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Oracle® Secure Backup Installation and Configuration Guide
Release 10.3

Part Number E12835-06
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2 Installing Oracle Secure Backup on Linux or UNIX

This chapter explains how to install Oracle Secure Backup on hosts running Linux or UNIX.

This chapter contains the following sections:

2.1 Overview of Oracle Secure Backup Linux and UNIX Installation

There are three steps to installing Oracle Secure Backup on a Linux or UNIX host:

  1. Loading

    Files required for installing Oracle Secure Backup are staged on the administrative server, in a directory called the Oracle Secure Backup home. This step is performed by a script named setup.

  2. Installing

    Oracle Secure Backup executables are deployed correctly for use on the host. This step is performed by a script named installob.

    Note:

    On a Solaris media server, installob also performs some tape device configuration tasks, including installation of a required device driver, and, optionally, attach point creation required for Oracle Secure Backup to access tape devices.
  3. Creating attach points on each media server

    This step is required for the Oracle Secure Backup device driver to access tape devices. You need the SCSI device parameters to perform this task.

Note:

If you are installing Oracle Secure Backup in an Oracle Real Application Clusters (Oracle RAC) environment, then you must install Oracle Secure Backup on each node in the cluster.

2.2 Prerequisites for Installing Oracle Secure Backup on Linux and UNIX

The prerequisites for installing Oracle Secure Backup on Linux and UNIX operating systems are:

2.2.1 Prerequisites for Installation on Linux

For each Linux media server, ensure that the SCSI Generic (SG) driver is installed. This driver is required for Oracle Secure Backup to interact with a tape device.

Kernel modules are usually loaded directly by the facility that requires them, if the correct settings are present in the /etc/modprobe.conf file. However, it is sometimes necessary to explicitly force the loading of a module at start time.

For example, on RedHat Enterprise Linux, the module for the SCSI Generic driver is named sg. Red Hat Enterprise Linux checks at start time for the existence of the /etc/rc.modules file, which contains various commands to load modules.

Note:

The rc.modules file is necessary, and not rc.local, because rc.modules runs earlier in the start process.

On RedHat Enterprise Linux, you can use the following commands to add the sg module to the list of modules configured to load as root at start time:

# echo modprobe sg >> /etc/rc.modules
# chmod +x /etc/rc.modules

An Oracle Secure Backup user must be mapped to a Linux or UNIX user that has read/write permissions to the /dev/sg devices. One way to accomplish this goal is to set the permissions to 666 for the /dev/sg devices.

2.2.2 Required SCSI Tape Device Parameters on Linux and UNIX

Oracle Secure Backup supports both SCSI and Fibre Channel devices for Linux and UNIX. To configure a media server to communicate with its attached tape devices, you must have the SCSI parameters for each tape device.

Table 2-1 lists the required SCSI parameters for each platform.

Table 2-1 Required SCSI Parameters

Platform Linux HP-UX AIX

Host bus adapter

x

x

 

SCSI bus addressFoot 1 

x

x

 

SCSI bus name-instance

x

x

x

Target ID

x

x

x

SCSI LUN

x

x

x


Footnote 1 In Linux, SCSI bus addresses are referred to as channels.

You must also assign each tape drive and tape library an Oracle Secure Backup logical unit number, as described in "Assigning Oracle Secure Backup Logical Unit Numbers to Devices".

Note:

Do not confuse the SCSI LUN with the Oracle Secure Backup LUN. The SCSI LUN is part of the hardware address of the tape device, while the Oracle Secure Backup logical unit number is part of the device special filename.

2.2.2.1 Assigning Oracle Secure Backup Logical Unit Numbers to Devices

Each tape drive and tape library must be assigned an Oracle Secure Backup LUN during the configuration process. This number is used to generate unique device names during device configuration. Oracle Secure Backup logical unit numbers are assigned as needed automatically on Windows. For each UNIX or Linux media server, however, you must select Oracle Secure Backup logical unit numbers for each device as part of planning your administrative domain.

There is no required order for assigning Oracle Secure Backup logical unit numbers. They are typically assigned sequentially, starting at 0, for each tape device of a given type, whether tape library or tape drive. That is, tape libraries are typically numbered 0, 1, 2 and so on, and tape drives are also numbered 0, 1, 2 and so on. The maximum value for an Oracle Secure Backup logical unit number is 31.

On Linux or UNIX, the resulting device special file names for tape libraries are /dev/obl1, /dev/obl2, /dev/obl3 and so on, and the names for tape drives are /dev/obt1, /dev/obt2, /dev/obt3 and so on. On Windows, the resulting tape library names are //./obl1, //./obl2, //./obl3 and so on, and the names for tape drives are //./obt1, //./obt2, //./obt3 and so on, where these names are assigned automatically during the installation of Oracle Secure Backup on Windows.

Note:

The Oracle Secure Backup logical unit number should not be confused with the SCSI LUN. The latter is part of the hardware address of the tape device, while the Oracle Secure Backup logical unit number is part of the device special filename.

