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17 ADRCI: ADR Command Interpreter

The Automatic Diagnostic Repository Command Interpreter (ADRCI) utility is a command-line tool that you use to manage Oracle Database diagnostic data.

This chapter contains the following sections:

See Also:

Oracle Database Administrator's Guide for more information about managing diagnostic data.

About the ADR Command Interpreter (ADRCI) Utility

ADRCI is a command-line tool that is part of the fault diagnosability infrastructure introduced in Oracle Database 11g. ADRCI enables you to:

  • View diagnostic data within the Automatic Diagnostic Repository (ADR).

  • View Health Monitor reports.

  • Package incident and problem information into a zip file for transmission to Oracle Support.

Diagnostic data includes incident and problem descriptions, trace files, dumps, health monitor reports, alert log entries, and more.

ADR data is secured by operating system permissions on the ADR directories, hence there is no need to log in to ADRCI.

ADRCI has a rich command set, and can be used in interactive mode or within scripts.

Note:

The easier and recommended way to manage diagnostic data is with the Oracle Enterprise Manager Support Workbench (Support Workbench). ADRCI provides a command-line alternative to most of the functionality of the Support Workbench, and adds capabilities such as listing and querying trace files.

See Oracle Database Administrator's Guide for complete information about the Support Workbench.

Definitions

The following are definitions of terms used for ADRCI and the Oracle Database fault diagnosability infrastructure:

Automatic Diagnostic Repository (ADR)

The Automatic Diagnostic Repository (ADR) is a file-based repository for database diagnostic data such as traces, dumps, the alert log, health monitor reports, and more. It has a unified directory structure across multiple instances and multiple products. Beginning with release 11g, the database, Oracle Automatic Storage Management (Oracle ASM), and other Oracle products or components store all diagnostic data in the ADR. Each instance of each product stores diagnostic data underneath its own ADR home directory (see "ADR Home"). For example, in an Oracle Real Application Clusters (Oracle RAC) environment with shared storage and Oracle ASM, each database instance and each Oracle ASM instance has a home directory within the ADR. The ADR's unified directory structure enables customers and Oracle Support to correlate and analyze diagnostic data across multiple instances and multiple products.

Problem

A problem is a critical error in the database. Critical errors include internal errors such as ORA-00600 and other severe errors such as ORA-07445 (operating system exception) or ORA-04031 (out of memory in the shared pool). Problems are tracked in the ADR. Each problem has a problem key and a unique problem ID. (See "Problem Key".)

Incident

An incident is a single occurrence of a problem. When a problem occurs multiple times, an incident is created for each occurrence. Incidents are tracked in the ADR. Each incident is identified by a numeric incident ID, which is unique within the ADR. When an incident occurs, the database makes an entry in the alert log, sends an incident alert to Oracle Enterprise Manager, gathers diagnostic data about the incident in the form of dump files (incident dumps), tags the incident dumps with the incident ID, and stores the incident dumps in an ADR subdirectory created for that incident.

Diagnosis and resolution of a critical error usually starts with an incident alert. You can obtain a list of all incidents in the ADR with an ADRCI command. Each incident is mapped to a single problem only.

Incidents are flood-controlled so that a single problem does not generate too many incidents and incident dumps. See Oracle Database Administrator's Guide for more information about incident flood control.

Problem Key

Every problem has a problem key, which is a text string that includes an error code (such as ORA 600) and in some cases, one or more error parameters. Two incidents are considered to have the same root cause if their problem keys match.

Incident Package

An incident package (package) is a collection of data about incidents for one or more problems. Before sending incident data to Oracle Support it must be collected into a package using the Incident Packaging Service (IPS). After a package is created, you can add external files to the package, remove selected files from the package, or scrub (edit) selected files in the package to remove sensitive data.

A package is a logical construct only, until you create a physical file from the package contents. That is, an incident package starts out as a collection of metadata in the ADR. As you add and remove package contents, only the metadata is modified. When you are ready to upload the data to Oracle Support, you create a physical package using ADRCI, which saves the data into a zip file. You can then upload the zip file to Oracle Support.

Finalizing

Before ADRCI can generate a physical package from a logical package, the package must be finalized. This means that other components are called to add any correlated diagnostic data files to the incidents already in this package. Finalizing also adds recent trace files, alert log entries, Health Monitor reports, SQL test cases, and configuration information. This step is run automatically when a physical package is generated, and can also be run manually using the ADRCI utility. After manually finalizing a package, you can review the files that were added and then remove or edit any that contain sensitive information.

See Also:

Oracle Database Administrator's Guide for more information about correlated diagnostic data

ADR Home

An ADR home is the root directory for all diagnostic data—traces, dumps, alert log, and so on—for a particular instance of a particular Oracle product or component. For example, in an Oracle RAC environment with Oracle ASM, each database instance and each Oracle ASM instance has an ADR home. All ADR homes share the same hierarchical directory structure. Some of the standard subdirectories in each ADR home include alert (for the alert log), trace (for trace files), and incident (for incident information). All ADR homes are located within the ADR base directory. (See "ADR Base".)

Some ADRCI commands can work with multiple ADR homes simultaneously. The current ADRCI homepath determines the ADR homes that are searched for diagnostic data when an ADRCI command is issued. See "Homepath" for more information.

ADR Base

To permit correlation of diagnostic data across multiple ADR homes, ADR homes are grouped together under the same root directory called the ADR base. For example, in an Oracle RAC environment, the ADR base could be on a shared disk, and the ADR home for each Oracle RAC instance could be located under this ADR base.

The location of the ADR base for a database instance is set by the DIAGNOSTIC_DEST initialization parameter. If this parameter is omitted or is null, the database sets it to a default value. See Oracle Database Administrator's Guide for details.

When multiple database instances share an Oracle home, whether they are multiple single instances or the instances of an Oracle RAC database, and when one or more of these instances set ADR base in different locations, the last instance to start up determines the default ADR base for ADRCI.

Homepath

All ADRCI commands operate on diagnostic data in the current ADR homes. More than one ADR home can be current at any one time. Some ADRCI commands (such as SHOW INCIDENT) search for and display diagnostic data from all current ADR homes, while other commands require that only one ADR home be current, and display an error message if more than one are current.

The ADRCI homepath determines the ADR homes that are current. It does so by pointing to a directory within the ADR base hierarchy. If it points to a single ADR home directory, that ADR home is the only current ADR home. If the homepath points to a directory that is above the ADR home directory level in the hierarchy, all ADR homes that are below the directory that is pointed to become current.

The homepath is null by default when ADRCI starts. This means that all ADR homes under ADR base are current.

The SHOW HOME and SHOW HOMEPATH commands display a list of the ADR homes that are current, and the SET HOMEPATH command sets the homepath.

See Also:

Starting ADRCI and Getting Help

You can use ADRCI in interactive mode or batch mode. Details are provided in the following sections:

Using ADRCI in Interactive Mode

Interactive mode prompts you to enter individual commands one at a time.

To use ADRCI in interactive mode:

  1. Ensure that the ORACLE_HOME and PATH environment variables are set properly.

    On the Windows platform, these environment variables are set in the Windows registry automatically upon installation. On other platforms, you must set and check environment variables with operating system commands.

    The PATH environment variable must include ORACLE_HOME/bin.

  2. Enter the following command at the operating system command prompt:

    ADRCI
    

    The utility starts and displays the following prompt:

    adrci>
    
  3. Enter ADRCI commands, following each with the Enter key.

  4. Enter one of the following commands to exit ADRCI:

    EXIT
    QUIT
    

Getting Help

With the ADRCI help system, you can:

  • View a list of ADR commands.

  • View help for an individual command.

  • View a list of ADRCI command line options.

To view a list of ADRCI commands:

  1. Start ADRCI in interactive mode.

    See "Using ADRCI in Interactive Mode" for instructions.

  2. At the ADRCI prompt, enter the following command:

    HELP
    

To get help for a specific ADRCI command:

  1. Start ADRCI in interactive mode.

    See "Using ADRCI in Interactive Mode" for instructions.

  2. At the ADRCI prompt, enter the following command:

    HELP command
    

    For example, to get help on the SHOW TRACEFILE command, enter the following:

    HELP SHOW TRACEFILE
    

To view a list of command line options:

  • Enter the following command at the operating system command prompt:

    ADRCI -HELP
    

    The utility displays output similar to the following:

    Syntax:
       adrci [-help] [script=script_filename] [exec="command [;command;...]"]
     
    Options      Description                     (Default)
    -----------------------------------------------------------------
    script       script file name                (None)
    help         help on the command options     (None)
    exec         exec a set of commands          (None)
    -----------------------------------------------------------------
    

Using ADRCI in Batch Mode

Batch mode enables you to run a series of ADRCI commands at once, without being prompted for input. To use batch mode, you add a command line parameter to the ADRCI command when you start ADRCI. Batch mode enables you to include ADRCI commands in shell scripts or Windows batch files. Like interactive mode, the ORACLE_HOME and PATH environment variables must be set before starting ADRCI.

The following command line parameters are available for batch operation:

Table 17-1 ADRCI Command Line Parameters for Batch Operation

Parameter Description

EXEC

Enables you to submit one or more ADRCI commands on the operating system command line that starts ADRCI. Commands are separated by semicolons (;).

SCRIPT

Enables you to run a script containing ADRCI commands.


To submit ADRCI commands on the command line:

  • Enter the following command at the operating system command prompt:

    ADRCI EXEC="COMMAND[; COMMAND]..."
    

    For example, to run the SHOW HOMES command in batch mode, enter the following command at the operating system command prompt:

    ADRCI EXEC="SHOW HOMES"
    

    To run the SHOW HOMES command followed by the SHOW INCIDENT command, enter the following:

    ADRCI EXEC="SHOW HOMES; SHOW INCIDENT"
    

To run ADRCI scripts:

  • Enter the following command at the operating system command prompt:

  • ADRCI SCRIPT=SCRIPT_FILE_NAME
    

    For example, to run a script file named adrci_script.txt, enter the following command at the operating system command prompt:

    ADRCI SCRIPT=adrci_script.txt
    

    A script file contains a series of commands separated by semicolons (;) or line breaks, such as:

  • SET HOMEPATH diag/rdbms/orcl/orcl; SHOW ALERT -term
    

Setting the ADRCI Homepath Before Using ADRCI Commands

When diagnosing a problem, you may want to work with diagnostic data from multiple database instances or components, or you may want to focus on diagnostic data from one instance or component. To work with diagnostic data from multiple instances or components, you must ensure that the ADR homes for all of these instances or components are current. To work with diagnostic data from only one instance or component, you must ensure that only the ADR home for that instance or component is current. You control the ADR homes that are current by setting the ADRCI homepath.

If multiple homes are current, this means that the homepath points to a directory in the ADR directory structure that contains multiple ADR home directories underneath it. To focus on a single ADR home, you must set the homepath to point lower in the directory hierarchy, to a single ADR home directory.

For example, if the Oracle RAC database with database name orclbi has two instances, where the instances have SIDs orclbi1 and orclbi2, and Oracle RAC is using a shared Oracle home, the following two ADR homes exist:

/diag/rdbms/orclbi/orclbi1/
/diag/rdbms/orclbi/orclbi2/

In all ADRCI commands and output, ADR home directory paths (ADR homes) are always expressed relative to ADR base. So if ADR base is currently /u01/app/oracle, the absolute paths of these two ADR homes are the following:

/u01/app/oracle/diag/rdbms/orclbi/orclbi1/
/u01/app/oracle/diag/rdbms/orclbi/orclbi2/

You use the SET HOMEPATH command to set one or more ADR homes to be current. If ADR base is /u01/app/oracle and you want to set the homepath to /u01/app/oracle/diag/rdbms/orclbi/orclbi2/, you use this command:

adrci> set homepath diag/rdbms/orclbi/orclbi2

When ADRCI starts, the homepath is null by default, which means that all ADR homes under ADR base are current. In the previously cited example, therefore, the ADR homes for both Oracle RAC instances would be current.

adrci> show homes
ADR Homes:
diag/rdbms/orclbi/orclbi1
diag/rdbms/orclbi/orclbi2

In this case, any ADRCI command that you run, assuming that the command supports more than one current ADR home, works with diagnostic data from both ADR homes. If you were to set the homepath to /diag/rdbms/orclbi/orclbi2, only the ADR home for the instance with SID orclbi2 would be current.

adrci> set homepath diag/rdbms/orclbi/orclbi2
adrci> show homes
ADR Homes:
diag/rdbms/orclbi/orclbi2

In this case, any ADRCI command that you run would work with diagnostic data from this single ADR home only.

