10 Managing Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Control

In this chapter:

Database Control Overview

This chapter describes the functionality and administration of Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Control (Database Control), the Web-based interface and primary tool for managing an Oracle database. Using Database Control, you can perform administrative tasks such as creating schema objects (tables, views, indexes, and so on), managing user security, managing database memory and storage, backing up and recovering your database, and importing and exporting data. You can also view performance and status information about your database.

After you have installed the Oracle Database software, created or upgraded a database, and configured the network, you can use Database Control to manage your database. Database Control also provides an interface for both performance advisors and Oracle utilities such as SQL*Loader and Recovery Manager (RMAN).

Oracle also offers separately licensed Oracle Enterprise Manager management packs, management plug-ins, and other products that you can purchase to enhance the capabilities of Oracle Enterprise Manager in specific environments.

Understanding the Enterprise Manager Directories

When you install Oracle Database, you also install Database Control by default. As a result, the Oracle Database installation procedure installs a set of Enterprise Manager directories and files into the $ORACLE_HOME directory.

In particular, the emctl commands required to control Database Control are installed into the $ORACLE_HOME/bin directory.

The Management Agent and Management Service support files are installed in two locations in an installation of Oracle Database:

  • Files that are common and shared among all instances of the database are stored in the following directory:

    • $ORACLE_HOME/sysman

      For example, the administration files, which define the supported target types and the scripts used to perform Management Agent configuration tasks are stored in the $ORACLE_HOME/sysman/admin directory

  • Files that are unique to each instance of the database are stored in the following directory:

    • $ORACLE_HOME/hostname_dbuniquename/ (for a single-instance database)

    • $ORACLE_HOME/nodename_dbuniquename/ (for an Oracle Real Applications Cluster (Oracle RAC) database)

      Note:

      In Oracle Database 10g, files that are unique to each instance of the database are stored in following directory of the Oracle Database 10g home:
      • $ORACLE_HOME/hostname_sid/ (for a single-instance database)

      • $ORACLE_HOME/nodename_sid/ (for an Oracle RAC database)

Throughout the rest of this chapter, $ORACLE_HOME/hostname_dbuniquename/ and $ORACLE_HOME/nodename_dbuniquename may be used interchangeably. (For release 10g of the database, the directories are $ORACLE_HOME/hostname_sid/ and $ORACLE_HOME/nodename_sid/.) Both paths refer to the same concept: the Enterprise Manager directory for the specific database instance. The difference is that $ORACLE_HOME/hostname_dbuniquename/ is used for single-instance databases, while $ORACLE_HOME/nodename_dbuniquename/ is used for cluster (Oracle RAC) databases. In cluster databases, nodename refers to the public name of the node, as specified during Cluster Ready Services (CRS) configuration for cluster environments.

For example, if the database host name is mgmt1.example.com and the system identifier for the database name is db11, the log files for the Management Agent and Management Service for that instance are installed in the following directory:

$ORACLE_HOME/mgmt1.example.com_db11/sysman/log/

If a hostname_dbuniquename directory does not exist in the Oracle home directory, then Database Control was never configured for the database instance. Note that in Oracle Database Release 10g, the directory is hostname_sid.

In addition, the files required to deploy the Database Control as a J2EE application are installed into the $ORACLE_HOME/oc4j/j2ee/ directory structure. Database Control is a J2EE application that is deployed using the standalone version of Oracle Application Server Containers for J2EE (OC4J). The OC4J_DBConsole directory contains the template files that are used to create database-specific deployment directories for each Database Control instance deployed in the Oracle home.

The installation and configuration files are stored in the $ORACLE_HOME directory in the following sub-directories:

  • cfgtoollogs/dbua

  • cfgtoollogs/rconfig

  • cfgtoollogs/dbca

  • cfgtoollogs/emca

Figure 10-1 summarizes the location of the important Enterprise Manager directories in a typical Oracle home directory for Oracle Database 11g Release 2 or later. Note that references to hostname_dbuniquename are for single-instance databases; cluster databases have paths of the form nodename_dbuniquename.

Figure 10-1 Directory Structure in the Management Service Home for Release 11g or Later

Description of Figure 10-1 follows
Description of "Figure 10-1 Directory Structure in the Management Service Home for Release 11g or Later"

Similarly, Figure 10-2 displays the directory structure of Enterprise Manager directories in the Oracle home directory for Oracle Database Release 10g.

Figure 10-2 Directory Structure in the Management Home for Release 10g

Description of Figure 10-2 follows
Description of "Figure 10-2 Directory Structure in the Management Home for Release 10g"

Configuring Database Control During and After Installation

The following sections describe how Database Control is configured during installation, and how you can configure Database Control after installation.

Overview of Configuration Options

The following are the products, tools, and utilities you, as a database administrator, can use to configure the Database Control environment:

  • Oracle Universal Installer

    Oracle Universal Installer (OUI) is a utility that installs your Oracle software and options. It can automatically start Oracle Database Configuration Assistant to install a database.

  • DBCA

    Oracle Database Configuration Assistant (DBCA) is a utility that creates a database from templates that are supplied by Oracle. It also enables you to create your own database by copying a preconfigured seed database, thus saving the time and effort needed to generate and customize a new database.

  • Database Upgrade Assistant

    The Database Upgrade Assistant is a tool that guides you through the upgrade of your existing database to a new Oracle Database release.

  • Net Configuration Assistant

    Net Configuration Assistant (NETCA) is a utility that enables you to configure listeners and naming methods, which are critical components of the Oracle Database network.

Configuring Database Control During Installation

If you create a database while installing Oracle Database, you have the option of configuring your database so it can be managed by Oracle Enterprise Manager Grid Control Console or by Database Control Console.

To select Grid Control Console as your management option, the Oracle Management Service must be installed on a network host. In addition, the Oracle Management Agent must be installed on the host where you are installing the database. Otherwise, the Grid Control Console option is unavailable and you must instead choose to manage your database with Database Control.

For most of the Oracle installation types, you must choose either Database Control or Grid Control as your management option when you create a database during the installation.

However, if you create a database using one of the following methods, you can choose not to configure Database Control:

  • Choosing the Advanced database configuration option during an Enterprise or Standard Edition installation

  • Running DBCA after the installation

Note that if you do not configure Database Control during installation of an Oracle Database 11g instance, a hostname_dbuniquename directory will not be created in the resulting Oracle home directory. When installing a release 10g database, a hostname_sid directory will not be created in the resulting Oracle home directory.

