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Oracle® Database PL/SQL Packages and Types Reference
11g Release 2 (11.2)

Part Number E16760-04
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135 DBMS_SQL

The DBMS_SQL package provides an interface to use dynamic SQL to parse any data manipulation language (DML) or data definition language (DDL) statement using PL/SQL. For example, you can enter a DROP TABLE statement from within a stored procedure by using the PARSE procedure supplied with the DBMS_SQL package.

See Also:

For more information on native dynamic SQL, see Oracle Database PL/SQL Language Reference.

This chapter contains the following topics:


Using DBMS_SQL


Overview

Oracle lets you write stored procedures and anonymous PL/SQL blocks that use dynamic SQL. Dynamic SQL statements are not embedded in your source program; rather, they are stored in character strings that are input to, or built by, the program at runtime. This enables you to create more general-purpose procedures. For example, dynamic SQL lets you create a procedure that operates on a table whose name is not known until runtime.

Native Dynamic SQL is an alternative to DBMS_SQL that lets you place dynamic SQL statements directly into PL/SQL blocks. In most situations, Native Dynamic SQL is easier to use and performs better than DBMS_SQL. However, Native Dynamic SQL itself has certain limitations:

Also, there are some tasks that can only be performed using DBMS_SQL.

The ability to use dynamic SQL from within stored procedures generally follows the model of the Oracle Call Interface (OCI).

PL/SQL differs somewhat from other common programming languages, such as C. For example, addresses (also called pointers) are not user-visible in PL/SQL. As a result, there are some differences between the Oracle Call Interface and the DBMS_SQL package. These differences include the following:

A sample usage of the DBMS_SQL package follows. For users of the Oracle Call Interface, this code should seem fairly straightforward.


Security Model

DBMS_SQL is a SYS-owned package compiled with AUTHID CURRENT_USER. Any DBMS_SQL subprogram called from an anonymous PL/SQL block is run using the privileges of the current user.

See Also:

Oracle Database PL/SQL Language Reference for more information about using Invoker Rights or Definer Rights

In Oracle Database 11g, Release 1 (11.1), Oracle introduces a number of enhancements to DBMS_SQL to improve the security of the package.

Preventing Malicious or Accidental Access of Open Cursor Numbers

An error, ORA-29471, is raised when any DBMS_SQL subprogram is called with a cursor number that does not denote an open cursor. When the error is raised, an alert is issued to the alert log and DBMS_SQL becomes inoperable for the life of the session.

If the actual value for the cursor number in a call to the IS_OPEN Function denotes a cursor currently open in the session, the return value is TRUE. If the actual value is NULL, then the return value is FALSE. Otherwise, this raises an ORA-29471 error.

Note that the OPEN_CURSOR Function is the only DBMS_SQL subprogram that has no formal parameter for the cursor number; rather, it returns a cursor number. Therefore it is not within the scope of these rules.

Preventing Inappropriate Use of a Cursor

Cursors are protected from security breaches that subvert known existing cursors.

Checks are made when binding and executing. Optionally, checks may be performed for every single DBMS_SQL subprogram call. The check is:

Consistent with the use of definer's rights subprograms, roles do not apply.

If either check fails, and ORA-29470 error is raised.

The mechanism for defining when checks are performed is a new overload for the OPEN_CURSOR subprogram which takes a formal parameter, security_level, with allowed values NULL, 1 and 2.

Upgrade Considerations

This security regime is stricter than those in Oracle Database 10g, Release 2 (10.2) and previous releases. As a consequence, users of DBMS_SQL may encounter runtime errors on upgrade. While these security enhancements make for more secure applications, users may wish to relax the security checks temporarily as they migrate to Oracle Database 11g, Release 1 (11.1). If so, please consult with Oracle Support on steps to relax the above security restrictions.


Constants

The constants described in Table 135-1 are used with the language_flag parameter of the PARSE Procedures.

Table 135-1 DBMS_SQL Constants

Name Type Value Description

V6

INTEGER

0

Specifies Oracle database version 6 behavior

NATIVE

INTEGER

1

Specifies normal behavior for the database to which the program is connected

V7

INTEGER

2

Specifies Oracle database version 7 behavior



Exceptions

inconsistent_type EXCEPTION;
  pragma exception_init(inconsistent_type, -6562);

This exception is raised by the COLUMN_VALUE Procedure or the VARIABLE_VALUE Procedures when the type of the given OUT parameter (for where to put the requested value) is different from the type of the value.


Operational Notes

Execution Flow

  1. OPEN_CURSOR

  2. PARSE

  3. BIND_VARIABLE or BIND_ARRAY

  4. DEFINE_COLUMN, DEFINE_COLUMN_LONG, or DEFINE_ARRAY

  5. EXECUTE

  6. FETCH_ROWS or EXECUTE_AND_FETCH

  7. VARIABLE_VALUE, COLUMN_VALUE, or COLUMN_VALUE_LONG

  8. CLOSE_CURSOR

OPEN_CURSOR

To process a SQL statement, you must have an open cursor. When you call the OPEN_CURSOR Function, you receive a cursor ID number for the data structure representing a valid cursor maintained by Oracle. These cursors are distinct from cursors defined at the precompiler, OCI, or PL/SQL level, and are used only by the DBMS_SQL package.


PARSE

Every SQL statement must be parsed by calling the PARSE Procedures. Parsing the statement checks the statement's syntax and associates it with the cursor in your program.

You can parse any DML or DDL statement. DDL statements are run on the parse, which performs the implied commit.

The execution flow of DBMS_SQL is shown in Figure 135-1.

Figure 135-1 DBMS_SQL Execution Flow

Description of Figure 135-1 follows
Description of "Figure 135-1 DBMS_SQL Execution Flow"


BIND_VARIABLE or BIND_ARRAY

Many DML statements require that data in your program be input to Oracle. When you define a SQL statement that contains input data to be supplied at runtime, you must use placeholders in the SQL statement to mark where data must be supplied.

For each placeholder in the SQL statement, you must call one of the bind procedures, the BIND_ARRAY Procedures or the BIND_VARIABLE Procedures, to supply the value of a variable in your program (or the values of an array) to the placeholder. When the SQL statement is subsequently run, Oracle uses the data that your program has placed in the output and input, or bind, variables.

DBMS_SQL can run a DML statement multiple times — each time with a different bind variable. The BIND_ARRAY procedure lets you bind a collection of scalars, each value of which is used as an input variable once for each EXECUTE. This is similar to the array interface supported by the OCI.


DEFINE_COLUMN, DEFINE_COLUMN_LONG, or DEFINE_ARRAY

The columns of the row being selected in a SELECT statement are identified by their relative positions as they appear in the select list, from left to right. For a query, you must call one of the define procedures (DEFINE_COLUMN, DEFINE_COLUMN_LONG, or DEFINE_ARRAY) to specify the variables that are to receive the SELECT values, much the way an INTO clause does for a static query.

Use the DEFINE_COLUMN_LONG procedure to define LONG columns, in the same way that DEFINE_COLUMN is used to define non-LONG columns. You must call DEFINE_COLUMN_LONG before using the COLUMN_VALUE_LONG procedure to fetch from the LONG column.

Use the DEFINE_ARRAY procedure to define a PL/SQL collection into which you want to fetch rows in a single SELECT statement. DEFINE_ARRAY provides an interface to fetch multiple rows at one fetch. You must call DEFINE_ARRAY before using the COLUMN_VALUE procedure to fetch the rows.


EXECUTE

Call the EXECUTE function to run your SQL statement.


FETCH_ROWS or EXECUTE_AND_FETCH

The FETCH_ROWS function retrieves the rows that satisfy the query. Each successive fetch retrieves another set of rows, until the fetch is unable to retrieve anymore rows. Instead of calling EXECUTE and then FETCH_ROWS, you may find it more efficient to call EXECUTE_AND_FETCH if you are calling EXECUTE for a single execution.


VARIABLE_VALUE, COLUMN_VALUE, or COLUMN_VALUE_LONG

For queries, call COLUMN_VALUE to determine the value of a column retrieved by the FETCH_ROWS call. For anonymous blocks containing calls to PL/SQL procedures or DML statements with returning clause, call VARIABLE_VALUE to retrieve the values assigned to the output variables when statements were run.

To fetch just part of a LONG database column (which can be up to two gigabytes in size), use the COLUMN_VALUE_LONG procedure. You can specify the offset (in bytes) into the column value, and the number of bytes to fetch.


CLOSE_CURSOR

When you no longer need a cursor for a session, close the cursor by calling CLOSE_CURSOR. If you are using an Oracle Open Gateway, then you may need to close cursors at other times as well. Consult your Oracle Open Gateway documentation for additional information.

If you neglect to close a cursor, then the memory used by that cursor remains allocated even though it is no longer needed.


Processing Queries

If you are using dynamic SQL to process a query, then you must perform the following steps:

  1. Specify the variables that are to receive the values returned by the SELECT statement by calling the DEFINE_COLUMN Procedures, the DEFINE_COLUMN_LONG Procedure, or the DEFINE_ARRAY Procedure.

  2. Run your SELECT statement by calling the EXECUTE Function.

  3. Call the FETCH_ROWS Function (or EXECUTE_AND_FETCH) to retrieve the rows that satisfied your query.

  4. Call COLUMN_VALUE Procedure or COLUMN_VALUE_LONG Procedure to determine the value of a column retrieved by the FETCH_ROWS Function for your query. If you used anonymous blocks containing calls to PL/SQL procedures, then you must call the VARIABLE_VALUE Procedures to retrieve the values assigned to the output variables of these procedures.

Processing Updates, Inserts, and Deletes

If you are using dynamic SQL to process an INSERT, UPDATE, or DELETE, then you must perform the following steps:

  1. You must first run your INSERT, UPDATE, or DELETE statement by calling the EXECUTE Function.

  2. If statements have the returning clause, then you must call the VARIABLE_VALUE Procedures to retrieve the values assigned to the output variables.

Locating Errors

There are additional functions in the DBMS_SQL package for obtaining information about the last referenced cursor in the session. The values returned by these functions are only meaningful immediately after a SQL statement is run. In addition, some error-locating functions are only meaningful after certain DBMS_SQL calls. For example, you call the LAST_ERROR_POSITION Function immediately after a PARSE.


Examples

This section provides example procedures that make use of the DBMS_SQL package.

Example 1

This example does not require the use of dynamic SQL because the text of the statement is known at compile time, but it illustrate the basic concept underlying the package.

The DEMO procedure deletes all of the employees from the EMP table whose salaries are greater than the salary that you specify when you run DEMO.

CREATE OR REPLACE PROCEDURE demo(salary IN NUMBER) AS
    cursor_name INTEGER;
    rows_processed INTEGER;
BEGIN
    cursor_name := dbms_sql.open_cursor;
    DBMS_SQL.PARSE(cursor_name, 'DELETE FROM emp WHERE sal > :x',
                   DBMS_SQL.NATIVE);
    DBMS_SQL.BIND_VARIABLE(cursor_name, ':x', salary);
    rows_processed := DBMS_SQL.EXECUTE(cursor_name);
    DBMS_SQL.CLOSE_CURSOR(cursor_name);
EXCEPTION
WHEN OTHERS THEN
    DBMS_SQL.CLOSE_CURSOR(cursor_name);
END;

Example 2

The following sample procedure is passed a SQL statement, which it then parses and runs:

CREATE OR REPLACE PROCEDURE exec(STRING IN varchar2) AS
    cursor_name INTEGER;
    ret INTEGER;
BEGIN
   cursor_name := DBMS_SQL.OPEN_CURSOR;
  

DDL statements are run by the parse call, which performs the implied commit.

DBMS_SQL.PARSE(cursor_name, string, DBMS_SQL.NATIVE);
   ret := DBMS_SQL.EXECUTE(cursor_name);
   DBMS_SQL.CLOSE_CURSOR(cursor_name);
END;

Creating such a procedure enables you to perform the following operations:

For example, after creating this procedure, you could make the following call:

exec('create table acct(c1 integer)');

You could even call this procedure remotely, as shown in the following example. This lets you perform remote DDL.

exec@hq.com('CREATE TABLE acct(c1 INTEGER)');

Example 3

The following sample procedure is passed the names of a source and a destination table, and copies the rows from the source table to the destination table. This sample procedure assumes that both the source and destination tables have the following columns:

id        of type NUMBER
name      of type VARCHAR2(30)
birthdate of type DATE

This procedure does not specifically require the use of dynamic SQL; however, it illustrates the concepts of this package.