See Also:

Viewing the Alert Log

Beginning with Oracle Database 11g, the alert log is written as both an XML-formatted file and as a text file. You can view either format of the file with any text editor, or you can run an ADRCI command to view the XML-formatted alert log with the XML tags omitted. By default, ADRCI displays the alert log in your default editor. You can use the SET EDITOR command to change your default editor.

To view the alert log with ADRCI:

  1. Start ADRCI in interactive mode.

    See "Starting ADRCI and Getting Help" for instructions.

  2. (Optional) Use the SET HOMEPATH command to select (make current) a single ADR home.

    You can use the SHOW HOMES command first to see a list of current ADR homes. See "Homepath" and "Setting the ADRCI Homepath Before Using ADRCI Commands" for more information.

  3. At the ADRCI prompt, enter the following command:

    SHOW ALERT
    

    If more than one ADR home is current, you are prompted to select a single ADR home from a list. The alert log is displayed, with XML tags omitted, in your default editor.

  4. Exit the editor to return to the ADRCI command prompt.

The following are variations on the SHOW ALERT command:

SHOW ALERT -TAIL

This displays the last portion of the alert log (the last 10 entries) in your terminal session.

SHOW ALERT -TAIL 50

This displays the last 50 entries in the alert log in your terminal session.

SHOW ALERT -TAIL -F

This displays the last 10 entries in the alert log, and then waits for more messages to arrive in the alert log. As each message arrives, it is appended to the display. This command enables you to perform live monitoring of the alert log. Press CTRL+C to stop waiting and return to the ADRCI prompt.

SPOOL /home/steve/MYALERT.LOG
SHOW ALERT -TERM
SPOOL OFF

This outputs the alert log, without XML tags, to the file /home/steve/MYALERT.LOG.

SHOW ALERT -P "MESSAGE_TEXT LIKE '%ORA-600%'"

This displays only alert log messages that contain the string 'ORA-600'. The output looks something like this:

ADR Home = /u01/app/oracle/product/11.1.0/db_1/log/diag/rdbms/orclbi/orclbi:
******************************************************************************
01-SEP-06 09.17.44.849000000 PM -07:00
AlertMsg1: ORA-600 dbgris01, addr=0xa9876541

See Also:

Finding Trace Files

ADRCI enables you to view the names of trace files that are currently in the automatic diagnostic repository (ADR). You can view the names of all trace files in the ADR, or you can apply filters to view a subset of names. For example, ADRCI has commands that enable you to:

  • Obtain a list of trace files whose file name matches a search string.

  • Obtain a list of trace files in a particular directory.

  • Obtain a list of trace files that pertain to a particular incident.

You can combine filtering functions by using the proper command line parameters.

The SHOW TRACEFILE command displays a list of the trace files that are present in the trace directory and in all incident directories under the current ADR home. When multiple ADR homes are current, the traces file lists from all ADR homes are output one after another.

The following statement lists the names of all trace files in the current ADR homes, without any filtering:

SHOW TRACEFILE

The following statement lists the name of every trace file that has the string mmon in its file name. The percent sign (%) is used as a wildcard character, and the search string is case sensitive.

SHOW TRACEFILE %mmon%

This statement lists the name of every trace file that is located in the /home/steve/temp directory and that has the string mmon in its file name:

SHOW TRACEFILE %mmon% -PATH /home/steve/temp

This statement lists the names of trace files in reverse order of last modified time. That is, the most recently modified trace files are listed first.

SHOW TRACEFILE -RT

This statement lists the names of all trace files related to incident number 1681:

SHOW TRACEFILE -I 1681

See Also:

Viewing Incidents

The ADRCI SHOW INCIDENT command displays information about open incidents. For each incident, the incident ID, problem key, and incident creation time are shown. If the ADRCI homepath is set so that there are multiple current ADR homes, the report includes incidents from all of them.

To view a report of all open incidents:

  1. Start ADRCI in interactive mode, and ensure that the homepath points to the correct directory within the ADR base directory hierarchy.

    See "Starting ADRCI and Getting Help" and "Homepath" for details.

  2. At the ADRCI prompt, enter the following command:

    SHOW INCIDENT
    

    ADRCI generates output similar to the following:

ADR Home = /u01/app/oracle/product/11.1.0/db_1/log/diag/rdbms/orclbi/orclbi:
*****************************************************************************
INCIDENT_ID       PROBLEM_KEY               CREATE_TIME
----------------- ------------------------- ---------------------------------
3808              ORA 603                   2010-06-18 21:35:49.322161 -07:00
3807              ORA 600 [4137]            2010-06-18 21:35:47.862114 -07:00
3805              ORA 600 [4136]            2010-06-18 21:35:25.012579 -07:00
3804              ORA 1578                  2010-06-18 21:35:08.483156 -07:00
4 rows fetched

The following are variations on the SHOW INCIDENT command:

SHOW INCIDENT -MODE BRIEF
SHOW INCIDENT -MODE DETAIL

These commands produce more detailed versions of the incident report.

SHOW INCIDENT -MODE DETAIL -P "INCIDENT_ID=1681"

This shows a detailed incident report for incident 1681 only.

Packaging Incidents

You can use ADRCI commands to package one or more incidents for transmission to Oracle Support for analysis. Background information and instructions are presented in the following topics:

About Packaging Incidents

Packaging incidents is a three-step process:

Step 1: Create a logical incident package.

The incident package (package) is denoted as logical because it exists only as metadata in the automatic diagnostic repository (ADR). It has no content until you generate a physical package from the logical package. The logical package is assigned a package number, and you refer to it by that number in subsequent commands.

You can create the logical package as an empty package, or as a package based on an incident number, a problem number, a problem key, or a time interval. If you create the package as an empty package, you can add diagnostic information to it in step 2.

Creating a package based on an incident means including diagnostic data—dumps, health monitor reports, and so on—for that incident. Creating a package based on a problem number or problem key means including in the package diagnostic data for incidents that reference that problem number or problem key. Creating a package based on a time interval means including diagnostic data on incidents that occurred in the time interval.

Step 2: Add diagnostic information to the incident package

If you created a logical package based on an incident number, a problem number, a problem key, or a time interval, this step is optional. You can add additional incidents to the package or you can add any file within the ADR to the package. If you created an empty package, you must use ADRCI commands to add incidents or files to the package.

Step 3: Generate the physical incident package

When you submit the command to generate the physical package, ADRCI gathers all required diagnostic files and adds them to a zip file in a designated directory. You can generate a complete zip file or an incremental zip file. An incremental file contains all the diagnostic files that were added or changed since the last zip file was created for the same logical package. You can create incremental files only after you create a complete file, and you can create as many incremental files as you want. Each zip file is assigned a sequence number so that the files can be analyzed in the correct order.

Zip files are named according to the following scheme:

packageName_mode_sequence.zip

where:

  • packageName consists of a portion of the problem key followed by a timestamp

  • mode is either COM or INC, for complete or incremental

  • sequence is an integer

For example, if you generate a complete zip file for a logical package that was created on September 6, 2006 at 4:53 p.m., and then generate an incremental zip file for the same logical package, you would create files with names similar to the following:

ORA603_20060906165316_COM_1.zip
ORA603_20060906165316_INC_2.zip

Creating Incident Packages

The following sections present the ADRCI commands that you use to create a logical incident package (package) and generate a physical package:

Creating a Logical Incident Package

You use variants of the IPS CREATE PACKAGE command to create a logical package (package).

To create a package based on an incident:

  1. Start ADRCI in interactive mode, and ensure that the homepath points to the correct directory within the ADR base directory hierarchy.

    See "Starting ADRCI and Getting Help" and "Homepath" for details.

  2. At the ADRCI prompt, enter the following command:

    IPS CREATE PACKAGE INCIDENT incident_number
    

    For example, the following command creates a package based on incident 3:

    IPS CREATE PACKAGE INCIDENT 3
    

    ADRCI generates output similar to the following:

    Created package 10 based on incident id 3, correlation level typical
    

    The package number assigned to this logical package is 10.

The following are variations on the IPS CREATE PACKAGE command:

IPS CREATE PACKAGE

This creates an empty package. You must use the IPS ADD INCIDENT or IPS ADD FILE commands to add diagnostic data to the package before generating it.

IPS CREATE PACKAGE PROBLEM problem_ID

This creates a package and includes diagnostic information for incidents that reference the specified problem ID. (Problem IDs are integers.) You can obtain the problem ID for an incident from the report displayed by the SHOW INCIDENT -MODE BRIEF command. Because there can be many incidents with the same problem ID, ADRCI adds to the package the diagnostic information for the first three incidents (early incidents) that occurred and last three incidents (late incidents) that occurred with this problem ID, excluding any incidents that are older than 90 days.

Note:

The number of early and late incidents, and the 90-day age limit are defaults that can be changed. See "IPS SET CONFIGURATION".

ADRCI may also add other incidents that correlate closely in time or in other criteria with the already added incidents.

IPS CREATE PACKAGE PROBLEMKEY "problem_key"

This creates a package and includes diagnostic information for incidents that reference the specified problem key. You can obtain problem keys from the report displayed by the SHOW INCIDENT command. Because there can be many incidents with the same problem key, ADRCI adds to the package only the diagnostic information for the first three early incidents and last three late incidents with this problem key, excluding incidents that are older than 90 days.

Note:

The number of early and late incidents, and the 90-day age limit are defaults that can be changed. See "IPS SET CONFIGURATION".

ADRCI may also add other incidents that correlate closely in time or in other criteria with the already added incidents.

The problem key must be enclosed in single quotation marks (') or double quotation marks (") if it contains spaces or quotation marks.

IPS CREATE PACKAGE SECONDS sec

This creates a package and includes diagnostic information for all incidents that occurred from sec seconds ago until now. sec must be an integer.

IPS CREATE PACKAGE TIME 'start_time' TO 'end_time'

This creates a package and includes diagnostic information for all incidents that occurred within the specified time range. start_time and end_time must be in the format 'YYYY-MM-DD HH24:MI:SS.FF TZR'. This is a valid format string for the NLS_TIMESTAMP_TZ_FORMAT initialization parameter. The fraction (FF) portion of the time is optional, and the HH24:MI:SS delimiters can be colons or periods.

For example, the following command creates a package with incidents that occurred between July 24th and July 30th of 2010:

IPS CREATE PACKAGE TIME '2010-07-24 00:00:00 -07:00' to '2010-07-30 23.59.59 -07:00'

Adding Diagnostic Information to a Logical Incident Package

You can add the following diagnostic information to an existing logical package (package):

  • All diagnostic information for a particular incident

  • A named file within the ADR

To add an incident to an existing package:

  1. Start ADRCI in interactive mode, and ensure that the homepath points to the correct directory within the ADR base directory hierarchy.

    See "Starting ADRCI and Getting Help" and "Homepath" for details.

  2. At the ADRCI prompt, enter the following command:

    IPS ADD INCIDENT incident_number PACKAGE package_number
    

To add a file in the ADR to an existing package:

  • At the ADRCI prompt, enter the following command:

    IPS ADD FILE filespec PACKAGE package_number
    

    filespec must be a fully qualified file name (with path). Only files that are within the ADR base directory hierarchy may be added.

Generating a Physical Incident Package

When you generate a package, you create a physical package (a zip file) for an existing logical package.

To generate a physical incident package:

  1. Start ADRCI in interactive mode, and ensure that the homepath points to the correct directory within the ADR base directory hierarchy.

    See "Starting ADRCI and Getting Help" and "Homepath" for details.

  2. At the ADRCI prompt, enter the following command:

    IPS GENERATE PACKAGE package_number IN path
    

    This generates a complete physical package (zip file) in the designated path. For example, the following command creates a complete physical package in the directory /home/steve/diagnostics from logical package number 2:

    IPS GENERATE PACKAGE 2 IN /home/steve/diagnostics
    

You can also generate an incremental package containing only the incidents that have occurred since the last package generation.