Configuring Database Control with DBCA

The primary method for configuring an existing Oracle database so it can be managed with Database Control is to use DBCA. You can use DBCA to create a new database or to reconfigure an existing database.

See Also:

"Installing Oracle Software and Building the Database" in the Oracle Database 2 Day DBA book for more information about using DBCA to create a new database instance, and Oracle Database 2 Day + Real Application Clusters Guide for Oracle RAC examples using DBCA.

To use DBCA to reconfigure your database so it can be managed with Database Control:

  1. Log in to the database host as a member of the administrative group that is authorized to install Oracle software and create and run the database.

  2. Start DBCA, change directory to the $ORACLE_HOME/bin directory, then enter the following command:

    $ ./dbca
    

    The DBCA Welcome page appears.

  3. Advance to the Operations page and select Configure Database Options.

  4. Advance to the Database page and select the database that you want to configure.

  5. Advance to the Management Options page and select the following options:

    • Configure the Database with Enterprise Manager

    • Use Database Control for Database Management

  6. Select any desired options for enabling e-mail notifications and enabling daily backups.

    For more information about Enterprise Manager notifications and daily backups, click Help on the Management Options page.

  7. Advance until the Finish button is available.

  8. Click Finish to reconfigure the database to use Database Control.

    After DBCA reconfigures the database, a new subdirectory appears in the Oracle home. In release 11g of the database and later, this directory is named using the following format and contains Database Control configuration and state files specific to the database you just configured:

    hostname_dbuniquename

    Note that for cluster databases, the directories are named:

    nodename_dbuniquename.

    In Oracle Database 10g, the new subdirectory is named:

    hostname_sid

    Likewise in Oracle Database 10g, for cluster databases the directories are named:

    nodename_sid

    For example:

    mycluster1.example.com_myNewDB
    

Configuring Database Control Using EMCA

When you use DBCA to configure Oracle 11g Release 2 (11.2), DBCA provides a graphical user interface to help you select Database Control options and to configure other aspects of your database.

However, to use the operating system command line to configure Database Control, you can use the Enterprise Manager Configuration Assistant (EMCA).

Caution:

When you configure Database Control using EMCA, the database may become unavailable and users may not be able to connect to the database or perform operations on the database.

To configure Database Control with EMCA:

  1. Set the ORACLE_HOME environment variable to specify the Oracle home for the database that you want to manage.

  2. Change directory to the $ORACLE_HOME/bin directory.

  3. Start EMCA by entering the following command with any of the optional command-line arguments shown in Table 10-1, "EMCA Command-Line Operations":

    $ ./emca
    

    Depending on the arguments that you include on the EMCA command line, EMCA prompts you for the information required to configure Database Control.

    For example, enter the following command to configure Database Control so that it will perform automatic daily backups of your database:

    $ ./emca -config dbcontrol db -backup
    

EMCA commands are in the following form:

emca [operation] [mode] [flags] [parameters]

Note:

To configure Database Control for single-instance database using Oracle Automatica Storage Management (ASM), no extra parameters need to be passed along with the EMCA command. Run the following command to configure the Database Control which will automatically detect the Oracle ASM instance:
$ emca -config dbcontrol db -repos create

Table 10-1 describes the valid execution operations and modes and lists the optional parameters in brackets. Table 10-2 discusses the flags and their behavior and Table 10-3 defines the optional parameters in detail. EMCA parameters are in the form [-parameterName parameterValue]. Multiple parameters can be used in combination at the command line.

Table 10-1 EMCA Command-Line Operations

Command Description

emca -h | --h | -help | --help

Use this option to display help messages for the EMCA utility. The options described in Table 10-1, Table 10-2, and Table 10-3, and the valid parameters you may include are listed.

emca –version

Prints the version information associated with EMCA.

emca -config dbcontrol db [-repos (create | recreate)] [-cluster] [-silent] [-backup] [parameters]

Configures Database Control for a database. Options include creating (or re-creating) the Database Control repository, configuring automatic backups, and performing these operations on a cluster database.

emca -config centralAgent (db | asm) [-cluster] [-silent] [parameters]

Configures central agent management for a database or an Oracle ASM instance. Options include performing this operation on a cluster environment. This operation will configure the database so that it can be centrally managed by the Oracle Enterprise Manager Grid Control Console. To use this option, you must have previously installed the Oracle Management Service component of Enterprise Manager on a network host. In addition, the Oracle Management Agent must be installed on the host on which you are running the database.

emca -config all db [-repos (create | recreate)] [-cluster] [-silent] [-backup] [parameters]

Configures both Database Control and central agent management for a database. The possible configuration options are similar to those described above.

emca -deconfig dbcontrol db [-repos drop] [-cluster] [-silent] [parameters]

Deconfigures Database Control for a database. Options include dropping the Database Control repository and performing these operations on a cluster database. For example, you might use this command to remove the Database Control configuration from a database you are planning to delete. In such a scenario, remove the Database Control configuration before physically deleting the database. This operation does not remove the actual database or its data files.

emca -deconfig centralAgent (db | asm) [-cluster] [-silent] [parameters]

Deconfigures central agent management for a database or an Oracle ASM instance. Options include performing this operation on a cluster environment. For example, you might use this command to remove the central agent management configuration from a database you are planning to delete. In such a scenario, remove the central agent management configuration before physically deleting the database. This operation does not remove the actual database or its data files.

emca -deconfig all db [-repos drop] [-cluster] [-silent] [parameters]

Deconfigures both Database Control and central agent management for a database. The possible deconfiguration options are similar to those described above.

emca -addNode (db | asm) [-silent] [parameters]

Configures Enterprise Manager for a new cluster instance of a database or ASM storage. For more information, see "Using EMCA With Oracle RAC". This option applies only to Release 11g.

emca -deleteNode (db | asm) [-silent] [parameters]

Deconfigures Enterprise Manager for a node being deleted. For more information, see "Using EMCA With Oracle RAC". This option applies only to Oracle Database Release 11g.

emca -addInst (db | asm) [-silent] [parameters]

Configures Enterprise Manager for a newly added cluster instance of an administrator-managed database or Oracle ASM storage. This parameter takes a SID for the instance being added. For more information, see "Using EMCA With Oracle RAC".

emca -deleteInst (db | asm) [-silent] [parameters]

Deconfigures Enterprise Manager for a newly deleted cluster instance of an administrator-managed database or Oracle ASM storage. This parameter takes a SID for the instance being deleted. This is discussed further below, in "Using EMCA With Oracle RAC".

emca -reconfig ports [-cluster] [parameters]

Explicitly reassigns Database Control ports. Options include performing this operation on a cluster environment. For more information, see "Specifying the Ports Used by Database Control".