2.3 Extracting Oracle Secure Backup from OTN Download on Linux or UNIX

This section explains how to download the Oracle Secure Backup software.

To download and extract the Oracle Secure Backup installation software:

  1. Log in to your host as a user with root privileges.

  2. Create a directory called osbdownload on a file system with enough free space to hold the downloaded installation file:

    mkdir /tmp/osbdownload
    
  3. Open a Web browser and go to the Oracle Secure Backup Web site on Oracle Technology Network (OTN):

    http://www.oracle.com/technology/products/secure-backup

  4. Click Free Download.

    The Oracle Technology Network Developer License Terms page appears.

  5. Read Export Controls on the Programs and select the Yes, I accept... option.

    Read the Oracle Technology Network Development License Agreement and click I Accept.

    The Oracle Secure Backup Downloads page appears.

  6. Select the Accept License Agreement option, and click the link for the version of Oracle Secure Backup release 10.3 specific to your operating system.

    Note:

    If you have multiple operating systems in your environment, then you must perform multiple downloads of the Oracle Secure Backup release 10.3 software.
  7. Save the Oracle Secure Backup release 10.3 installation software to a temporary directory.

  8. Expand the compressed installation software to the osbdownload directory you created in step 2.

You now have all of the files required to install Oracle Secure Backup release 10.3.

2.4 Preparing to Install Oracle Secure Backup on Linux and UNIX

Perform the following actions before installing Oracle Secure Backup:

2.5 Creating the Oracle Secure Backup Home

You must create an Oracle Secure Backup home. The Oracle Secure Backup setup program uses this directory to store installation files specific to your host.

Note:

Oracle recommends that you use /usr/local/oracle/backup as your Oracle Secure Backup home. If you use a different directory, then the setup program prompts you to confirm your selected directory.

Note:

To enable users other than root to use obtool or the Oracle Secure Backup Web tool, install Oracle Secure Backup to a file system that can use the suid mechanism. You can do this by excluding the nosuid option from the /etc/fstab file entry for that file system.

See also:

"Oracle Secure Backup Home Directory" and Oracle Secure Backup Administrator's Guide for more details about the Oracle Secure Backup home.

To create the Oracle Secure Backup home:

  1. Log into the host as root.

  2. Run the following command:

    # mkdir -p /usr/local/oracle/backup
    

2.6 Loading Oracle Secure Backup Software on Linux or UNIX Using setup Script

The setup script performs the loading process, in which packages of files required to install Oracle Secure Backup are extracted from the installation media and staged in the Oracle Secure Backup home for later use by the installob installation script.

To load Oracle Secure Backup into an Oracle Secure Backup home directory for later installation on one or more Linux or UNIX platforms:

  1. Log into your Linux or UNIX operating system as root.

  2. Change to the Oracle Secure Backup home directory created in "Creating the Oracle Secure Backup Home". For example:

    # cd /usr/local/oracle/backup
    
  3. Run the setup script from your installation media or extracted archive directory. Enter the following command, where /media_dir is the CD-ROM mount point or the directory containing the files extracted from the downloaded archive:

    # /media_dir/setup
    

    For example, if you downloaded an archive from Oracle Technology Network (OTN) and extracted the setup software to the /tmp/osbdownload/OB directory, then you would run setup as follows:

    # /tmp/osbdownload/OB/setup
    

    Oracle Secure Backup expands compressed files in a temporary directory during installation. To specify a directory for this expansion, you can use the -t option to the setup command. The following example specifies that setup should use directory_name for the expansion:

    # /media_dir/setup -t directory_name
    

    The setup script displays the following messages:

    • A welcome message stating the Oracle Secure Backup version number and then displays progress messages

    • A message stating the platform

    • Various progress messages as it loads the package

    When the script finishes, it prompts you to unmount and remove the installation CD-ROM.

    Note:

    At this point the loading process is complete. The files required to install Oracle Secure Backup are stored in the Oracle Secure Backup home on this host.
  4. The setup script prompts you to start the installob script to install Oracle Secure Backup on the local host. Choose one of these options:

    Note:

    If the setup script is interrupted, then some temporary files, named OBnnnn or OBnnnn.Z, might remain in /usr/tmp. You can safely delete these files.

2.7 Configuring Installation Parameters in the obparameters File

The setup script creates a file called obparameters in the install subdirectory of the Oracle Secure Backup home. For example, if the Oracle Secure Backup home is in the default location /usr/local/oracle/backup, then the obparameters file is located at /usr/local/oracle/backup/install/.

During the installation process the setup script gives you the choice of accepting the default settings in the obparameters file or customizing those settings. In most cases, it is not necessary to change the defaults in the obparameters file. However, you should review the parameters you can control in this file as part of planning your installation, and determine whether any of them should be changed.

The obparameters file is plain text that can be edited using any standard text editor.

Reasons to change the parameters in the obparameters file include:

2.8 Installing Oracle Secure Backup on Linux or UNIX with installob

To install the Oracle Secure Backup software on Linux or UNIX:

  1. Ensure that the SCSI parameters for each tape device available.

    You can enter these parameters to create an attach point for each SCSI device as part of the initial installation. Solaris 10 systems have special device configuration procedures. See "Configuring the Solaris sgen Driver to Provide Oracle Secure Backup Attach Points".

