3.3.5 Stored Procedures

Copyright 1997-2014 the PHP Documentation Group.

The MySQL database supports stored procedures. A stored procedure is a subroutine stored in the database catalog. Applications can call and execute the stored procedure. The CALL SQL statement is used to execute a stored procedure.

Parameter

Stored procedures can have IN, INOUT and OUT parameters, depending on the MySQL version. The mysqli interface has no special notion for the different kinds of parameters.

IN parameter

Input parameters are provided with the CALL statement. Please, make sure values are escaped correctly.

Example 3.19 Calling a stored procedure


<?php
$mysqli = new mysqli("example.com", "user", "password", "database");
if ($mysqli->connect_errno) {
    echo "Failed to connect to MySQL: (" . $mysqli->connect_errno . ") " . $mysqli->connect_error;
}

if (!$mysqli->query("DROP TABLE IF EXISTS test") || !$mysqli->query("CREATE TABLE test(id INT)")) {
    echo "Table creation failed: (" . $mysqli->errno . ") " . $mysqli->error;
}

if (!$mysqli->query("DROP PROCEDURE IF EXISTS p") ||
    !$mysqli->query("CREATE PROCEDURE p(IN id_val INT) BEGIN INSERT INTO test(id) VALUES(id_val); END;")) {
    echo "Stored procedure creation failed: (" . $mysqli->errno . ") " . $mysqli->error;
}

if (!$mysqli->query("CALL p(1)")) {
    echo "CALL failed: (" . $mysqli->errno . ") " . $mysqli->error;
}

if (!($res = $mysqli->query("SELECT id FROM test"))) {
    echo "SELECT failed: (" . $mysqli->errno . ") " . $mysqli->error;
}

var_dump($res->fetch_assoc());
?>

    

The above example will output:


array(1) {
  ["id"]=>
  string(1) "1"
}

    


INOUT/OUT parameter

The values of INOUT/OUT parameters are accessed using session variables.

Example 3.20 Using session variables


<?php
$mysqli = new mysqli("example.com", "user", "password", "database");
if ($mysqli->connect_errno) {
    echo "Failed to connect to MySQL: (" . $mysqli->connect_errno . ") " . $mysqli->connect_error;
}

if (!$mysqli->query("DROP PROCEDURE IF EXISTS p") ||
    !$mysqli->query('CREATE PROCEDURE p(OUT msg VARCHAR(50)) BEGIN SELECT "Hi!" INTO msg; END;')) {
    echo "Stored procedure creation failed: (" . $mysqli->errno . ") " . $mysqli->error;
}


if (!$mysqli->query("SET @msg = ''") || !$mysqli->query("CALL p(@msg)")) {
    echo "CALL failed: (" . $mysqli->errno . ") " . $mysqli->error;
}

if (!($res = $mysqli->query("SELECT @msg as _p_out"))) {
    echo "Fetch failed: (" . $mysqli->errno . ") " . $mysqli->error;
}

$row = $res->fetch_assoc();
echo $row['_p_out'];
?>

    

The above example will output:


Hi!

    


Application and framework developers may be able to provide a more convenient API using a mix of session variables and databased catalog inspection. However, please note the possible performance impact of a custom solution based on catalog inspection.

Handling result sets

Stored procedures can return result sets. Result sets returned from a stored procedure cannot be fetched correctly using mysqli_query. The mysqli_query function combines statement execution and fetching the first result set into a buffered result set, if any. However, there are additional stored procedure result sets hidden from the user which cause mysqli_query to fail returning the user expected result sets.

Result sets returned from a stored procedure are fetched using mysqli_real_query or mysqli_multi_query. Both functions allow fetching any number of result sets returned by a statement, such as CALL. Failing to fetch all result sets returned by a stored procedure causes an error.