emca -reconfig dbcontrol -cluster [-silent] [parameters]

Reconfigures Database Control deployment for a cluster database. Note that this command must be used with the -cluster option. For more information, see "Using EMCA With Oracle RAC".

emca -displayConfig dbcontrol -cluster [-silent] [parameters]

Displays information about the current deployment configuration of Database Control in a cluster environment. Note that this command must be used with the -cluster option. For more information, see "Using EMCA With Oracle RAC".

emca -upgrade (db | asm | db_asm) [-cluster] [-silent] [parameters]

Upgrades the configuration of an earlier release of Enterprise Manager to the current release. This operation can be performed for Oracle Database, Oracle ASM, or Oracle Database and Oracle ASM instances together simultaneously. This does not upgrade the actual database or Oracle ASM instances, nor does it upgrade the Enterprise Manager software. Instead, it upgrades the configuration files for the specified instance so that they are compatible with the current version of the Enterprise Manager software. EMCA will attempt to upgrade all instances of the specified database or Oracle ASM target, or both, on the host, across all Oracle homes (because it is likely that certain target properties, such as the listener port or Oracle home, have changed).

emca -restore (db | asm | db_asm) [-cluster] [-silent] [parameters]

Restores the current version of Enterprise Manager configuration to an earlier version. This is the inverse of the -upgrade option (and will reverse any changes that result from this operation).

emca -migrate -from dbcontrol -to centralAgent [-repos drop] [-cluster] [-silent] [parameters]

Migrates the Enterprise Manager configuration from Database Control to Central Agent.


Table 10-2 EMCA Command-Line Flags

Flag Description

db

Performs the operation for a database (including cluster databases). Use this option for databases that use Oracle ASM to store the data files. If a database is using Oracle ASM, all the configuration operations and modes described above (except for -upgrade and -restore) will detect this automatically and apply the changes to both the database and Oracle ASM instances.

asm

Performs the operation for an Oracle ASM-only instance (including cluster Oracle ASM instances).

db_asm

This flag can only be used in -upgrade and -restore mode. Performs the upgrade or restore operation for an Oracle Database and an Oracle ASM instance together. Database and Oracle ASM instances may be upgraded or restored separately (that is, upgrading an Oracle ASM instance does not require upgrading the database instances it services). Therefore, the Enterprise Manager configuration can be upgraded or restored separately for a database and its respective Oracle ASM instance.

-repos create

Creates a new Database Control management repository.

-repos drop

Drops the current Database Control management repository.

-repos recreate

Drops the current Database Control management repository and then re-creates a new one.

-cluster

Performs the operation for a cluster database or Oracle ASM instance.

-silent

Performs the operation without prompting for additional information. If this mode is specified, all the required parameters must be entered at the command line or specified in an input file using the –respFile argument. You can view a list of the available parameters by entering emca -help at the command line.

-backup

Configures automatic backup for a database. EMCA will prompt for daily automatic backup options. The default Enterprise Manager settings will be used to backup the database files.

Note: If you use this option, EMCA will use the value of the db_recovery_file_dest initialization parameter to identify the flashback recovery area for the automated backups. If that parameter is not set, EMCA will generate an error. You can modify these settings later using the Maintenance page in Database Control. For more information, see the Database Control online help.


Table 10-3 EMCA Command-Line Parameters

Parameter Description

-respFile

Specifies the path of an input file listing parameters for EMCA to use while performing its configuration operation. For more information, see "Using an Input File for EMCA Parameters".

-SID

Database system identifier.

-PORT

Port number for the listener servicing the database.

-ORACLE_HOME

Database Oracle home, as an absolute path.

-ORACLE_HOSTNAME

Local database hostname.

-LISTENER_OH

Oracle home from which the listener is running. If the listener is running from an Oracle home other than the one on which the database is running, the parameter LISTENER_OH must be specified.

-HOST_USER

Host system user name (for automatic backup).

-HOST_USER_PWD

Host system user password (for automatic backup).

-BACKUP_SCHEDULE

Schedule in the form of "HH:MM" for daily automatic backups.

-EMAIL_ADDRESS

E-mail address for notifications.

-MAIL_SERVER_NAME

Outgoing Mail (SMTP) server for notifications.

-ASM_OH

Oracle ASM Oracle home.

-ASM_SID

System identifier for Oracle ASM instance.

-ASM_PORT

Port number for the listener servicing the Oracle ASM instance.

-ASM_USER_ROLE

User role for connecting to the Oracle ASM instance.

-ASM_USER_NAME

User name for connecting to the Oracle ASM instance.

-ASM_USER_PWD

Password for connecting to the Oracle ASM instance.

-DBSNMP_PWD

Password for the DBSNMP user.

-SYSMAN_PWD

Password for the SYSMAN user.

-SYS_PWD

Password for the SYS user.

-SRC_OH

Oracle home of the database with Enterprise Manager configuration to be upgraded or restored.

-DBCONTROL_HTTP_PORT

Use this parameter to specify the port you use to display the Database Control Console in your Web browser. For more information, see "Specifying the Ports Used by Database Control".

-AGENT_PORT

Use this parameter to specify the Management Agent port for Database Control. For more information, see "Specifying the Ports Used by Database Control".

-RMI_PORT

Use this parameter to specify the RMI port for Database Control. For more information, see "Specifying the Ports Used by Database Control".

-JMS_PORT

Use this parameter to specify the JMS port for Database Control. For more information, see "Specifying the Ports Used by Database Control".

-CLUSTER_NAME

Cluster name (for cluster databases).

-DB_UNIQUE_NAME

Database unique name (for cluster databases).

-SERVICE_NAME

Database service name (for cluster databases).

-EM_NODE

Node from which Database Control console is to be run (for cluster databases). For more information, see "Using EMCA With Oracle RAC".

-EM_NODE_LIST

Comma-delimited list of NODEs for agent-only configurations, uploading data to -EM_NODE. For more information, see "Using EMCA With Oracle RAC".

-EM_SWLIB_STAGE_LOC

Software library location.

-PORTS_FILE

Path to a static file specifying the ports to use. The default value is: ${ORACLE_HOME}/install/staticports.ini.