CREATE OR REPLACE PROCEDURE copy ( 
     source      IN VARCHAR2, 
     destination IN VARCHAR2) IS 
     id_var             NUMBER; 
     name_var           VARCHAR2(30); 
     birthdate_var      DATE; 
     source_cursor      INTEGER; 
     destination_cursor INTEGER; 
     ignore             INTEGER; 
  BEGIN 
 
  -- Prepare a cursor to select from the source table: 
     source_cursor := dbms_sql.open_cursor; 
     DBMS_SQL.PARSE(source_cursor, 
         'SELECT id, name, birthdate FROM ' || source, 
          DBMS_SQL.NATIVE); 
     DBMS_SQL.DEFINE_COLUMN(source_cursor, 1, id_var); 
     DBMS_SQL.DEFINE_COLUMN(source_cursor, 2, name_var, 30); 
     DBMS_SQL.DEFINE_COLUMN(source_cursor, 3, birthdate_var); 
     ignore := DBMS_SQL.EXECUTE(source_cursor); 
 
  -- Prepare a cursor to insert into the destination table: 
     destination_cursor := DBMS_SQL.OPEN_CURSOR; 
     DBMS_SQL.PARSE(destination_cursor, 
                  'INSERT INTO ' || destination || 
                  ' VALUES (:id_bind, :name_bind, :birthdate_bind)', 
                   DBMS_SQL.NATIVE); 
 
  -- Fetch a row from the source table and insert it into the destination table: 
     LOOP 
       IF DBMS_SQL.FETCH_ROWS(source_cursor)>0 THEN 
         -- get column values of the row 
         DBMS_SQL.COLUMN_VALUE(source_cursor, 1, id_var); 
         DBMS_SQL.COLUMN_VALUE(source_cursor, 2, name_var); 
         DBMS_SQL.COLUMN_VALUE(source_cursor, 3, birthdate_var); 
 
  -- Bind the row into the cursor that inserts into the destination table. You 
  -- could alter this example to require the use of dynamic SQL by inserting an 
  -- if condition before the bind. 
        DBMS_SQL.BIND_VARIABLE(destination_cursor, ':id_bind', id_var); 
        DBMS_SQL.BIND_VARIABLE(destination_cursor, ':name_bind', name_var); 
        DBMS_SQL.BIND_VARIABLE(destination_cursor, ':birthdate_bind', 
birthdate_var); 
        ignore := DBMS_SQL.EXECUTE(destination_cursor); 
      ELSE 
 
  -- No more rows to copy: 
        EXIT; 
      END IF; 
    END LOOP; 
 
  -- Commit and close all cursors: 
     COMMIT; 
     DBMS_SQL.CLOSE_CURSOR(source_cursor); 
     DBMS_SQL.CLOSE_CURSOR(destination_cursor); 
   EXCEPTION 
     WHEN OTHERS THEN 
       IF DBMS_SQL.IS_OPEN(source_cursor) THEN 
         DBMS_SQL.CLOSE_CURSOR(source_cursor); 
       END IF; 
       IF DBMS_SQL.IS_OPEN(destination_cursor) THEN 
         DBMS_SQL.CLOSE_CURSOR(destination_cursor); 
       END IF; 
       RAISE; 
  END; 
/ 

Examples 3, 4, and 5: Bulk DML

This series of examples shows how to use bulk array binds (table items) in the SQL DML statements INSERT, UPDATE and DELETE.

Here is an example of a bulk INSERT statement that demonstrates adding seven new employees to the emp table:

DECLARE
  stmt VARCHAR2(200);
  empno_array      DBMS_SQL.NUMBER_TABLE;
  empname_array    DBMS_SQL.VARCHAR2_TABLE;
  jobs_array       DBMS_SQL.VARCHAR2_TABLE;
  mgr_array        DBMS_SQL.NUMBER_TABLE;
  hiredate_array   DBMS_SQL.VARCHAR2_TABLE;
  sal_array        DBMS_SQL.NUMBER_TABLE;
  comm_array       DBMS_SQL.NUMBER_TABLE;
  deptno_array     DBMS_SQL.NUMBER_TABLE;
  c                NUMBER;
  dummy            NUMBER;
BEGIN
  empno_array(1):= 9001;
  empno_array(2):= 9002;
  empno_array(3):= 9003;
  empno_array(4):= 9004;
  empno_array(5):= 9005;
  empno_array(6):= 9006;
  empno_array(7):= 9007;

  empname_array(1) := 'Dopey';
  empname_array(2) := 'Grumpy';
  empname_array(3) := 'Doc';
  empname_array(4) := 'Happy';
  empname_array(5) := 'Bashful';
  empname_array(6) := 'Sneezy';
  empname_array(7) := 'Sleepy';

  jobs_array(1) := 'Miner';
  jobs_array(2) := 'Miner';
  jobs_array(3) := 'Miner';
  jobs_array(4) := 'Miner';
  jobs_array(5) := 'Miner';
  jobs_array(6) := 'Miner';
  jobs_array(7) := 'Miner';

  mgr_array(1) := 9003;
  mgr_array(2) := 9003;
  mgr_array(3) := 9003;
  mgr_array(4) := 9003;
  mgr_array(5) := 9003;
  mgr_array(6) := 9003;
  mgr_array(7) := 9003;

  hiredate_array(1) := '06-DEC-2006';
  hiredate_array(2) := '06-DEC-2006';
  hiredate_array(3) := '06-DEC-2006';
  hiredate_array(4) := '06-DEC-2006';
  hiredate_array(5) := '06-DEC-2006';
  hiredate_array(6) := '06-DEC-2006';
  hiredate_array(7) := '06-DEC-2006';

  sal_array(1):= 1000;
  sal_array(2):= 1000;
  sal_array(3):= 1000;
  sal_array(4):= 1000;
  sal_array(5):= 1000;
  sal_array(6):= 1000;
  sal_array(7):= 1000;

  comm_array(1):= 0;
  comm_array(2):= 0;
  comm_array(3):= 0;
  comm_array(4):= 0;
  comm_array(5):= 0;
  comm_array(6):= 0;
  comm_array(7):= 0;

  deptno_array(1):= 11;
  deptno_array(2):= 11;
  deptno_array(3):= 11;
  deptno_array(4):= 11;
  deptno_array(5):= 11;
  deptno_array(6):= 11;
  deptno_array(7):= 11;

  stmt := 'INSERT INTO emp VALUES(
     :num_array, :name_array, :jobs_array, :mgr_array, :hiredate_array, 
     :sal_array, :comm_array, :deptno_array)';
  c := DBMS_SQL.OPEN_CURSOR;
  DBMS_SQL.PARSE(c, stmt, DBMS_SQL.NATIVE);
  DBMS_SQL.BIND_ARRAY(c, ':num_array', empno_array);
  DBMS_SQL.BIND_ARRAY(c, ':name_array', empname_array);
  DBMS_SQL.BIND_ARRAY(c, ':jobs_array', jobs_array);
  DBMS_SQL.BIND_ARRAY(c, ':mgr_array', mgr_array);
  DBMS_SQL.BIND_ARRAY(c, ':hiredate_array', hiredate_array);
  DBMS_SQL.BIND_ARRAY(c, ':sal_array', sal_array);
  DBMS_SQL.BIND_ARRAY(c, ':comm_array', comm_array);
  DBMS_SQL.BIND_ARRAY(c, ':deptno_array', deptno_array);

  dummy := DBMS_SQL.EXECUTE(c);
  DBMS_SQL.CLOSE_CURSOR(c);
  EXCEPTION WHEN OTHERS THEN
    IF DBMS_SQL.IS_OPEN(c) THEN
      DBMS_SQL.CLOSE_CURSOR(c);
    END IF;
    RAISE;
END;
/
SHOW ERRORS;

Here is an example of a bulk UPDATE statement that demonstrates updating salaries for four existing employees in the emp table:

DECLARE
  stmt VARCHAR2(200);
  empno_array     DBMS_SQL.NUMBER_TABLE;
  salary_array    DBMS_SQL.NUMBER_TABLE;
  c               NUMBER;
  dummy           NUMBER;
BEGIN
 
  empno_array(1):= 7369;
  empno_array(2):= 7876;
  empno_array(3):= 7900;
  empno_array(4):= 7934;
 
  salary_array(1) := 10000;
  salary_array(2) := 10000;
  salary_array(3) := 10000;
  salary_array(4) := 10000;
 
  stmt := 'update emp set sal = :salary_array
    WHERE empno = :num_array';
  c := DBMS_SQL.OPEN_CURSOR;
  DBMS_SQL.PARSE(c, stmt, DBMS_SQL.NATIVE);
  DBMS_SQL.BIND_ARRAY(c, ':num_array', empno_array);
  DBMS_SQL.BIND_ARRAY(c, ':salary_array', salary_array);
  dummy := DBMS_SQL.EXECUTE(c);
  DBMS_SQL.CLOSE_CURSOR(c);
 
  EXCEPTION WHEN OTHERS THEN
    IF DBMS_SQL.IS_OPEN(c) THEN
      DBMS_SQL.CLOSE_CURSOR(c);
    END IF;
    RAISE;
END;
/

In a DELETE statement, for example, you could bind in an array in the WHERE clause and have the statement be run for each element in the array:

DECLARE
  stmt VARCHAR2(200);
  dept_no_array DBMS_SQL.NUMBER_TABLE;
  c NUMBER;
  dummy NUMBER;
begin
  dept_no_array(1) := 10; dept_no_array(2) := 20;
  dept_no_array(3) := 30; dept_no_array(4) := 40;
  dept_no_array(5) := 30; dept_no_array(6) := 40;
  stmt := 'delete from emp where deptno = :dept_array';
  c := DBMS_SQL.OPEN_CURSOR;
  DBMS_SQL.PARSE(c, stmt, DBMS_SQL.NATIVE);
  DBMS_SQL.BIND_ARRAY(c, ':dept_array', dept_no_array, 1, 4);
  dummy := DBMS_SQL.EXECUTE(c);
  DBMS_SQL.CLOSE_CURSOR(c); 

  EXCEPTION WHEN OTHERS THEN
    IF DBMS_SQL.IS_OPEN(c) THEN
      DBMS_SQL.CLOSE_CURSOR(c);
    END IF;
    RAISE;
END;
/ 

In the preceding example, only elements 1 through 4 are used as specified by the BIND_ARRAY call. Each element of the array potentially deletes a large number of employees from the database.

Examples 6 and 7: Defining an Array

The following examples show how to use the DEFINE_ARRAY procedure:

declare
  c       NUMBER;
  d       NUMBER;
  n_tab   DBMS_SQL.NUMBER_TABLE;
  indx    NUMBER := -10;
BEGIN
  c := DBMS_SQL.OPEN_CURSOR;
  dBMS_SQL.PARSE(c, 'select n from t order by 1', DBMS_SQL.NATIVE);

  DBMS_SQL.DEFINE_ARRAY(c, 1, n_tab, 10, indx);

  d := DBMS_SQL.EXECUTE(c);
  loop
    d := DBMS_SQL.FETCH_ROWS(c);

    DBMS_SQL.COLUMN_VALUE(c, 1, n_tab);

    EXIT WHEN d != 10;
  END LOOP;

  DBMS_SQL.CLOSE_CURSOR(c);

  EXCEPTION WHEN OTHERS THEN
    IF DBMS_SQL.IS_OPEN(c) THEN
      DBMS_SQL.CLOSE_CURSOR(c);
    END IF;
    RAISE;
END;
/

Each time the preceding example does a FETCH_ROWS Function call, it fetches 10 rows that are kept in DBMS_SQL buffers. When the COLUMN_VALUE Procedure call is run, those rows move into the PL/SQL table specified (in this case n_tab), at positions -10 to -1, as specified in the DEFINE statements. When the second batch is fetched in the loop, the rows go to positions 0 to 9; and so on.

A current index into each array is maintained automatically. This index is initialized to "indx" at EXECUTE and keeps getting updated every time a COLUMN_VALUE call is made. If you re-execute at any point, then the current index for each DEFINE is re-initialized to "indx".

In this way the entire result of the query is fetched into the table. When FETCH_ROWS cannot fetch 10 rows, it returns the number of rows actually fetched (if no rows could be fetched, then it returns zero) and exits the loop.