  2. Start the installob script.

    The Oracle Secure Backup setup script ends by asking to start the installation process using the installob script. If you enter yes to this question, then the setup script runs the installob script for you.

    Otherwise, start installob from the command prompt. While logged in as root, go to the Oracle Secure Backup home and enter the following command:

    install/installob
    

    The installob script displays a welcome message and tells you that most of its questions have default answers, which you can select by simply pressing Enter.

  3. Confirm the settings in the obparameters file.

    This step depends upon the value of the customized obparameters parameter in the obparameters file described in "Configuring Installation Parameters in the obparameters File". The two possibilities are:

    • You have edited the obparameters file and set customized obparameters to yes.

      In this case, the installob script assumes that you have made the changes you want in the obparameters file and uses those parameters during the installation. Continue to step 4.

    • The customized obparameters parameter is set to no, which is the default.

      In this case, the installob script asks if you have reviewed and customized the obparameters file. Choose one of these options:

      • Enter yes or press the Enter key to indicate that you do not want to customize the obparameters file. Continue to step 4.

      • Enter no to indicate that you do want to customize the obparameters file. The installob script tells you to rerun the script after reviewing obparameters. The installob script then exits.

        See Also:

        "customized obparameters" for details about the customize obparameters parameter.
  4. Specify the host role.

    You determined the roles for each host when planning your administrative domain. Choose one of these options:

    • Enter a to install the software for an administrative server.

      If you choose this option, then installob also installs the software required for the media server and client roles.

    • Enter b to install the software for a media server.

      If you choose this option, then installob also installs the software required for the client role.

    • Enter c to install the software for a client.

    You can add or remove a role later with the chhost command in obtool.

    Note:

    • If you choose an administrative server or media server installation, then installob installs the software necessary for the media server role. However, the host does not have the media server role until the admin user grants that role with the chhost command after Oracle Secure Backup is installed.

    • To add the media server role to an administrative server or client after initial installation, you must create attach points using makedev or installob. See Oracle Secure Backup Reference for details.

    See Also:

    "Installation and Configuration Overview" to learn more about the roles of administrative server, media server and client in Oracle Secure Backup

    This procedure describes installation for an administrative server.

  5. Create a password for the Oracle Secure Backup keystore.

    The installob script prompts for a password for the keystore and then prompts you to re-enter the password. Oracle recommends that you choose a password of at least 8 characters in length that contains a mixture of alphabetic and numeric characters. When you enter the password, the password is not echoed to the display.

  6. Create a password for the Oracle Secure Backup administrative server.

    The installob script asks for a password for the admin user, and then asks you to reenter it for confirmation. Oracle recommends that you choose a password of at least 8 characters in length, containing a mixture of alphabetic and numeric characters. When you type in the password, your entry is not echoed to the display.

    The minimum password length is determined by the minuserpasswordlen security policy. Its default value is 0, which means a null password is permitted. You can change the value of minuserpasswordlen by setting the minimum user password length parameter in the obparameters file.

    See Also:

    Oracle Secure Backup Reference for more information on the minuserpasswordlen security policy

    Note:

    The practice of supplying a password in clear text on a command line or in a command script is not recommended by Oracle. It is a security vulnerability. The recommended procedure is to have the user be prompted for the password.
  7. Enter an e-mail address for notifications.

    The installob script asks for an e-mail address to which Oracle Secure Backup sends notifications.

    Note:

    The default from address for e-mails generated by Oracle Secure Backup is root@fqdn, where fqdn is the fully qualified domain name of the Oracle Secure Backup administrative server. You can change this default from address after installation. See Oracle Secure Backup Reference for more information.

    The installob script now displays informational messages as it installs and configures the Oracle Secure Backup software on this host. This process might take several minutes to complete.

  8. If you are installing Oracle Secure Backup on an administrative server or media server, then the installob script asks to configure a tape drive or tape library.

    Note:

    In installob, the term configuring refers to creating the attach points required for Oracle Secure Backup to communicate with the tape devices. Do not confuse this step with configuring the administrative domain with information about tape devices and media servers, as described in Chapter 5, "Configuring and Managing the Administrative Domain".

    The installob script includes software required for both the administrative server and media server roles in an administrative server installation. Therefore, this prompt is displayed when installing on an administrative server even if there are no attached tape drives or tape libraries.

    Although this procedure discusses SCSI tape libraries and tape drives, it also applies to a Fibre Channel tape device.

    Choose from these options:

    • Enter no if you do not want to create attach points for your tape devices now, or if you are installing on an administrative server with no tape devices attached.

      Note:

      On Linux and Solaris systems Oracle recommends that you enter no when asked to configure tape libraries or drives during installation.

      On Linux, the recommended method is to use the /dev/sg devices for attach points, as described in "Identifying and Configuring Linux Attach Points". For Solaris systems, see "Configuring the Solaris sgen Driver to Provide Oracle Secure Backup Attach Points".