Example 3.21 Fetching results from stored procedures


<?php
$mysqli = new mysqli("example.com", "user", "password", "database");
if ($mysqli->connect_errno) {
    echo "Failed to connect to MySQL: (" . $mysqli->connect_errno . ") " . $mysqli->connect_error;
}

if (!$mysqli->query("DROP TABLE IF EXISTS test") ||
    !$mysqli->query("CREATE TABLE test(id INT)") ||
    !$mysqli->query("INSERT INTO test(id) VALUES (1), (2), (3)")) {
    echo "Table creation failed: (" . $mysqli->errno . ") " . $mysqli->error;
}

if (!$mysqli->query("DROP PROCEDURE IF EXISTS p") ||
    !$mysqli->query('CREATE PROCEDURE p() READS SQL DATA BEGIN SELECT id FROM test; SELECT id + 1 FROM test; END;')) {
    echo "Stored procedure creation failed: (" . $mysqli->errno . ") " . $mysqli->error;
}

if (!$mysqli->multi_query("CALL p()")) {
    echo "CALL failed: (" . $mysqli->errno . ") " . $mysqli->error;
}

do {
    if ($res = $mysqli->store_result()) {
        printf("---\n");
        var_dump($res->fetch_all());
        $res->free();
    } else {
        if ($mysqli->errno) {
            echo "Store failed: (" . $mysqli->errno . ") " . $mysqli->error;
        }
    }
} while ($mysqli->more_results() && $mysqli->next_result());
?>

    

The above example will output:


---
array(3) {
  [0]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(1) "1"
  }
  [1]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(1) "2"
  }
  [2]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(1) "3"
  }
}
---
array(3) {
  [0]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(1) "2"
  }
  [1]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(1) "3"
  }
  [2]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(1) "4"
  }
}

    


Use of prepared statements

No special handling is required when using the prepared statement interface for fetching results from the same stored procedure as above. The prepared statement and non-prepared statement interfaces are similar. Please note, that not every MYSQL server version may support preparing the CALL SQL statement.

Example 3.22 Stored Procedures and Prepared Statements


<?php
$mysqli = new mysqli("example.com", "user", "password", "database");
if ($mysqli->connect_errno) {
    echo "Failed to connect to MySQL: (" . $mysqli->connect_errno . ") " . $mysqli->connect_error;
}

if (!$mysqli->query("DROP TABLE IF EXISTS test") ||
    !$mysqli->query("CREATE TABLE test(id INT)") ||
    !$mysqli->query("INSERT INTO test(id) VALUES (1), (2), (3)")) {
    echo "Table creation failed: (" . $mysqli->errno . ") " . $mysqli->error;
}

if (!$mysqli->query("DROP PROCEDURE IF EXISTS p") ||
    !$mysqli->query('CREATE PROCEDURE p() READS SQL DATA BEGIN SELECT id FROM test; SELECT id + 1 FROM test; END;')) {
    echo "Stored procedure creation failed: (" . $mysqli->errno . ") " . $mysqli->error;
}

if (!($stmt = $mysqli->prepare("CALL p()"))) {
    echo "Prepare failed: (" . $mysqli->errno . ") " . $mysqli->error;
}

if (!$stmt->execute()) {
    echo "Execute failed: (" . $stmt->errno . ") " . $stmt->error;
}

do {
    if ($res = $stmt->get_result()) {
        printf("---\n");
        var_dump(mysqli_fetch_all($res));
        mysqli_free_result($res);
    } else {
        if ($stmt->errno) {
            echo "Store failed: (" . $stmt->errno . ") " . $stmt->error;
        }
    }
} while ($stmt->more_results() && $stmt->next_result());
?>

    


Of course, use of the bind API for fetching is supported as well.

Example 3.23 Stored Procedures and Prepared Statements using bind API


<?php
if (!($stmt = $mysqli->prepare("CALL p()"))) {
    echo "Prepare failed: (" . $mysqli->errno . ") " . $mysqli->error;
}

if (!$stmt->execute()) {
    echo "Execute failed: (" . $stmt->errno . ") " . $stmt->error;
}

do {

    $id_out = NULL;
    if (!$stmt->bind_result($id_out)) {
        echo "Bind failed: (" . $stmt->errno . ") " . $stmt->error;
    }
 
    while ($stmt->fetch()) {
        echo "id = $id_out\n";
    }
} while ($stmt->more_results() && $stmt->next_result());
?>

    


See also

mysqli::query
mysqli::multi_query
mysqli_result::next-result
mysqli_result::more-results