To generate an incremental physical incident package:

  • At the ADRCI prompt, enter the following command:

    IPS GENERATE PACKAGE package_number IN path INCREMENTAL
    

ADRCI Command Reference

There are four command types in ADRCI:

  • Commands that work with one or more current ADR homes

  • Commands that work with only one current ADR home, and that issue an error message if there is more than one current ADR home

  • Commands that prompt you to select an ADR home when there are multiple current ADR homes

  • Commands that do not need a current ADR home

All ADRCI commands support the case where there is a single current ADR home.

Table 17-2 lists the set of ADRCI commands.

Table 17-2 List of ADRCI commands

Command Description

CREATE REPORT

Creates a report for the specified report type and ID.

ECHO

Echoes the input string.

EXIT

Exits the current ADRCI session.

HOST

Executes operating system commands from ADRCI.

IPS

Invokes the IPS utility. See Table 17-3 for the IPS commands available within ADRCI.

PURGE

Purges diagnostic data in the current ADR home, according to current purging policies.

QUIT

Exits the current ADRCI session.

RUN

Runs an ADRCI script.

SELECT

Retrieves qualified records from the specified incident or problem.

SET BASE

Sets the ADR base for the current ADRCI session.

SET BROWSER

Reserved for future use.

SET CONTROL

Set purging policies for ADR contents.

SET ECHO

Toggles command output.

SET EDITOR

Sets the default editor for displaying trace and alert log contents.

SET HOMEPATH

Makes current one or more ADR homes.

SET TERMOUT

Toggles terminal output.

SHOW ALERT

Shows alert log messages.

SHOW BASE

Shows the current ADR base.

SHOW CONTROL

Shows ADR information, including the current purging policy.

SHOW HM_RUN

Shows Health Monitor run information.

SHOW HOMEPATH

Shows the current homepath.

SHOW HOMES

Lists the current ADR homes.

SHOW INCDIR

Lists the trace files created for the specified incidents.

SHOW INCIDENT

Outputs a list of incidents.

SHOW LOG

Shows diagnostic log messages.

SHOW PROBLEM

Outputs a list of problems.

SHOW REPORT

Shows a report for the specified report type and ID.

SHOW TRACEFILE

Lists qualified trace file names.

SPOOL

Directs output to a file.


Note:

Unless otherwise specified, all commands work with multiple current ADR homes.

CREATE REPORT

Purpose

Creates a report for the specified report type and run ID and stores the report in the ADR. Currently, only the hm_run (Health Monitor) report type is supported.

Note:

Results of Health Monitor runs are stored in the ADR in an internal format. To view these results, you must create a Health Monitor report from them and then view the report. You need create the report only once. You can then view it multiple times.

Syntax and Description

create report report_type run_name

report_type must be hm_run. run_name is a Health Monitor run name. Obtain run names with the SHOW HM_RUN command.

If the report already exists it is overwritten. Use the SHOW REPORT command to view the report.

This command does not support multiple ADR homes.

Example

This example creates a report for the Health Monitor run with run name hm_run_1421:

create report hm_run hm_run_1421

Note:

CREATE REPORT does not work when multiple ADR homes are set. For information about setting a single ADR home, see "Setting the ADRCI Homepath Before Using ADRCI Commands".

ECHO

Purpose

Prints the input string. You can use this command to print custom text from ADRCI scripts.

Syntax and Description

echo quoted_string

The string must be enclosed in single or double quotation marks.

This command does not require an ADR home to be set before you can use it.

Example

These examples print the string "Hello, world!":

echo "Hello, world!"
echo 'Hello, world!'

EXIT

Purpose

Exits the ADRCI utility.

Syntax and Description

exit

EXIT is a synonym for the QUIT command.

This command does not require an ADR home to be set before you can use it.

HOST

Purpose

Execute operating system commands without leaving ADRCI.

Syntax and Description

host ["host_command_string"]

Use host by itself to enter an operating system shell, which allows you to enter multiple operating system commands. Enter EXIT to leave the shell and return to ADRCI.

You can also specify the command on the same line (host_command_string) enclosed in double quotation marks.

This command does not require an ADR home to be set before you can use it.

Examples

host
host "ls -l *.pl"

IPS

Purpose

Invokes the Incident Packaging Service (IPS). The IPS command provides options for creating logical incident packages (packages), adding diagnostic data to packages, and generating physical packages for transmission to Oracle Support.

See Also:

"Packaging Incidents" for more information about packaging

The IPS command set contains the following commands:

Table 17-3 IPS Command Set

Command Description

IPS ADD

Adds an incident, problem, or problem key to a package.

IPS ADD FILE

Adds a file to a package.

IPS ADD NEW INCIDENTS

Finds and adds new incidents for the problems in the specified package.

IPS COPY IN FILE

Copies files into the ADR from the external file system.

IPS COPY OUT FILE

Copies files out of the ADR to the external file system.

IPS CREATE PACKAGE

Creates a new (logical) package.

IPS DELETE PACKAGE

Deletes a package and its contents from the ADR.

IPS FINALIZE

Finalizes a package before uploading.

IPS GENERATE PACKAGE

Generates a zip file of the specified package contents in the target directory.

IPS GET MANIFEST

Retrieves and displays the manifest from a package zip file.

IPS GET METADATA

Extracts metadata from a package zip file and displays it.

IPS PACK

Creates a physical package (zip file) directly from incidents, problems, or problem keys.

IPS REMOVE

Removes incidents from an existing package.

IPS REMOVE FILE

Remove a file from an existing package.

IPS SET CONFIGURATION

Changes the value of an IPS configuration parameter.

IPS SHOW CONFIGURATION

Displays the values of IPS configuration parameters.

IPS SHOW FILES

Lists the files in a package.

IPS SHOW INCIDENTS

Lists the incidents in a package.

IPS SHOW PACKAGE

Displays information about the specified package.

IPS UNPACK FILE

Unpackages a package zip file into a specified path.


Note:

IPS commands do not work when multiple ADR homes are set. For information about setting a single ADR home, see "Setting the ADRCI Homepath Before Using ADRCI Commands".

Using the <ADR_HOME> and <ADR_BASE> Variables in IPS Commands

The IPS command set provides shortcuts for referencing the current ADR home and ADR base directories. To access the current ADR home directory, use the <ADR_HOME> variable as follows:

ips add file <ADR_HOME>/trace/orcl_ora_13579.trc package 12

Use the <ADR_BASE> variable to access the ADR base directory as follows:

ips add file <ADR_BASE>/diag/rdbms/orcl/orcl/trace/orcl_ora_13579.trc package 12

Note:

Type the angle brackets (< >) as shown.

IPS ADD

Purpose

Adds incidents to a package.

Syntax and Description

ips add {incident first [n] | incident inc_id | incident last [n] | 
     problem first [n] | problem prob_id | problem last [n] |
     problemkey pr_key | seconds secs | time start_time to end_time} 
     package package_id

Table 17-4 describes the arguments of IPS ADD.

Table 17-4 Arguments of IPS ADD command

Argument Description

incident first [n]

Adds the first n incidents to the package, where n is a positive integer. For example, if n is set to 5, then the first five incidents are added. If n is omitted, then the default is 1, and the first incident is added.

incident inc_id

Adds an incident with ID inc_id to the package.

incident last [n]

Adds the last n incidents to the package, where n is a positive integer. For example, if n is set to 5, then the last five incidents are added. If n is omitted, then the default is 1, and the last incident is added.

problem first [n]

Adds the incidents for the first n problems to the package, where n is a positive integer. For example, if n is set to 5, then the incidents for the first five problems are added. If n is omitted, then the default is 1, and the incidents for the first problem is added.

Adds only the first three early incidents and last three late incidents for each problem, excluding any older than 90 days. (Note: These limits are defaults and can be changed. See "IPS SET CONFIGURATION".)

problem prob_id

Adds all incidents with problem ID prob_id to the package. Adds only the first three early incidents and last three late incidents for the problem, excluding any older than 90 days. (Note: These limits are defaults and can be changed. See "IPS SET CONFIGURATION".)

problem last [n]

Adds the incidents for the last n problems to the package, where n is a positive integer. For example, if n is set to 5, then the incidents for the last five problems are added. If n is omitted, then the default is 1, and the incidents for the last problem is added.

Adds only the first three early incidents and last three late incidents for each problem, excluding any older than 90 days. (Note: These limits are defaults and can be changed. See "IPS SET CONFIGURATION".)

problemkey pr_key

Adds incidents with problem key pr_key to the package. Adds only the first three early incidents and last three late incidents for the problem key, excluding any older than 90 days. (Note: These limits are defaults and can be changed.)

seconds secs

Adds all incidents that have occurred within secs seconds of the present time.

time start_time to end_time

Adds all incidents between start_time and end_time to the package. Time format is 'YYYY-MM-YY HH24:MI:SS.FF TZR'. Fractional part (FF) is optional.

package package_id

Specifies the package to which to add incidents.


Example

This example adds incident 22 to package 12:

ips add incident 22 package 12

This example adds the first three early incidents and the last three late incidents with problem ID 6 to package 2, exuding any incidents older than 90 days:

ips add problem 6 package 2

This example adds all incidents taking place during the last minute to package 5:

ips add seconds 60 package 5

This example adds all incidents taking place between 10:00 a.m. and 11:00 p.m. on May 1, 2010:

ips add  time '2010-05-01 10:00:00.00 -07:00' to '2010-05-01 23:00:00.00 -07:00'

IPS ADD FILE

Purpose

Adds a file to an existing package.

Syntax and Description

ips add file file_name package package_id

file_name is the full path name of the file. You can use the <ADR_HOME> and <ADR_BASE> variables if desired. The file must be under the same ADR base as the package.

package_id is the package ID.

Example

This example adds a trace file to package 12:

ips add file <ADR_HOME>/trace/orcl_ora_13579.trc package 12

See Also:

See "Using the <ADR_HOME> and <ADR_BASE> Variables in IPS Commands" for information about the <ADR_HOME> directory syntax

IPS ADD NEW INCIDENTS

Purpose

Find and add new incidents for all of the problems in the specified package.

Syntax and Description

ips add new incidents package package_id

package_id is the ID of the package to update. Only new incidents of the problems in the package are added.

Example

This example adds up to three of the new late incidents for the problems in package 12:

ips add new incidents package 12

Note:

The number of late incidents added is a default that can be changed. See "IPS SET CONFIGURATION".

IPS COPY IN FILE

Purpose

Copies a file into the ADR from the external file system.

To edit a file in a package, you must copy the file out to a designated directory, edit the file, and copy it back into the package. You may want to do this to delete sensitive data in the file before sending the package to Oracle Support.

Syntax and Description

ips copy in file filename [to new_name][overwrite] package package_id
     [incident incid]

Copies an external file, filename (specified with full path name) into the ADR, associating it with an existing package, package_id, and optionally an incident, incid. Use the to new_name option to give the copied file a new file name within the ADR. Use the overwrite option to overwrite a file that exists already.

Example

This example copies a trace file from the file system into the ADR, associating it with package 2 and incident 4:

ips copy in file /home/nick/trace/orcl_ora_13579.trc to <ADR_HOME>/trace/orcl_ora_13579.trc package 2 incident 4

See Also:

IPS COPY OUT FILE

Purpose

Copies a file from the ADR to the external file system.

To edit a file in a package, you must copy the file out to a designated directory, edit the file, and copy it back into the package. You may want to do this to delete sensitive data in the file before sending the package to Oracle Support.

Syntax and Description

ips copy out file source to target [overwrite]

Copies a file, source, to a location outside the ADR, target (specified with full path name). Use the overwrite option to overwrite the file that exists already.

Example

This example copies the file orcl_ora_13579.trc, in the trace subdirectory of the current ADR home, to a local folder.

ips copy out file <ADR_HOME>/trace/orcl_ora_13579.trc to /home/nick/trace/orcl_ora_13579.trc

See Also:

IPS CREATE PACKAGE

Purpose

Creates a new package. ADRCI automatically assigns the package number for the new package.

Syntax and Description

ips create package {incident first [n] | incident inc_id | 
     incident last [n] | problem first [n] | problem prob_id |
     problem last [n] | problemkey prob_key | seconds secs | 
     time start_time to end_time} [correlate {basic |typical | all}]

Optionally, you can add incidents to the new package using the provided options.