      If you choose to create attach points later, or if you add a tape device to a media server in the future, then see "Creating Attach Points with makedev" for two alternative methods of completing this task.

    • Enter yes to configure tape devices now.

      To create attach points, the installob script asks if tape libraries are connected to this host, and if so, what the SCSI parameters are for each tape library. After you have entered the tape library SCSI parameters, the installob script asks you to confirm your entries.

      When you have entered information about tape libraries attached to this host, the installob script asks the same questions about standalone tape drives.

      Table 2-2 lists the information required by installob for each platform. For the device type, enter a d for a tape drive or l (lowercase L) for a tape library.

      Table 2-2 Information Required by installob

      Platform Linux HP-UX Solaris AIX

      Oracle Secure Backup LUNFoot 1 

      x

      x

      x

      x

      Device type

      x

      x

      x

      x

      Host bus adapter

      x

      x

         

      SCSI bus addressFoot 2 

      x

      x

         

      SCSI bus name-instance

      x

      x

      x

      x

      Target ID

      x

      x

      x

      x

      SCSI LUN

      x

      x

      x

      x


      Footnote 1 Do not confuse the Oracle Secure Backup logical unit number with the SCSI LUN.

      Footnote 2 In Linux, SCSI bus addresses are referred to as channels.

      Enter each parameter value in response to the prompts from the installob script. You can press Enter to accept a default value, but the default SCSI parameters offered by the script might not be correct.

      When you have entered the SCSI parameters for all tape libraries and tape drives attached to this host, the installob script begins device driver configuration and device special file creation.

      Record the name of the device special file created for each tape device. The filename is needed when you configure the attachment for the tape device, as part of configuring the Oracle Secure Backup domain. The filename should be /dev/obtn for tape drives, and /dev/obln for tape libraries, where n is the Oracle Secure Backup LUN you entered for the tape device.

      If you enter the wrong parameters, then device special file creation fails. To resolve the resulting errors, run installob again, entering the correct values, or use the makedev script described in "Creating Attach Points with makedev".

      When the installob script has created attach points for all tape devices attached to this host, it reminds you that you must configure these tape devices through the Oracle Secure Backup Web interface or the command line using the mkdev command in obtool.

  9. The installob script displays a summary of installation activities during this session and exits. This installation summary does not include any information about device special file creation performed during the installob session.

2.9 Installing or Uninstalling Oracle Secure Backup on AIX

The installation and uninstallation procedures for AIX and Linux/UNIX are identical.

During Oracle Secure Backup installation, the Oracle Secure Backup admin user is mapped by default to UNIX user root and UNIX group root. In this configuration, Oracle Secure Backup requires that the user root be a member of the group root to back up the file system successfully. AIX does not define a group root by default. If the group root does not exist on your AIX system, then you must create it and make user root a member of it.

Note:

You can change this mapping of the Oracle Secure Backup admin after installation.

2.10 Installing or Uninstalling Oracle Secure Backup on HP-UX

The installation and uninstallation procedures for HP-UX and Linux/UNIX are identical.

2.11 Creating Attach Points with makedev

The makedev script in Oracle Secure Backup is used to create an attach point for a single tape drive. Internally, the installob script calls makedev once for each tape device specified during installation. Alternatively, you can run makedev outside of installob to create all required attach points.

The makedev script can also replace an old attach point, rather than creating a new one. If you reuse an Oracle Secure Backup LUN for a tape library or drive, then the attach point for the old tape device is overwritten.

If you must create attach points for several tape devices, then it may be more convenient to use the installob script.

Table 2-3 lists the information required by makedev for each platform. For the device type, enter a d for a tape drive or l (lowercase L) for a tape library.

Table 2-3 Information Required by makedev

Platform Linux HP-UX AIX

Oracle Secure Backup LUNFoot 1 

x

x

x

Device type

x

x

x

Host bus adapter

x

x

 

SCSI bus address

x

x

 

SCSI bus name-instance

x

x

x

Target ID

x

x

x

SCSI LUN

x

x

x


Footnote 1 Do not confuse the Oracle Secure Backup logical unit number with the SCSI LUN.

See Also:

Oracle Secure Backup Reference for makedev syntax

2.11.1 Identifying and Configuring AIX Devices

To access SCSI or Fibre Channel tape devices, Oracle Secure Backup requires the following identifying information about how the devices are attached to their hosts:

  • SCSI bus name

  • Target ID

  • LUN

This information may not be readily available for all attached devices using standard operating system commands.

2.11.1.1 Identifying and Configuring AIX Devices in a Switched Fibre Channel Configuration

If you use Fibre Channel tape and media changer devices in a switched environment on AIX, you can use the standalone tool obscan to assist with gathering device information. The SCSI ID and LUN are required to correctly configure the devices for use by Oracle Secure Backup.

The obscan tool is provided as an optional tool for device identification in AIX environments. The obscan executable is located in the cdtools directory of the Oracle Secure Backup CD or CD image. The syntax is as follows, where dname is the device file name of the SCSI bus or Fibre Channel fabric to scan:

obscan dname

The obscan tool determines the SCSI ID and LUN for every tape and media changer device in a switched configuration.