Here is another example of using the DEFINE_ARRAY procedure:

Consider a table MULTI_TAB defined as:

CREATE TABLE multi_tab (num NUMBER, 
                        dat1 DATE, 
                        var VARCHAR2(24), 
                        dat2 DATE) 

To select everything from this table and move it into four PL/SQL tables, you could use the following simple program:

declare
  c       NUMBER;
  d       NUMBER;
  n_tab  DBMS_SQL.NUMBER_TABLE;
  d_tab1 DBMS_SQL.DATE_TABLE;
  v_tab  DBMS_SQL.VARCHAR2_TABLE;
  d_tab2 DBMS_SQL.DATE_TABLE;
  indx NUMBER := 10;
BEGIN

  c := DBMS_SQL.OPEN_CURSOR;
  DBMS_SQL.PARSE(c, 'select * from multi_tab order by 1', DBMS_SQL.NATIVE);

  DBMS_SQL.DEFINE_ARRAY(c, 1, n_tab,  5, indx);
  DBMS_SQL.DEFINE_ARRAY(c, 2, d_tab1, 5, indx);
  DBMS_SQL.DEFINE_ARRAY(c, 3, v_tab,  5, indx);
  DBMS_SQL.DEFINE_ARRAY(c, 4, d_tab2, 5, indx);

  d := DBMS_SQL.EXECUTE(c);

  loop
    d := DBMS_SQL.FETCH_ROWS(c);

    DBMS_SQL.COLUMN_VALUE(c, 1, n_tab);
    DBMS_SQL.COLUMN_VALUE(c, 2, d_tab1);
    DBMS_SQL.COLUMN_VALUE(c, 3, v_tab);
    DBMS_SQL.COLUMN_VALUE(c, 4, d_tab2);
  
    EXIT WHEN d != 5;
  END LOOP;

  DBMS_SQL.CLOSE_CURSOR(c);

/* 

The four tables can be used for anything. One usage might be to use BIND_ARRAY to move the rows to another table by using a statement such as 'INSERT into SOME_T values (:a, :b, :c, :d);

*/

EXCEPTION WHEN OTHERS THEN
    IF DBMS_SQL.IS_OPEN(c) THEN
      DBMS_SQL.CLOSE_CURSOR(c);
    END IF;
    RAISE;
END;
/

Example 8: Describe Columns

This can be used as a substitute to the SQL*Plus DESCRIBE call by using a SELECT * query on the table that you want to describe.

DECLARE
  c           NUMBER;
  d           NUMBER;
  col_cnt     INTEGER;
  f           BOOLEAN;
  rec_tab     DBMS_SQL.DESC_TAB;
  col_num    NUMBER;
  PROCEDURE print_rec(rec in DBMS_SQL.DESC_REC) IS
  BEGIN
    DBMS_OUTPUT.NEW_LINE;
    DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE('col_type            =    '
                         || rec.col_type);
    DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE('col_maxlen          =    '
                         || rec.col_max_len);
    DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE('col_name            =    '
                         || rec.col_name);
    DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE('col_name_len        =    '
                         || rec.col_name_len);
    DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE('col_schema_name     =    '
                         || rec.col_schema_name);
    DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE('col_schema_name_len =    '
                         || rec.col_schema_name_len);
    DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE('col_precision       =    '
                         || rec.col_precision);
    DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE('col_scale           =    '
                         || rec.col_scale);
    DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT('col_null_ok         =    ');
    IF (rec.col_null_ok) THEN
      DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE('true');
    ELSE
      DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE('false');
    END IF;
  END;
BEGIN
  c := DBMS_SQL.OPEN_CURSOR;

  DBMS_SQL.PARSE(c, 'SELECT * FROM scott.bonus', DBMS_SQL.NATIVE);
 
  d := DBMS_SQL.EXECUTE(c);
 
  DBMS_SQL.DESCRIBE_COLUMNS(c, col_cnt, rec_tab);

/*
 * Following loop could simply be for j in 1..col_cnt loop.
 * Here we are simply illustrating some of the PL/SQL table
 * features.
 */
  col_num := rec_tab.first;
  IF (col_num IS NOT NULL) THEN
    LOOP
      print_rec(rec_tab(col_num));
      col_num := rec_tab.next(col_num);
      EXIT WHEN (col_num IS NULL);
    END LOOP;
  END IF;
 
  DBMS_SQL.CLOSE_CURSOR(c);
END;
/

Example 9: RETURNING clause

The RETURNING clause was added to DML statements in an earlier Oracle database release. With this clause, INSERT, UPDATE, and DELETE statements can return values of expressions. These values are returned in bind variables.

DBMS_SQL.BIND_VARIABLE is used to bind these outbinds if a single row is inserted, updated, or deleted. If multiple rows are inserted, updated, or deleted, then DBMS_SQL.BIND_ARRAY is used. DBMS_SQL.VARIABLE_VALUE must be called to get the values in these bind variables.

Note:

This is similar to DBMS_SQL.VARIABLE_VALUE, which must be called after running a PL/SQL block with an out-bind inside DBMS_SQL.

i) Single row insert

CREATE OR REPLACE PROCEDURE single_Row_insert
           (c1 NUMBER, c2 NUMBER, r OUT NUMBER) is
      c NUMBER;
      n NUMBER;
      begin
        c := DBMS_SQL.OPEN_CURSOR;
        DBMS_SQL.PARSE(c, 'INSERT INTO tab VALUES (:bnd1, :bnd2) ' ||
                          'RETURNING c1*c2 INTO :bnd3', DBMS_SQL.NATIVE);
     DBMS_SQL.BIND_VARIABLE(c, 'bnd1', c1);
        DBMS_SQL.BIND_VARIABLE(c, 'bnd2', c2);
        DBMS_SQL.BIND_VARIABLE(c, 'bnd3', r);
        n := DBMS_SQL.EXECUTE(c); 
        DBMS_SQL.VARIABLE_VALUE(c, 'bnd3', r); -- get value of outbind variable
        DBMS_SQL.CLOSE_CURSOR(c);
      END;
      /
 

ii) Single row update

CREATE OR REPLACE PROCEDURE single_Row_update
           (c1 NUMBER, c2 NUMBER, r out NUMBER) IS
      c NUMBER;
      n NUMBER;
      BEGIN
        c := DBMS_SQL.OPEN_CURSOR;
        DBMS_SQL.PARSE(c, 'UPDATE tab SET c1 = :bnd1, c2 = :bnd2 ' ||
                          'WHERE rownum < 2 ' || 
                          'RETURNING c1*c2 INTO :bnd3', DBMS_SQL.NATIVE);
        DBMS_SQL.BIND_VARIABLE(c, 'bnd1', c1);
        DBMS_SQL.BIND_VARIABLE(c, 'bnd2', c2);
        DBMS_SQL.BIND_VARIABLE(c, 'bnd3', r);
        n := DBMS_SQL.EXECUTE(c); 
        DBMS_SQL.VARIABLE_VALUE(c, 'bnd3', r);-- get value of outbind variable
        DBMS_SQL.CLOSE_CURSOR(c);
      END;
      /

iii) Single row delete

CREATE OR REPLACE PROCEDURE single_Row_Delete
           (c1 NUMBER, r OUT NUMBER) is
      c NUMBER;
      n number;
      BEGIN
        c := DBMS_SQL.OPEN_CURSOR;
        DBMS_SQL.PARSE(c, 'DELETE FROM tab WHERE ROWNUM = :bnd1 ' ||
                      'RETURNING c1*c2 INTO :bnd2', DBMS_SQL.NATIVE);
        DBMS_SQL.BIND_VARIABLE(c, 'bnd1', c1);
        DBMS_SQL.BIND_VARIABLE(c, 'bnd2', r);
        n := DBMS_SQL.EXECUTE(c); 
        DBMS_SQL.VARIABLE_VALUE(c, 'bnd2', r);-- get value of outbind variable
        DBMS_SQL.CLOSE_CURSOR(c);
      END;
      /
 

iv) Multiple row insert

CREATE OR REPLACE PROCEDURE multi_Row_insert
           (c1 DBMS_SQL.NUMBER_TABLE, c2 DBMS_SQL.NUMBER_TABLE, 
            r OUT DBMS_SQL.NUMBER_TABLE) is
      c NUMBER;
      n NUMBER;
      BEGIN
        c := DBMS_SQL.OPEN_CURSOR;
        DBMS_SQL.PARSE(c, 'insert into tab VALUES (:bnd1, :bnd2) ' ||
                          'RETURNING c1*c2 INTO :bnd3', DBMS_SQL.NATIVE);
        DBMS_SQL.BIND_ARRAY(c, 'bnd1', c1);
        DBMS_SQL.BIND_ARRAY(c, 'bnd2', c2);
        DBMS_SQL.BIND_ARRAY(c, 'bnd3', r);
        n := DBMS_SQL.EXECUTE(c); 
        DBMS_SQL.VARIABLE_VALUE(c, 'bnd3', r);-- get value of outbind variable
        DBMS_SQL.CLOSE_CURSOR(c);
      END;
      /

v) Multiple row Update.

CREATE OR REPLACE PROCEDURE multi_Row_update
           (c1 NUMBER, c2 NUMBER, r OUT DBMS_SQL.NUMBER_TABLE) IS
      c NUMBER;
      n NUMBER;
     BEGIN
        c := DBMS_SQL.OPEN_CURSOR;
        DBMS_SQL.PARSE(c, 'UPDATE tab SET c1 = :bnd1 WHERE c2 = :bnd2 ' ||
                          'RETURNING c1*c2 INTO :bnd3', DBMS_SQL.NATIVE);
        DBMS_SQL.BIND_VARIABLE(c, 'bnd1', c1);
        DBMS_SQL.BIND_VARIABLE(c, 'bnd2', c2);
        DBMS_SQL.BIND_ARRAY(c, 'bnd3', r);
        n := DBMS_SQL.EXECUTE(c); 
        DBMS_SQL.VARIABLE_VALUE(c, 'bnd3', r);-- get value of outbind variable
        DBMS_SQL.CLOSE_CURSOR(c);
      END;
      /

Note:

bnd1 and bnd2 can be arrays as well. The value of the expression for all the rows updated will be in bnd3. There is no way of differentiating which rows were updated of each value of bnd1 and bnd2.

vi) Multiple row delete

CREATE OR REPLACE PROCEDURE multi_row_delete
           (c1 DBMS_SQL.NUMBER_TABLE,
            r OUT DBMS_SQL.NUMBER_TABLE) is
      c NUMBER;
      n NUMBER;
      BEGIN
        c := DBMS_SQL.OPEN_CURSOR;
        DBMS_SQL.PARSE(c, 'DELETE FROM tab WHERE c1 = :bnd1' ||
                          'RETURNING c1*c2 INTO :bnd2', DBMS_SQL.NATIVE);
        DBMS_SQL.BIND_ARRAY(c, 'bnd1', c1);
        DBMS_SQL.BIND_ARRAY(c, 'bnd2', r);
        n := DBMS_SQL.EXECUTE(c); 
        DBMS_SQL.VARIABLE_VALUE(c, 'bnd2', r);-- get value of outbind variable
        DBMS_SQL.CLOSE_CURSOR(c);
      END;
      /

vii) Out-bind in bulk PL/SQL

CREATE OR REPLACE PROCEDURE foo (n NUMBER, square OUT NUMBER) IS
      BEGIN square := n * n; END;/
 
      CREATE OR REPLACE PROCEDURE bulk_plsql 
         (n DBMS_SQL.NUMBER_TABLE, square OUT DBMS_SQL.NUMBER_TABLE) IS
      c NUMBER;
      r NUMBER;
      BEGIN
        c := DBMS_SQL.OPEN_CURSOR;
        DBMS_SQL.PARSE(c, 'BEGIN foo(:bnd1, :bnd2); END;', DBMS_SQL.NATIVE);
        DBMS_SQL.BIND_ARRAY(c, 'bnd1', n);
        DBMS_SQL.BIND_ARRAY(c, 'bnd2', square);
        r := DBMS_SQL.EXECUTE(c);
        DBMS_SQL.VARIABLE_VALUE(c, 'bnd2', square);
     END;
     /

Note:

DBMS_SQL.BIND_ARRAY of number_Table internally binds a number. The number of times statement is run depends on the number of elements in an inbind array.

