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Oracle® Access Manager Installation Guide
10g (10.1.4.3)

Part Number E12493-01
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3 About Multi-Language Environments

This chapter explains how to set up host computers when installing Oracle Access Manager in multi-language environments. The general behavior of Oracle Access Manager is the same whether you have an English-only installation or one that includes multiple-languages. The following topics are included:

Note:

Messages added for minor releases (10g (10.1.4.2.0) and 10g (10.1.4.3) as a result of new functionality might not be translated and can appear in only English.

For a behavioral overview, see the Oracle Access Manager Introduction

3.1 About Installing in Multi-Language Environments

When you install Oracle Access Manager without a Language Pack, English is the only language used to display product messages for Administrators and end users. When installing with Oracle-provided Language Packs, you can choose any Administrator language to be used as the default for administrative activities. English is always installed, regardless of the language (locale) that you choose as the default for Administrators and any other Language Packs you install.

Note:

You can include one or more Oracle-provided Language Packs during component installation as described in "Installing with Language Packs". Alternatively, you can install Language Packs after component installation as described in Chapter 12, "Installing Language Packs Independently".

Administrative information can be displayed in only installed Administrator languages. If administrative pages are requested in a language that is not supported for administrators (based upon the browser setting), the language that was selected as the default Administrator language during product installation is used to display the pages. For more information about languages, see the Oracle Access Manager Introduction.

Static product pages (/identity/oblix/index.html and /access/oblix/index.html) always use the default Administrator language selected during Identity Server and Access Server installation at this location.

For end-users, Oracle Access Manager enables the display of static application data such as error messages, and display names for tabs, panels, and attributes in installed end-user languages. After installing Language Packs, you must enable all languages that you want to use, then configure Oracle Access Manager to use the installed languages by entering display names for attributes, tabs, and panels. For details about enabling languages, see the Oracle Access Manager Identity and Common Administration Guide.

When installing Oracle Access Manager on a computer running an English (AMERICAN) language operating system, installation and setup messages appear in English. When installing on a computer running a supported non-English (AMERICAN) language operating system, installation messages appear in the locale of the operating system and setup messages appear in the language you selected as a default locale for Administrative functions during component installation (assuming that you have installed Oracle-provided Language Packs).

Note:

If the computer on which you are installing is running with an operating system that specifies something other than English (AMERICAN) as the language, America as the territory, and ASCII as the character set, review "Setting Environment Variables for Command-Line Tools (Optional)" next.

3.2 Setting Environment Variables for Command-Line Tools (Optional)

By default, the console on each computer supports the locale and character set of the operating system. However, it may also support other character encodings such as UTF-8.

Oracle Access Manager 10.1.4 console-based command-line tools automatically detect and use various environment variables to determine the language to use when processing data provided in non-English languages and non-American locales (also known as internationalized data).

Note:

When no environment variables are set to specify the language and character set, Oracle Access Manager command-line tools use English (AMERICAN) as the language, America as the territory (AMERICA), and ASCII (US7ASCII) as the character set. In this case, Oracle Access Manager command-line tools may not properly process command-line input provided in non-English languages and non-American locales.

You may disable the auto-detect feature and specify a language to take precedence by setting the following environment variables:

If the intended host computer is running a supported operating system that specifies something other than AMERICAN_AMERICA.US7ASCII, the auto-detection feature will determine and use the locale of the server for Oracle Access Manager command-line tools. However, when set, NLS_LANG takes precedence over LANG and COREID_NLS_LANG takes precedence over NLS_LANG.

In other words, NLS_LANG and COREID_NLS_LANG override the Oracle Access Manager automatic detection of the server's locale and convert the data passed as command-line arguments and the like from the console's character set encoding to the UTF-8 encoding used within Oracle Access Manager. This enables you to set NLS_LANG for the Oracle Database Server (for example) and also set COREID_NLS_LANG to enable proper operation of for Oracle Access Manager command-line interfaces when these products are running on the same computer.

The character set that is specified by NLS_LANG or COREID_NLS_LANG should reflect the setting for the client application. In the case of Oracle Access Manager, the client application is the console and command-line tools which are invoked during installation to perform operations such as updating the directory server schema with Oracle Access Manager configuration, policy, and user data; modifying the Web server's configuration; creating services for Identity and Access Servers on Windows platforms; registering Access Servers with the Policy Manager, and other operations; and which can be invoked by administrators at any time.