Using an Input File for EMCA Parameters

Instead of answering a series of prompts when you run EMCA, you can use the -respFile argument to specify an input file. The input file you create must be in a format similar to the following example:

PORT=1521
SID=DB
DBSNMP_PWD=xpE234D
SYSMAN_PWD=KDOdk432

After you create an EMCA input file, you can use it on the command line as follows:

$ ./emca -config dbcontrol db -respFile input_file_path

For example, to configure the Database Control to perform daily backups and create the Database Control Management Repository, create an input file similar to the one shown in Example 10-1 and enter the following command at the operating system prompt:

$ ./emca -config dbcontrol db -repos create -backup -respFile input_file_path

Example 10-1 Sample EMCA Input File

PORT=1521
SID=DB
DBSNMP_PWD=dow3l224
SYSMAN_PWD=squN3243
HOST_USER=johnson
HOST_USER_PWD=diTf32of
SYS_PWD=qlKj4352
BACKUP_SCHEDULE=06:30

Specifying the Ports Used by Database Control

When you initially install Oracle Database or configure Database Control with EMCA, Database Control uses a set of default system ports. For example, by default, you access Database Control using port 1158, as shown in the following example:

http://host.domain:1158/em

This is the default port assigned to Database Control by the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA). Likewise, the default Database Control Agent port, as assigned by the IANA, is 3938.

To use ports other than the default ports, use the following EMCA command-line arguments when you initially configure the Database Control with EMCA. Alternatively, you can explicitly assign ports after configuring Database Control using the following command:

$ emca -reconfig ports [-cluster]

Note:

You can also use the following EMCA command-line arguments to configure Database Control after you have installed and configured Oracle Database.

The following list summarizes the EMCA command-line arguments that control the standard Database Control port assignments:

  • -DBCONTROL_HTTP_PORT port_number

    This port is used in the Database Control Console URL. For example, if you set this port to 5570, you can then use the following URL to display the Database Control Console:

    http://host.domain:5570/em
    
  • -RMI_PORT port_number

    This port is used by the Remote Method Invocation (RMI) system, which is part of the J2EE software required by Database Control. The default port can be changed if you want to configure a specific port for Database Control. When a port other than the default port (1521) is used, use the -RMI_PORT or -JMS_PORT options along with the emca reconfig command.

  • -JMS_PORT port_number

    This port is used by the OC4J Java Message Service (JMS), which is part of the J2EE software required by Database Control. The default port can be changed if the user wants to configure a specific port for Database Control. When a port other than the default port (1521) is used, use the -RMI_PORT or -JMS_PORT options along with the emca reconfig command.

  • -AGENT_PORT port_number

    This port is used by the Database Control Management Agent, which is monitoring and administering the database for the Database Control.

Using EMCA With Oracle RAC

Each EMCA command can be used in Oracle RAC environments, and certain commands are only applicable in cluster setups. To perform cluster commands using EMCA, use the cluster flag that is available in almost every EMCA operational mode.

When you use EMCA to configure Database Control for Oracle RAC, you configure the Database Control for each instance in the cluster. However, by default the Database Control Console will only start on the local node. On every other node of the cluster, only the Enterprise Manager agent will start. This is because the Database Control Console opens several connections to the database. If an instance of the console is running on every host in the cluster, then you may easily exceed the maximum number of permitted open connections on a 32-node or 64-node environment.

To remedy this situation, the Database Control is started only on the local node. On every other node, the commands emctl start dbconsole and emctl stop dbconsole only start and stop the agent. Each of the remote agents will upload their respective data to the console running on the local node, from which you can monitor and manage all the targets in the cluster. The following subdirectory is created on each instance of the Oracle RAC database where nodename is the name of a node in the cluster, and dbuniquename is the database instance name of the database for release 11g and later:

$ORACLE_HOME/nodename_dbuniquename

For Oracle Database release 10g, nodename is the name of the node in the cluster and sid is the database instance name:

$ORACLE_HOME/nodename_sid

However, note that if you upgrade an existing Oracle RAC database configured with Database Control to the current release, then the existing Database Control configuration is retained. The existing Database Control has a Database Control running on each cluster node. The console will still be started on each individual node.

To modify the existing configuration in a release 11g and later database, use the following command where nodename is the public name of the node and node_list is a comma-delimited list of nodes where the database is configured:

$ emca -reconfig dbcontrol –cluster –EM_NODE nodename -EM_NODE_LIST node_list

To modify the existing configuration in a release 10g database, use the following command where nodename is the public name of the node and SID_list is a comma-delimited list of database system identifiers:

$ emca -reconfig dbcontrol –cluster –EM_NODE nodename -EM_SID_LIST SID_list

Note:

SCAN listener configuration is mandatory when configuring Database Control in an Oracle RAC environment.

This command reconfigures the current Database Control setup and performs the following actions in sequence:

Note:

Unless otherwise specified, all command options in the following actions represent release 11g and later databases. Release 10g database differences are called out in the sequence.
  1. Starts a Database Control Console on nodename, if one has not been started yet.

  2. Redirects the agents monitoring the database instances in node_list (SID_list in release 10g of the database) so that they upload their data to the console running on nodename. Also, agents monitoring database instances on nodename will also upload their data to the local console. Note that if you do not enter the command options -EM_NODE or -EM_NODE_LIST (-EM_SID_LIST for release 10g of the database) at the command line, you will be prompted to enter them.

-EM_NODE defaults to the local node if it is not specified when prompted. If not specified, -EM_NODE_LIST (-EM_SID_LIST for release 10g of the database) defaults to all nodes where the database is configured.

You can use this command to start the console on multiple nodes. For instance, on an 8-node cluster with nodes node1, node2, node3, node4, node5, node6, node7, and node8, you can run the following commands in succession:

$ emca -reconfig dbcontrol –cluster –EM_NODE node1 -EM_NODE_LIST node2,node3,node4
$ emca -reconfig dbcontrol –cluster –EM_NODE node5 -EM_NODE_LIST node6,node7,node8

For release 10g databases, run the following commands in succession:

$ emca -reconfig dbcontrol –cluster –EM_NODE node1 -EM_SID_LIST sid2,sid3,sid4
$ emca -reconfig dbcontrol –cluster –EM_NODE node5 -EM_SID_LIST sid6,sid7,sid8

In this scenario, there are two Database Control consoles running, one on node1 and the other on node5. From either of these consoles, you can manage and monitor all targets in the cluster.

For information about the current cluster configuration, run the following command:

$ emca -displayConfig dbcontrol –cluster

The preceding command prompts for the database unique name for the cluster database. This will print the current configuration onto the screen, indicating the nodes that have consoles running on them and the consoles where each agent is uploading.

