast, then initialize the POSIX user with the following BS2000 command:

/ADD-POSIX-USER

The POSIX user attributes of an initialized POSIX user can be modified with the following BS2000 command:

/MODIFY-POSIX-USER-ATTRIBUTES

Finally, add the user to the Oracle installation group in the file /etc/group.

Note:

  • Ensure that the home directory does not reside in the root or var file system.

  • The USER-NUMBER must be unique and greater than 100.

  • The GROUP-NUMBER must be the number of the Oracle installation group.

3.3.5 Identify Required Directories in POSIX

You must identify or create the following directories in the POSIX file system for the Oracle software:

3.3.5.1 Oracle Base Directory

Oracle base directory is a top-level directory for Oracle software installations. Oracle recommends using a path similar to the following for the Oracle base directory:

/mount_point/app/software_owner

In this example:

  • mount_point is the mount point directory for the file system that contains the Oracle software. The examples in this guide use /u01 for the mount point directory.

  • software_owner is the operating system user name of the software owner installing the Oracle software.

The components /mount_point/app represent the operating system part of the path. Before you start the installation of Oracle Database 11g Release 2, you must create the operating system part of the path.

Note:

  • The installation user ID and the installation group must have read, write and execute permissions to the subdirectory app.

  • During Oracle Database software installation, you are prompted for a valid Oracle base directory. You can accept the default value or enter a new path. The installation procedure creates the Oracle base directory if possible.

You can use the same Oracle base directory for the installation of the Oracle Management Agent. Multiple Oracle installations require separate installation user IDs in BS2000/OSD with the consequence of creating separate Oracle base directories in the POSIX file system. The following are examples of Oracle base directories that can exist on the same system:

/u01/app/orac1120
/u01/app/ora10205

See "Create or Expand a File System for the Oracle Base Directory" for more information about the POSIX file system.

3.3.5.2 Oracle Inventory Directory

The Oracle Inventory directory (oraInventory) stores the inventory of all software installed on the system. It is required and shared by all Oracle software installations on a single system. If you have an existing Oracle Inventory path, then the Oracle installation procedure uses that Oracle Inventory.

The Oracle installation procedure derives the path for the Oracle Inventory directory from the file /var/opt/oracle/oraInst.loc. If this file does not exist, then it derives the inventory path from ORACLE_BASE and creates the Oracle Inventory directory in the following path: ORACLE_BASE/../oraInventory. For example, if ORACLE_BASE is set to /u01/app/orac1120, then the Oracle Inventory directory is created in the path /u01/app/oraInventory.

The Oracle installation procedure creates the Oracle subdirectories that you specify and sets the correct owner, group, and permissions for it. The operating system part of the path, for example, /u01/app must exist and you must have read, write and execute permissions in the directory app.

Note:

  • All Oracle software installations rely on the Oracle Inventory directory. Ensure that you back it up regularly.

  • Do not delete this directory unless you have completely removed all Oracle software from the system.

  • By default, the Oracle Inventory directory is not installed under the Oracle base directory. This is because all Oracle software installations share a common Oracle Inventory, so there is only one Oracle Inventory for all software owners. Whereas, there is a separate Oracle base directory for each user.

3.3.5.3 Oracle Home Directory

The Oracle home directory is the directory where you install the software for a particular Oracle product. When you run the Oracle installation procedure, it prompts you to specify the path of this directory. You can accept the recommended path or enter a new path. The directory that you specify must be a subdirectory of the Oracle base directory. Oracle recommends that you specify a path similar to the following for the Oracle home directory:

oracle_base_path/product/dbhome

The Oracle installation procedure creates the directory path that you specify. It also sets the correct owner, group, and permissions on it. You do not have to create this directory manually.

Note:

During the installation, you must not specify an existing directory that has predefined permissions applied to it as the Oracle home directory. If you do, then you may experience installation failure due to file and group ownership permission errors.

3.3.6 Identifying or Creating Oracle Base Directory in POSIX

Before starting the installation, you must either identify the operating system part of an existing Oracle base directory or if required, create one. This section contains information about the following topics:

Note:

You can create an Oracle base directory, even if other Oracle base directories exist on the system.

3.3.6.1 Identifying an Existing Oracle Base Directory in POSIX

Existing Oracle base directories can be identified as follows:

  • Identifying an existing Oracle Inventory directory.

    Search for the string 'inventory_loc' in the file /var/opt/oracle/oraInst.loc.

    $ grep 'inventory_loc' /var/opt/oracle/oraInst.loc
    

    If oraInst.loc exists, then the output is similar to the following:

    inventory_loc=/u01/app/oraInventory
    
  • Deriving an Oracle base directory from an existing Oracle home directory.

