13.7.5.37 SHOW WARNINGS Syntax

SHOW WARNINGS [LIMIT [offset,] row_count]
SHOW COUNT(*) WARNINGS

SHOW WARNINGS is a diagnostic statement that displays information about the conditions (errors, warnings, and notes) resulting from executing a statement in the current session. Warnings are generated for DML statements such as INSERT, UPDATE, and LOAD DATA INFILE as well as DDL statements such as CREATE TABLE and ALTER TABLE.

The LIMIT clause has the same syntax as for the SELECT statement. See Section 13.2.8, “SELECT Syntax”.

SHOW WARNINGS is also used following EXPLAIN EXTENDED, to display the extra information generated by EXPLAIN when the EXTENDED keyword is used. See Section 8.2.3, “EXPLAIN EXTENDED Output Format”.

SHOW WARNINGS displays information about the conditions resulting from the most recent statement in the current session that generated messages. It shows nothing if the most recent statement used a table and generated no messages. (That is, statements that use a table but generate no messages clear the message list.) Statements that do not use tables and do not generate messages have no effect on the message list.

The SHOW COUNT(*) WARNINGS diagnostic statement displays the total number of errors, warnings, and notes. You can also retrieve this number from the warning_count system variable:

SHOW COUNT(*) WARNINGS;
SELECT @@warning_count;

A related diagnostic statement, SHOW ERRORS, shows only error conditions (it excludes warnings and notes), and SHOW COUNT(*) ERRORS statement displays the total number of errors. See Section 13.7.5.14, “SHOW ERRORS Syntax”.

Here is a simple example that shows data-conversion warnings for INSERT:

mysql> CREATE TABLE t1 (a TINYINT NOT NULL, b CHAR(4));
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.01 sec)

mysql> INSERT INTO t1 VALUES(10,'mysql'), (NULL,'test'), (300,'xyz');
Query OK, 3 rows affected, 3 warnings (0.00 sec)
Records: 3  Duplicates: 0  Warnings: 3

mysql> SHOW WARNINGS\G
*************************** 1. row ***************************
  Level: Warning
   Code: 1265
Message: Data truncated for column 'b' at row 1
*************************** 2. row ***************************
  Level: Warning
   Code: 1048
Message: Column 'a' cannot be null
*************************** 3. row ***************************
  Level: Warning
   Code: 1264
Message: Out of range value adjusted for column 'a' at row 3
3 rows in set (0.00 sec)

The max_error_count system variable controls the maximum number of error, warning, and note messages for which the server stores information, and thus the number of messages that SHOW WARNINGS displays. To change the number of messages the server can store, change the value of max_error_count. The default is 64.

max_error_count controls only how many messages are stored, not how many are counted. The value of warning_count is not limited by max_error_count, even if the number of messages generated exceeds max_error_count. The following example demonstrates this. The ALTER TABLE statement produces three warning messages (strict SQL mode is disabled for the example to prevent an error from occuring after a single conversion issue). Only one message is stored and displayed because max_error_count has been set to 1, but all three are counted (as shown by the value of warning_count):

mysql> SHOW VARIABLES LIKE 'max_error_count';
+-----------------+-------+
| Variable_name   | Value |
+-----------------+-------+
| max_error_count | 64    |
+-----------------+-------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> SET max_error_count=1, sql_mode = '';
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.00 sec)

mysql> ALTER TABLE t1 MODIFY b CHAR;
Query OK, 3 rows affected, 3 warnings (0.00 sec)
Records: 3  Duplicates: 0  Warnings: 3

mysql> SHOW WARNINGS;
+---------+------+----------------------------------------+
| Level   | Code | Message                                |
+---------+------+----------------------------------------+
| Warning | 1263 | Data truncated for column 'b' at row 1 |
+---------+------+----------------------------------------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> SELECT @@warning_count;
+-----------------+
| @@warning_count |
+-----------------+
|               3 |
+-----------------+
1 row in set (0.01 sec)

To disable message storage, set max_error_count to 0. In this case, warning_count still indicates how many warnings occurred, but messages are not stored and cannot be displayed.

The sql_notes system variable controls whether note messages increment warning_count and whether the server stores them. By default, sql_notes is 1, but if set to 0, notes do not increment warning_count and the server does not store them:

mysql> SET sql_notes = 1;
mysql> DROP TABLE IF EXISTS test.no_such_table;
Query OK, 0 rows affected, 1 warning (0.00 sec)
mysql> SHOW WARNINGS;
+-------+------+-------------------------------+
| Level | Code | Message                       |
+-------+------+-------------------------------+
| Note  | 1051 | Unknown table 'no_such_table' |
+-------+------+-------------------------------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> SET sql_notes = 0;
mysql> DROP TABLE IF EXISTS test.no_such_table;
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.00 sec)
mysql> SHOW WARNINGS;
Empty set (0.00 sec)

The MySQL server sends to each client a count indicating the total number of errors, warnings, and notes resulting from the most recent statement executed by that client. From the C API, this value can be obtained by calling mysql_warning_count(). See Section 20.6.7.72, “mysql_warning_count()”.