Example 10: Binds and Defines of User-defined Types in DBMS_SQL

CREATE TYPE dnames_var IS VARRAY(7) OF VARCHAR2(30)
/
 
CREATE TABLE depts (region VARCHAR2(25), dept_names dnames_var)
/
 
INSERT INTO depts VALUES('Europe', dnames_var('Shipping','Sales','Finance'))
/
INSERT INTO depts VALUES('Americas', dnames_var('Sales','Finance','Shipping'))
/
INSERT INTO depts 
     VALUES('Asia', dnames_var('Finance','Payroll','Shipping','Sales'))
/
 
CREATE OR REPLACE PROCEDURE update_depts(new_dnames dnames_var, region VARCHAR2) IS
   some_dnames dnames_var;
   c      NUMBER;
   r      NUMBER;
   sql_stmt VARCHAR2(32767) :=
    'UPDATE depts SET dept_names = :b1 WHERE region = :b2 RETURNING dept_names INTO :b3';
 
BEGIN
 
   c := DBMS_SQL.OPEN_CURSOR;
 
   DBMS_SQL.PARSE(c, sql_stmt, dbms_sql.native);
 
   DBMS_SQL.BIND_VARIABLE(c, 'b1', new_dnames);
   DBMS_SQL.BIND_VARIABLE(c, 'b2', region);
   DBMS_SQL.BIND_VARIABLE(c, 'b3', some_dnames);
 
   r := DBMS_SQL.EXECUTE(c);
 
   -- Get value of outbind variable
   DBMS_SQL.VARIABLE_VALUE(c, 'b3', some_dnames);
 
   DBMS_SQL.CLOSE_CURSOR(c);
 
   -- select dept_names
   sql_stmt := 'SELECT dept_names FROM depts WHERE region = :b1';
 
   c := DBMS_SQL.OPEN_CURSOR;
   DBMS_SQL.PARSE(c, sql_stmt, dbms_sql.native);
 
   DBMS_SQL.DEFINE_COLUMN(c, 1, some_dnames);
   DBMS_SQL.BIND_VARIABLE(c, 'b1', region);
 
   r := DBMS_SQL.EXECUTE_AND_FETCH(c);
 
   DBMS_SQL.COLUMN_VALUE(c, 1, some_dnames);
 
   DBMS_SQL.CLOSE_CURSOR(c);
 
    -- loop through some_dnames collections
    FOR i IN some_dnames.FIRST .. some_dnames.LAST  LOOP
        DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE('Dept. Name = ' || some_dnames(i) || ' Updated!');
    END LOOP;
END;
/
 
DECLARE
  new_dnames dnames_var;
BEGIN
  new_dnames := dnames_var('Benefits', 'Advertising', 'Contracting', 
                           'Executive', 'Marketing');
  update_depts(new_dnames, 'Asia');
END;
/

Data Structures

The DBMS_SQL package defines the following RECORD types and TABLE types.

RECORD Types

TABLE Types


DESC_REC Record Type

Note:

This type has been deprecated in favor of the DESC_REC2 Record Type.

This record type holds the describe information for a single column in a dynamic query. It is the element type of the DESC_TAB table type and the DESCRIBE_COLUMNS Procedure.

Syntax

TYPE desc_rec IS RECORD (
      col_type            BINARY_INTEGER := 0,
      col_max_len         BINARY_INTEGER := 0,
      col_name            VARCHAR2(32)   := '',
      col_name_len        BINARY_INTEGER := 0,
      col_schema_name     VARCHAR2(32)   := '',
      col_schema_name_len BINARY_INTEGER := 0,
      col_precision       BINARY_INTEGER := 0,
      col_scale           BINARY_INTEGER := 0,
      col_charsetid       BINARY_INTEGER := 0,
      col_charsetform     BINARY_INTEGER := 0,
      col_null_ok         BOOLEAN        := TRUE);
TYPE desc_tab IS TABLE OF desc_rec INDEX BY BINARY_INTEGER;

Fields

Table 135-2 DESC_REC Fields

Field Description

col_type

Type of column

col_max_len

Maximum column length

col_name

Name of column

col_name_len

Length of column name

col_schema_name

Column schema name

col_schema_name_len

Length of column schema name

col_precision

Precision of column

col_scale

Scale of column

col_charsetid

Column character set id

col_charsetform

Column character set form

col_null_ok

NULL column flag; TRUE, if NULL possible



DESC_REC2 Record Type

DESC_REC2 is the element type of the DESC_TAB2 table type and the DESCRIBE_COLUMNS2 Procedure.

This record type is identical to DESC_REC except for the col_name field, which has been expanded to the maximum possible size for VARCHAR2. It is therefore preferred to DESC_REC because column name values can be greater than 32 characters. DESC_REC is deprecated as a result.

Syntax

TYPE desc_rec2 IS RECORD (
   col_type            binary_integer := 0,
   col_max_len         binary_integer := 0,
   col_name            varchar2(32767) := '',
   col_name_len        binary_integer := 0,
   col_schema_name     varchar2(32)   := '',
   col_schema_name_len binary_integer := 0,
   col_precision       binary_integer := 0,
   col_scale           binary_integer := 0,
   col_charsetid       binary_integer := 0,
   col_charsetform     binary_integer := 0,
   col_null_ok         boolean        := TRUE);

Fields

Table 135-3 DESC_REC2 Fields

Field Description

col_type

Type of column

col_max_len

Maximum column length

col_name

Name of column

col_name_len

Length of column name

col_schema_name

Column schema name

col_schema_name_len

Length of column schema name

col_precision

Precision of column

col_scale

Scale of column

col_charsetid

Column character set id

col_charsetform

Column character set form

col_null_ok

NULL column flag; TRUE, if NULL possible



DESC_REC3 Record Type

DESC_REC3 is the element type of the DESC_TAB3 table type and the DESCRIBE_COLUMNS3 Procedure.

DESC_REC3 is identical to DESC_REC2 except for two additional fields to hold the type name (type_name) and type name len (type_name_len) of a column in a dynamic query. These two fields hold the type name and type name length when the column is a user-defined type (a collection or object type). The col_type_name and col_type_name_len fields are only populated when the col_type field's value is 109, the Oracle type number for user-defined types.

Syntax

TYPE desc_rec3 IS RECORD (
   col_type               binary_integer := 0,
   col_max_len            binary_integer := 0,
   col_name               varchar2(32767) := '',
   col_name_len           binary_integer := 0,
   col_schema_name        varchar2(32) := '',
   col_schema_name_len    binary_integer := 0,
   col_precision          binary_integer := 0,
   col_scale              binary_integer := 0,
   col_charsetid          binary_integer := 0,
   col_charsetform        binary_integer := 0,
   col_null_ok            boolean := TRUE,
   col_type_name          varchar2(32767)   := '',
   col_type_name_len      binary_integer := 0);

Fields

Table 135-4 DESC_REC3 Fields

Field Description

col_type

Type of column

col_max_len

Maximum column length

col_name

Name of column

col_name_len

Length of column name

col_schema_name

Column schema name

col_schema_name_len

Length of column schema name

col_precision

Precision of column

col_scale

Scale of column

col_charsetid

Column character set ID

col_charsetform

Column character set form

col_null_ok

NULL column flag; TRUE, if NULL possible

col_type_name

User-define type column type name, this field is valid when col_type is 109

col_type_name_len

Length of user-define type column type name, this field is valid when col_type is 109



BFILE_TABLE Table Type

This is a table of BFILE.

Syntax

TYPE bfile_table IS TABLE OF BFILE INDEX BY BINARY_INTEGER;

BINARY_DOUBLE_TABLE Table Type

This is a table of BINARY_DOUBLE.

Syntax

TYPE binary_double_table IS TABLE OF BINARY_DOUBLE INDEX BY BINARY_INTEGER;

BINARY_FLOAT_TABLE Table Type

This is a table of BINARY_FLOAT.

Syntax

TYPE binary_float_table IS TABLE OF BINARY_FLOAT INDEX BY BINARY_INTEGER;

BLOB_TABLE Table Type

This is a table of BLOB.

Syntax

TYPE blob_table IS TABLE OF BLOB INDEX BY BINARY_INTEGER;

CLOB_TABLE Table Type

This is a table of CLOB.

Syntax

TYPE clob_table IS TABLE OF CLOB INDEX BY BINARY_INTEGER;

DATE_TABLE Table Type

This is a table of DATE.

Syntax

type date_table IS TABLE OF DATE INDEX BY BINARY_INTEGER; 

DESC_TAB Table Type

This is a table of DESC_REC Record Type.

Syntax

TYPE desc_tab IS TABLE OF desc_rec INDEX BY BINARY_INTEGER;

DESC_TAB2 Table Type

This is a table of DESC_REC2 Record Type.

Syntax

TYPE desc_tab2 IS TABLE OF desc_rec2 INDEX BY BINARY_INTEGER;

DESC_TAB3 Table Type

This is a table of DESC_REC3 Record Type.

Syntax

TYPE desc_tab3 IS TABLE OF desc_rec3 INDEX BY BINARY_INTEGER; 

INTERVAL_DAY_TO_SECOND_TABLE Table Type

This is a table of DSINTERVAL_UNCONSTRAINED.

Syntax

TYPE interval_day_to_second_Table IS TABLE OF
    DSINTERVAL_UNCONSTRAINED INDEX BY binary_integer;

INTERVAL_YEAR_TO_MONTH_TABLE Table Type

This is a table of YMINTERVAL_UNCONSTRAINED.

Syntax

TYPE interval_year_to_month_table IS TABLE OF YMINTERVAL_UNCONSTRAINED 
   INDEX BY BINARY_INTEGER;

NUMBER_TABLE Table Type

This is a table of NUMBER.

Syntax

TYPE number_table IS TABLE OF NUMBER INDEX BY BINARY_INTEGER;

TIME_TABLE Table Type

This is a table of TIME_UNCONSTRAINED.

Syntax

TYPE time_table IS TABLE OF TIME_UNCONSTRAINED INDEX BY BINARY_INTEGER;

TIME_WITH_TIME_ZONE_TABLE Table Type

This is a table of TIME_TZ_UNCONSTRAINED.

Syntax

TYPE time_with_time_zone_table IS TABLE OF TIME_TZ_UNCONSTRAINED 
   INDEX BY BINARY_INTEGER;;

TIMESTAMP_TABLE Table Type

This is a table of TIMESTAMP_UNCONSTRAINED.

Syntax

TYPE timestamp_table IS TABLE OF TIMESTAMP_UNCONSTRAINED INDEX BY BINARY_INTEGER;

TIMESTAMP_WITH_LTZ_TABLE Table Type

This is a table of TIMESTAMP_LTZ_UNCONSTRAINED

Syntax

TYPE timestamp_with_ltz_table IS TABLE OF
    TIMESTAMP_LTZ_UNCONSTRAINED INDEX BY binary_integer;

TIMESTAMP_WITH_TIME_ZONE_TABLE Table Type

This is a table of TIMESTAMP_TZ_UNCONSTRAINED.

Syntax

TYPE timestamp_with_time_zone_Table IS TABLE OF 
    TIMESTAMP_TZ_UNCONSTRAINED INDEX BY binary_integer;

UROWID_TABLE Table Type

This is a table of UROWID.

Syntax

TYPE urowid_table IS TABLE OF UROWID INDEX BY BINARY_INTEGER;

VARCHAR2_TABLE Table Type

This is table of VARCHAR2(2000).

Syntax

TYPE varchar2_table IS TABLE OF VARCHAR2(2000) INDEX BY BINARY_INTEGER;

VARCHAR2A Table Type

This is table of VARCHAR2(32767).

Syntax

TYPE varchar2a IS TABLE OF VARCHAR2(32767) INDEX BY BINARY_INTEGER;

VARCHAR2S Table Type

This is table of VARCHAR2(256).

Note:

This type has been superseded by the VARCHAR2A Table Type. Although it is currently retained for backward compatibility of legacy code, it is in the process of deprecation and will be de-supported in a future release.

Syntax

TYPE varchar2s IS TABLE OF VARCHAR2(256) INDEX BY BINARY_INTEGER;

Summary of DBMS_SQL Subprograms

Table 135-5 DBMS_SQL Package Subprograms

Subprogram Description

BIND_ARRAY Procedures

Binds a given value to a given collection

BIND_VARIABLE Procedures

Binds a given value to a given variable

CLOSE_CURSOR Procedure

Closes given cursor and frees memory

COLUMN_VALUE Procedure

Returns value of the cursor element for a given position in a cursor

COLUMN_VALUE_LONG Procedure

Returns a selected part of a LONG column, that has been defined using DEFINE_COLUMN_LONG

DEFINE_ARRAY Procedure

Defines a collection to be selected from the given cursor, used only with SELECT statements

DEFINE_COLUMN Procedures

Defines a column to be selected from the given cursor, used only with SELECT statements

DEFINE_COLUMN_CHAR Procedure

Defines a column of type CHAR to be selected from the given cursor, used only with SELECT statements

DEFINE_COLUMN_LONG Procedure

Defines a LONG column to be selected from the given cursor, used only with SELECT statements

DEFINE_COLUMN_RAW Procedure

Defines a column of type RAW to be selected from the given cursor, used only with SELECT statements

DEFINE_COLUMN_ROWID Procedure

Defines a column of type ROWID to be selected from the given cursor, used only with SELECT statements

DESCRIBE_COLUMNS Procedure

Describes the columns for a cursor opened and parsed through DBMS_SQL

DESCRIBE_COLUMNS2 Procedure

Describes describes the specified column, an alternative to DESCRIBE_COLUMNS Procedure

DESCRIBE_COLUMNS3 Procedure

Describes describes the specified column, an alternative to DESCRIBE_COLUMNS Procedure

EXECUTE Function

Executes a given cursor

EXECUTE_AND_FETCH Function

Executes a given cursor and fetch rows

FETCH_ROWS Function

Fetches a row from a given cursor

IS_OPEN Function

Returns TRUE if given cursor is open

LAST_ERROR_POSITION Function

Returns byte offset in the SQL statement text where the error occurred

LAST_ROW_COUNT Function

Returns cumulative count of the number of rows fetched

LAST_ROW_ID Function

Returns ROWID of last row processed

LAST_SQL_FUNCTION_CODE Function

Returns SQL function code for statement

OPEN_CURSOR Function

Returns cursor ID number of new cursor

PARSE Procedures

Parses given statement

TO_CURSOR_NUMBER Function

Takes an OPENed strongly or weakly-typed ref cursor and transforms it into a DBMS_SQL cursor number

TO_REFCURSOR Function

Takes an OPENed, PARSEd, and EXECUTEd cursor and transforms/migrates it into a PL/SQL manageable REF CURSOR (a weakly-typed cursor) that can be consumed by PL/SQL native dynamic SQL switched to use native dynamic SQL

VARIABLE_VALUE Procedures

Returns value of named variable for given cursor



BIND_ARRAY Procedures

This procedure binds a given value or set of values to a given variable in a cursor, based on the name of the variable in the statement.

