21.2.2.4 UDF Return Values and Error Handling

The initialization function should return 0 if no error occurred and 1 otherwise. If an error occurs, xxx_init() should store a null-terminated error message in the message parameter. The message is returned to the client. The message buffer is MYSQL_ERRMSG_SIZE characters long, but you should try to keep the message to less than 80 characters so that it fits the width of a standard terminal screen.

The return value of the main function xxx() is the function value, for long long and double functions. A string function should return a pointer to the result and set *length to the length (in bytes) of the return value. For example:

memcpy(result, "result string", 13);
*length = 13;

MySQL passes a buffer to the xxx() function using the result parameter. This buffer is sufficiently long to hold 255 characters, which can be multi-byte characters. The xxx() function can store the result in this buffer if it fits, in which case the return value should be a pointer to the buffer. If the function stores the result in a different buffer, it should return a pointer to that buffer.

If your string function does not use the supplied buffer (for example, if it needs to return a string longer than 255 characters), you must allocate the space for your own buffer with malloc() in your xxx_init() function or your xxx() function and free it in your xxx_deinit() function. You can store the allocated memory in the ptr slot in the UDF_INIT structure for reuse by future xxx() calls. See Section 21.2.2.1, “UDF Calling Sequences for Simple Functions”.

To indicate a return value of NULL in the main function, set *is_null to 1:

*is_null = 1;

To indicate an error return in the main function, set *error to 1:

*error = 1;

If xxx() sets *error to 1 for any row, the function value is NULL for the current row and for any subsequent rows processed by the statement in which XXX() was invoked. (xxx() is not even called for subsequent rows.)