    Enter the following command to display the contents of the /var/opt/oracle/oratab file:

    $ more /var/opt/oratab
    

    If the oratab file exists, then it may contain lines similar to the following:

    *:/u01/app/orac1020/product/10g:N
    *:/oracl920/9.2.0:N
    

    The directory paths specified on each line identify Oracle home directories. Directory paths that end with the user name of the Oracle software owner are existing Oracle base directories. For the installation of Oracle Database 11g Release 2, you can choose the subdirectory /u01/app as root for your Oracle base directory. If you intend to use the orac1120 user to install the software, then you can choose the following directory:

    /u01/app/orac1120
    

Ensure that the Oracle base directory for this installation meets the following conditions:

  • It is not on the same file system as the operating system (root or var).

  • It has sufficient free disk space.

To determine the free disk space on the file system where the Oracle base directory is located, enter the following command:

$ df -k oracle_base_path

Note:

The installation procedure looks for an Oracle base directory and prompts you to accept the suggested path or to enter a new path.

3.3.6.2 Create or Expand a File System for the Oracle Base Directory

If you want to install the Oracle software into an existing file system with Oracle base directories but the POSIX file system has insufficient space, then the POSIX administrator or BS2000 system administrator can expand the file system with the Oracle base directory using the POSIX installer. Complete the following steps to expand the file system using the POSIX installer:

  1. Start the POSIX Installer using the following command:

    /START-POSIX-INSTALLATION
    
  2. Choose Administrate POSIX filesystems.

  3. Mark the desired file system and choose expand.

  4. Enter the number of PAM pages by which the file system should be expanded.

If you want the Oracle base directory to reside in a new POSIX files system, then the POSIX administrator or BS2000 system administrator must create a POSIX file system using the POSIX installer. Complete the following steps to create a POSIX file system using the POSIX installer:

  1. Start the POSIX installer using the following command:

    /START-POSIX-INSTALLATION
    
  2. Choose Administrate POSIX filesystems and then, choose append.

The POSIX installer allocates a new POSIX container file in the BS2000 file system and creates the POSIX file system inside the container. The POSIX installer also asks for a mount point for the new file system. If the mount point does not exist, then it is created in the root system and the new file system is mounted. By default, the owner of the new file system is SYSROOT. The administrator must now create the Oracle base directory and specify the correct owner, group, and permissions for it with the following specifications:

# mkdir -p /mount_point/app/oracle_sw_owner
# chown -R oracle_sw_owner:oracle_installation_group /mount_point/app/oracle_sw_owner
# chmod -R 775 /mount_point/app/oracle_sw_owner

For example:

# mkdir -p /u01/app/orac1120
# chown -R orac1120:oracle /u01/app/orac1120
# chmod -R 775 /u01/app/orac1120

3.4 Installing the Oracle Database Software

The Oracle Database 11g Release 2 software is available in a zipped LMS library. Complete the following steps to install the Oracle Database software:

  1. The software must be copied to a temporary location on a Windows or UNIX system that has FTP access to the BS2000 system where you are to install the software.

    Download the installation files from Oracle Software Delivery Cloud (https://edelivery.oracle.com/) and move the zip file to this Windows or UNIX system.

  2. Unzip the zip file with a zip utility, such as WinZip, into a temporary location on this system. The following files should be created:

    welcome.htm: Starting point for accessing the documentation.

    doc/: Contains the platform specific documentation for Oracle Database on BS2000/OSD.

    And the installation files for one of the following platforms:

    • ora11202.s390.lib: Staging library for Fujitsu BS2000/OSD (S Series)

    • ora11202.sq.lib: Staging library for Fujitsu BS2000/OSD (SQ Series)

  3. Transfer the staging library with FTP binary into a user ID on the BS2000 system. This can either be the Oracle installation user ID, for example, ORAC1120, or any other user ID. Before the transfer, if you are using BS2000 FTP, preallocate the file by using the following FTP file command:

    file ora11202.s390.lib,fcbtype=pam,blkctrl=no,blksize=(std,2),space=820000
    

    Use the following command if you are using FTP on the platform where you had unzipped the file:

    quote file ora11202.s390.lib,fcbtype=pam,blkctrl=no,blksize=(std,2),space=820000
    
  4. If you have transferred the staging library to a user ID not equal to the Oracle installation user ID, then you must grant access to the staging library for all users, with the following command:

    /MODIFY-FILE-ATTRIBUTES ORA11202.S390.LIB,USER-ACCESS=*ALL-USERS
    
  5. Log in to the installation user ID, for example, ORAC1120.

  6. If the staging library resides in the installation user ID, then call the Oracle installation procedure as follows:

    /CALL-PROCEDURE (ORA11202.S390.LIB,ORAINST.PRC)
    

    If you have stored the staging library in a different BS2000 user ID, then call the Oracle installation procedure as follows:

    /CALL-PROCEDURE (staging_userid.ORA11202.S390.LIB,ORAINST.PRC),(INSTUID=staging_userid) 
    