To identify and configure AIX devices with obscan and makedev:

  1. Log on as root.

    You must have operating system privileges to access devices, which is often root access, to run obscan.

  2. Run obscan for each SCSI and Fibre Channel adapter with tape devices to be used by Oracle Secure Backup.

    In the following example, obscan gathers information about the tape devices connected to the SCSI bus identified by the device file /dev/scsi2:

    obscan /dev/scsi2
     
    obscan version 10.2.0.3 (AIX)
    Copyright (c) 2008, Oracle. All rights reserved.
     
    DEVICE information for /dev/scsi2 
     
     Target-id : 0, Lun : 0
        Vendor : ADIC  Product : FastStor 2      
     
     Target-id : 5, Lun : 0
        Vendor : HP    Product : Ultrium 2-SCSI  
     
     Total count of Media Changers and/or Tape devices found : 2
    

    In this second example, obscan gathers information about the tape devices connected to the Fibre Channel fabric identified by /dev/fssci0:

    obscan /dev/fscsi0DEVICE information for /dev/fscsi0 
     
     Target-id : 6423827, Lun : 0 
        Vendor : ADIC  Product : Scalar 24    World Wide Name : 2001006045175222
     
     Target-id : 6423827, Lun : 1 
        Vendor : IBM   Product : ULTRIUM-TD2  World Wide Name : 2001006045175222
     
     Target-id : 6423827, Lun : 2 
        Vendor : IBM   Product : ULTRIUM-TD2  World Wide Name : 2001006045175222
     
     Target-id : 6491411, Lun : 0 
        Vendor : ADIC  Product : Scalar i500  World Wide Name : 2400005084800672
     
     Target-id : 6491411, Lun : 1 
        Vendor : IBM   Product : ULTRIUM-TD3  World Wide Name : 2400005084800672
     
     Target-id : 6491411, Lun : 2 
        Vendor : IBM   Product : ULTRIUM-TD3  World Wide Name : 2400005084800672
     
     Target-id : 6491411, Lun : 3 
        Vendor : IBM   Product : ULTRIUM-TD3  World Wide Name : 2400005084800672
     
     Target-id : 6491411, Lun : 4 
        Vendor : IBM   Product : ULTRIUM-TD3  World Wide Name : 2400005084800672
     
     Total count of Media Changers and/or Tape devices found : 8
    
  3. Navigate to the install directory in your Oracle Secure Backup home. For example:

    # cd /usr/local/oracle/backup/install
    
  4. Enter the makedev command at the shell prompt:

    # makedev
    
  5. At the prompts, enter the information required to create attach points used within Oracle Secure Backup to identify devices for backup and restore operations.

    In the following example, the attach point /dev/obl8 is created for the ADIC FastStor 2 library attached to scsi2 having the target id 0 and lun 0:

    makedev 
    Enter logical unit number 0-31 [0]: 8
    Enter 'd' if this device is a tape drive or 'l' if a SCSI-2 addressable
        tape library [d]: l
    Enter SCSI bus name: scsi2
    Enter SCSI target id 0-16777215: 0
    Enter SCSI logica l unit number (lun) 0-7 [0]: 0
    /dev/obt8 created
    

    In this second example, the attach point /dev/obl9 is created for the ADIC Scalar 24 library attached to fsci0 having the target id 6423827 and lun 0:

    makedev
    Enter logical unit number 0-31 [0]: 9
    Enter 'd' if this device is a tape drive or 'l' if a SCSI-2 addressable
        tape library [d]: l
    Enter SCSI bus name: fscsi0
    Enter SCSI target id 0-16777215: 6423827
    Enter SCSI logical unit number (lun) 0-7 [0]: 0
    /dev/obl9 created
    

    The makedev script creates the attach point, displaying messages indicating its progress.

2.11.1.2 Identifying and Configuring AIX Devices in a Point-to-Point or FC-AL Configuration

In a point-to-point or FC-AL configuration, no tool is provided to help you determine the SCSI ID and LUN . However, for IBM-supported devices in these configurations, you can use the lsattr command.

To identify and configure AIX devices with lsattr and makedev: 

  1. Log on as root.

    You must have operating system privileges to access devices, which is often root access, to run lsattr.

  2. Run lsattr for each SCSI and Fibre Channel adapter with tape devices to be used by Oracle Secure Backup.

    The following lsattr example displays the attribute names, current values, descriptions, and user-settable flag values for the rmt0 device:

    user: lsattr -El rmt0
    block_size     512                BLOCK size (0=variable length)           True
    delay          45                 Set delay after a FAILED command         True
    density_set_1  0                  DENSITY setting #1                       True
    density_set_2  0                  DENSITY setting #2                       True
    extfm          yes                Use EXTENDED file marks                  True
    location                          Location Label                           True
    lun_id         0x1000000000000    Logical Unit Number ID                  False
    mode           yes                Use DEVICE BUFFERS during writes         True
    node_name      0x1000006045175222 FC Node Name                            False
    res_support    no                 RESERVE/RELEASE support                  True
    ret_error      no                 RETURN error on tape change or reset     True
    rwtimeout      144                Set timeout for the READ or WRITE commandTrue
    scsi_id        0x2                SCSI ID                                 False
    var_block_size 0                  BLOCK SIZE for variable length support   True
    ww_name        0x2001006045175222 FC World Wide Name                      False
    
    
    

    You can convert the hexadecimal values of lun_id and scsi_id (shown in bold) to decimal so that they are usable by the Oracle Secure Backup makdev command. After conversion, the SCSI LUN ID is 281474976710656 and the SCSI ID is 2.