Both NLS_LANG and COREID_NLS_LANG consist of three components specified in the following format (including the punctuation):

NLS_LANG = language_territory.charset
     COREID_NLS_LANG = language_territory.charset

For example:

NLS_LANG = FRENCH_CANADA.WE8ISO8859P1
     COREID_NLS_LANG = JAPANESE_JAPAN.JA16EUC

Each component of NLS_LANG and COREID_NLS_LANG controls the operation of a subset of globalization and localization support features:

For instance, if the database character set is AL32UTF8 and the client is running on a Windows operating system, then you should not set AL32UTF8 as the client character set. Instead, NLS_LANG or COREID_NLS_LANG should reflect the code page of the client. For example, on an English Windows client, the code page is 1252. An appropriate setting is AMERICAN_AMERICA.WE8MSWIN1252.

On both UNIX and Windows platforms, NLS_LANG and COREID_NLS_LANG should be set as local environment variables.

For additional information about NLS_LANG, see the Oracle Database Globalization Support Guide, 10g Release 2 (10.2), Part Number B14225-02.

3.2.1 Setting NLS_LANG and COREID_NLS_LANG on Windows Systems

On Windows systems, the encoding scheme (character set) is specified by a code page. Code pages are defined to support specific languages or groups of languages that share common writing systems. Oracle views the terms code page and character set as the same. The Windows GUI and DOS command prompt do not use the same code page in non Chinese-Japanese-Korean environments.

Note:

For more information about NLS_LANG, see the Oracle Database Globalization Support Guide, 10g Release 2 (10.2), Part Number B14225-02.

To set NLS_LANG and COREID_NLS_LANG

  1. From the Start menu, select Run.

  2. In the command window, type cmd, then click OK.

  3. At the command prompt, type the environment variable appropriate to your system. For example:

    C:\>set COREID_NLS_LANG = JAPANESE_JAPAN.JA16EUC

  4. Locate and edit the entry with the name NLS_LANG, if desired.

3.2.2 Setting NLS_LANG and COREID_NLS_LANG on UNIX Systems

As discussed earlier, Oracle Access Manager console-based command-line tools automatically detect and use the server locale when processing data provided in non-English languages and non-American locales (also known as internationalized data). You may disable the auto-detect feature and specify the language to take precedence by setting the UNIX LANG environment variable as described in your UNIX documentation, or the Oracle NLS_LANG and COREID_NLS_LANG environment variables as described here. On a UNIX system, set this as you would any other environment variable. The method will differ depending upon the shell: bash, csh, sh, and so on.

Note:

For more information about NLS_LANG, see the Oracle Database Globalization Support Guide, 10g Release 2 (10.2), Part Number B14225-02.

3.3 Installing with Language Packs

Installing Oracle Access Manager without any Oracle-provided Language Packs results in English as the language for both end-user and administrative information. Installing Oracle Access Manager with one or more Oracle-provided Language Packs enables you to localize Oracle Access Manager applications to display static data such as error messages and display names for tabs, panels, and attributes to end users in their native language.

Note:

Oracle Access Manager supports UTF-8 encoding for multibyte languages such as Chinese, Japanese, and provides support for bi-directional languages. See the Oracle Access Manager Introduction for a complete list of languages available for users and for administrative information. Contact Oracle for information about specific Language Packs.

Language Pack installers are available on the Oracle Access Manager installation media. For each language that Oracle supports (other than English, which requires no Language Pack), one Language Pack installer is provided for the Identity System and one Language Pack installer is provided for the Access System. For instance, if you install a Language Pack on the Identity Server, you must also install the Language Pack on WebPass. If you have the Access System, you must install Language Packs using the Access System installer.

Component installers call Language Pack installers silently and perform Language Pack installation at the same time. You must run appropriate Language Pack installers for each component you install. For example, use Identity System Language Pack installers when installing Identity Servers and WebPass instances and use Access System Language Pack installers for Access Server, WebGate, and Policy Manager components.

The overview that follows outlines the procedures needed to install Language Packs when you install Oracle Access Manager components. You may choose to install Language Packs independently, after Oracle Access Manager installation and setup, as described in Chapter 12, "Installing Language Packs Independently". The tasks that follow must be completed in either case.

Note:

Oracle Access Manager 10g (10.1.4.3) provides Language Pack installers. You cannot use earlier Language Packs with 10g (10.1.4.3) components.

