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Oracle® Database SQL Language Reference
12c Release 1 (12.1)

E17209-15
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NOAUDIT (Traditional Auditing)

This section describes the NOAUDIT statement for traditional auditing, which is the same auditing functionality used in releases earlier than Oracle Database 12c.

Beginning with Oracle Database 12c, Oracle introduces unified auditing, which provides a full set of enhanced auditing features. For backward compatibility, traditional auditing is still supported. However, Oracle recommends that you plan the migration of your existing audit settings to the new unified audit policy syntax. For new audit requirements, Oracle recommends that you use the new unified auditing. Traditional auditing may be desupported in a future major release.

See Also:

NOAUDIT (Unified Auditing) for a description of the NOAUDIT statement for unified auditing

Purpose

Use the NOAUDIT statement to stop auditing operations previously enabled by the AUDIT statement.

The NOAUDIT statement must have the same syntax as the previous AUDIT statement. Further, it reverses the effects only of that particular statement. For example, suppose one AUDIT statement A enables auditing for a specific user. A second statement B enables auditing for all users. A NOAUDIT statement C to disable auditing for all users reverses statement B. However, statement C leaves statement A in effect and continues to audit the user that statement A specified.

Prerequisites

To stop auditing of SQL statements, you must have the AUDIT SYSTEM system privilege.

To stop auditing of schema objects, you must be the owner of the object on which you stop auditing or you must have the AUDIT ANY system privilege. In addition, if the object you chose for auditing is a directory, then even if you created it, you must have the AUDIT ANY system privilege.

To specify the CONTAINER clause, you must be connected to a multitenant container database (CDB). To specify CONTAINER = ALL, the current container must be the root and you must have the commonly granted AUDIT SYSTEM privilege in order to stop auditing for the issuances of a SQL statement, or the commonly granted AUDIT ANY privilege in order to stop auditing for the operations on a schema object. To specify CONTAINER = CURRENT, the current container must be a pluggable database (PDB) and you must have the locally granted AUDIT SYSTEM privilege in order to stop auditing the issuances of a SQL statement, or the locally granted AUDIT ANY privilege in order to stop auditing operations on a schema object.

Semantics

audit_operation_clause

Use the audit_operation_clause to stop auditing of a particular SQL statement.

statement_option For sql_statement_shortcut, specify the shortcut for the SQL statements for which auditing is to be stopped. Refer to Table 13-1 and Table 13-2 for a list of the SQL statement shortcuts and the SQL statements they audit.

ALL Specify ALL to stop auditing of all statement options currently being audited because of an earlier AUDIT ALL ... statement. You cannot use this clause to reverse an earlier AUDIT ALL STATEMENTS ... statement.

ALL STATEMENTS Specify ALL STATEMENTS to reverse an earlier AUDIT ALL STATEMENTS ... statement. You cannot use this clause to reverse an earlier AUDIT ALL ... statement.

system_privilege For system_privilege, specify the system privilege for which auditing is to be stopped. Refer to Table 18-1 for a list of the system privileges and the statements they authorize.

ALL PRIVILEGES Specify ALL PRIVILEGES to stop auditing of all system privileges currently being audited.

auditing_by_clause

Use the auditing_by_clause to stop auditing only for SQL statements issued by the specified users in their subsequent sessions. If you omit this clause, then Oracle Database stops auditing for all users' statements, except for the situation described for WHENEVER SUCCESSFUL.

audit_schema_object_clause

Use the audit_schema_object_clause to stop auditing of a particular database object.

sql_operation For sql_operation, specify the type of operation for which auditing is to be stopped on the object specified in the ON clause. Refer to Table 13-3 for a list of these options.

ALL Specify ALL as a shortcut equivalent to specifying all SQL operations applicable for the type of object.

auditing_on_clause  The auditing_on_clause lets you specify the particular schema object for which auditing is to be stopped.

  • For object, specify the object name of a table, view, sequence, stored procedure, function, or package, materialized view, or library. If you do not qualify object with schema, then Oracle Database assumes the object is in your own schema. Refer to AUDIT (Traditional Auditing) for information on auditing specific schema objects.

  • The DIRECTORY clause lets you specify the name of the directory on which auditing is to be stopped.

  • The SQL TRANSLATION PROFILE clause lets you specify the SQL translation profile on which auditing is to be stopped.

  • Specify DEFAULT to remove the specified object options as default object options for subsequently created objects.

NETWORK Use this clause to discontinue auditing of database link usage and logins.

DIRECT_PATH LOAD Use this clause to discontinue auditing of SQL*Loader direct path loads.

WHENEVER [NOT] SUCCESSFUL

Specify WHENEVER SUCCESSFUL to stop auditing only for SQL statements and operations on schema objects that complete successfully.

Specify WHENEVER NOT SUCCESSFUL to stop auditing only for SQL statements and operations that result in Oracle Database errors.

If you omit this clause, then the database stops auditing for all statements or operations, regardless of success or failure.

CONTAINER Clause

Use the CONTAINER clause to specify the scope of the NOAUDIT command.

  • Specify CONTAINER = CURRENT to stop auditing in the PDB to which you are connected. If you specify the auditing_by_clause, then user must be a common user or local user in the current PDB. If you specify the auditing_on_clause, then the objects must be local objects in the current PDB.

  • Specify CONTAINER = ALL to stop auditing across the entire CDB. If you specify the auditing_by_clause, then user must be a common user. If you do not specify the auditing_by_clause, then auditing is stopped for all common users and all local users in each PDB. If you specify the auditing_on_clause, then the objects must be common objects.

If you omit this clause, then CONTAINER = CURRENT is the default.

Examples

Stop Auditing of SQL Statements Related to Roles: Example If you have chosen auditing for every SQL statement that creates or drops a role, then you can stop auditing of such statements by issuing the following statement:

NOAUDIT ROLE; 

Stop Auditing of Updates or Queries on Objects Owned by a Particular User: Example If you have chosen auditing for any statement that queries or updates any table issued by the users hr and oe, then you can stop auditing for queries by hr by issuing the following statement:

NOAUDIT SELECT TABLE BY hr; 

The preceding statement stops auditing only queries by hr, so the database continues to audit queries and updates by oe as well as updates by hr.

Stop Auditing of Statements Authorized by a Particular Object Privilege: Example To stop auditing on all statements that are authorized by DELETE ANY TABLE system privilege, issue the following statement:

NOAUDIT DELETE ANY TABLE;

Stop Auditing of Queries on a Particular Object: Example If you have chosen auditing for every SQL statement that queries the employees table in the schema hr, then you can stop auditing for such queries by issuing the following statement:

NOAUDIT SELECT 
   ON hr.employees; 

Stop Auditing of Queries that Complete Successfully: Example You can stop auditing for queries that complete successfully by issuing the following statement:

NOAUDIT SELECT 
   ON hr.employees
   WHENEVER SUCCESSFUL; 

This statement stops auditing only for successful queries. Oracle Database continues to audit queries resulting in Oracle Database errors.