To configure Enterprise Manager for a newly added node of a cluster, enter the following command:

$ emca -addNode db

To configure Enterprise Manager for a new cluster instance of an administrator-managed database or Oracle ASM storage, enter the following command:

$ emca -addInst db

For Oracle Database release 11g, on cluster policy managed databases another common operation is the addition and deletion of cluster nodes. After you add a new node, you can run EMCA to configure Database Control or central agent management for that node using the command emca -addNode db. Running EMCA only configures Enterprise Manager so that you can manage the instance in a way consistent with the rest of the cluster database instances.

For Oracle Database releases 10g and 11, on cluster databases you can create and delete database instances. After you create a new instance, you can run EMCA to configure Database Control or central agent management for that instance using the command emca -addInst db. Running EMCA does not create the actual database instance; it only configures Enterprise Manager so that you can manage the instance in a way consistent with the rest of the cluster database instances.

On release 11g and later, when configuring Enterprise Manager for a new node, run the EMCA command only after you have added the node. Also, run the command from a node in the cluster that already has Enterprise Manager configured for it, because the Enterprise Manager configuration settings on the existing node are propagated to the new node when you run the command. Because the -addNode option can be used only in an Oracle RAC environment, you do not need to use the -cluster option on the command line.

After running the command emca -addNode db, enter the node name and database unique name for the node and database. For example:

Node name: node2
Database Unique Name: EM102

Similarly in releases 10g and 11g of the database, when configuring Enterprise Manager for a new instance, run the EMCA command only after you have created the instance. Also, run the command from a node in the cluster that already has Enterprise Manager configured for its associated database instance, as these configuration settings will be propagated to the new instance. Do not run this command from the node on which the new instance was created. Note that this option can be used only in an Oracle RAC environment so you do not need to use the -cluster option on the command line. After running the command emca -addInst db, enter the following information for the node and database:

Node name: node2
Database Unique Name: EM102
Database SID: EM1022

For release 11g and later, to deconfigure Enterprise Manager for a specific node you are deleting from the cluster, log in to a different node from the one you plan to delete, then use the command emca -deleteNode db. Running this command removes the Enterprise Manager configuration so that you will no longer be able to manage the instance with Enterprise Manager on that node. Ensure that you run the EMCA command before you delete the actual cluster node. Because this option can be used only in an Oracle RAC environment, you do not need to use the -cluster option on the command line.

For Oracle Database release 10g, to deconfigure Enterprise Manager for a specific database instance (typically before the database instance is deleted), use the inverse command, emca -deleteInst db. Running EMCA does not delete the database instance; it only removes the Enterprise Manager configuration so that you will no longer be able to manage the instance with Enterprise Manager.

Ensure that you run the EMCA command before you delete the actual cluster database instance. Also, ensure that you run the command from a different node and not from the node on which the database instance will be deleted. Note that this option can be used only in an Oracle RAC environment, so you do not need to use the -cluster option on the command line.

For more information, see Table 10-1 which describes EMCA command line operations.

Note:

If you use the command emca -cluster to configure Database Control for Oracle RAC, then check the TNS_ADMIN environment variable on all cluster nodes. If you have a different TNS_ADMIN set for each node, then the listener for the target cannot be configured correctly. In this case, set the value of TNS_ADMIN the same on all cluster nodes before running the emca -cluster command.

Administering Database Control

This section provides a brief description of the activities that you can perform while administering your database using Database Control. The following sections describe some of the tasks available for managing an Oracle database:

Starting and Stopping the Database Control Process

To access Database Control from a browser, the Database Control console process dbconsole must be running on the database host computer. The dbconsole process is automatically started after installation. However, if the system must be restarted, you can start the process manually at the command line or start it as a service in Windows. You can also run commands to stop the process or view its status. If the process is stopped, then it must be manually restarted before you use Database Control.To start or stop the database or to view the status of the dbconsole process from the command line:

  1. Configure the operating system environment variables, as described in the "Configuring the Operating System Environment Variables" chapter in the Oracle Database 2 Day DBA guide.

  2. Do one of the following:

    • To start the process, run the following command:

      $ ./emctl start dbconsole
      
    • To stop the process, run the following command:

      $ ./emctl stop dbconsole
      
    • To view the status of the process, run the following command:

      $ ./emctl status dbconsole
      

    Note:

    If you are prompted to set the ORACLE_UNQNAME environment variable, then set this variable and run the emctl command again. Set the variable to the database unique name (the value of the DB_UNIQUE_NAME database parameter). A typical value for DB_UNIQUE_NAME is orcl.

    To start or stop Database Control as a service on Microsoft Windows:

    1. Do one of the following:

      • On Windows XP and Windows Server 2003, click Start, then select Control Panel.

      • On Windows 2000 Server, click Start, select Settings, then select Control Panel.

      The Control Panel window opens.

    2. Double-click the Administrative Tools icon, and then double-click the Services icon.

      The Services window opens.

      Oracle Database services begin with Oracle. The service is listed as OracleDBConsolesid, where sid is the system identifier (SID) for your database instance. The status of the process is listed in the Status column.

    3. Double-click the OracleDBConsolesid service (for Release 10g). Double-click the OracleDBConsoledbuniquename service (for Release 11g).

      The Service Properties window opens.

    4. In the Startup Type list, ensure that either Manual or Automatic is selected.

    5. Do one of the following:

      • To start the service, click Start then click OK

      • To stop the service, click Stop then click OK.

Accessing the Database Home Page

The Database Home page is the main database management page in Database Control.

To access the Database Home page:

  1. Ensure that the dbconsole process is running on the database host computer.

    See the "Starting and Stopping the Database Control Process" section.

  2. In your Web browser, enter the following URL:

    https://hostname:portnumber/em
    

    For example, if you installed the database on a host computer named comp42.example.com, and the installer indicated that your Enterprise Manager Console HTTP port number is 1158, then enter the following URL:

    https://comp42.example.com:1158/em
    

    If you have recently installed Oracle Database, you can determine the port number for Database Control on Linux and UNIX systems by viewing the $ORACLE_HOME/install/portlist.ini file. Otherwise, you can determine the port number for Database Control by searching for REPOSITORY_URL in the ORACLE_$HOME/Oracle_sid/sysman/config/emd.properties file, where Oracle_sid is the system identifier (SID) for your database instance.

    You must do the following to start the database:

    1. Click Startup/Shutdown, enter the host login user name and password, then enter the database login user name and password.

      For the database user name and password, enter SYS and the password that you specified during installation.

    2. Click OK to start the database instance, then in the Confirmation page, click Yes to start the database in open mode.

  3. Log in to the database with a user account that is authorized to access Database Control.

    This user initially could be SYS or SYSTEM, with the password that you specified during database installation.