  3. Navigate to the install directory in your Oracle Secure Backup home. For example:

    # cd /usr/local/oracle/backup/install
    
  4. Enter the makedev command at the shell prompt:

    # makedev
    
  5. At the prompts, enter the information required to create attach points used within Oracle Secure Backup to identify devices for backup and restore operations.

    The makedev script creates the attach point, displaying messages indicating its progress.

2.11.2 Identifying and Configuring HP-UX Devices

To access SCSI or Fibre Channel tape devices on HP-UX using the makedev script, Oracle Secure Backup requires the following identifying information about how the devices are attached to their hosts:

  • SCSI bus number instance

  • Target ID

  • LUN

To gather device information in HP-UX, you can use the ioscan utility located in /usr/sbin on the HP-UX operating system. The ioscan command searches the system and lists any devices that it finds. You must have root access to run ioscan.

Note:

The ioscan tool is provided as an optional tool for device identification in HP-UX environments. The ioscan tool is not included as part of any Oracle Secure Backup installation.

To identify and configure HP-UX devices:  

  1. Log on as root.

  2. Execute the following command:

    /usr/sbin/ioscan -f
    

    Running the command with the -f option displays full information about the system configuration including device class, instance number, device or interface driver, software state, and hardware type.

    Example 2-1 shows sample output for ioscan -f. The bus number instance, target ID, SCSI LUN, and device description for each device are shown in bold.

    Example 2-1 ioscan -f

    $ /usr/sbin/ioscan -f
     
    Class      I  H/W Path                 Driver   S/W State  H/W Type   Description
    ...
    ext_bus    3  0/1/1/1                  mpt      CLAIMED    INTERFACE  SCSI Ultra320
    target    11  0/1/1/1.1                tgt      CLAIMED    DEVICE
    autoch     4  0/1/1/1.1.0              schgr    CLAIMED    DEVICE     ADIC FastStor 2
    target    10  0/1/1/1.2                tgt      CLAIMED    DEVICE
    tape       8  0/1/1/1.2.0              stape    CLAIMED    DEVICE     HP  Ultrium 2-SCSI
    ...
    fcp        2  0/2/1/0.99               fcp      CLAIMED    INTERFACE  FCP Domain
    ext_bus    9  0/2/1/0.99.15.255.1      fcpdev   CLAIMED    INTERFACE  FCP Device Interface
    target     1  0/2/1/0.99.15.255.1.3    tgt      CLAIMED    DEVICE
    autoch     8  0/2/1/0.99.15.255.1.3.0  schgr    CLAIMED    DEVICE     ADIC Scalar 24
    tape      19  0/2/1/0.99.15.255.1.3.1  stape    CLAIMED    DEVICE     IBM ULTRIUM-TD3
    tape      20  0/2/1/0.99.15.255.1.3.2  stape    CLAIMED    DEVICE     IBM ULTRIUM-TD3
    
  3. Using the ioscan output, make a note of the bus number, target ID, and SCSI LUN for the tape devices.

    Table 2-4 shows the relevant information from Example 2-1.

    Table 2-4 Information Required by makedev

    Device Type Name Bus Number Instance Target ID SCSI LUN

    Tape library (autoch)

    SCSI

    ADIC FastStor 2

    3

    1

    0

    Tape drive (tape)

    SCSI

    HP Ultrium 2

    3

    2

    0

    Tape library (autoch)

    FC

    ADIC Scalar 24

    9

    3

    0

    Tape drive (tape)

    FC

    IBM ULTRIUM-TD3

    9

    3

    1

    Tape drive (tape)

    FC

    IBM ULTRIUM-TD3

    9

    3

    2


  4. Use makedev to create attach points so that Oracle Secure Backup can identify devices for backup and restore operations.

    The following example runs makedev using the information in Table 2-4. The example creates the attach point /dev/obl/8 for the ADIC FastStor 2 library on SCSI bus instance 3 with the target ID 1 and SCSI LUN 0.

    % makedev 
    Enter logical unit number 0-31 [0]: 8
    Enter 'd' if this device is a tape drive or 'l' if a SCSI-2 addressable
        tape library [d]: l
    Enter SCSI bus instance: 3
    Enter SCSI target id 0-16777215: 1
    Enter SCSI logical unit number (lun) 0-7 [0]: 0
    /dev/obl/8 created
    

    The following example runs makedev using the information in Table 2-4. The example creates the attach point /dev/obt/9m for the HP Ultrium 2 tape drive on SCSI bus instance 3 with the target ID 2 and SCSI LUN 0.