Table 17-5 describes the arguments for IPS CREATE PACKAGE.

Table 17-5 Arguments of IPS CREATE PACKAGE command

Argument Description

incident first [n]

Adds the first n incidents to the package, where n is a positive integer. For example, if n is set to 5, then the first five incidents are added. If n is omitted, then the default is 1, and the first incident is added.

incident inc_id

Adds an incident with ID inc_id to the package.

incident last [n]

Adds the last n incidents to the package, where n is a positive integer. For example, if n is set to 5, then the last five incidents are added. If n is omitted, then the default is 1, and the last incident is added.

problem first [n]

Adds the incidents for the first n problems to the package, where n is a positive integer. For example, if n is set to 5, then the incidents for the first five problems are added. If n is omitted, then the default is 1, and the incidents for the first problem is added.

Adds only the first three early incidents and last three late incidents for each problem, excluding any older than 90 days. (Note: These limits are defaults and can be changed. See "IPS SET CONFIGURATION".)

problem prob_id

Adds all incidents with problem ID prob_id to the package. Adds only the first three early incidents and last three late incidents for the problem, excluding any older than 90 days. (Note: These limits are defaults and can be changed. See "IPS SET CONFIGURATION".)

problem last [n]

Adds the incidents for the last n problems to the package, where n is a positive integer. For example, if n is set to 5, then the incidents for the last five problems are added. If n is omitted, then the default is 1, and the incidents for the last problem is added.

Adds only the first three early incidents and last three late incidents for each problem, excluding any older than 90 days. (Note: These limits are defaults and can be changed. See "IPS SET CONFIGURATION".)

problemkey pr_key

Adds all incidents with problem key pr_key to the package. Adds only the first three early incidents and last three late incidents for the problem key, excluding any older than 90 days. (Note: These limits are defaults and can be changed.)

seconds secs

Adds all incidents that have occurred within secs seconds of the present time.

time start_time to end_time

Adds all incidents taking place between start_time and end_time to the package. Time format is 'YYYY-MM-YY HH24:MI:SS.FF TZR'. Fractional part (FF) is optional.

correlate {basic |typical | all}

Selects a method of including correlated incidents in the package. There are three options for this argument:

  • correlate basic includes incident dumps and incident process trace files.

  • correlate typical includes incident dumps and any trace files that were modified within five minutes of each incident. You can alter the time interval by modifying the INCIDENT_TIME_WINDOW configuration parameter.

  • correlate all includes the incident dumps, and all trace files that were modified between the time of the first selected incident and the last selected incident.

The default value is correlate typical.


Examples

This example creates a package with no incidents:

ips create package

Output:

Created package 5 without any contents, correlation level typical

This example creates a package containing all incidents between 10 AM and 11 PM on the given day:

ips create package time '2010-05-01 10:00:00.00 -07:00' to '2010-05-01 23:00:00.00 -07:00'

Output:

Created package 6 based on time range 2010-05-01 10:00:00.00 -07:00 to 2010-05-01 23:00:00.00 -07:00, correlation level typical

This example creates a package and adds the first three early incidents and the last three late incidents with problem ID 3, excluding incidents that are older than 90 days:

ips create package problem 3

Output:

Created package 7 based on problem id 3, correlation level typical

Note:

The number of early and late incidents added, and the 90-day age limit are defaults that can be changed. See "IPS SET CONFIGURATION".

IPS DELETE PACKAGE

Purpose

Drops a package and its contents from the ADR.

Syntax and Description

ips delete package package_id

package_id is the package to delete.

Example

ips delete package 12

IPS FINALIZE

Purpose

Finalizes a package before uploading.

Syntax and Description

ips finalize package package_id

package_id is the package ID to finalize.

Example

ips finalize package 12

See Also:

Oracle Database Administrator's Guide for more information about finalizing packages

IPS GENERATE PACKAGE

Purpose

Creates a physical package (a zip file) in target directory.

Syntax and Description

ips generate package package_id [in path] [complete | incremental]

package_id is the ID of the package to generate. Optionally, you can save the file in the directory path. Otherwise, the package is generated in the current working directory.

The complete option means the package forces ADRCI to include all package files. This is the default behavior.

The incremental option includes only files that have been added or changed since the last time that this package was generated. With the incremental option, the command finishes more quickly.

Example

This example generates a physical package file in path /home/steve:

ips generate package 12 in /home/steve

This example generates a physical package from files added or changed since the last generation:

ips generate package 14 incremental

IPS GET MANIFEST

Purpose

Extracts the manifest from a package zip file and displays it.

Syntax and Description

ips get manifest from file filename

filename is a package zip file. The manifest is an XML-formatted set of metadata for the package file, including information about ADR configuration, correlated files, incidents, and how the package was generated.

This command does not require an ADR home to be set before you can use it.

Example

ips get manifest from file /home/steve/ORA603_20060906165316_COM_1.zip

IPS GET METADATA

Purpose

Extracts ADR-related metadata from a package file and displays it.

Syntax and Description

ips get metadata {from file filename | from adr}

filename is a package zip file. The metadata in a package file (stored in the file metadata.xml) contains information about the ADR home, ADR base, and product.

Use the from adr option to get the metadata from a package zip file that has been unpacked into an ADR home using IPS UNPACK.

The from adr option requires an ADR home to be set.

Example

This example displays metadata from a package file:

ips get metadata from file /home/steve/ORA603_20060906165316_COM_1.zip

This next example displays metadata from a package file that was unpacked into the directory /scratch/oracle/package1:

set base /scratch/oracle/package1
ips get metadata from adr

In this previous example, upon receiving the SET BASE command, ADRCI automatically adds to the homepath the ADR home that was created in /scratch/oracle/package1 by the IPS UNPACK FILE command.

See Also:

"IPS UNPACK FILE" for more information about unpacking package files

IPS PACK

Purpose

Creates a package and generates the physical package immediately.

Syntax and Description

ips pack [incident first [n] | incident inc_id | incident last [n] | 
     problem first [n] | problem prob_id | problem last [n] | 
     problemkey prob_key | seconds secs | time start_time to end_time] 
     [correlate {basic |typical | all}] [in path]

ADRCI automatically generates the package number for the new package. IPS PACK creates an empty package if no package contents are specified.

Table 17-6 describes the arguments for IPS PACK.

Table 17-6 Arguments of IPS PACK command

Argument Description

incident first [n]

Adds the first n incidents to the package, where n is a positive integer. For example, if n is set to 5, then the first five incidents are added. If n is omitted, then the default is 1, and the first incident is added.

incident inc_id

Adds an incident with ID inc_id to the package.

incident last [n]

Adds the last n incidents to the package, where n is a positive integer. For example, if n is set to 5, then the last five incidents are added. If n is omitted, then the default is 1, and the last incident is added.

problem first [n]

Adds the incidents for the first n problems to the package, where n is a positive integer. For example, if n is set to 5, then the incidents for the first five problems are added. If n is omitted, then the default is 1, and the incidents for the first problem is added.

Adds only the first three early incidents and last three late incidents for each problem, excluding any older than 90 days. (Note: These limits are defaults and can be changed. See "IPS SET CONFIGURATION".)

problem prob_id

Adds all incidents with problem ID prob_id to the package. Adds only the first three early incidents and last three late incidents for the problem, excluding any older than 90 days. (Note: These limits are defaults and can be changed. See "IPS SET CONFIGURATION".)

problem last [n]

Adds the incidents for the last n problems to the package, where n is a positive integer. For example, if n is set to 5, then the incidents for the last five problems are added. If n is omitted, then the default is 1, and the incidents for the last problem is added.

Adds only the first three early incidents and last three late incidents for each problem, excluding any older than 90 days. (Note: These limits are defaults and can be changed. See "IPS SET CONFIGURATION".)

problemkey pr_key

Adds incidents with problem key pr_key to the package. Adds only the first three early incidents and last three late incidents for the problem key, excluding any older than 90 days. (Note: These limits are defaults and can be changed.)

seconds secs

Adds all incidents that have occurred within secs seconds of the present time.

time start_time to end_time

Adds all incidents taking place between start_time and end_time to the package. Time format is 'YYYY-MM-YY HH24:MI:SS.FF TZR'. Fractional part (FF) is optional.

correlate {basic |typical | all}

Selects a method of including correlated incidents in the package. There are three options for this argument:

  • correlate basic includes incident dumps and incident process trace files.

  • correlate typical includes incident dumps and any trace files that were modified within five minutes of each incident. You can alter the time interval by modifying the INCIDENT_TIME_WINDOW configuration parameter.

  • correlate all includes the incident dumps, and all trace files that were modified between the time of the first selected incident and the last selected incident.

The default value is correlate typical.

in path

Saves the physical package to directory path.


Example

This example creates an empty package:

ips pack

This example creates a physical package containing all information for incident 861:

ips pack incident 861

This example creates a physical package for all incidents in the last minute, fully correlated:

ips pack seconds 60 correlate all

See Also:

"IPS SET CONFIGURATION" for more information about setting configuration parameters.

IPS REMOVE

Purpose

Removes incidents from an existing package.

Syntax and Description

ips remove {incident inc_id | problem prob_id | problemkey prob_key} 
     package package_id

After removing incidents from a package, the incidents continue to be tracked within the package metadata to prevent ADRCI from automatically including them later (such as with ADD NEW INCIDENTS).

Table 17-7 describes the arguments of IPS REMOVE.

Table 17-7 Arguments of IPS REMOVE command

Argument Description

incident inc_id

Removes the incident with ID inc_id from the package

problem prob_id

Removes all incidents with problem ID prob_id from the package

problemkey pr_key

Removes all incidents with problem key pr_key from the package

package package_id

Removes incidents from the package with ID package_id.


Example

This example removes incident 22 from package 12:

ips remove incident 22 package 12

See Also:

"IPS GET MANIFEST" for information about package metadata

IPS REMOVE FILE

Purpose

Removes a file from an existing package.

Syntax and Description

ips remove file file_name package package_id

file_name is the file to remove from package package_id. The complete path of the file must be specified. (You can use the <ADR_HOME> and <ADR_BASE> variables if desired.)

After removal, the file continues to be tracked within the package metadata to prevent ADRCI from automatically including it later (such as with ADD NEW INCIDENTS). Removing a file, therefore, only sets the EXCLUDE flag for the file to Explicitly excluded.

Example

This example removes a trace file from package 12:

ips remove file <ADR_HOME>/trace/orcl_ora_13579.trc package 12
Removed file <ADR_HOME>/trace/orcl_ora_13579.trc from package 12
ips show files package 12

.
.
.
FILE_ID                4
FILE_LOCATION          <ADR_HOME>/trace
FILE_NAME              orcl_ora_13579.trc
LAST_SEQUENCE          0
EXCLUDE                Explicitly excluded
.
.
.

See Also:

IPS SET CONFIGURATION

Purpose

Changes the value of an IPS configuration parameter.

Syntax and Description

ips set configuration {parameter_id | parameter_name} value

parameter_id is the ID of the parameter to change, and parameter_name is the name of the parameter to change. value is the new value. For a list of the configuration parameters and their IDs, use "IPS SHOW CONFIGURATION".

Example

ips set configuration 3 10

IPS SHOW CONFIGURATION

Purpose

Displays a list of IPS configuration parameters and their values. These parameters control various thresholds for IPS data, such as timeouts and incident inclusion intervals.

Syntax and Description

ips show configuration {parameter_id | parameter_name}]

IPS SHOW CONFIGURATION lists the following information for each configuration parameter:

  • Parameter ID

  • Name

  • Description

  • Unit used by parameter (such as days or hours)

  • Value

  • Default value

  • Minimum Value

  • Maximum Value

  • Flags

Optionally, you can get information about a specific parameter by supplying a parameter_id or a parameter_name.