Syntax

DBMS_SQL.BIND_ARRAY ( 
   c                   IN INTEGER, 
   name                IN VARCHAR2, 
   <table_variable>    IN <datatype> 
 [,index1              IN INTEGER, 
   index2              IN INTEGER)] ); 

Where the <table_variable> and its corresponding <datatype> can be any one of the following matching pairs:

<clob_tab>     Clob_Table
<bflt_tab>     Binary_Float_Table
<bdbl_tab>     Binary_Double_Table
<blob_tab>     Blob_Table
<bfile_tab>    Bfile_Table
<date_tab>     Date_Table
<num_tab>      Number_Table
<urowid_tab>   Urowid_Table
<vchr2_tab>    Varchar2_Table
<tm_tab>       Time_Table
<ttz_tab>      Time_With_Time_Zone_Table
<tms_tab>      Timestamp_Table
<tstz_tab>     Timestamp_With_ltz_Table;
<tstz_tab>     Timestamp_With_Time_Zone_Table
<ids_tab>      Interval_Day_To_Second_Table
<iym_tab>      Interval_Year_To_Month_Table

Notice that the BIND_ARRAY procedure is overloaded to accept different datatypes.

Parameters

Table 135-6 BIND_ARRAY Procedure Parameters

Parameter Description

c

ID number of the cursor to which you want to bind a value.

name

Name of the collection in the statement.

table_variable

Local variable that has been declared as <datatype>.

index1

Index for the table element that marks the lower bound of the range.

index2

Index for the table element that marks the upper bound of the range.


Usage Notes

The length of the bind variable name should be <=30 bytes.

For binding a range, the table must contain the elements that specify the range — tab(index1) and tab(index2) — but the range does not have to be dense. Index1 must be less than or equal to index2. All elements between tab(index1) and tab(index2) are used in the bind.

If you do not specify indexes in the bind call, and two different binds in a statement specify tables that contain a different number of elements, then the number of elements actually used is the minimum number between all tables. This is also the case if you specify indexes — the minimum range is selected between the two indexes for all tables.

Not all bind variables in a query have to be array binds. Some can be regular binds and the same value are used for each element of the collections in expression evaluations (and so forth).

See Also:

"Examples 3, 4, and 5: Bulk DML" for examples of how to bind collections.

Bulk Array Binds

Bulk selects, inserts, updates, and deletes can enhance the performance of applications by bundling many calls into one. The DBMS_SQL package lets you work on collections of data using the PL/SQL table type.

Table items are unbounded homogeneous collections. In persistent storage, they are like other relational tables and have no intrinsic ordering. But when a table item is brought into the workspace (either by querying or by navigational access of persistent data), or when it is created as the value of a PL/SQL variable or parameter, its elements are given subscripts that can be used with array-style syntax to get and set the values of elements.

The subscripts of these elements need not be dense, and can be any number including negative numbers. For example, a table item can contain elements at locations -10, 2, and 7 only.

When a table item is moved from transient workspace to persistent storage, the subscripts are not stored; the table item is unordered in persistent storage.

At bind time the table is copied out from the PL/SQL buffers into local DBMS_SQL buffers (the same as for all scalar types) and then the table is manipulated from the local DBMS_SQL buffers. Therefore, if you change the table after the bind call, then that change does not affect the way the execute acts.

Types for Scalar and LOB Collections

You can declare a local variable as one of the following table-item types, which are defined as public types in DBMS_SQL.

TYPE binary_double_table 
                    IS TABLE OF BINARY_DOUBLE  INDEX BY BINARY_INTEGER;
TYPE binary_float_table 
                    IS TABLE OF BINARY_FLOAT   INDEX BY BINARY_INTEGER;
TYPE bfile_table    IS TABLE OF BFILE          INDEX BY BINARY_INTEGER;
TYPE blob_table     IS TABLE OF BLOB           INDEX BY BINARY_INTEGER;
TYPE clob_table     IS TABLE OF CLOB           INDEX BY BINARY_INTEGER;
TYPE date_table     IS TABLE OF DATE           INDEX BY BINARY_INTEGER;
TYPE interval_day_to_second_Table 
                    IS TABLE OF dsinterval_unconstrained 
                                               INDEX BY BINARY_INTEGER;
TYPE interval_year_to_MONTH_Table 
                    IS TABLE OF yminterval_unconstrained 
                                               INDEX BY BINARY_INTEGER;
TYPE number_table   IS TABLE OF NUMBER         INDEX BY BINARY_INTEGER;
TYPE time_table     IS TABLE OF time_unconstrained           
                                               INDEX BY BINARY_INTEGER;
TYPE time_with_time_zone_table 
                    IS TABLE OF time_tz_unconstrained 
                                               INDEX BY BINARY_INTEGER;
TYPE timestamp_table 
                    IS TABLE OF timestamp_unconstrained   
                                               INDEX BY BINARY_INTEGER;
TYPE timestamp_with_ltz_Table 
                    IS TABLE OF timestamp_ltz_unconstrained 
                                               INDEX BY BINARY_INTEGER;
TYPE timestamp_with_time_zone_Table 
                    IS TABLE OF timestamp_tz_unconstrained 
                                               INDEX BY BINARY_INTEGER;
TYPE urowid_table   IS TABLE OF UROWID         INDEX BY BINARY_INTEGER;
TYPE varchar2_table IS TABLE OF VARCHAR2(2000) INDEX BY BINARY_INTEGER;

BIND_VARIABLE Procedures

This procedures binds a given value or set of values to a given variable in a cursor, based on the name of the variable in the statement.

Syntax

DBMS_SQL.BIND_VARIABLE (
   c              IN INTEGER,
   name           IN VARCHAR2,
   value          IN <datatype>);

Where <datatype> can be any one of the following types:

BINARY_DOUBLE
BINARY_FLOAT
BFILE
BLOB
CLOB CHARACTER SET ANY_CS
DATE
DSINTERVAL_UNCONSTRAINED
NUMBER
TIME_UNCONSTRAINED
TIME_TZ_UNCONSTRAINED
TIMESTAMP_LTZ_UNCONSTRAINED
TIMESTAMP_TZ_UNCONSTRAINED
TIMESTAMP_UNCONSTRAINED
UROWID
VARCHAR2 CHARACTER SET ANY_CS
YMINTERVAL_UNCONSTRAINED
user-defined object types
collections (VARRAYs and nested tables)
REFs
Opaque types

Notice that BIND_VARIABLE is overloaded to accept different datatypes.

The following syntax is also supported for BIND_VARIABLE. The square brackets [] indicate an optional parameter for the BIND_VARIABLE function.

DBMS_SQL.BIND_VARIABLE (
   c              IN INTEGER,
   name           IN VARCHAR2,
   value          IN VARCHAR2 CHARACTER SET ANY_CS [,out_value_size IN INTEGER]);

To bind CHAR, RAW, and ROWID data, you can use the following variations on the syntax:

DBMS_SQL.BIND_VARIABLE_CHAR (
   c              IN INTEGER,
   name           IN VARCHAR2,
   value          IN CHAR CHARACTER SET ANY_CS [,out_value_size IN INTEGER]);

DBMS_SQL.BIND_VARIABLE_RAW (
   c              IN INTEGER,
   name           IN VARCHAR2,
   value          IN RAW [,out_value_size IN INTEGER]);

DBMS_SQL.BIND_VARIABLE_ROWID (
   c              IN INTEGER,
   name           IN VARCHAR2,
   value          IN ROWID);

Pragmas

pragma restrict_references(bind_variable,WNDS);

Parameters

Table 135-7 BIND_VARIABLE Procedure Parameters

Parameter Description

c

ID number of the cursor to which you want to bind a value.

name

Name of the variable in the statement.

value

Value that you want to bind to the variable in the cursor.

For IN and IN/OUT variables, the value has the same type as the type of the value being passed in for this parameter.

out_value_size

Maximum expected OUT value size, in bytes, for the VARCHAR2, RAW, CHAR OUT or IN/OUT variable.

If no size is given, then the length of the current value is used. This parameter must be specified if the value parameter is not initialized.


Usage Notes

If the variable is an IN or IN/OUT variable or an IN collection, then the given bind value must be valid for the variable or array type. Bind values for OUT variables are ignored.

The bind variables or collections of a SQL statement are identified by their names. When binding a value to a bind variable or bind array, the string identifying it in the statement must contain a leading colon, as shown in the following example:

SELECT emp_name FROM emp WHERE SAL > :X;

For this example, the corresponding bind call would look similar to

BIND_VARIABLE(cursor_name, ':X', 3500); 

or

BIND_VARIABLE (cursor_name, 'X', 3500);

The length of the bind variable name should be <=30 bytes.

See Also:

"Examples 3, 4, and 5: Bulk DML" for examples of how to bind collections.

CLOSE_CURSOR Procedure

This procedure closes a given cursor.

Syntax

DBMS_SQL.CLOSE_CURSOR (
   c    IN OUT INTEGER);

Pragmas

pragma restrict_references(close_cursor,RNDS,WNDS);

Parameters

Table 135-8 CLOSE_CURSOR Procedure Parameters

Parameter Mode Description

c

IN

ID number of the cursor that you want to close.

c

OUT

Cursor is set to null.

After you call CLOSE_CURSOR, the memory allocated to the cursor is released and you can no longer fetch from that cursor.



COLUMN_VALUE Procedure

This procedure returns the value of the cursor element for a given position in a given cursor. This procedure is used to access the data fetched by calling FETCH_ROWS.

Syntax

DBMS_SQL.COLUMN_VALUE (
   c                 IN  INTEGER,
   position          IN  INTEGER,
   value             OUT <datatype> 
 [,column_error      OUT NUMBER] 
 [,actual_length     OUT INTEGER]);

Where square brackets [ ] indicate optional parameters and <datatype> can be any one of the following types:

BINARY_DOUBLE
BINARY_FLOAT
BFILE
BLOB
CLOB CHARACTER SET ANY_CS
DATE
DSINTERVAL_UNCONSTRAINED
NUMBER
TIME_TZ_UNCONSTRAINED
TIME_UNCONSTRAINED
TIMESTAMP_LTZ_UNCONSTRAINED
TIMESTAMP_TZ_UNCONSTRAINED
TIMESTAMP_UNCONSTRAINED
UROWID
VARCHAR2 CHARACTER SET ANY_CS
YMINTERVAL_UNCONSTRAINED
user-defined object types
collections (VARRAYs and nested tables)
REFs
Opaque types

For variables containing CHAR, RAW, and ROWID data, you can use the following variations on the syntax:

DBMS_SQL.COLUMN_VALUE_CHAR (
   c               IN  INTEGER,
   position        IN  INTEGER,
   value           OUT CHAR CHARACTER SET ANY_CS
 [,column_error    OUT NUMBER]
 [,actual_length   OUT INTEGER]);
 
DBMS_SQL.COLUMN_VALUE_RAW (
   c               IN  INTEGER,
   position        IN  INTEGER,
   value           OUT RAW
 [,column_error    OUT NUMBER]
 [,actual_length   OUT INTEGER]);

DBMS_SQL.COLUMN_VALUE_ROWID (
   c               IN  INTEGER,
   position        IN  INTEGER,
   value           OUT ROWID
 [,column_error    OUT NUMBER]
 [,actual_length   OUT INTEGER]);

The following syntax enables the COLUMN_VALUE procedure to accommodate bulk operations:

DBMS_SQL.COLUMN_VALUE( 
   c                 IN             INTEGER, 
   position          IN             INTEGER, 
   <param_name>      IN OUT NOCOPY  <table_type>);  

Where the <param_name> and its corresponding <table_type> can be any one of these matching pairs:

bdbl_tab     Binary_Double_Table
bflt_tab     Binary_Float_Table
bf_tab       Bfile_Table
bl_tab       Blob_Table
cl_tab       Clob_Table
d_tab        Date_Table
ids_tab      Interval_Day_To_Second_Table
iym_tab      Interval_Year_To_Month_Table
n_tab        Number_Table
tm_tab       Time_Table
ttz_tab      Time_With_Time_Zone_Table
tms_tab      Timestamp_Table
tstz_tab     Timestamp_With_ltz_Table;
tstz_tab     Timestamp_With_Time_Zone_Table
ur_tab       Urowid_Table
c_tab        Varchar2_Table

Pragmas

pragma restrict_references(column_value,RNDS,WNDS);

Parameters

Table 135-9 COLUMN_VALUE Procedure Parameters (Single Row)

Parameter Description

c

ID number of the cursor from which you are fetching the values.

position

Relative position of the column in the cursor.