    % makedev 
    Enter logical unit number 0-31 [0]: 9
    Enter 'd' if this device is a tape drive or 'l' if a SCSI-2 addressable
        tape library [d]: d
    Enter SCSI bus instance: 3
    Enter SCSI target id 0-16777215: 2
    Enter SCSI logical unit number (lun) 0-7 [0]: 0
    /dev/obt/9m created
    

2.11.3 Identifying and Configuring Linux Attach Points

Oracle recommends that you use the /dev/sg devices as attach points with Oracle Secure Backup on Linux. The use of the Oracle Secure Backup /dev/ob devices has certain limitations that may not be acceptable in some environments. For example, the LUN cannot be greater than 7, and the SCSI bus number cannot be greater than 1. The existing method of using /dev/ob* devices continues to work for a tape device that does not fall into the limitation category.

To identify the /dev/sg that corresponds to the tape device you are interested in, you can use the sg_map command.

To configure Linux attach points:  

  1. Execute the following Linux command:

    sg_map -i -x
    

    Example 2-2 shows sample output.

    Example 2-2 sg_map -i -x

    sg_map -i -x
    /dev/sg0   0 0 0 0  0  /dev/sda  DELL      PERC Stripe       V1.0
    /dev/sg1   0 0 1 0  0  /dev/sdb  DELL      PERC Stripe       V1.0
    /dev/sg2   0 0 2 0  0  /dev/sdc  DELL      PERC Volume       V1.0
    /dev/sg3   1 0 1 0  8  ADIC      FastStor 2        G12r
    /dev/sg4   1 0 2 0  1  /dev/nst0  HP        Ultrium 2-SCSI    F53A
    /dev/sg5   2 0 0 0  1  /dev/nst1  IBM       ULTRIUM-TD2       5AT0
    /dev/sg6   2 0 0 1  8  ADIC      Scalar 24         310A
    /dev/sg7   2 0 1 0  1  /dev/nst2  IBM       ULTRIUM-TD2       5AT0
    /dev/sg8   2 0 1 1  8  ADIC      Scalar 24         310A
    /dev/sg9   2 0 2 0  1  /dev/nst3  IBM       ULTRIUM-TD3       54K1
    /dev/sg10  2 0 3 0  1  /dev/nst4  IBM       ULTRIUM-TD3       54K1
    /dev/sg11  2 0 3 1  8  ADIC      Scalar 24         310A
    
  2. Using the sg_map output, make a note of the attach point for each tape device that you want to configure.

    Table 2-5 shows a tape library and tape drive from Example 2-2.

    Table 2-5 Information Required by mkdev

    Device Type Name Path

    Tape library

    ADIC FastStor 2

    /dev/sg3

    Tape drive

    HP Ultrium 2

    /dev/sg4


  3. Use the mkdev command in obtool to create attach points so that Oracle Secure Backup can identify devices for backup and restore operations.

    The following example creates attach points for the tape library and tape drive shown in Table 2-5.

    ob> mkdev -t library -o -a node1:/dev/sg3 lib1
    ob> mkdev -t tape -o -a node1:/dev/sg4 -l lib1 -d 1 tape1
    

2.11.4 Configuring the Solaris sgen Driver to Provide Oracle Secure Backup Attach Points

Prior to Oracle Secure Backup 10.3.0.3, Oracle Secure Backup provided a loadable kernel driver to control the library (changer) and tape (sequential) devices. Starting with Oracle Secure Backup 10.3.0.3, this kernel driver is removed. The standard sgen driver that is included with Solaris now provides the functionality provided by the kernel driver.

2.11.4.1 Enabling the Solaris sgen Driver for Changer and Sequential Devices

You need to enable the Solaris sgen driver for changer and sequential devices before you install Oracle Secure Backup.

Use the following steps to enable the Solaris sgen driver for sequential and changer devices:

  1. If your host does not have a previous installation of Oracle Secure Backup, skip to Step 2.

    When you enable the Solaris sgen driver on a host that already has Oracle Secure Backup installed, the attach points and device configuration will be lost. You need to first uninstall Oracle Secure Backup using the steps described in "Uninstalling Oracle Secure Backup on Linux or UNIX".

    While uninstalling, it is recommended that you remove the backup directory. You can retain that admin directory.

  2. Enable sequential (01) and changer (01) devices by adding the following line in the /kernel/drv/sgen.conf file:

    device-type-config-list="sequential","changer";
    

    Note:

    If device-type-config-list is already defined for other devices, add "sequential" and "changer" to the existing list in the sgen.conf file.
  3. Verify that there is an entry for the sgen driver in /etc/minor_perm.