To prepare to install Language Packs in concert with Oracle Access Manager

  1. Before installation, move desired Language Pack installers into the same temporary directory as the component installer. For example:


    Oracle_Access_Manager10_1_4_3_0_FR_Win32_LP_Identity_System.exe
    Oracle_Access_Manager10_1_4_3_0_JA_Win32_LP_Identity_System.exe
    Oracle_Access_Manager10_1_4_3_0_DE_Win32_LP_Identity_System.exe
  2. UNIX: Ensure that each Language Pack has execute permissions before launching the main installer. For example:

    chmod +x " Oracle_Access_Manager10_1_4_3_0_FR_sparc-s2_LP_Identity_System" 
       chmod +x " Oracle_Access_Manager10_1_4_3_0_JA_sparc-s2_LP_Identity_System" 
       chmod +x " Oracle_Access_Manager10_1_4_3_0_DE_sparc-s2_LP_Identity_System" 
    
       chmod +x " Oracle_Access_Manager10_1_4_3_0_FR_sparc-s2_LP_Access_System" 
       chmod +x " Oracle_Access_Manager10_1_4_3_0_JA_sparc-s2_LP_Access_System" 
       chmod +x " Oracle_Access_Manager10_1_4_3_0_DE_sparc-s2_LP_Access_System" 
    
  3. During component installation, select a Default Locale for the Administrator language and additional locales (which are listed based on the Language Pack installers detected).

  4. After installation, you must enable all languages that you want to use, then configure Oracle Access Manager product applications to use the installed languages by entering display names (at the Object Class level) for attributes, tabs, and panels. For details, see the Oracle Access Manager Identity and Common Administration Guide.

During installation, the following processes are performed automatically:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" ?>  
- <ParamsCtlg xmlns="http://www.oblix.com" CtlgName="obnls.xml">
- <CompoundList xmlns="http://www.oblix.com" ListName="">
- <SimpleList>
  <NameValPair ParamName="default" Value="en-us" /> 
  </SimpleList>
- <ValList xmlns="http://www.oblix.com" 
ListName="languages">  <ValListMember Value="en-us" /> 
  <ValListMember Value="de-de" /> 
  <ValListMember Value="ja-jp" />
  </ValList>
...  </CompoundList>
  </ParamsCtlg>

Note:

For details about removing Language Packs, see "Uninstalling Oracle Access Manager Components". If you need to troubleshoot language issues, see "Language Issues".

3.4 Directory Structure

Starting with the release of Release 6.5, a new directory structure was introduced to accommodate the addition of Language Packs that enable you to display static information to users in their native language. Oracle Access Manager provides a new directory named \oblix\oracle\nlstrl that is created for each component during with the automatic installation of the Oracle National Language Support Library.

OracleAccessManager\access

OracleAccessManager\identity

OracleAccessManager\webcomponent

The globalization files used internally by Oracle Access Manager are stored in the Identity Server installation directory under \oblix\Oracle.

Note:

NetPoint is the default name assigned to the top level Oracle Access Manager file system directory. However, you can change this to be anything that you want during the installation process. In this guide, you will see path names that include \OracleAccessManager and references to the component_install_dir\.

3.4.1 Language Directories

Oracle Access Manager installations include a directory named \lang, which includes a named subdirectory for each installed language. For example, \lang\ en-us contains English-specific directories and files that are included with every installation.

For each installed Language Pack, a \langtag directory is created and named with the corresponding language tag. In the following example, the German and Japanese Language Packs were installed and appropriately named directories were created automatically:

component_install_dir\identity\oblix\lang\en-us (this is always present)

component_install_dir\identity\oblix\lang\de-de

component_install_dir\identity\oblix\lang\ja-jp

and so on

In the preceding example, component_install_dir represents the directory where the main component is installed and identity|access represents the appropriate suffix appended to the path during installation.

Note:

Your installation will be English only unless Oracle-provided Language Packs were installed.

Each \langTag directory contains .xml message catalog files for various applications, which you may customize, as well as other .html files. For more information, see the Oracle Access Manager Customization Guide.

3.5 Removing Language Packs

You must remove (uninstall) each installed Language Pack individually using the appropriate file in the component's uninstall directory. Do not remove (uninstall) the Language Pack associated with the default Administrator language selected during installation.

For more information, see Chapter 22, "Removing Oracle Access Manager".