    While the SYSTEM account can be used to perform day-to-day administrative tasks, Oracle strongly recommends creating named user accounts for administering the Oracle database to enable monitoring of database activity. To back up, recover, or upgrade the database, you must log in as a SYSDBA user.

    Database Control displays the Database Home page.

The subpage links across the top of the page enable you to access performance, availability, and other administration pages to manage your database. The features provided by these pages are discussed in other sections of this documentation.

The various sections of the Database Home page provide information about the environment and status of the database. For example, the Alerts and Diagnostic Summary sections warn you of errors and performance problems that are impacting the operation of your database. You can click the provided links to see more detail about the problem areas, and, in some cases, to obtain recommendations for resolving the problems. These topics are discussed in the 2 Day DBA guide, in the "Monitoring and Tuning the Database" chapter.

Creating Database Control Administrative Users

When you log in to Database Control using the SYS, SYSTEM, or SYSMAN user accounts, you are logging in as the Database Control super user. These are the only accounts that are automatically granted the roles and privileges required to administer Database Control itself. Examples of Database Control administration tasks include the following:

  • Creating other Database Control administrators.

  • Configuring e-mail and other notification methods.

  • Setting alert thresholds for database metrics, such as tablespace space usage percentage exceeded or SQL response time exceeded.

  • Selecting database policies to apply, so that Database Control can show alerts if a policy is violated. (An example policy is "A nonsystem user cannot use the SYSTEM or SYSAUX tablespace as its default tablespace.")

  • Defining blackouts, which are time periods in which database monitoring is suspended so that maintenance operations do not skew monitoring data or generate needless alerts.

You can create Database Control administrative users who have enough privileges to administer Database Control itself, but lack the high-level database administration privileges of the SYS and SYSTEM users. This practice enables you to assign the minimum privileges required for other Database Control administrators to do their jobs, which is a best practice for database security. You can also create a Database Control administrative account for yourself, thus avoiding logging in as SYS or SYSTEM until you must perform database administration tasks.

Using the following procedure, you can assign Database Control administrative privileges to an existing database user or create a new Database Control administrative user. When you create a new Database Control administrative user, a user account is created for that user for the database. You must then decide which system privileges, object privileges, or roles to grant the user, if any, to perform database administration tasks.

To create a Database Control administrative user:

  1. On any Database Control page, at the top of the page, click Setup.

    The Enterprise Manager Configuration page appears, showing the Overview of Setup page.

  2. In the left navigation bar, click Administrators.

    The Administrators page appears.

  3. Click Create.

    The Create Administrator: Properties page appears.

  4. In the Name field, enter the name of an existing database user, or click the flashlight icon next to the field and select an existing database user.

  5. Enter one or more e-mail addresses for this administrator only if you plan to set up e-mail notifications for the database.

  6. Click Review to view a page that summarizes the information that you entered.

  7. Click Finish to configure the database user as a Database Control administrative user.

    The Administrators page appears, showing the new administrator in the list.

Granting Access to Database Control for Non-Administrative Users

As a database administrator, you can log in to Database Control with the SYS or SYSTEM user account to perform administrative and other tasks. Non-administrative users may also want to log in to Database Control. For example, application developers may want to take advantage of the Database Control interface to create or modify tables, indexes, views, and so on. You must grant access to Database Control to these users before they can log in.For non administrative users to have access to Database Control, they must be granted the SELECT_CATALOG_ROLE role.

Setting Database Control Preferences

This section discusses setting user preferences for Database Control.

About Database Control Preferences

Database Control enables you to set user preferences in the following areas:

  • Notification

    These settings enable Database Control to e-mail you alerts. Alerts are notifications that the database is in an undesirable state and needs your attention. By default, the Database Home page lists all alerts. However, setup is required for e-mail notification. For more information about alerts and setting up notifications, see the "Setting Up Direct Alert Notification" section in the "Monitoring and Tuning the Database" chapter of the Oracle Database 2 Day DBA book.

  • Blackout Administration

    During blackouts, Database Control does not collect database monitoring data or send alerts. Blackouts enable you to perform scheduled maintenance on the database without receiving needless alerts and without skewing the monitoring data.

    For example, you can stop data collections during a database backup or a hardware upgrade. If you continue monitoring during these periods, then the collected data shows trends and other monitoring information that is not the result of typical day-to-day operations. To get a more accurate, long-term picture of database performance, you can use blackouts to exclude these special-case situations from data analysis. See the "Defining Blackout Periods" section in the "Getting Started with Database Administration" chapter of the Oracle Database 2 Day DBA book for more information.

  • Preferred Credentials

    Database Control can automatically execute many routine administrative tasks, such as backups. You can use a job scheduling system that is built into Database Control for these routine tasks. To keep your environment secure, setting up tasks for automatic execution in Enterprise Manager requires you to provide login information for the host computer and database. To avoid entering this information every time you create or run a job or task, Database Control enables you to save this information as preferred credentials. Preferred credentials are stored in the database in encrypted mode to protect them from unauthorized use. See the Setting Preferred Credentials section for more information.

Defining Blackout Periods

You can define one or more one-time or repeating blackout periods where Database Control does not collect database monitoring data or send alerts.

To define a blackout period:

  1. On any Database Control page, at the top of the page, click Setup.

    The Enterprise Manager Configuration page appears, showing the Overview of Setup page.

  2. In the left-hand pane, click Blackouts.

    The Blackouts page appears.

  3. Click Create to start the Create Blackout wizard.

    The Create Blackout: Properties page appears.

  4. If desired, replace the default blackout name with one of your choosing.

  5. If desired, in the Comments field, enter text that describes the purpose of the blackout.

  6. In the Reason list, select the blackout reason that is most appropriate.

  7. In the Available Targets section, in the Type list, select Database Instance.

    The fully qualified name for your database instance appears in the Available Targets list.

  8. In the Available Targets list, select your instance then click the Move icon. You can also double-click the instance name.

    The instance name is moved from the Available Targets list to the Selected Targets list.

  9. Click Next.

    The Create Blackout Schedule page appears.

  10. On the Create Blackout Schedule page, do the following:

    1. In the Start section, schedule the blackout either immediately or for a later date and time.

    2. In the Duration section, indicate the duration of the blackout.

    3. To repeat the blackout periodically, in the Repeating section, select a repeat frequency from the Repeat list. Otherwise, use the default value of Do Not Repeat.

  11. Click Next.

    The Review page appears.

    Review what you have entered. You can click Back to change a setting.

  12. Click Finish.

    The Confirmation heading appears on the Blackouts page, and the new blackout period is shown in the list.