    An example of an entry in this file is as follows:

    "sgen * 0600 root sys"
    
  4. Verify that there is an entry for the sgen driver in /etc/name_to_major.

    The following is an example of an entry in this file:

    "sgen 151"
    
  5. Remove the links in /dev/scsi/changer and /dev/scsi/sequential using the following commands:

    rm -r /dev/scsi/changer
    rm -r /dev/scsi/sequential
    
  6. Unconfigure the st driver for type 01 devices using the following command:

    update_drv -d -i '"scsiclass,01"' st 
    
  7. Configure sgen driver for the types 01 and 08 using the following command:

    add_drv -m '*0666 bin bin' -i '"scsiclass,01" "scsiclass,08" "scsa,01.bmpt" "scsa,0.8.bmpt"' sgen
    

After you complete the steps to enable the sgen driver, there must be entries in /etc/scsi/changer for every library and /etc/scsi/sequential for every tape device. If you do not find these entries, reboot your host system using the following commands:

touch /reconfigure
reboot

2.11.4.2 Utilizing sgen Attach Points

The entries that are made in the /dev/scsi/changer and /dev/scsi/sequential directories when you enable the Solaris sgen driver must be used as Oracle Secure Backup targets for /dev/ob links. These entries vary depending on the version of Solaris.

It is recommended that you create links in /dev in the form /dev/obln and /dev/obtn that point to the entries in /dev/scsi/changer or /dev/scsi/sequential. There must be a unique /dev/obln or /dev/obtn entry for each device that Oracle Secure Backup utilizes. These entries in /dev will be used in the obtool mkdev command during Oracle Secure Backup device configuration.

2.12 Performing an Upgrade Installation on Linux or UNIX

In preparation for an upgrade, Oracle recommends that you do the following:

  1. Copy your $OSB_HOME/admin directory to a secure but easily accessed location.

  2. If you customized the obparameters file, then save a copy of it.

  3. Cancel all active and pending jobs.

  4. Stop all Oracle Secure Backup daemons.

  5. Run the setup scripts from the new CD-ROM.

  6. During the upgrade process, the installer displays the following prompt:

    Oracle Secure Backup is already installed on this machine (myhostname).
    Would you like to re-install it preserving current configuration data[no]?
    

    Enter yes to perform the upgrade installation, retaining your previous configuration.

2.13 Uninstalling Oracle Secure Backup on Linux or UNIX

This section explains how to uninstall Oracle Secure Backup from a Linux or UNIX host. In this procedure Oracle Secure Backup is uninstalled from the administrative server. The procedure is the same when using the administrative server to uninstall Oracle Secure Backup from other hosts.

  1. Log on as root to the administrative server.

  2. Use the following command to identify processes related to Oracle Secure Backup:

    # /bin/ps -ef |grep ob
    
  3. Shut down processes related to Oracle Secure Backup, such as the http processes for the Oracle Secure Backup Web tool.

    The appendix "Startup and Shutdown of Oracle Secure Backup Services" in Oracle Secure Backup Reference lists operating system-specific commands for shutting down and starting Oracle Secure Backup processes on Linux and UNIX.

    Alternatively, you can terminate observiced, which stops all processes. Use the following command to end each process in the list associated with Oracle Secure Backup, where pid is the process ID of observiced:

    kill pid
    
  4. Change directory to the Oracle Secure Backup home directory. For example:

    # cd /usr/local/oracle/backup
    

    Note:

    If you uninstall Oracle Secure Backup from the administrative server, then the uninstallob script removes the Oracle Secure Backup home directory at the end of the uninstall process.
  5. Run the uninstallob script:

    # ./install/uninstallob
    

    The uninstallob script displays a welcome message and then asks for the name of the host from which you want to remove Oracle Secure Backup.

  6. Enter the name of a host from which you want to uninstall Oracle Secure Backup.

  7. The uninstallob script asks for the name of the obparameters file used for installation.

    If you created an obparameters file in a location other than the default, then enter the correct path information. Otherwise, press the Enter key to accept the default value install/obparameters.

  8. The uninstallob script asks to remove the Oracle Secure Backup home directory. Select one of the following options:

    • no

      Select this option if you do not want to remove the Oracle Secure Backup home directory.

    • yes

      Select this option to remove the Oracle Secure Backup home directory. All files in the home directory are deleted. The only exception is the admin directory, which you can elect to retain by answering yes at the next prompt.

    This procedure assumes you are saving the Oracle Secure Backup home directory.

  9. The uninstallob script asks to save the Oracle Secure Backup admin directory, even if you have chosen not to save the entire Oracle Secure Backup home directory. Select one of these options:

    • no

      Select this option to remove the admin directory.

    • yes

      Select this option to save the admin directory. If you keep the admin directory, then you can reinstall the Oracle Secure Backup software later without destroying your administrative domain.

    This procedure assumes you are saving the Oracle Secure Backup admin directory.

  10. The uninstallob script displays the choices you have made and asks to continue with the uninstallation on this host. Select one of the following options:

    • yes

      If you select this option, then the uninstallob script displays progress messages as it uninstalls Oracle Secure Backup. When it is finished, it displays the following message:

      Oracle Secure Backup has been successfully removed from host_name.
      
    • no

      If you select this option, then the uninstallob script does not uninstall Oracle Secure Backup from this host.