The first column in a statement has position 1.

value

Returns the value at the specified column.

Oracle raises exception ORA-06562, inconsistent_type, if the type of this output parameter differs from the actual type of the value, as defined by the call to DEFINE_COLUMN.

column_error

Returns any error code for the specified column value.

actual_length

The actual length, before any truncation, of the value in the specified column.


Table 135-10 COLUMN_VALUE Procedure Parameters (Bulk)

Parameter Description

c

ID number of the cursor from which you are fetching the values.

position

Relative position of the column in the cursor.

The first column in a statement has position 1.

<param_name>

Local variable that has been declared <table_type>. <param_name> is an IN OUT NOCOPY parameter for bulk operations.

For bulk operations, the subprogram appends the new elements at the appropriate (implicitly maintained) index. For instance if on utilizing the DEFINE_ARRAY Procedure a batch size (the cnt parameter) of 10 rows was specified and a start index (lower_bound) of 1 was specified, then the first call to this subprogram after calling the FETCH_ROWS Function will populate elements at index 1..10, and the next call will populate elements 11..20, and so on.


Exceptions

INCONSISTENT_TYPE (ORA-06562) is raised if the type of the given OUT parameter value is different from the actual type of the value. This type was the given type when the column was defined by calling procedure DEFINE_COLUMN.


COLUMN_VALUE_LONG Procedure

This procedure gets part of the value of a long column.

Syntax

DBMS_SQL.COLUMN_VALUE_LONG (
   c            IN  INTEGER, 
   position     IN  INTEGER, 
   length       IN  INTEGER, 
   offset       IN  INTEGER,
   value        OUT VARCHAR2,
   value_length OUT INTEGER);

Pragmas

pragma restrict_references(column_value_long,RNDS,WNDS);

Parameters

Table 135-11 COLUMN_VALUE_LONG Procedure Parameters

Parameter Description

c

Cursor ID number of the cursor from which to get the value.

position

Position of the column of which to get the value.

length

Number of bytes of the long value to fetch.

offset

Offset into the long field for start of fetch.

value

Value of the column as a VARCHAR2.

value_length

Number of bytes actually returned in value.



DEFINE_ARRAY Procedure

This procedure defines the collection for column into which you want to fetch rows (with a FETCH_ROWS call). This procedure lets you do batch fetching of rows from a single SELECT statement. A single fetch call brings over a number of rows into the PL/SQL aggregate object.

When you fetch the rows, they are copied into DBMS_SQL buffers until you run a COLUMN_VALUE call, at which time the rows are copied into the table that was passed as an argument to the COLUMN_VALUE call.

Scalar and LOB Types for Collections

You can declare a local variable as one of the following table-item types, and then fetch any number of rows into it using DBMS_SQL. (These are the same types as you can specify for the BIND_ARRAY procedure.)

TYPE binary_double_table 
                    IS TABLE OF BINARY_DOUBLE  INDEX BY BINARY_INTEGER;
TYPE binary_float_table 
                    IS TABLE OF BINARY_FLOAT   INDEX BY BINARY_INTEGER;
TYPE bfile_table    IS TABLE OF BFILE          INDEX BY BINARY_INTEGER;
TYPE blob_table     IS TABLE OF BLOB           INDEX BY BINARY_INTEGER;
TYPE clob_table     IS TABLE OF CLOB           INDEX BY BINARY_INTEGER;
TYPE date_table     IS TABLE OF DATE           INDEX BY BINARY_INTEGER;
TYPE interval_day_to_second_Table 
                    IS TABLE OF dsinterval_unconstrained 
                                               INDEX BY BINARY_INTEGER;
TYPE interval_year_to_MONTH_Table 
                    IS TABLE OF yminterval_unconstrained 
                                               INDEX BY BINARY_INTEGER;
TYPE number_table   IS TABLE OF NUMBER         INDEX BY BINARY_INTEGER;
TYPE time_table     IS TABLE OF time_unconstrained           
                                               INDEX BY BINARY_INTEGER;
TYPE time_with_time_zone_table 
                    IS TABLE OF time_tz_unconstrained 
                                               INDEX BY BINARY_INTEGER;
TYPE timestamp_table 
                    IS TABLE OF timestamp_unconstrained   
                                               INDEX BY BINARY_INTEGER;
TYPE timestamp_with_ltz_Table 
                    IS TABLE OF timestamp_ltz_unconstrained 
                                               INDEX BY BINARY_INTEGER;
TYPE timestamp_with_time_zone_Table 
                    IS TABLE OF timestamp_tz_unconstrained 
                                               INDEX BY BINARY_INTEGER;
TYPE urowid_table   IS TABLE OF UROWID         INDEX BY BINARY_INTEGER;
TYPE varchar2_table IS TABLE OF VARCHAR2(2000) INDEX BY BINARY_INTEGER;

Syntax

DBMS_SQL.DEFINE_ARRAY (
   c           IN INTEGER, 
   position    IN INTEGER,
   <table_variable>    IN <datatype> 
   cnt         IN INTEGER, 
   lower_bnd   IN INTEGER);

Where <table_variable> and its corresponding <datatype> can be any one of the following matching pairs, DEFINE_ARRAY being overloaded to accept different datatypes:

<clob_tab>     Clob_Table
<bflt_tab>     Binary_Float_Table
<bdbl_tab>     Binary_Double_Table
<blob_tab>     Blob_Table
<bfile_tab>    Bfile_Table
<date_tab>     Date_Table
<num_tab>      Number_Table
<urowid_tab>   Urowid_Table
<vchr2_tab>    Varchar2_Table
<tm_tab>       Time_Table
<ttz_tab>      Time_With_Time_Zone_Table
<tms_tab>      Timestamp_Table
<tstz_tab>     Timestamp_With_ltz_Table;
<tstz_tab>     Timestamp_With_Time_Zone_Table
<ids_tab>      Interval_Day_To_Second_Table
<iym_tab>      Interval_Year_To_Month_Table

Pragmas

pragma restrict_references(define_array,RNDS,WNDS);

The subsequent FETCH_ROWS call fetch "count" rows. When the COLUMN_VALUE call is made, these rows are placed in positions lower_bnd, lower_bnd+1, lower_bnd+2, and so on. While there are still rows coming, the user keeps issuing FETCH_ROWS/COLUMN_VALUE calls. The rows keep accumulating in the table specified as an argument in the COLUMN_VALUE call.

Parameters

Table 135-12 DEFINE_ARRAY Procedure Parameters

Parameter Description

c

ID number of the cursor to which you want to bind an array.

position

Relative position of the column in the array being defined.

The first column in a statement has position 1.

table_variable

Local variable that has been declared as <datatype>.

cnt

Number of rows that must be fetched.

lower_bnd

Results are copied into the collection, starting at this lower bound index.


Usage Notes

The count (cnt) must be an integer greater than zero; otherwise an exception is raised. The lower_bnd can be positive, negative, or zero. A query on which a DEFINE_ARRAY call was issued cannot contain array binds.

Examples

PROCEDURE BULK_PLSQL(deptid NUMBER)
    TYPE namelist IS TABLE OF employees.last_name%TYPE;
    TYPE sallist IS TABLE OF employees.salary%TYPE;
    names    namelist;
    sals     sallist;
    c        NUMBER;
    r        NUMBER;
    sql_stmt VARCHAR2(32767) :=
        'SELECT last_name, salary FROM employees WHERE department_id = :b1';
 
BEGIN
    c := DBMS_SQL.OPEN_CURSOR;
    DBMS_SQL.PARSE(c, sql_stmt, dbms_sql.native);
 
    DBMS_SQL.BIND_VARIABLE(c, 'b1', deptid);
 
    DBMS_SQL.DEFINE_ARRAY(c, 1, names, 5);
    DBMS_SQL.DEFINE_ARRAY(c, 2, sals, 5);
 
    r := DBMS_SQL.EXECUTE(c);
 
    LOOP
      r := DBMS_SQL.FETCH_ROWS(c);
      DBMS_SQL.COLUMN_VALUE(c, 1, names);
      DBMS_SQL.COLUMN_VALUE(c, 2, sals);
      EXIT WHEN r != 5;
    END LOOP;
 
    DBMS_SQL.CLOSE_CURSOR(c);
 
    -- loop through the names and sals collections
    FOR i IN names.FIRST .. names.LAST  LOOP
      DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE('Name = ' || names(i) || ', salary = ' || sals(i));
    END LOOP;
END;
/

See Also:

"Examples 6 and 7: Defining an Array" for examples of how to define collections.

DEFINE_COLUMN Procedures

This procedure defines a column to be selected from the given cursor. This procedure is only used with SELECT cursors.

The column being defined is identified by its relative position in the SELECT list of the statement in the given cursor. The type of the COLUMN value determines the type of the column being defined.

See also the DEFINE_COLUMN_CHAR Procedure, DEFINE_COLUMN_LONG Procedure, DEFINE_COLUMN_RAW Procedure and DEFINE_COLUMN_ROWID Procedure.

Syntax

DBMS_SQL.DEFINE_COLUMN (
   c              IN INTEGER,
   position       IN INTEGER,
   column         IN <datatype>);

Where <datatype> can be any one of the following types:

BINARY_DOUBLE
BINARY_FLOAT
BFILE
BLOB
CLOB CHARACTER SET ANY_CS
DATE
DSINTERVAL_UNCONSTRAINED
NUMBER
TIME_UNCONSTRAINED
TIME_TZ_UNCONSTRAINED
TIMESTAMP_LTZ_UNCONSTRAINED
TIMESTAMP_TZ_UNCONSTRAINED
TIMESTAMP_UNCONSTRAINED
UROWID
YMINTERVAL_UNCONSTRAINED
user-defined object types
collections (VARRAYs and nested tables)
REFs
Opaque types

Note that DEFINE_COLUMN is overloaded to accept different datatypes.

The following syntax is also supported for the DEFINE_COLUMN procedure:

DBMS_SQL.DEFINE_COLUMN (
   c              IN INTEGER,
   position       IN INTEGER,
   column         IN VARCHAR2 CHARACTER SET ANY_CS,
   column_size    IN INTEGER);

Pragmas

pragma restrict_references(define_column,RNDS,WNDS);

Parameters

Table 135-13 DEFINE_COLUMN Procedure Parameters

Parameter Description

c

ID number of the cursor for the row being defined to be selected

position

Relative position of the column in the row being defined.The first column in a statement has position 1.

column

Value of the column being defined. The type of this value determines the type for the column being defined.

column_size

Maximum expected size of the column value in bytes for columns of type VARCHAR2, and RAW.


Usage Notes

When using character length semantics the maximum number of bytes that can be returned for a column value of type VARCHAR2 is calculated as: column_size * maximum character byte size for the current characterset. For example, specifying the column_size as 10 means that a maximum of 30 (10*3) bytes can be returned when using character length semantics with a UTF8 character set regardless of the number of characters this represents.


DEFINE_COLUMN_CHAR Procedure

This procedure defines a column with CHAR data to be selected from the given cursor. This procedure is only used with SELECT cursors.

The column being defined is identified by its relative position in the SELECT list of the statement in the given cursor. The type of the COLUMN value determines the type of the column being defined.

See also the DEFINE_COLUMN Procedures, DEFINE_COLUMN_LONG Procedure, DEFINE_COLUMN_RAW Procedure and DEFINE_COLUMN_ROWID Procedure.

Syntax

DBMS_SQL.DEFINE_COLUMN_CHAR (
   c              IN INTEGER,
   position       IN INTEGER,
   column         IN CHAR CHARACTER SET ANY_CS,
   column_size    IN INTEGER);

Pragmas

pragma restrict_references(define_column,RNDS,WNDS);

Parameters

Table 135-14 DEFINE_COLUMN_CHAR Procedure Parameters

Parameter Description

c

ID number of the cursor for the row being defined to be selected

position

Relative position of the column in the row being defined.The first column in a statement has position 1.

column

Value of the column being defined. The type of this value determines the type for the column being defined.

column_size

Maximum expected size of the column value in characters for columns of type CHAR.