Setting Preferred Credentials

When you set preferred credentials, Database Control automatically fills in host computer and database login credentials for you at times when it usually prompts for these credentials. Database Control also fills in these credentials when it is about to run a job that requires credentials.

To set preferred credentials for the database:

  1. From any Database Control page, at the top of the page, click Preferences.

    The Preferences page appears.

  2. Click Preferred Credentials in the left-hand pane.

    The Preferred Credentials page appears, showing a table of targets.

  3. In the table row for the Database Instance, click the icon under Set Credentials.

    The Database Preferred Credentials page appears.

  4. Enter the following credentials:

    • Database credentials for Username/Password and SYSDBA Username/SYSDBA Password

    • Host credentials for Host Username/Host Password

    For example, you might typically connect as the user SYSTEM, use the SYS account for SYSDBA access, and use oracle for the host user name.

    Note:

    The host user may require certain host privileges to run background jobs such as database backups. For example, on UNIX and Linux, the host user must belong to the OSDBA group (typically dba). On Windows, the host user must be a member of the Administrators group and must be granted the Log on as Batch Job log in right. See your platform documentation for more information.
  5. Click Test to test your credentials.

    A confirmation message is displayed if your credentials can be verified.

  6. Click Apply to apply the changes.

Managing Database Control in an Oracle RAC Environment

When you create an Oracle RAC database and choose Database Control for your database management, Database Control is installed and configured automatically.

In this section:

Verifying that Database Control is Running in an Oracle RAC Environment

To verify that Database Control has been started in your new Oracle RAC environment:

  1. Ensure that the ORACLE_UNQNAME environment variable is set to the unique name of the database to which you want to connect, for example orcl. Also make sure the ORACLE_HOME environment variable is set to the location of the installed Oracle Database software, for example:

    $ export ORACLE_UNQNAME=orcl
    $ echo $ORACLE_HOME
    /u01/app/oracle/product/11.2.0/dbhome_1
     
    $ echo $ORACLE_UNQNAME
    orcl
    
  2. Go to the $ORACLE_HOME/bin directory.

  3. Run the following command as the oracle user:

    ./emctl status dbconsole
    

    The Enterprise Manager Control (EMCTL) utility displays the current status of the Database Control console on the current node, for example:

    Oracle Enterprise Manager 11g Database Control Release 11.2.0.1.0
    Copyright (c) 1996, 2009 Oracle Corporation.  All rights reserved.
    https://racnode1.example.com:1158/em/console/aboutApplication
    Oracle Enterprise Manager 11g is running.
    ------------------------------------------------------------------
    Logs are generated in directory /u01/app/oracle/product/11.2.0/dbhome_1/racnode1_orcl/sysman/log
    
  4. If the EMCTL utility reports that Database Control is not started, use the following command to start it:

    $ ./emctl start dbconsole
    

    Following a typical installation, Database Control serves console pages from the node where the database was created. The console also monitors agents on all nodes of the cluster. However, you can configure Enterprise Manager to have multiple Database Control consoles within a cluster using EMCA.

Backing Up the emkey.ora File

During the installation, the Database Control management repository is placed in secure mode. All Enterprise Manager data is encrypted using the encryption key stored in the file emkey.ora. If this file is damaged or lost, and cannot be restored from a backup, you will no longer be able to use the existing Enterprise Manager repository.

The emkey.ora file is located in the $ORACLE_HOME/node_name_Database_name/sysman/config directory. For example, on the racnode2 server, the encryption key file for the orcl.example.com database is located at /u01/app/oracle/product/11.2.0/dbhome_1/racnode2_orcl/sysman/config/emkey.ora.

Deleting and Creating Database Control Objects

This section discusses the process of deleting and creating Database Control objects, and how to re-create configuration files and a repository in Database Control.

Deleting Database Control Objects

This section describes the steps required to delete database control objects. There are six possible options to use when deleting Database Control objects:

Option 1: Deleting Database Control Configuration Files Using EMCA Scripts

To delete Database Control configuration files using EMCA scripts, run one of the following commands:

For a single-instance database:

$ $ORACLE_HOME/bin/emca -deconfig dbcontrol db

For an Oracle RAC database:

$ $ORACLE_HOME/bin/emca -deconfig dbcontrol db –cluster

The -deconfig option removes the Enterprise Manager jobs from Scheduling before Database Control is deconfigured. Otherwise the repository, which is not dropped, could be corrupted or inconsistent if Enterprise Manager jobs were scheduled at the time Database Control is dropped. It could also cause errors during the Database Control deletion.

Option 2: Deleting Database Control Configuration Files and Repository Objects Using An EMCA Script

You can delete Database Control configuration files and repository objects using an EMCA script. Both configuration files and repository objects can be deleted using a single command.

Run the following command for a single-instance database:

$ $ORACLE_HOME/bin/emca -deconfig dbcontrol db -repos drop

Run the following command for an Oracle RAC database:

$ $ORACLE_HOME/bin/emca -deconfig dbcontrol db -repos drop –cluster

Note:

This command places the database in Quiesce Mode.

Option 3: Deleting A Database Control Repository Using EMCA Scripts

You can delete a Database Control repository using EMCA scripts by using the commands listed below.

Run the following command for a single-instance database:

$ $ORACLE_HOME/bin/emca –repos drop

Run the following command for an Oracle RAC database:

$ $ORACLE_HOME/bin/emca -repos drop -cluster

Note:

This command places the database in Quiesce Mode.

Option 4: Deleting Database Control Configuration Files Manually

In addition to using EMCA scripts to delete Database Control objects, you can delete objects manually, as follows:

Remove the following directories from your file system:

$ $ORACLE_HOME/hostname_sid

$ $ORACLE_HOME/oc4j/j2ee/OC4J_DBConsole_hostname_sid

On Windows, you also need to delete the Database Control service, as follows:

  1. Run regedit.

  2. Navigate to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE/SYSTEM/CurrentControlSet/Services.

  3. Locate the OracleDBConsolesid entry and delete it.

Alternatively, on Windows XP and Windows Server 2003 you can run the following from the command line, where service_name is the Database Control service name (typically OracleDBConsolesid):

sc delete service_name

Also available from Microsoft is The delsrv.exe executable is also available as a free download from Microsoft.

Option 5: Deleting the Database Control Repository Using RepManager

You can delete the Database Control repository using RepManager. This option is not as complete as the other options. You may find that dropping the repository using the command line options is a better solution. Also note that RepManager cannot be used to create a Database Control Repository.