Example

This command describes all IPS configuration parameters:

ips show configuration

Output:

PARAMETER INFORMATION:
   PARAMETER_ID           1
   NAME                   CUTOFF_TIME
   DESCRIPTION            Maximum age for an incident to be considered for 
                          inclusion
   UNIT                   Days
   VALUE                  90
   DEFAULT_VALUE          90
   MINIMUM                1
   MAXIMUM                4294967295
   FLAGS                  0
 
PARAMETER INFORMATION:
   PARAMETER_ID           2
   NAME                   NUM_EARLY_INCIDENTS
   DESCRIPTION            How many incidents to get in the early part of the range
   UNIT                   Number
   VALUE                  3
   DEFAULT_VALUE          3
   MINIMUM                1
   MAXIMUM                4294967295
   FLAGS                  0
 
PARAMETER INFORMATION:
   PARAMETER_ID           3
   NAME                   NUM_LATE_INCIDENTS
   DESCRIPTION            How many incidents to get in the late part of the range
   UNIT                   Number
   VALUE                  3
   DEFAULT_VALUE          3
   MINIMUM                1
   MAXIMUM                4294967295
   FLAGS                  0
 
PARAMETER INFORMATION:
   PARAMETER_ID           4
   NAME                   INCIDENT_TIME_WINDOW
   DESCRIPTION            Incidents this close to each other are considered 
                          correlated
   UNIT                   Minutes
   VALUE                  5
   DEFAULT_VALUE          5
   MINIMUM                1
   MAXIMUM                4294967295
   FLAGS                  0
 
PARAMETER INFORMATION:
   PARAMETER_ID           5
   NAME                   PACKAGE_TIME_WINDOW
   DESCRIPTION            Time window for content inclusion is from x hours 
                          before first included incident to x hours after last 
                          incident
   UNIT                   Hours
   VALUE                  24
   DEFAULT_VALUE          24
   MINIMUM                1
   MAXIMUM                4294967295
   FLAGS                  0
 
PARAMETER INFORMATION:
   PARAMETER_ID           6
   NAME                   DEFAULT_CORRELATION_LEVEL
   DESCRIPTION            Default correlation level for packages
   UNIT                   Number
   VALUE                  2
   DEFAULT_VALUE          2
   MINIMUM                1
   MAXIMUM                4
   FLAGS                  0

Examples

This command describes configuration parameter NUM_EARLY_INCIDENTS:

ips show configuration num_early_incidents

This command describes configuration parameter 3:

ips show configuration 3

Configuration Parameter Descriptions

Table 17-8 describes the IPS configuration parameters in detail.

Table 17-8 IPS Configuration Parameters

Parameter ID Description

CUTOFF_TIME

1

Maximum age, in days, for an incident to be considered for inclusion.

NUM_EARLY_INCIDENTS

2

Number of incidents to include in the early part of the range when creating a package based on a problem. By default, ADRCI adds the three earliest incidents and three most recent incidents to the package.

NUM_LATE_INCIDENTS

3

Number of incidents to include in the late part of the range when creating a package based on a problem. By default, ADRCI adds the three earliest incidents and three most recent incidents to the package.

INCIDENT_TIME_WINDOW

4

Number of minutes between two incidents in order for them to be considered correlated.

PACKAGE_TIME_WINDOW

5

Number of hours to use as a time window for including incidents in a package. For example, a value of 5 includes incidents five hours before the earliest incident in the package, and five hours after the most recent incident in the package.

DEFAULT_CORRELATION_LEVEL

6

The default correlation level to use for correlating incidents in a package. The correlation levels are:

  • 1 (basic): includes incident dumps and incident process trace files.

  • 2 (typical): includes incident dumps and any trace files that were modified within the time window specified by INCIDENT_TIME_WINDOW (see above).

  • 4 (all): includes the incident dumps, and all trace files that were modified between the first selected incident and the last selected incident. Additional incidents can be included automatically if they occurred in the same time range.


IPS SHOW FILES

Purpose

Lists files included in the specified package.

Syntax and Description

ips show files package package_id

package_id is the package ID to display.

Example

This example shows all files associated with package 1:

ips show files package 1

Output:

   FILE_ID                1
   FILE_LOCATION          <ADR_HOME>/alert
   FILE_NAME              log.xml
   LAST_SEQUENCE          1
   EXCLUDE                Included
 
   FILE_ID                2
   FILE_LOCATION          <ADR_HOME>/trace
   FILE_NAME              alert_adcdb.log
   LAST_SEQUENCE          1
   EXCLUDE                Included
 
   FILE_ID                27
   FILE_LOCATION          <ADR_HOME>/incident/incdir_4937
   FILE_NAME              adcdb_ora_692_i4937.trm
   LAST_SEQUENCE          1
   EXCLUDE                Included
 
   FILE_ID                28
   FILE_LOCATION          <ADR_HOME>/incident/incdir_4937
   FILE_NAME              adcdb_ora_692_i4937.trc
   LAST_SEQUENCE          1
   EXCLUDE                Included
 
   FILE_ID                29
   FILE_LOCATION          <ADR_HOME>/trace
   FILE_NAME              adcdb_ora_692.trc
   LAST_SEQUENCE          1
   EXCLUDE                Included
 
   FILE_ID                30
   FILE_LOCATION          <ADR_HOME>/trace
   FILE_NAME              adcdb_ora_692.trm
   LAST_SEQUENCE          1
   EXCLUDE                Included
.
.
.

IPS SHOW INCIDENTS

Purpose

Lists incidents included in the specified package.

Syntax and Description

ips show incidents package package_id

package_id is the package ID to display.

Example

This example lists the incidents in package 1:

ips show incidents package 1

Output:

MAIN INCIDENTS FOR PACKAGE 1:
   INCIDENT_ID            4985
   PROBLEM_ID             1
   EXCLUDE                Included
 
CORRELATED INCIDENTS FOR PACKAGE 1:

IPS SHOW PACKAGE

Purpose

Displays information about the specified package.

Syntax and Description

ips show package package_id {basic | brief | detail}

package_id is the ID of the package to display.

Use the basic option to display a minimal amount of information. It is the default when no package_id is specified.

Use the brief option to display more information about the package than the basic option. It is the default when a package_id is specified.

Use the detail option to show the information displayed by the brief option, as well as some package history and information about the included incidents and files.

Example

ips show package 12
ips show package 12 brief

IPS UNPACK FILE

Purpose

Unpackages a physical package file into the specified path.

Syntax and Description

ips unpack file file_name [into path]

file_name is the full path name of the physical package (zip file) to unpack. Optionally, you can unpack the file into directory path, which must exist and be writable. If you omit the path, the current working directory is used. The destination directory is treated as an ADR base, and the entire ADR base directory hierarchy is created, including a valid ADR home.

This command does not require an ADR home to be set before you can use it.

Example

ips unpack file /tmp/ORA603_20060906165316_COM_1.zip into /tmp/newadr

PURGE

Purpose

Purges diagnostic data in the current ADR home, according to current purging policies. Only ADR contents that are due to be purged are purged.

Diagnostic data in the ADR has a default lifecycle. For example, information about incidents and problems is subject to purging after one year, whereas the associated dump files (dumps) are subject to purging after only 30 days.

Some Oracle products, such as Oracle Database, automatically purge diagnostic data at the end of its life cycle. Other products and components require you to purge diagnostic data manually with this command. You can also use this command to purge data that is due to be automatically purged.

The SHOW CONTROL command displays the default purging policies for short-lived ADR contents and long-lived ADR contents.

Syntax and Description

purge [-i {id | start_id end_id} | 
  -age mins [-type {ALERT|INCIDENT|TRACE|CDUMP|HM}]]

Table 17-9 describes the flags for PURGE.

Table 17-9 Flags for the PURGE command

Flag Description

-i {id1 | start_id end_id}

Purges either a specific incident ID (id) or a range of incident IDs (start_id and end_id)

-age mins

Purges only data older than mins minutes.

-type {ALERT|INCIDENT|TRACE|CDUMP|HM}

Specifies the type of diagnostic data to purge (alert log messages, incident data, trace files (including dumps), core files, or Health Monitor run data and reports). Used with the -age clause.


Examples

This example purges all diagnostic data in the current ADR home based on the default purging policies:

purge

This example purges all diagnostic data for all incidents between 123 and 456:

purge -i 123 456

This example purges all incident data from the last hour:

purge -age 60 -type incident

Note:

PURGE does not work when multiple ADR homes are set. For information about setting a single ADR home, see "Setting the ADRCI Homepath Before Using ADRCI Commands".

QUIT

See "EXIT".

RUN

Purpose

Runs an ADRCI script.

Syntax and Description

run script_name

@ script_name

@@ script_name

script_name is the file containing the ADRCI commands to execute. ADRCI looks for the script in the current directory unless a full path name is supplied. If the file name is given without a file extension, ADRCI uses the default extension .adi.

The run and @ commands are synonyms. The @@ command is similar to run and @ except that when used inside a script, @@ uses the path of the calling script to locate script_name, rather than the current directory.

This command does not require an ADR home to be set before you can use it.

Example

run my_script
@my_script

SELECT

Purpose

Retrieves qualified records for the specified incident or problem.

Syntax and Description

select {*|[field1, [field2, ...]} FROM {incident|problem}
  [WHERE predicate_string]
  [ORDER BY field1 [, field2, ...] [ASC|DSC|DESC]]
  [GROUP BY field1 [, field2, ...]]
  [HAVING having_predicate_string]

Table 17-10 Flags for the SELECT command

Flag Description

field1, field2, ...

Lists the fields to retrieve. If * is specified, then all fields are retrieved.

incident|problem

Indicates whether to query incidents or problems.

WHERE "predicate_string"

Uses a SQL-like predicate string to show only the incident or problem for which the predicate is true. The predicate string must be enclosed in double quotation marks.

Table 17-16 lists the fields that can be used in the predicate string incidents.

Table 17-20 lists the fields that can be used in the predicate string for problems.

ORDER BY field1, field2, ... [ASC|DSC|DESC]

Show results sorted by field in the given order, as well as in ascending (ASC) and descending order (DSC or DESC). When the ORDER BY clause is specified, results are shown in ascending order by default.

GROUP BY field1, field2, ...

Show results grouped by the specified fields.

The GROUP BY flag groups rows but does not guarantee the order of the result set. To order the groupings, use the ORDER BY flag.

HAVING "having_predicate_string"

Restrict the groups of returned rows to those groups for which the having predicate is true. The HAVING flag must be used in combination with the GROUP BY flag.


Note:

The WHERE, ORDER BY, GROUP BY, and HAVING flags are similar to the clauses with the same names in a SELECT SQL statement. See Oracle Database SQL Language Reference for more information about the clauses in a SELECT SQL statement.

Restrictions

The following restrictions apply when you use the SELECT command:

  • The command cannot join more than two tables.

  • The command cannot use table aliases.

  • The command can use only a limited set of functions, which are listed in this section.

  • The command cannot use column wildcard ("*") when joining tables or when using the GROUP BY clause.

  • Statements must be on a single line.

  • Statement cannot have subqueries.

  • Statement cannot have a WITH clause.

  • A limited set of pseudocolumns are allowed. For example, ROWNUM is allowed, but ROWID is not allowed.

Examples

This example retrieves the incident_id and create_time for incidents with an incident_id greater than 1:

select incident_id, create_time from incident where incident_id > 1

The following is sample output for this query:

INCIDENT_ID          CREATE_TIME                              
-------------------- ---------------------------------------- 
4801                 2011-05-27 10:10:26.541656 -07:00       
4802                 2011-05-27 10:11:02.456066 -07:00       
4803                 2011-05-27 10:11:04.759654 -07:00       

This example retrieves the problem_id and first_incident for each problem with a problem_key that includes 600:

select problem_id, first_incident from problem where problem­_key like '%600%'

The following is sample output for this query:

PROBLEM_ID           FIRST_INCIDENT       
-------------------- -------------------- 
1                    4801                
2                    4802                
3                    4803                

Functions

This section describes functions that you can use with the SELECT command.

The purpose and syntax of these functions are similar to the corresponding SQL functions, but there are some differences. This section notes the differences between the functions used with the ADRCI utility and the SQL functions.

The following restrictions apply to all of the functions:

  • The expressions must be simple expressions. See Oracle Database SQL Language Reference for information about simple expressions.

  • You cannot combine function calls. For example, the following combination of function calls is not supported:

    sum(length(column_name))
    
  • No functions are overloaded.

  • All function arguments are mandatory.

  • The functions cannot be used with other ADRCI Utility commands.

Table 17-11 ADRCI Utility Functions for the SELECT Command

Function Description

AVG

Returns the average value of an expression.

CONCAT

Returns the concatenation of two character strings.

COUNT

Returns the number of rows returned by the query.