    For example:

    /CALL-PROCEDURE ($FOO.ORA11202.S390.LIB,ORAINST.PRC),(INSTUID=$FOO)
    

The Oracle installation procedure performs the following actions:

  • Checks hardware and software requirements

  • Checks the available disk space for the BS2000 files and POSIX files

  • Extracts the files from the staging library

  • Installs Oracle software in the installation user ID

  • Updates the SDF syntax files if SDF-A is available

  • Installs Oracle Database software in the POSIX file system

  • Registers the software in the Oracle Inventory file

The following is the complete syntax of the installation procedure:

/CALL-PROCEDURE ([staging_userid.]ORA11202.{S390|SQ}.LIB,ORAINST.PRC)[,
( [ CMD={INSTALL|UNINSTALL}] 
[,INSTUID=staging_userid]
[,OLDUID=old_userid] 
[,ORACLE-BASE={*DIALOG|oracle_base}]
[,ORACLE-HOME={*DIALOG|oracle_home}]
[,DEBUG={Y|N}]
[,PROCLOG={Y|N}] )]
Parameter Value Description
CMD INSTALL|UNINSTALL

default: INSTALL

action: install or uninstall Oracle Database software
INSTUID user ID of staging library

default: ''

BS2000 user ID where the staging library is located.
OLDUID old user ID used in scripts

default:$ORAC1120

User ID stored in several scripts when the software is released. Is updated to the current user ID during installation.
ORACLE-BASE *DIALOG|oracle_base

default: *DIALOG

The Oracle base directory is required for the installation of Oracle Database 11g Release 2 in the POSIX file system. The default value *DIALOG, indicates the prompting for an Oracle base directory.
ORACLE-HOME *DIALOG|oracle_home

default: *DIALOG

The Oracle home directory is required for the installation of Oracle Database 11g Release 2 in the POSIX file system. The default value *DIALOG indicates the prompting for an Oracle home directory.
DEBUG Y|N

default: N

Debug the installation procedures.
PROCLOG Y|N

default: N

Use the logging feature of the BS2000 command CALL-PROCEDURE

The installation procedure also provides the opportunity to run the installation in a background task. In this case, you must specify the parameters ORACLE-BASE and ORACLE-HOME, otherwise the installation is aborted. Since the installation takes about 250 CPU seconds, Oracle recommends that you set the CPU-LIMIT to at least 300. You can start the Installation as follows:

/ENTER-PROCEDURE 
(ORA11202.S390.LIB,ORAINST.PRC),(ORACLE-BASE='/u01/app/orac1120',ORACLE-HOME='/u01/app/orac1120/product/dbhome'),CPU-LIMIT=300

The installation is logged to the file INSTALL.ORAINST.LST.

The installation of the Oracle Database software in the POSIX file system requires an ORACLE_BASE and ORACLE_HOME path. During installation you are prompted for these paths, if the installation runs in the dialog mode and if you have not specified the parameters in the procedure call. You can accept the suggested paths or enter new paths.

3.5 Oracle Database Postinstallation Tasks

To complete the installation, the POSIX administrator or BS2000 system administrator has to run the oracle_home_path/root.sh scripts as follows:

  • In the BS2000 environment use the following command

    /EXECUTE-POSIX-CMD CMD='oracle_home_path/root.sh'
    

    For example,

    /EXECUTE-POSIX-CMD CMD='/u01/app/orac1120/product/dbhome/root.sh'
    
  • In the POSIX environment (shell) use the following command

    # sh oracle_home_path/root.sh
    

    For example:

    # sh /u01/app/orac1120/product/dbhome/root.sh
    

If this is the first Oracle Database installation on the BS2000 server, then the root script completes the following actions:

  • Creates the path /var/opt/oracle

  • Creates the file /var/opt/oracle/oraInst.loc

  • Creates an empty file /var/opt/ortacle/oratab

  • If the product APACHE is installed, then it creates a link in the lib directory of the APACHE installation to the Oracle Client shared library in the Oracle home lib directory.

3.6 Installing Multiple Oracle Systems

You can also install multiple Oracle systems, based on the same or different versions of Oracle software. In this case, different versions of the software must be installed under different installation user IDs.

3.7 Removing Oracle Database Software

If you want to remove Oracle Database software from your system, then log in to the Oracle installation user ID and use the installation procedure as follows:

/CALL-PROCEDURE INSTALL.P.ORAINST,(CMD=UNINSTALL)

In this case, the Oracle installation procedure completes the following actions:

  • Removes the Oracle Database software from the POSIX file system

  • Updates the Oracle inventory

  • Removes the Oracle Database software from the BS2000 file system

Note:

Only the files installed by the Oracle installation procedure, namely, ORAINST.PRC, are removed from the system. Files created by a user or by an Oracle instance are left in the Oracle home directory and installation user ID.