Run the following command:

$ $ORACLE_HOME/sysman/admin/emdrep/bin/RepManager hostname listener_port sid -action drop

Note:

This command places the database in Quiesce Mode.

For more information about Quiesce Mode, see My Oracle Support Note 375946.1, "Running EMCA Results in Database Quiesce" and "No New Connections or Operations Can Be Performed During the DB Control Repository Creation".

Creating Database Control Objects

This section discusses the three options that you can use to create Database Control objects.

Option 1: Creating the DB Control Configuration Files

The first option that you can use to create Database Control objects is to create the Database Control configuration files. Use the following commands to create the files without going through the repository creation process.

Run the following command for a single-instance database:

$ $ORACLE_HOME/bin/emca -config dbcontrol db

Run the following command for an Oracle RAC database:

$ $ORACLE_HOME/bin/emca -config dbcontrol db -cluster

Option 2: Creating the Database Control Repository Objects and Configuration Files

The second option you can use to create Database Control objects is to create the Database Control repository objects and configuration files.

Run the following command for a single-instance database:

$ $ORACLE_HOME/bin/emca -config dbcontrol db -repos create

Run the following command for an Oracle RAC database:

$ $ORACLE_HOME/bin/emca -config dbcontrol db -repos create –cluster

Option 3: Creating the Database Control Repository Objects and Configuration Files For a Cloned Database Home

The third option you can use to create Database Control objects is to create the Database Control repository objects and configuration files for a cloned database home, as follows:

Run the following command for a single-instance database:

$ $ORACLE_HOME/bin/emca -config dbcontrol db -repos recreate

Run the following command for an Oracle RAC database:

$ $ORACLE_HOME/bin/emca -config dbcontrol db -repos recreate -cluster

Re-Creating Or Reconfiguring Database Control

This section discusses the two options you can use to re-create or reconfigure Database Control.

Option 1: Re-Creating the Database Control Configuration Files Only (Leaving Repository Intact)

The first option you can use to re-create Database Control is to re-create only the Database Control configuration files, as follows:

Run the following command for a single-instance database:

$ $ORACLE_HOME/bin/emca -config dbcontrol db

Run the following command for an Oracle RAC database:

$ $ORACLE_HOME/bin/emca -config dbcontrol db -cluster

Option 2: Re-Creating the Database Control Configuration Files and Repository

The second option you can use to re-create Database Control is to re-create the Database Control configuration files and the repository.

Run the following command for a single-instance database:

$ $ORACLE_HOME/bin/emca -config dbcontrol db -repos recreate

Run the following command for an Oracle RAC database:

$ $ORACLE_HOME/bin/emca -config dbcontrol db -repos recreate -cluster

Note:

This command places the database in Quiesce Mode.

EMCA Troubleshooting Tips

The following sections describe troubleshooting tips to consider when using EMCA to configure Database Control.

Using EMCA After Changing the Database Listener Port

If you change the listener port of the database after you have configured Database Control, the database status will appear as down. To reconfigure Database Control so it uses the new listener port, run the EMCA command using the -config dbcontrol db [-cluster] command-line arguments.

Upgrading 11g Release 2 Grid Control Agents

When upgrading an Oracle Database 11g Release 2 database or an Oracle ASM instance that was configured for Oracle Enterprise Manager (either Database Control or a Grid Control central agent) to an Oracle Database 11g Release 2 (11.2) database, all Enterprise Manager targets on the relevant hosts referring to the upgraded instances are updated automatically. This occurs because the upgrade involves altering the instance Oracle home, port, or other target-associated properties. However, some of these targets on the hosts are not updated successfully during the upgrade if they are managed by an Oracle Database 11g Release 2 (11.2) Grid Control Agent.

To update these targets, in the Home page for the upgraded database (or Oracle ASM) target, click Monitoring Configuration. On the Monitoring Configuration page, you can update properties such as Oracle home, listener port, and so on to the correct values.

Using EMCA When the Database Host Name or IP Address Changes

When the database host name (including the domain name) or the IP address changes, deconfigure and then reconfigure Database Control with the -repos recreate flag for the emca command. For example, to re-create Database Control with a new host name, complete the following steps:

  1. Set ORACLE_HOSTNAME=old_hostname in the environment.

  2. De-configure the old dbconsole by running the following command:

    For a single-instance database:

    $ $ORACLE_HOME/bin/emca -deconfig dbcontrol db
    

    For Oracle RAC:

    $ $ORACLE_HOME/bin/emca -deconfig dbcontrol db -cluster
    
  3. Un-set ORACLE_HOSTNAME in the environment.

  4. Configure a new dbconsole by running one of the following commands:

    For a single-instance database, enter:

    $ $ORACLE_HOME/bin/emca -config dbcontrol db -repos recreate
    

    For Oracle RAC, enter:

    $ $ORACLE_HOME/bin/emca -config dbcontrol db -repos recreate -cluster
    

Using EMCA When the TNS Configuration Is Changed

When the TNS configuration is changed, set the environment variable, then run the following command:

$ emca -config dbcontrol db

Using EMCA for Desktop Class Installations

For Desktop class installation where hostname is localhost, set ORACLE_HOSTNAME=localhost in the environment before you perform any EMCA or emctl operations.

Handling EMCA Error Messages

The following are some EMCA error messages and instructions for handling them.

Failed To Allocate Port(s) In the Specified Range(s)

Check the following:

  • Free the ports if they are in use or use EMCA to provide free ports in command line options.

  • Open up the required ports in the firewall and re-run the emca -config dbcontrol db [-cluster] command by specifying free ports in the command line.

  • Check the /etc/hosts file. It should contain an entry for the physical host. Enter the following command to determine the physical host name:

    $ CMD>hostname

    Set the environment variable:

    $ set ORACLE_HOSTNAME=output of above command

    Try to run the following command:

    $ $ORACLE_HOME/bin/emca -config dbcontrol db

    By completing these steps you are fixing the environment variable and then running the –config dbcontrol db command again to re-attempt to allocate the ports.

Listener Is Not Up or Database Service Is Not Registered With It

Check the following:

  • If the listener is not up on the specified port, then start it and rerun the EMCA script.

  • Check whether the database service is registered with the listener. If not, then register it and rerun the EMCA script.

  • If the listener is configured with a different host name than the physical host name, configure Database Control as follows:

    $ set ORACLE_HOSTNAME=listener host

    $ $ORACLE_HOME/bin/emca -config dbcontrol db

    If the listener port changes, then reconfigure Database Control by providing the new listener port:

    $ $ORACLE_HOME/bin/emca -config dbcontrol db