DECODE

Compares an expression to each search value one by one.

LENGTH

Returns the length of a character string using as defined by the input character set.

MAX

Returns the maximum value of an expression.

MIN

Returns the minimum value of an expression

NVL

Replaces null (returned as a blank) with character data in the results of a query.

REGEXP_LIKE

Returns rows that match a specified pattern in a specified regular expression.

SUBSTR

Returns a portion of character data.

SUM

Returns the sum of values of an expression.

TIMESTAMP_TO_CHAR

Converts a value of TIMESTAMP data type to a value of VARCHAR2 data type in a specified format.

TOLOWER

Returns character data, with all letters lowercase.

TOUPPER

Returns character data, with all letters uppercase.


AVG

Returns the average value of an expression.

Syntax

See Oracle Database SQL Language Reference.

Restrictions

The following restrictions apply when you use the AVG function in the SELECT command:

  • The expression must be a numeric column or a positive numeric constant.

  • The function does not support the DISTINCT or ALL keywords.

  • The function does not support the OVER clause.

CONCAT

Returns a concatenation of two character strings. The character data can be of the data types CHAR and VARCHAR2. The return value is the same data type as the character data.

Syntax

See Oracle Database SQL Language Reference.

Restrictions

The following restrictions apply when you use the CONCAT function in the SELECT command:

  • The function does not support LOB data types, including BLOB, CLOB, NCLOB, and BFILE data types.

  • The function does not support national character set data types, including NCHAR, NVARCHAR2, and NCLOB data types.

COUNT

Returns the number of rows returned by the query.

Syntax

See Oracle Database SQL Language Reference.

Restrictions

The following restrictions apply when you use the COUNT function in the SELECT command:

  • The expression must be a column, a numeric constant, or a string constant.

  • The function does not support the DISTINCT or ALL keywords.

  • The function does not support the OVER clause.

  • The function always counts all rows for the query, including duplicates and nulls.

Examples

This example returns the number of incidents for which flood_controlled is 0 (zero):

select count(*) from incident where flood_controlled = 0;

This example returns the number of problems for which problem_key includes ORA-600:

select count(*) from problem where problem_key like '%ORA-600%';

DECODE

Compares an expression to each search value one by one. If the expression is equal to a search, then Oracle Database returns the corresponding result. If no match is found, then Oracle returns the specified default value.

Syntax

See Oracle Database SQL Language Reference.

Restrictions

The following restrictions apply when you use the DECODE function in the SELECT command:

  • The search arguments must be character data.

  • A default value must be specified.

Example

This example shows each incident_id and whether or not the incident is flood-controlled. The example uses the DECODE function to display text instead of numbers for the flood_controlled field.

select incident_id, decode(flood_controlled, 0, \
  "Not flood-controlled", "Flood-controlled") from incident;

LENGTH

Returns the length of a character string using as defined by the input character set.

The character string can be any of the data types CHAR, VARCHAR2, NCHAR, NVARCHAR2, CLOB, or NCLOB. The return value is of data type NUMBER. If the character sting has data type CHAR, then the length includes all trailing blanks. If the character string is null, then this function returns 0 (zero).

Note:

The SQL function returns null if the character string is null.

Syntax

See Oracle Database SQL Language Reference.

Restrictions

The SELECT command does not support the following functions: LENGTHB, LENGTHC, LENGTH2, and LENGTH4.

Example

This example shows the problem_id and the length of the problem_key for each problem.

select problem_id, length(problem_key) from problem;

MAX

Returns the maximum value of an expression.

Syntax

See Oracle Database SQL Language Reference.

Restrictions

The following restrictions apply when you use the MAX function in the SELECT command:

  • The function does not support the DISTINCT or ALL keywords.

  • The function does not support the OVER clause.

Example

This example shows the maximum last_incident value for all of the recorded problems.

select max(last_incident) from problem;

MIN

Returns the minimum value of an expression.

Syntax

See Oracle Database SQL Language Reference.

Restrictions

The following restrictions apply when you use the MIN function in the SELECT command:

  • The function does not support the DISTINCT or ALL keywords.

  • The function does not support the OVER clause.

Example

This example shows the minimum first_incident value for all of the recorded problems.

select min(first_incident) from problem;

NVL

Replaces null (returned as a blank) with character data in the results of a query. If the first expression specified is null, then NVL returns second expression specified. If first expression specified is not null, then NVL returns the value of the first expression.

Syntax

See Oracle Database SQL Language Reference.

Restrictions

The following restrictions apply when you use the NVL function in the SELECT command:

  • The replacement value (second expression) must be specified as character data.

  • The function does not support data conversions.

Example

This example replaces NULL in the output for singalling_component with the text "No component."

select nvl(signalling_component, 'No component') from incident;

REGEXP_LIKE

Returns rows that match a specified pattern in a specified regular expression.

Note:

In SQL, REGEXP_LIKE is a condition instead of a function.

Syntax

See Oracle Database SQL Language Reference.

Restrictions

The following restrictions apply when you use the REGEXP_LIKE function in the SELECT command:

  • The pattern match is always case-sensitive.

  • The function does not support the match_param argument.

Example

This example shows the problem_id and problem_key for all problems where the problem_key ends with a number.

select problem_id, problem_key from problem \
  where regexp_like(problem_key, '[0-9]$') = true

SUBSTR

Returns a portion of character data. The portion of data returned begins at the specified position and is the specified substring length characters long. SUBSTR calculates lengths using characters as defined by the input character set.

Syntax

See Oracle Database SQL Language Reference.

Restrictions

The following restrictions apply when you use the SUBSTR function in the SELECT command:

  • The function supports only positive integers. It does not support negative values or floating-point numbers.

  • The SELECT command does not support the following functions: SUBSTRB, SUBSTRC, SUBSTR2, and SUBSTR4.

Example

This example shows each problem_key starting with the fifth character in the key.

select substr(problem_key, 5) from problem;

SUM

Returns the sum of values of an expression.

Syntax

See Oracle Database SQL Language Reference.

Restrictions

The following restrictions apply when you use the SUM function in the SELECT command:

  • The expression must be a numeric column or a numeric constant.

  • The function does not support the DISTINCT or ALL keywords.

  • The function does not support the OVER clause.

TIMESTAMP_TO_CHAR

Converts a value of TIMESTAMP data type to a value of VARCHAR2 data type in a specified format. If you do not specify a format, then the function converts values to the default timestamp format.

Syntax

See the syntax of the TO_CHAR function in Oracle Database SQL Language Reference.

Restrictions

The following restrictions apply when you use the TIMESTAMP_TO_CHAR function in the SELECT command:

  • The function converts only TIMESTAMP data type. TIMESTAMP WITH TIME ZONE, TIMESTAMP WITH LOCAL TIME ZONE, and other data types are not supported.

  • The function does not support the nlsparm argument. The function uses the default language for your session.

Example

This example converts the create_time for each incident from a TIMESTAMP data type to a VARCHAR2 data type in the DD-MON-YYYY format.

select timestamp_to_char(create_time, 'DD-MON-YYYY') from incident;

TOLOWER

Returns character data, with all letters lowercase. The character data can be of the data types CHAR and VARCHAR2. The return value is the same data type as the character data. The database sets the case of the characters based on the binary mapping defined for the underlying character set.

Syntax

See the syntax of the LOWER function in Oracle Database SQL Language Reference.

Restrictions

The following restrictions apply when you use the TOLOWER function in the SELECT command:

  • The function does not support LOB data types, including BLOB, CLOB, NCLOB, and BFILE data types.

  • The function does not support national character set data types, including NCHAR, NVARCHAR2, and NCLOB data types.

Example

This example shows each problem_key in all lowercase letters.

select tolower(problem_key) from problem;

TOUPPER

Returns character data, with all letters uppercase. The character data can be of the data types CHAR and VARCHAR2. The return value is the same data type as the character data. The database sets the case of the characters based on the binary mapping defined for the underlying character set.

Syntax

See the syntax of the UPPER function in Oracle Database SQL Language Reference.

Restrictions

The following restrictions apply when you use the TOUPPER function in the SELECT command:

  • The function does not support LOB data types, including BLOB, CLOB, NCLOB, and BFILE data types.

  • The function does not support national character set data types, including NCHAR, NVARCHAR2, and NCLOB data types.

Example

This example shows each problem_key in all uppercase letters.

select toupper(problem_key) from problem;

SET BASE

Purpose

Sets the ADR base to use in the current ADRCI session.

Syntax and Description

set base base_str

base_str is a full path to a directory. The format for base_str depends on the operating system. If there are valid ADR homes under the base directory, these homes are added to the homepath of the current ADRCI session.

This command does not require an ADR home to be set before you can use it.

Example

set base /u01/app/oracle

See Also:

"ADR Base"

SET BROWSER

Purpose

Sets the default browser for displaying reports.

Note:

This command is reserved for future use. At this time ADRCI does not support HTML-formatted reports in a browser.

Syntax and Description

set browser browser_program

browser_program is the browser program name (it is assumed the browser can be started from the current ADR working directory). If no browser is set, ADRCI will display reports to the terminal or spool file.

This command does not require an ADR home to be set before you can use it.

Example

set browser mozilla

See Also:

  • "SHOW REPORT" for more information about showing reports

  • "SPOOL" for more information about spooling

SET CONTROL

Purpose

Sets purging policies for ADR contents.

Syntax and Description

set control (purge_policy = value, ...)

purge_policy is either SHORTP_POLICY or LONGP_POLICY. See "SHOW CONTROL" for more information.

value is the number of hours after which the ADR contents become eligible for purging.

The SHORTP_POLICY and LONGP_POLICY are not mutually exclusive. Each policy controls different types of content.

This command works with a single ADR home only.

Example

set control (SHORTP_POLICY = 360)

SET ECHO

Purpose

Turns command output on or off. This command only affects output being displayed in a script or using the spool mode.

Syntax and Description

set echo on|off

This command does not require an ADR home to be set before you can use it.

Example

set echo off

See Also:

"SPOOL" for more information about spooling

SET EDITOR

Purpose

Sets the editor for displaying the alert log and the contents of trace files.

Syntax and Description

set editor editor_program

editor_program is the editor program name. If no editor is set, ADRCI uses the editor specified by the operating system environment variable EDITOR. If EDITOR is not set, ADRCI uses vi as the default editor.

This command does not require an ADR home to be set before you can use it.

Example

set editor xemacs

SET HOMEPATH

Purpose

Makes one or more ADR homes current. Many ADR commands work with the current ADR homes only.

Syntax and Description

set homepath homepath_str1 homepath_str2 ...

The homepath_strn strings are the paths of the ADR homes relative to the current ADR base. The diag directory name can be omitted from the path. If the specified path contains multiple ADR homes, all of the homes are added to the homepath.

If a desired new ADR home is not within the current ADR base, use SET BASE to set a new ADR base and then use SET HOMEPATH.

This command does not require an ADR home to be set before you can use it.

Example

set homepath diag/rdbms/orcldw/orcldw1  diag/rdbms/orcldw/orcldw2

The following command sets the same homepath as the previous example:

set homepath rdbms/orcldw/orcldw1  rdbms/orcldw/orcldw2

See Also:

"Homepath"

SET TERMOUT

Purpose

Turns output to the terminal on or off.

Syntax and Description

set termout on|off

This setting is independent of spooling. That is, the output can be directed to both terminal and a file at the same time.

This command does not require an ADR home to be set before you can use it.

See Also:

"SPOOL" for more information about spooling

Example

set termout on

SHOW ALERT

Purpose

Shows the contents of the alert log in the default editor.

Syntax and Description

show alert [-p "predicate_string"] [-tail [num] [-f]] [-term]
  [-file alert_file_name]

Except when using the -term flag, this command works with only a single current ADR home. If more than one ADR home is set, ADRCI prompts you to choose the ADR home to use.

Table 17-12 Flags for the SHOW ALERT command

Flag Description

-p "predicate_string"

Uses a SQL-like predicate string to show only the alert log entries for which the predicate is true. The predicate string must be enclosed in double quotation marks.

Table 17-13 lists the fields that can be used in the predicate string.

-tail [num] [-f]

Displays the most recent entries in the alert log.

Use the num option to display the last num entries in the alert log. If num is omitted, the last 10 entries are displayed.