DEFINE_COLUMN_LONG Procedure

This procedure defines a LONG column for a SELECT cursor. The column being defined is identified by its relative position in the SELECT list of the statement for the given cursor. The type of the COLUMN value determines the type of the column being defined.

See also the DEFINE_COLUMN Procedures, DEFINE_COLUMN_CHAR Procedure, DEFINE_COLUMN_RAW Procedure and DEFINE_COLUMN_ROWID Procedure.

Syntax

DBMS_SQL.DEFINE_COLUMN_LONG (
   c              IN INTEGER,
   position       IN INTEGER); 

Parameters

Table 135-15 DEFINE_COLUMN_LONG Procedure Parameters

Parameter Description

c

ID number of the cursor for the row being defined to be selected.

position

Relative position of the column in the row being defined.

The first column in a statement has position 1.



DEFINE_COLUMN_RAW Procedure

This procedure defines a column of type RAW to be selected from the given cursor. This procedure is only used with SELECT cursors.

The column being defined is identified by its relative position in the SELECT list of the statement in the given cursor. The type of the COLUMN value determines the type of the column being defined.

See also the DEFINE_COLUMN Procedures, DEFINE_COLUMN_CHAR Procedure, DEFINE_COLUMN_LONG Procedure and DEFINE_COLUMN_ROWID Procedure.

Syntax

DBMS_SQL.DEFINE_COLUMN_RAW (
   c              IN INTEGER,
   position       IN INTEGER,
   column         IN RAW,
   column_size    IN INTEGER);

Pragmas

pragma restrict_references(define_column,RNDS,WNDS);

Parameters

Table 135-16 DEFINE_COLUMN Procedure Parameters

Parameter Description

c

ID number of the cursor for the row being defined to be selected

position

Relative position of the column in the row being defined.The first column in a statement has position 1.

column

Value of the column being defined. The type of this value determines the type for the column being defined.

column_size

Maximum expected size of the column value in bytes for columns of and RAW



DEFINE_COLUMN_ROWID Procedure

This procedure defines a column of type ROWID to be selected from the given cursor. This procedure is only used with SELECT cursors.

The column being defined is identified by its relative position in the SELECT list of the statement in the given cursor. The type of the COLUMN value determines the type of the column being defined.

See also the DEFINE_COLUMN Procedures, DEFINE_COLUMN_CHAR Procedure, DEFINE_COLUMN_LONG Procedure and DEFINE_COLUMN_RAW Procedure.

Syntax

DBMS_SQL.DEFINE_COLUMN_ROWID (
   c              IN INTEGER,
   position       IN INTEGER,
   column         IN ROWID); 

Pragmas

pragma restrict_references(define_column,RNDS,WNDS);

Parameters

Table 135-17 DEFINE_COLUMN Procedure Parameters

Parameter Description

c

ID number of the cursor for the row being defined to be selected

position

Relative position of the column in the row being defined.The first column in a statement has position 1.

column

Value of the column being defined. The type of this value determines the type for the column being defined.



DESCRIBE_COLUMNS Procedure

This procedure describes the columns for a cursor opened and parsed through DBMS_SQL.

Syntax

DBMS_SQL.DESCRIBE_COLUMNS ( 
   c              IN  INTEGER, 
   col_cnt        OUT INTEGER, 
   desc_t         OUT DESC_TAB);

Parameters

Table 135-18 DESCRIBE_COLUMNS Procedure Parameters

Parameter Description

c

ID number of the cursor for the columns being described

col_cnt

Number of columns in the select list of the query

desc_t

Describe table to fill in with the description of each of the columns of the query


See Also:

"Example 8: Describe Columns" illustrates how to use DESCRIBE_COLUMNS.

DESCRIBE_COLUMNS2 Procedure

This procedure describes the specified column. This is an alternative to DESCRIBE_COLUMNS Procedure.

Syntax

DBMS_SQL.DESCRIBE_COLUMNS2 ( 
   c              IN  INTEGER, 
   col_cnt        OUT INTEGER, 
   desc_t         OUT DESC_TAB2);

Pragmas

PRAGMA RESTRICT_REFERENCES(describe_columns2,WNDS);

Parameters

Table 135-19 DESCRIBE_COLUMNS2 Procedure Parameters

Parameter Description

c

ID number of the cursor for the columns being described.

col_cnt

Number of columns in the select list of the query.

desc_t

Describe table to fill in with the description of each of the columns of the query. This table is indexed from one to the number of elements in the select list of the query.



DESCRIBE_COLUMNS3 Procedure

This procedure describes the specified column. This is an alternative to DESCRIBE_COLUMNS Procedure.

Syntax

DBMS_SQL.DESCRIBE_COLUMNS3 ( 
   c              IN  INTEGER, 
   col_cnt        OUT INTEGER, 
   desc_t         OUT DESC_TAB3);

Pragmas

PRAGMA RESTRICT_REFERENCES(describe_columns3,WNDS);

Parameters

Table 135-20 DESCRIBE_COLUMNS3 Procedure Parameters

Parameter Description

c

ID number of the cursor for the columns being described.

col_cnt

Number of columns in the select list of the query.

desc_t

Describe table to fill in with the description of each of the columns of the query. This table is indexed from one to the number of elements in the select list of the query.


Usage Notes

The cursor passed in by the cursor ID has to be OPENed and PARSEd, otherwise an "invalid cursor id" error is raised.

Examples

CREATE TYPE PROJECT_T AS OBJECT
      ( projname          VARCHAR2(20),
        mgr               VARCHAR2(20))
/
 
CREATE TABLE projecttab(deptno NUMBER, project HR.PROJECT_T)
/
 
DECLARE
  curid      NUMBER;
  desctab    DBMS_SQL.DESC_TAB3;
  colcnt     NUMBER;
  sql_stmt   VARCHAR2(200) := 'select * from projecttab';
BEGIN
 
    curid := DBMS_SQL.OPEN_CURSOR;
 
    DBMS_SQL.PARSE(curid, sql_stmt, DBMS_SQL.NATIVE);
 
    DBMS_SQL.DESCRIBE_COLUMNS3(curid, colcnt, desctab);
 
    FOR i IN 1 .. colcnt LOOP
      IF desctab(i).col_type = 109 THEN
        DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT(desctab(i).col_name || ' is user-defined type: ');
        DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE(desctab(i).col_schema_name || '.' ||
                             desctab(i).col_type_name);
      END IF;
    END LOOP;
 
    DBMS_SQL.CLOSE_CURSOR(curid);
END;
/
 
Output:
 
PROJECT is user-defined type: HR.PROJECT_T

EXECUTE Function

This function executes a given cursor. This function accepts the ID number of the cursor and returns the number of rows processed. The return value is only valid for INSERT, UPDATE, and DELETE statements; for other types of statements, including DDL, the return value is undefined and should be ignored.

Syntax

DBMS_SQL.EXECUTE (
   c   IN INTEGER)
  RETURN INTEGER;

Parameters

Table 135-21 EXECUTE Function Parameters

Parameter Description

c

Cursor ID number of the cursor to execute.


Return Values

Returns number of rows processed

Usage Notes

The DBMS_SQL cursor that is returned by the TO_CURSOR_NUMBER Function performs in the same way as a DBMS_SQL cursor that has already been executed. Consequently, calling EXECUTE for this cursor will cause an error.


EXECUTE_AND_FETCH Function

This function executes the given cursor and fetches rows. This function provides the same functionality as calling EXECUTE and then calling FETCH_ROWS. Calling EXECUTE_AND_FETCH instead, however, may reduce the number of network round-trips when used against a remote database.

The EXECUTE_AND_FETCH function returns the number of rows actually fetched.

Syntax

DBMS_SQL.EXECUTE_AND_FETCH (
   c              IN INTEGER,
   exact          IN BOOLEAN DEFAULT FALSE)
  RETURN INTEGER;

Pragmas

pragma restrict_references(execute_and_fetch,WNDS);

Parameters

Table 135-22 EXECUTE_AND_FETCH Function Parameters

Parameter Description

c

ID number of the cursor to execute and fetch.

exact

Set to TRUE to raise an exception if the number of rows actually matching the query differs from one.

Note: Oracle does not support the exact fetch TRUE option with LONG columns.

Even if an exception is raised, the rows are still fetched and available.


Return Values

Returns designated rows


FETCH_ROWS Function

This function fetches a row from a given cursor. You can call FETCH_ROWS repeatedly as long as there are rows remaining to be fetched. These rows are retrieved into a buffer, and must be read by calling COLUMN_VALUE, for each column, after each call to FETCH_ROWS.

The FETCH_ROWS function accepts the ID number of the cursor to fetch, and returns the number of rows actually fetched.

Syntax

DBMS_SQL.FETCH_ROWS (
   c              IN INTEGER)
  RETURN INTEGER;

Pragmas

pragma restrict_references(fetch_rows,WNDS);

Parameters

Table 135-23 FETCH_ROWS Function Parameters

Parameter Description

c

ID number.


Return Values

Returns a row from a given cursor


IS_OPEN Function

This function checks to see if the given cursor is currently open.

Syntax

DBMS_SQL.IS_OPEN (
   c              IN INTEGER)
  RETURN BOOLEAN;

Pragmas

pragma restrict_references(is_open,RNDS,WNDS);

Parameters

Table 135-24 IS_OPEN Function Parameters

Parameter Description

c

Cursor ID number of the cursor to check.


Return Values

Returns TRUE for any cursor number that has been opened but not closed, and FALSE for a NULL cursor number. Note that the CLOSE_CURSOR Procedure Procedure NULLs out the cursor variable passed to it.

Exceptions

ORA-29471 DBMS_SQL access denied: This is raised if an invalid cursor ID number is detected. Once a session has encountered and reported this error, every subsequent DBMS_SQL call in the same session will raise this error, meaning that DBMS_SQL is non-operational for this session.


LAST_ERROR_POSITION Function

This function returns the byte offset in the SQL statement text where the error occurred. The first character in the SQL statement is at position 0.

Syntax

DBMS_SQL.LAST_ERROR_POSITION 
   RETURN INTEGER;

Pragmas

pragma restrict_references(last_error_position,RNDS,WNDS);

Return Values

Returns the byte offset in the SQL statement text where the error occurred

Usage Notes

Call this function after a PARSE call, before any other DBMS_SQL procedures or functions are called.


LAST_ROW_COUNT Function

This function returns the cumulative count of the number of rows fetched.

Syntax

DBMS_SQL.LAST_ROW_COUNT 
   RETURN INTEGER;

Pragmas

pragma restrict_references(last_row_count,RNDS,WNDS);

Return Values

Returns the cumulative count of the number of rows fetched

Usage Notes

Call this function after a FETCH_ROWS or an EXECUTE_AND_FETCH call. If called after an EXECUTE call, then the value returned is zero.


LAST_ROW_ID Function

This function returns the ROWID of the last row processed.

Syntax

DBMS_SQL.LAST_ROW_ID 
   RETURN ROWID;

Pragmas

pragma restrict_references(last_row_id,RNDS,WNDS);

Return Values

Returns the ROWID of the last row processed

Usage Notes

Call this function after a FETCH_ROWS or an EXECUTE_AND_FETCH call.


LAST_SQL_FUNCTION_CODE Function

This function returns the SQL function code for the statement. These codes are listed in the Oracle Call Interface Programmer's Guide.

Syntax

DBMS_SQL.LAST_SQL_FUNCTION_CODE 
   RETURN INTEGER;

Pragmas

pragma restrict_references(last_sql_function_code,RNDS,WNDS);

Return Values

Returns the SQL function code for the statement

Usage Notes

You should call this function immediately after the SQL statement is run; otherwise, the return value is undefined.


OPEN_CURSOR Function

This procedure opens a new cursor. The second overload takes a security_level parameter to apply fine-grained control to the security of the opened cursor.

When you no longer need this cursor, you must close it explicitly by calling the CLOSE_CURSOR Procedure.

Syntax

DBMS_SQL.OPEN_CURSOR 
  RETURN INTEGER;

DBMS_SQL.OPEN_CURSOR (
   security_level   IN   INTEGER) 
  RETURN INTEGER;

Parameters

Table 135-25 OPEN_CURSOR Function Parameters

Parameter Description

security_level

Specifies the level of security protection to enforce on the opened cursor. Valid security level values are 0, 1, and 2. When a NULL argument value is provided to this overload, as well as for cursors opened using the overload of open_cursor without the security_level parameter, the default security level value 1 will be enforced on the opened cursor.

  • Level 0 - allows all DBMS_SQL operations on the cursor without any security checks. The cursor may be fetched from, and even re-bound and re-executed, by code running with a different effective userid or roles than those in effect at the time the cursor was parsed. This level of security is off by default.

  • Level 1 - requires that the effective userid and roles of the caller to DBMS_SQL for bind and execute operations on this cursor must be the same as those of the caller of the most recent parse operation on this cursor.

