Skip Headers
Oracle® Database Backup and Recovery User's Guide
11g Release 2 (11.2)

Part Number E10642-03
Go to Documentation Home
Home
Go to Book List
Book List
Go to Table of Contents
Contents
Go to Index
Index
Go to Master Index
Master Index
Go to Feedback page
Contact Us

Go to previous page
Previous
Go to next page
Next
View PDF

24 Duplicating a Database

This chapter describes how to use the DUPLICATE command to create an independently functioning database copy.

This chapter contains the following topics:

Overview of RMAN Database Duplication

Database duplication is the use of the DUPLICATE command to copy all or a subset of the data in a source database. The duplicate database (the copied database) functions entirely independently from the source database (the database being copied).

Purpose of Database Duplication

A duplicate database is useful for a variety of purposes, most of which involve testing. You can perform the following tasks in a duplicate database:

  • Test backup and recovery procedures

  • Test an upgrade to a new release of Oracle Database

  • Test the effect of applications on database performance

  • Create a standby database

  • Generate reports

For example, you can duplicate the production database on host1 to host2, and then use the duplicate database on host2 to practice restoring and recovering this database while the production database on host1 operates as usual.

If you copy a database by means of operating system utilities rather than with DUPLICATE, then the DBID of the copied database remains the same as the original database. To register the copy database in the same recovery catalog with the original, you must change the DBID with the DBNEWID utility (see Oracle Database Utilities). In contrast, DUPLICATE automatically assigns the duplicate database a different DBID so that it can be registered in the same recovery catalog as the source database.

The DUPLICATE command can create a fully functional copy of your database or a physical standby database, which serves a very different purpose. A standby database is a copy of the primary database that you update continually with archived log files from the primary database. If the primary database is inaccessible, then you can fail over to the standby database, which becomes the new primary database. A database copy, however, cannot be used in this way: it is not intended for failover scenarios and does not support the various standby recovery and failover options.

See Also:

Oracle Data Guard Concepts and Administration to learn how to create a standby database with the DUPLICATE command

Basic Concepts of Database Duplication

The source host is the computer that hosts the source database. The source database instance is the instance associated with the source database.

The destination host is the computer that hosts the duplicate database.The source host and destination host can be the same or different computers. The database instance associated with the duplicate database is called the auxiliary instance.

Techniques for Duplicating a Database

RMAN supports two basic types of duplication: active database duplication and backup-based duplication. RMAN can perform backup-based duplication with or without either of the following connections:

  • Target

  • Recovery Catalog

A connect to both is required for active database duplication.

Figure 24-1 shows the decision tree for the two duplication techniques.

Figure 24-1 Duplication Techniques

Surrounding text describes Figure 24-1 .
Active Database Duplication

In active database duplication, RMAN connects as TARGET to the source database instance and as AUXILIARY to the auxiliary instance. RMAN copies the live source database over the network to the auxiliary instance, thereby creating the duplicate database. No backups of the source database are required. Figure 24-2 illustrates active database duplication.

Figure 24-2 Active Database Duplication

Surrounding text describes Figure 24-2 .
Backup-Based Duplication

In backup-based duplication, RMAN creates the duplicate database by using pre-existing RMAN backups and copies. This technique of duplication uses one of the following mutually exclusive subtechniques:

  • Duplication without a target database connection, in which case RMAN must obtain metadata about backups from a recovery catalog

  • Duplication without a target database connection and without a recovery catalog, in which case RMAN uses a BACKUP LOCATION where all necessary backups and copies reside

  • Duplication with a target database connection, in which case RMAN can obtain metadata about backups from the target database control file or from the recovery catalog

Figure 24-3 illustrates backup-based duplication without a target connection. RMAN connects to a recovery catalog database instance and the auxiliary instance. The destination host must have access to the RMAN backups required to create the duplicate database.

Figure 24-3 Backup-Based Duplication Without a Target Connection

Surrounding text describes Figure 24-3 .

Figure 24-4 illustrates backup-based duplication without connections to the target or to the recovery catalog database instance. A disk backup location containing all the backups or copies for duplication must be available to the destination host.

Figure 24-4 Backup-Based Duplication Without a Target Connection or Recovery Catalog Connection

Surrounding text describes Figure 24-4 .

Figure 24-5 illustrates backup-based duplication with a target connection. RMAN connects to the source database instance and the auxiliary instance. Optionally, RMAN can connect to a recovery catalog database (not shown in the graphic). The destination host must have access to the RMAN backups required to create the duplicate database.

Figure 24-5 Backup-Based Duplication With a Target Connection

Surrounding text describes Figure 24-5 .

Contents of a Duplicate Database

A duplicate database can include the same contents as the source database or only a subset of the tablespaces in the source database. For example, you can use the TABLESPACE option to duplicate only specified tablespaces, or the SKIP READONLY option to exclude read-only tablespaces from the duplicate database.

How RMAN Duplicates a Database

For backup-based duplication, the principal work of the duplication is performed by the auxiliary channels. These channels correspond to a server session on the auxiliary instance on the destination host. For active database duplication the primary work is performed by target channels.

RMAN must perform database point-in-time recovery, even when no explicit point in time is provided for duplication. Point-in-time recover is required because the online redo log files in the source database are not backed up and cannot be applied to the duplicate database. The farthest point of recovery of the duplicate database is the most recent redo log file archived by the source database.