If the -f option is given, after displaying the requested messages, the command does not return. Instead, it remains active and continuously displays new alert log entries to the terminal as they arrive in the alert log. You can use this command to perform live monitoring of the alert log. To terminate the command, press CTRL+C.

-term

Directs results to the terminal. Outputs the entire alert logs from all current ADR homes, one after another. If this option is not given, the results are displayed in the default editor.

-file alert_file_name

Enables you to specify an alert file outside the ADR. alert_file_name must be specified with a full path name. Note that this option cannot be used with the -tail option.


Table 17-13 Alert Fields for SHOW ALERT

Field Type

ORIGINATING_TIMESTAMP

timestamp

NORMALIZED_TIMESTAMP

timestamp

ORGANIZATION_ID

text(65)

COMPONENT_ID

text(65)

HOST_ID

text(65)

HOST_ADDRESS

text(17)

MESSAGE_TYPE

number

MESSAGE_LEVEL

number

MESSAGE_ID

text(65)

MESSAGE_GROUP

text(65)

CLIENT_ID

text(65)

MODULE_ID

text(65)

PROCESS_ID

text(33)

THREAD_ID

text(65)

USER_ID

text(65)

INSTANCE_ID

text(65)

DETAILED_LOCATION

text(161)

UPSTREAM_COMP_ID

text(101)

DOWNSTREAM_COMP_ID

text(101)

EXECUTION_CONTEXT_ID

text(101)

EXECUTION_CONTEXT_SEQUENCE

number

ERROR_INSTANCE_ID

number

ERROR_INSTANCE_SEQUENCE

number

MESSAGE_TEXT

text(2049)

MESSAGE_ARGUMENTS

text(129)

SUPPLEMENTAL_ATTRIBUTES

text(129)

SUPPLEMENTAL_DETAILS

text(4000)

PROBLEM_KEY

text(65)


Example

This example shows all alert messages for the current ADR home in the default editor:

show alert

This example shows all alert messages for the current ADR home and directs the output to the terminal instead of the default editor:

show alert -term

This example shows all alert messages for the current ADR home with message text describing an incident:

show alert -p "message_text like '%incident%'"

This example shows the last twenty alert messages, and then keeps the alert log open, displaying new alert log entries as they arrive:

show alert -tail 20 -f

This example shows all alert messages for a single ADR home in the default editor when multiple ADR homes have been set:

show alert

Choose the alert log from the following homes to view:

1: diag/tnslsnr/dbhost1/listener
2: diag/asm/+asm/+ASM
3: diag/rdbms/orcl/orcl
4: diag/clients/user_oracle/host_9999999999_11
Q: to quit

Please select option:
3

See Also:

"SET EDITOR"

SHOW BASE

Purpose

Shows the current ADR base.

Syntax and Description

show base [-product product_name]

Optionally, you can show the product's ADR base location for a specific product. The products currently supported are CLIENT and ADRCI.

This command does not require an ADR home to be set before you can use it.

Example

This example shows the current ADR base:

show base

Output:

ADR base is "/u01/app/oracle"

This example shows the current ADR base for Oracle Database clients:

show base -product client

SHOW CONTROL

Purpose

Displays information about the ADR, including the purging policy.

Syntax and Description

show control

Displays various attributes of the ADR, including the following purging policy attributes:

Attribute Name Description
SHORTP_POLICY Number of hours after which to purge ADR contents that have a short life. Default is 720 (30 days).

A setting of 0 (zero) means that all contents that have a short life can be purged. The maximum setting is 35791394. If a value greater than 35791394 is specified, then this attribute is set to 0 (zero).

The ADR contents that have a short life include the following:

  • Trace files

  • Core dump files

  • Packaging information

LONGP_POLICY Number of hours after which to purge ADR contents that have a long life. Default is 8760 (365 days).

A setting of 0 (zero) means that all contents that have a long life can be purged. The maximum setting is 35791394. If a value greater than 35791394 is specified, then this attribute is set to 0 (zero).

The ADR contents that have a long life include the following:

  • Incident information

  • Incident dumps

  • Alert logs


Note:

The SHORTP_POLICY and LONGP_POLICY attributes are not mutually exclusive. Each policy controls different types of content.

SHOW HM_RUN

Purpose

Shows all information for Health Monitor runs.

Syntax and Description

show hm_run [-p "predicate_string"]

predicate_string is a SQL-like predicate specifying the field names to select. Table 17-14 displays the list of field names you can use.

Table 17-14 Fields for Health Monitor Runs

Field Type

RUN_ID

number

RUN_NAME

text(31)

CHECK_NAME

text(31)

NAME_ID

number

MODE

number

START_TIME

timestamp

RESUME_TIME

timestamp

END_TIME

timestamp

MODIFIED_TIME

timestamp

TIMEOUT

number

FLAGS

number

STATUS

number

SRC_INCIDENT_ID

number

NUM_INCIDENTS

number

ERR_NUMBER

number

REPORT_FILE

bfile


Example

This example displays data for all Health Monitor runs:

show hm_run

This example displays data for the Health Monitor run with ID 123:

show hm_run -p "run_id=123"

See Also:

Oracle Database Administrator's Guide for more information about Health Monitor

SHOW HOMEPATH

Purpose

Identical to the SHOW HOMES command.

Syntax and Description

show homepath | show homes | show home

This command does not require an ADR home to be set before you can use it.

Example

show homepath

Output:

ADR Homes:
diag/tnslsnr/dbhost1/listener
diag/asm/+asm/+ASM
diag/rdbms/orcl/orcl
diag/clients/user_oracle/host_9999999999_11

See Also:

"SET HOMEPATH" for information about how to set the homepath

SHOW HOMES

Purpose

Show the ADR homes in the current ADRCI session.

Syntax and Description

show homes | show home | show homepath

This command does not require an ADR home to be set before you can use it.

Example

show homes

Output:

ADR Homes:
diag/tnslsnr/dbhost1/listener
diag/asm/+asm/+ASM
diag/rdbms/orcl/orcl
diag/clients/user_oracle/host_9999999999_11

SHOW INCDIR

Purpose

Shows trace files for the specified incident.

Syntax and Description

show incdir [id | id_low id_high]

You can provide a single incident ID (id) or a range of incidents (id_low to id_high). If no incident ID is given, trace files for all incidents are listed.

Example

This example shows all trace files for all incidents:

show incdir

Output:

ADR Home = /u01/app/oracle/log/diag/rdbms/emdb/emdb:
*************************************************************************
diag/rdbms/emdb/emdb/incident/incdir_3801/emdb_ora_23604_i3801.trc
diag/rdbms/emdb/emdb/incident/incdir_3801/emdb_m000_23649_i3801_a.trc
diag/rdbms/emdb/emdb/incident/incdir_3802/emdb_ora_23604_i3802.trc
diag/rdbms/emdb/emdb/incident/incdir_3803/emdb_ora_23604_i3803.trc
diag/rdbms/emdb/emdb/incident/incdir_3804/emdb_ora_23604_i3804.trc
diag/rdbms/emdb/emdb/incident/incdir_3805/emdb_ora_23716_i3805.trc
diag/rdbms/emdb/emdb/incident/incdir_3805/emdb_m000_23767_i3805_a.trc
diag/rdbms/emdb/emdb/incident/incdir_3806/emdb_ora_23716_i3806.trc
diag/rdbms/emdb/emdb/incident/incdir_3633/emdb_pmon_28970_i3633.trc
diag/rdbms/emdb/emdb/incident/incdir_3633/emdb_m000_23778_i3633_a.trc
diag/rdbms/emdb/emdb/incident/incdir_3713/emdb_smon_28994_i3713.trc
diag/rdbms/emdb/emdb/incident/incdir_3713/emdb_m000_23797_i3713_a.trc
diag/rdbms/emdb/emdb/incident/incdir_3807/emdb_ora_23783_i3807.trc
diag/rdbms/emdb/emdb/incident/incdir_3807/emdb_m000_23803_i3807_a.trc
diag/rdbms/emdb/emdb/incident/incdir_3808/emdb_ora_23783_i3808.trc

This example shows all trace files for incident 3713:

show incdir 3713

Output:

ADR Home = /u01/app/oracle/log/diag/rdbms/emdb/emdb:
*************************************************************************
diag/rdbms/emdb/emdb/incident/incdir_3713/emdb_smon_28994_i3713.trc
diag/rdbms/emdb/emdb/incident/incdir_3713/emdb_m000_23797_i3713_a.trc

This example shows all tracefiles for incidents between 3801 and 3804:

show incdir 3801 3804

Output:

ADR Home = /u01/app/oracle/log/diag/rdbms/emdb/emdb:
*************************************************************************
diag/rdbms/emdb/emdb/incident/incdir_3801/emdb_ora_23604_i3801.trc
diag/rdbms/emdb/emdb/incident/incdir_3801/emdb_m000_23649_i3801_a.trc
diag/rdbms/emdb/emdb/incident/incdir_3802/emdb_ora_23604_i3802.trc
diag/rdbms/emdb/emdb/incident/incdir_3803/emdb_ora_23604_i3803.trc
diag/rdbms/emdb/emdb/incident/incdir_3804/emdb_ora_23604_i3804.trc

SHOW INCIDENT

Purpose

Lists all of the incidents associated with the current ADR home. Includes both open and closed incidents.

Syntax and Description

show incident [-p "predicate_string"] [-mode {BASIC|BRIEF|DETAIL}]          [-orderby field1, field2, ... [ASC|DSC]]

Table 17-15 describes the flags for SHOW INCIDENT.

Table 17-15 Flags for SHOW INCIDENT command

Flag Description

-p "predicate_string"

Use a predicate string to show only the incidents for which the predicate is true. The predicate string must be enclosed in double quotation marks.

Table 17-16 lists the fields that can be used in the predicate string.

-mode {BASIC|BRIEF|DETAIL}

Choose an output mode for incidents. BASIC is the default.

  • BASIC displays only basic incident information (the INCIDENT_ID, PROBLEM_ID, and CREATE_TIME fields). It does not display flood-controlled incidents.

  • BRIEF displays all information related to the incidents, as given by the fields in Table 17-16. It includes flood-controlled incidents.

  • DETAIL displays all information for the incidents (as with BRIEF mode) as well as information about incident dumps. It includes flood-controlled incidents.

-orderby field1, field2, ... [ASC|DSC]

Show results sorted by field in the given order, as well as in ascending (ASC) and descending order (DSC). By default, results are shown in ascending order.


Table 17-16 Incident Fields for SHOW INCIDENT

Field Type Description

INCIDENT_ID

number

ID of the incident

PROBLEM_ID

number

ID of the problem to which the incident belongs

CREATE_TIME

timestamp

Time when the incident was created

CLOSE_TIME

timestamp

Time when the incident was closed

STATUS

number

Status of this incident

FLAGS

number

Flags for internal use

FLOOD_CONTROLLED

number (decoded to a text status by ADRCI)

Encodes the flood control status for the incident

ERROR_FACILITY

text(10)

Error facility for the error that caused the incident

ERROR_NUMBER

number

Error number for the error that caused the incident

ERROR_ARG1

text(64)

First argument for the error that caused the incident

Error arguments provide additional information about the error, such as the code location that issued the error.