  • Level 2 - requires that the effective userid and roles of the caller to DBMS_SQL for all bind, execute, define, describe, and fetch operations on this cursor must be the same as those of the caller of the most recent parse operation on this cursor.


Pragmas

pragma restrict_references(open_cursor,RNDS,WNDS);

Return Values

Returns the cursor ID number of the new cursor

Usage Notes

You can use cursors to run the same SQL statement repeatedly or to run a new SQL statement. When a cursor is reused, the contents of the corresponding cursor data area are reset when the new SQL statement is parsed. It is never necessary to close and reopen a cursor before reusing it.


PARSE Procedures

This procedure parses the given statement in the given cursor. All statements are parsed immediately. In addition, DDL statements are run immediately when parsed.

There are three versions of the PARSE procedure:

Syntax

DBMS_SQL.PARSE (
   c                           IN   INTEGER,
   statement                   IN   VARCHAR2,
   language_flag               IN   INTEGER,
   edition                     IN   VARCHAR2 DEFAULT NULL,
   apply_crossedition_trigger  IN   VARCHAR2 DEFAULT NULL,
   fire_apply_trigger          IN   BOOLEAN DEFAULT TRUE);
DBMS_SQL.PARSE (
   c                           IN   INTEGER,
   statement                   IN   CLOB,
   language_flag               IN   INTEGER,
   edition                     IN   VARCHAR2 DEFAULT NULL,
   apply_crossedition_trigger  IN   VARCHAR2 DEFAULT NULL,
   fire_apply_trigger          IN   BOOLEAN DEFAULT TRUE);
DBMS_SQL.PARSE (
   c                           IN   INTEGER, 
   statement                   IN   VARCHAR2A,
   lb                          IN   INTEGER, 
   ub                          IN   INTEGER,
   lfflg                       IN   BOOLEAN, 
   language_flag               IN   INTEGER,
   edition                     IN   VARCHAR2 DEFAULT NULL,
   apply_crossedition_trigger  IN   VARCHAR2 DEFAULT NULL,
   fire_apply_trigger          IN   BOOLEAN DEFAULT TRUE);

Parameters

Table 135-26 PARSE Procedure Parameters

Parameter Description

c

ID number of the cursor in which to parse the statement.

statement

SQL statement to be parsed. SQL statements larger than 32K that may be stored in CLOBs.

Unlike PL/SQL statements, your SQL statement should not include a final semicolon. For example:

DBMS_SQL.PARSE(cursor1, 'BEGIN proc; END;', 2);

DBMS_SQL.PARSE(cursor1, 'INSERT INTO tab VALUES(1)', 2);

lb

Lower bound for elements in the statement

ub

Upper bound for elements in the statement

lfflg

If TRUE, then insert a linefeed after each element on concatenation.

language_flag

Determines how Oracle handles the SQL statement. The following options are recognized:

  • V6 (or 0) specifies version 6 behavior.

  • NATIVE (or 1) specifies normal behavior for the database to which the program is connected.

  • V7 (or 2) specifies Oracle database version 7 behavior.

edition

Specifies the edition to run the statement in. Passing NULL indicates the statement should to run in the caller's current edition. The contents of the string are processed as a SQL identifier; double-quotes must surround the remainder of the string if special characters or lower case characters are present in the edition's actual name, and if double-quotes are not used the contents will be uppercased. If the edition is specified with a non-NULL value, the user with which the statement is to be executed must have USE privilege on the named edition.

apply_crossedition_trigger

Specifies the unqualified name of a forward crossedition trigger that is to be applied to the specified SQL. The name is resolved using the edition and current_schema setting in which the statement is to be executed. The trigger must be owned by the user that will execute the statement.If a non-NULL value is specified, the specified crossedition trigger will be executed assuming fire_apply_trigger is TRUE, the trigger is enabled, the trigger is defined on the table which is the target of the statement, the type of the statement matches the trigger's dml_event_clause, any effective WHEN and UPDATE OF restrictions are satisfied, and so on. Other forward crossedition triggers may also be executed, selected using the "crossedition trigger DML rules" applied as if the specified trigger was doing a further DML to the table that is the target of the statement. Non-crossedition triggers and reverse crossedition triggers will not be executed.The contents of the string are processed as a SQL identifier; double-quotes must surround the remainder of the string if special characters or lower case characters are present in the trigger's actual name, and if double-quotes are not used, the contents will be uppercased.

fire_apply_trigger

Indicates whether the specified apply_crossedition_trigger is itself to be executed, or should only be a guide used in selecting other triggers. This is typically set FALSE when the statement is a replacement for the actions the apply_crossedition_trigger would itself perform. If FALSE, the specified trigger is not executed, but other triggers are still selected for firing as if the specified trigger was doing a DML to the table that is the target of the statement. The apply_crossedition_trigger and fire_apply_trigger parameters are ignored if the statement is not a DML.


Usage Notes

Exceptions

If you create a type/procedure/function/package using DBMS_SQL that has compilation warnings, an ORA-24344 exception is raised, and the procedure is still created.


TO_CURSOR_NUMBER Function

This function takes an OPENed strongly or weakly-typed ref cursor and transforms it into a DBMS_SQL cursor number.

Syntax

DBMS_SQL.TO_CURSOR_NUMBER(
   rc IN OUT SYS_REFCURSOR)
  RETURN INTEGER;

Parameters

Table 135-27 TO_CURSOR_NUMBER Function Parameters

Parameter Description

rc

REF CURSOR to be transformed into a cursor number


Return Values

Returns a DBMS_SQL manageable cursor number transformed from a REF CURSOR

Usage Notes

Examples

CREATE OR REPLACE PROCEDURE DO_QUERY(sql_stmt VARCHAR2) IS
  TYPE CurType IS REF CURSOR;
  src_cur         CurType;
  curid           NUMBER;
  desctab         DBMS_SQL.DESC_TAB;
  colcnt          NUMBER;
  namevar         VARCHAR2(50);
  numvar          NUMBER;
  datevar         DATE;
  empno           NUMBER := 100;
BEGIN
 
 
    -- sql_stmt := 'select ...... from employees where employee_id = :b1';
    OPEN src_cur FOR sql_stmt USING empno;
 
    -- Switch from native dynamic SQL to DBMS_SQL
    curid := DBMS_SQL.TO_CURSOR_NUMBER (src_cur);
 
    DBMS_SQL.DESCRIBE_COLUMNS(curid, colcnt, desctab);
 
    -- Define columns
    FOR i IN 1 .. colcnt LOOP
        IF desctab(i).col_type = 2 THEN
           DBMS_SQL.DEFINE_COLUMN(curid, i, numvar);
        ELSIF desctab(i).col_type = 12 THEN
            DBMS_SQL.DEFINE_COLUMN(curid, i, datevar);
.......
         ELSE
            DBMS_SQL.DEFINE_COLUMN(curid, i, namevar, 25);
         END IF;
    END LOOP;
 
  -- Fetch Rows
    WHILE DBMS_SQL.FETCH_ROWS(curid) > 0 LOOP
        FOR i IN 1 .. colcnt LOOP
          IF (desctab(i).col_type = 1) THEN
            DBMS_SQL.COLUMN_VALUE(curid, i, namevar);
         ELSIF (desctab(i).col_type = 2) THEN
            DBMS_SQL.COLUMN_VALUE(curid, i, numvar);
          ELSIF (desctab(i).col_type = 12) THEN
            DBMS_SQL.COLUMN_VALUE(curid, i, datevar);
....
          END IF;
        END LOOP;
    END LOOP;
 
    DBMS_SQL.CLOSE_CURSOR(curid);
END;
/ 

TO_REFCURSOR Function

This function takes an OPENed, PARSEd, and EXECUTEd cursor and transforms/migrates it into a PL/SQL manageable REF CURSOR (a weakly-typed cursor) that can be consumed by PL/SQL native dynamic SQLswitched to use native dynamic SQL. This subprogram is only used with SELECT cursors.

Syntax

DBMS_SQL.TO_REFCURSOR(
   cursor_number IN OUT INTEGER)
  RETURN SYS_REFCURSOR;

Parameters

Table 135-28 TO_REFCURSOR Function Parameters

Parameter Description

cursor_number

Cursor number of the cursor to be transformed into REF CURSOR


Return Values

Returns a PL/SQL REF CURSOR transformed from a DBMS_SQL cursor number

Usage Notes

Examples

CREATE OR REPLACE PROCEDURE DO_QUERY(mgr_id NUMBER) IS
  TYPE CurType IS REF CURSOR;
  src_cur         CurType;
  curid           NUMBER;
  sql_stmt        VARCHAR2(200);
  ret             INTEGER;
  empnos          DBMS_SQL.Number_Table;
  depts           DBMS_SQL.Number_Table;
BEGIN

  -- DBMS_SQL.OPEN_CURSOR
  curid := DBMS_SQL.OPEN_CURSOR;
 
  sql_stmt :=    'SELECT EMPLOYEE_ID, DEPARTMENT_ID from employees where MANAGER_ID = :b1';

  DBMS_SQL.PARSE(curid, sql_stmt, DBMS_SQL.NATIVE);
  DBMS_SQL.BIND_VARIABLE(curid, 'b1', mgr_id);
  ret := DBMS_SQL.EXECUTE(curid);

  -- Switch from DBMS_SQL to native dynamic SQL
  src_cur := DBMS_SQL.TO_REFCURSOR(curid);

  -- Fetch with native dynamic SQL
  FETCH src_cur BULK COLLECT INTO empnos, depts;

  IF empnos.COUNT > 0 THEN
    DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE('EMPNO DEPTNO');
    DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE('----- ------');
    -- Loop through the empnos and depts collections
    FOR i IN 1 .. empnos.COUNT LOOP
      DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE(empnos(i) || '   ' || depts(i));
    END LOOP;
  END IF;
   -- Close cursor
  CLOSE src_cur;
END;
/ 

VARIABLE_VALUE Procedures

This procedure returns the value of the named variable for a given cursor. It is used to return the values of bind variables inside PL/SQL blocks or DML statements with returning clause.

Syntax

DBMS_SQL.VARIABLE_VALUE (
   c               IN  INTEGER,
   name            IN  VARCHAR2,
   value           OUT NOCOPY <datatype>);
 

Where <datatype> can be any one of the following types:

BINARY_DOUBLE
BINARY_FLOAT
BFILE
BLOB
CLOB CHARACTER SET ANY_CS
DATE
DSINTERVAL_UNCONSTRAINED
NUMBER
TIME_TZ_UNCONSTRAINED
TIME_UNCONSTRAINED
TIMESTAMP_LTZ_UNCONSTRAINED
TIMESTAMP_TZ_UNCONSTRAINED
TIMESTAMP_UNCONSTRAINED
UROWID
VARCHAR2 CHARACTER SET ANY_CS
YMINTERVAL_UNCONSTRAINED
user-defined object types
collections (VARRAYs and nested tables)
REFs
Opaque types

For variables containing CHAR, RAW, and ROWID data, you can use the following variations on the syntax:

DBMS_SQL.VARIABLE_VALUE_CHAR (
   c               IN  INTEGER,
   name            IN  VARCHAR2,
   value           OUT CHAR CHARACTER SET ANY_CS);

DBMS_SQL.VARIABLE_VALUE_RAW (
   c               IN  INTEGER,
   name            IN  VARCHAR2,
   value           OUT RAW);

DBMS_SQL.VARIABLE_VALUE_ROWID (
   c               IN  INTEGER,
   name            IN  VARCHAR2,
   value           OUT ROWID);

The following syntax enables the VARIABLE_VALUE procedure to accommodate bulk operations:

DBMS_SQL.VARIABLE_VALUE ( 
   c                 IN   INTEGER, 
   name              IN   VARCHAR2,
   value             OUT NOCOPY <table_type>); 

For bulk operations, <table_type> can be:

Binary_Double_Table
Binary_Float_Table
Bfile_Table
Blob_Table
Clob_Table
Date_Table
Interval_Day_To_Second_Table
Interval_Year_To_Month_Table
Number_Table
Time_Table
Time_With_Time_Zone_Table
Timestamp_Table
Timestamp_With_ltz_Table;
Timestamp_With_Time_Zone_Table
Urowid_Table
Varchar2_Table

Pragmas

pragma restrict_references(variable_value,RNDS,WNDS);

Parameters

Table 135-29 VARIABLE_VALUE Procedure Parameters

Parameter Description

c

ID number of the cursor from which to get the values.

name

Name of the variable for which you are retrieving the value.

value

  • Single row option: Returns the value of the variable for the specified position. Oracle raises the exception ORA-06562, inconsistent_type, if the type of this output parameter differs from the actual type of the value, as defined by the call to BIND_VARIABLE.

  • Array option: Local variable that has been declared <table_type>. For bulk operations, value is an OUT NOCOPY parameter.