ERROR_ARG2

text(64)

Second argument for the error that caused the incident

ERROR_ARG3

text(64)

Third argument for the error that caused the incident

ERROR_ARG4

text(64)

Fourth argument for the error that caused the incident

ERROR_ARG5

text(64)

Fifth argument for the error that caused the incident

ERROR_ARG6

text(64)

Sixth argument for the error that caused the incident

ERROR_ARG7

text(64)

Seventh argument for the error that caused the incident

ERROR_ARG8

text(64)

Eighth argument for the error that caused the incident

SIGNALLING_COMPONENT

text(64)

Component that signaled the error that caused the incident

SIGNALLING_SUBCOMPONENT

text(64)

Subcomponent that signaled the error that caused the incident

SUSPECT_COMPONENT

text(64)

Component that has been automatically identified as possibly causing the incident

SUSPECT_SUBCOMPONENT

text(64)

Subcomponent that has been automatically identified as possibly causing the incident

ECID

text(64)

Execution Context ID

IMPACT

number

Encodes the impact of the incident

ERROR_ARG9

text(64)

Ninth argument for the error that caused the incident

ERROR_ARG10

text(64)

Tenth argument for the error that caused the incident

ERROR_ARG11

text(64)

Eleventh argument for the error that caused the incident

ERROR_ARG12

text(64)

Twelfth argument for the error that caused the incident


Examples

This example shows all incidents for this ADR home:

show incident

Output:

ADR Home = /u01/app/oracle/log/diag/rdbms/emdb/emdb:
*************************************************************************
INCIDENT_ID          PROBLEM_KEY                                  CREATE_TIME
-------------------- -------------------------------------------- ----------------------------
3808                 ORA 603                                      2010-06-18 21:35:49.322161 -07:00
3807                 ORA 600 [4137]                               2010-06-18 21:35:47.862114 -07:00
3806                 ORA 603                                      2010-06-18 21:35:26.666485 -07:00
3805                 ORA 600 [4136]                               2010-06-18 21:35:25.012579 -07:00
3804                 ORA 1578                                     2010-06-18 21:35:08.483156 -07:00
3713                 ORA 600 [4136]                               2010-06-18 21:35:44.754442 -07:00
3633                 ORA 600 [4136]                               2010-06-18 21:35:35.776151 -07:00
7 rows fetched

This example shows the detail view for incident 3805:

adrci> show incident -mode DETAIL -p "incident_id=3805"

Output:

ADR Home = /u01/app/oracle/log/diag/rdbms/emdb/emdb:
*************************************************************************
 
**********************************************************
INCIDENT INFO RECORD 1
**********************************************************
   INCIDENT_ID                   3805
   STATUS                        closed
   CREATE_TIME                   2010-06-18 21:35:25.012579 -07:00
   PROBLEM_ID                    2
   CLOSE_TIME                    2010-06-18 22:26:54.143537 -07:00
   FLOOD_CONTROLLED              none
   ERROR_FACILITY                ORA
   ERROR_NUMBER                  600
   ERROR_ARG1                    4136
   ERROR_ARG2                    2
   ERROR_ARG3                    18.0.628
   ERROR_ARG4                    <NULL>
   ERROR_ARG5                    <NULL>
   ERROR_ARG6                    <NULL>
   ERROR_ARG7                    <NULL>
   ERROR_ARG8                    <NULL>
   SIGNALLING_COMPONENT          <NULL>
   SIGNALLING_SUBCOMPONENT       <NULL>
   SUSPECT_COMPONENT             <NULL>
   SUSPECT_SUBCOMPONENT          <NULL>
   ECID                          <NULL>
   IMPACTS                       0
   PROBLEM_KEY                   ORA 600 [4136]
   FIRST_INCIDENT                3805
   FIRSTINC_TIME                 2010-06-18 21:35:25.012579 -07:00
   LAST_INCIDENT                 3713
   LASTINC_TIME                  2010-06-18 21:35:44.754442 -07:00
   IMPACT1                       0
   IMPACT2                       0
   IMPACT3                       0
   IMPACT4                       0
   KEY_NAME                      Client ProcId
   KEY_VALUE                     oracle@dbhost1 (TNS V1-V3).23716_3083142848
   KEY_NAME                      SID
   KEY_VALUE                     127.52237
   KEY_NAME                      ProcId
   KEY_VALUE                     23.90
   KEY_NAME                      PQ
   KEY_VALUE                     (0, 1182227717)
   OWNER_ID                      1
   INCIDENT_FILE                 /.../emdb/emdb/incident/incdir_3805/emdb_ora_23716_i3805.trc
   OWNER_ID                      1
   INCIDENT_FILE                 /.../emdb/emdb/trace/emdb_ora_23716.trc
   OWNER_ID                      1
   INCIDENT_FILE                 /.../emdb/emdb/incident/incdir_3805/emdb_m000_23767_i3805_a.trc
1 rows fetched

SHOW LOG

Purpose

Show diagnostic log messages.

Syntax and Description

show log [-l log_name] [-p "predicate_string"] [-term] [ [-tail [num] [-f]] ]

Table 17-17 describes the flags for SHOW LOG.

Table 17-17 Flags for SHOW LOG command

Flag Description

-l log_name

Name of the log to show.

If no log name is specified, then this command displays all messages from all diagnostic logs under the current ADR Home.

-p "predicate_string"

Use a SQL-like predicate string to show only the log entries for which the predicate is true. The predicate string must be enclosed in double quotation marks.

Table 17-18 lists the fields that can be used in the predicate string.

-term

Direct results to the terminal.

If this option is not specified, then this command opens the results in an editor. By default, it opens the results in emacs, but you can use the SET EDITOR command to open the results in other editors.

-tail [num] [-f]

Displays the most recent entries in the log.

Use the num option to display the last num entries in the log. If num is omitted, the last 10 entries are displayed.

If the -f option is given, after displaying the requested messages, the command does not return. Instead, it remains active and continuously displays new log entries to the terminal as they arrive in the log. You can use this command to perform live monitoring of the log. To terminate the command, press CTRL+C.


Table 17-18 Log Fields for SHOW LOG

Field Type

ORIGINATING_TIMESTAMP

timestamp

NORMALIZED_TIMESTAMP

timestamp

ORGANIZATION_ID

text(65)

COMPONENT_ID

text(65)

HOST_ID

text(65)

HOST_ADDRESS

text(17)

MESSAGE_TYPE

number

MESSAGE_LEVEL

number

MESSAGE_ID

text(65)

MESSAGE_GROUP

text(65)

CLIENT_ID

text(65)

MODULE_ID

text(65)

PROCESS_ID

text(33)

THREAD_ID

text(65)

USER_ID

text(65)

INSTANCE_ID

text(65)

DETAILED_LOCATION

text(161)

UPSTREAM_COMP_ID

text(101)

DOWNSTREAM_COMP_ID

text(101)

EXECUTION_CONTEXT_ID

text(101)

EXECUTION_CONTEXT_SEQUENCE

number

ERROR_INSTANCE_ID

number

ERROR_INSTANCE_SEQUENCE

number

MESSAGE_TEXT

text(2049)

MESSAGE_ARGUMENTS

text(129)

SUPPLEMENTAL_ATTRIBUTES

text(129)

SUPPLEMENTAL_DETAILS

text(4000)

PROBLEM_KEY

text(65)


SHOW PROBLEM

Purpose

Show problem information for the current ADR home.

Syntax and Description

show problem [-p "predicate_string"] [-last num | -all]
    [-orderby field1, field2, ... [ASC|DSC]]

Table 17-19 describes the flags for SHOW PROBLEM.

Table 17-19 Flags for SHOW PROBLEM command

Flag Description

-p "predicate_string"

Use a SQL-like predicate string to show only the incidents for which the predicate is true. The predicate string must be enclosed in double quotation marks.

Table 17-20 lists the fields that can be used in the predicate string.

-last num | -all

Shows the last num problems, or lists all the problems. By default, SHOW PROBLEM lists the most recent 50 problems.

-orderby field1, field2, ... [ASC|DSC]

Show results sorted by field in the given order (field1, field2, ...), as well as in ascending (ASC) and descending order (DSC). By default, results are shown in ascending order.


Table 17-20 Problem Fields for SHOW PROBLEM

Field Type Description

PROBLEM_ID

number

ID of the problem

PROBLEM_KEY

text(550)

Problem key for the problem

FIRST_INCIDENT

number

Incident ID of the first incident for the problem

FIRSTINC_TIME

timestamp

Creation time of the first incident for the problem

LAST_INCIDENT

number

Incident ID of the last incident for the problem

LASTINC_TIME

timestamp

Creation time of the last incident for the problem

IMPACT1

number

Encodes an impact of this problem

IMPACT2

number

Encodes an impact of this problem

IMPACT3

number

Encodes an impact of this problem

IMPACT4

number

Encodes an impact of this problem

SERVICE_REQUEST

text(64)

Service request for the problem (entered through Support Workbench)

BUG_NUMBER

text(64)

Bug number for the problem (entered through Support Workbench)


Example

This example lists all the problems in the current ADR home:

show problem -all

This example shows the problem with ID 4:

show problem -p "problem_id=4"

SHOW REPORT

Purpose

Show a report for the specified report type and run name. Currently, only the hm_run (Health Monitor) report type is supported, and only in XML formatting. To view HTML-formatted Health Monitor reports, use Oracle Enterprise Manager or the DBMS_HM PL/SQL package. See Oracle Database Administrator's Guide for more information.

Syntax and Description

SHOW REPORT report_type run_name

report_type must be hm_run. run_name is the Health Monitor run name from which you created the report. You must first create the report using the CREATE REPORT command.

This command does not require an ADR home to be set before you can use it.

Example

show report hm_run hm_run_1421

SHOW TRACEFILE

Purpose

List trace files.

Syntax and Description

show tracefile [file1 file2 ...] [-rt | -t]
  [-i inc1 inc2 ...] [-path path1 path2 ...] 

This command searches for one or more files under the trace directory and all incident directories of the current ADR homes, unless the -i or -path flags are given.

This command does not require an ADR home to be set unless using the -i option.

Table 17-21 describes the arguments of SHOW TRACEFILE.

Table 17-21 Arguments for SHOW TRACEFILE Command

Argument Description

file1 file2 ...

Filter results by file name. The % symbol is a wildcard character.


Table 17-22 Flags for SHOW TRACEFILE Command

Flag Description

-rt | -t

Order the trace file names by timestamp. -t sorts the file names in ascending order by timestamp, and -rt sorts them in reverse order. Note that file names are only ordered relative to their directory. Listing multiple directories of trace files applies a separate ordering to each directory.

Timestamps are listed next to each file name when using this option.

-i inc1 inc2 ...

Select only the trace files produced for the given incident IDs.

-path path1 path2 ...

Query only the trace files under the given path names.


Example

This example shows all the trace files under the current ADR home:

show tracefile

This example shows all the mmon trace files, sorted by timestamp in reverse order:

show tracefile %mmon% -rt

This example shows all trace files for incidents 1 and 4, under the path /home/steve/temp:

show tracefile -i 1 4 -path /home/steve/temp

SPOOL

Purpose

Directs ADRCI output to a file.

Syntax and Description

SPOOL filename [[APPEND] | [OFF]]

filename is the file name where the output is to be directed. If a full path name is not given, the file is created in the current ADRCI working directory. If no file extension is given, the default extension .ado is used. APPEND causes the output to be appended to the end of the file. Otherwise, the file is overwritten. Use OFF to turn off spooling.

This command does not require an ADR home to be set before you can use it.

Example

spool myfile
spool myfile.ado append
spool off
spool

Troubleshooting ADRCI

The following are some common ADRCI error messages, with their possible causes and remedies:

No ADR base is set

Cause: You may have started ADRCI with a null or invalid value for the ORACLE_HOME environment variable.

Action: Exit ADRCI, set the ORACLE_HOME environment variable, and restart ADRCI. See "ADR Base" for more information.

DIA-48323: Specified pathname string must be inside current ADR home

Cause: A file outside of the ADR home is not allowed as an incident file for this command.

Action: Retry using an incident file inside the ADR home.

DIA-48400: ADRCI initialization failed

Cause: The ADR Base directory does not exist.

Action: Check the value of the DIAGNOSTIC_DEST initialization parameter, and ensure that it points to an ADR base directory that contains at least one ADR home. If DIAGNOSTIC_DEST is missing or null, check for a valid ADR base directory hierarchy in ORACLE_HOME/log.

DIA-48431: Must specify at least one ADR home path

Cause: The command requires at least one ADR home to be current.

Action: Use the SET HOMEPATH command to make one or more ADR homes current.

DIA-48432: The ADR home path string is not valid

Cause: The supplied ADR home is not valid, possibly because the path does not exist.

Action: Check if the supplied ADR home path exists.

DIA-48447: The input path [path] does not contain any ADR homes

Cause: When using SET HOMEPATH to set an ADR home, you must supply a path relative to the current ADR base.

Action: If the new desired ADR home is not within the current ADR base, first set ADR base with SET BASE, and then use SHOW HOMES to check the ADR homes under the new ADR base. Next, use SET HOMEPATH to set a new ADR home if necessary.

DIA-48448: This command does not support multiple ADR homes

Cause: There are multiple current ADR homes in the current ADRCI session.

Action: Use the SET HOMEPATH command to make a single ADR home current.