As part of the duplicating operation, RMAN automates the following steps:

  1. Creates a default server parameter file for the auxiliary instance if the following conditions are true:

    • Duplication does not involve a standby database.

    • Server parameter files are not being duplicated.

    • The auxiliary instance was not started with a server parameter file.

  2. Restores from backup or copies from active database the latest control file that satisfies the UNTIL clause requirements.

  3. Mounts the restored or copied backup control file from the active database.

  4. Uses the RMAN repository to select the backups for restoring the datafiles to the auxiliary instance. This step applies to backup-based duplication.

  5. Restores and copies the duplicate datafiles and recovers them with incremental backups and archived redo log files to a non-current point in time.

  6. Shuts down and restarts the database instance in NOMOUNT mode.

  7. Creates a new control file, which then creates and stores the new DBID in the datafiles.

  8. Opens the duplicate database with the RESETLOGS option and creates the online redo log for the new database.

See Also:

The DUPLICATE entry in Oracle Database Backup and Recovery Reference for a complete list of which files are copied to the duplicate database

Basic Steps of Database Duplication

This section describes the basic steps of database duplication. Follow the link in each step for further instructions.

To duplicate a database:

  1. Prepare for database duplication.

    See "Preparing to Duplicate a Database".

  2. Start RMAN and connect to the necessary database instances.

    See "Starting RMAN and Connecting to Databases".

  3. Place the source database in the proper state (if necessary).

    See "Placing the Source Database in the Proper State".

  4. Configure RMAN channels (if necessary).

    See "Configuring RMAN Channels for Use in Duplication".

  5. Perform the duplication.

    See "Duplicating a Database".

Preparing to Duplicate a Database

Before duplicating the database, you must decide how to perform the duplication and then prepare the database environment, including the auxiliary database instance.

To prepare for duplication:

  1. Choose a duplication technique.

    See "Step 1: Choosing a Duplication Technique".

  2. Choose a strategy for naming the duplicate database files.

    See "Step 2: Choosing a Strategy for Naming Duplicate Files".

  3. For a backup-based strategy, make the backups accessible to the auxiliary instance; otherwise, skip this step.

    See "Step 3: Making Backups Accessible to the Duplicate Instance".

  4. Prepare remote access to databases.

    See "Step 4: Preparing Remote Access to Databases".

  5. Prepare the auxiliary instance.

    See "Step 5: Creating an Initialization Parameter File and Starting the Auxiliary Instance".

Step 1: Choosing a Duplication Technique

Your business requirements and the database environment determine which duplication technique is best for your situation. Consider the following questions:

  • Are you familiar with the prerequisites for each duplication technique?

    Review the "Prerequisites" section of the DUPLICATE command entry in the Oracle Database Backup and Recovery Reference for a complete list. Some prerequisites are common to all duplication techniques, such as the following:

    • The source and duplicate databases must be on the same platform. DUPLICATE considers 32-bit and 64-bit versions of the same operating system as belonging to the same platform.

    • The DUPLICATE command requires at least one auxiliary channel to perform the work of the duplication on the auxiliary instance.

    Other prerequisites are specific and depend on the duplication technique. For example, active duplication requires that the source and auxiliary instances use the same password as the source database, while backup-based duplication without connections to the target database and recovery catalog just requires that all backups and database copies reside in a single location.

  • Do backups of the source database already exist?

    The principal advantage of active database duplication is that it does not require source database backups. Active duplication copies mounted or online database files over a network to the auxiliary instance. One disadvantage of this technique is the negative performance impact on the network. Another disadvantage is that the source database is running processes required to transfer the files to the auxiliary host, thereby impacting the source database and production workload.

    In the case where the source database backups already exist, and if the impact on the network is unacceptable, then backup-based duplication may be a better option. You can copy backups to temporary storage and transfer them manually to the destination host. If duplication if made with a connection to the target or the recovery catalog, then the backup files on the destination host must have the same file specification as they had on the source host. Otherwise, this is not a requirement.

  • Is a recovery catalog available?

    If a recovery catalog exists, then you can perform backup-based duplication without connecting RMAN as TARGET to the source database. This technique is advantageous where network connections from the auxiliary host to the source database are restricted or prone to intermittent disruptions. In duplication without a TARGET connection, the source database is unaffected by the duplication.

  • How much disk space is available on the destination host?

    The disk space on the destination host can be an issue when you perform duplication using disk backups. For example, if the source database is 1TB, and if you duplicate the database from disk backups without using shared disk or NFS, then you must have at least 2TB of space available on the destination host. In some environments, manual transfer of backups is necessary because NFS performance is a bottleneck.

  • Are the source and destination hosts connected by a LAN or WAN?

    Performance of active database duplication is probably slower on a WAN than a LAN. If the performance degradation on a WAN is unacceptable, then backup-based duplication may be the only viable option.

  • When do you plan to duplicate the database?

    If you must duplicate the database during a period of high user activity, then the loss of network throughput caused by active duplication may be a problem, making backup-based duplication a better choice. Also, in active database duplication the RMAN channels required for copying files to the auxiliary host can have a performance impact.

Step 2: Choosing a Strategy for Naming Duplicate Files

When duplicating a database, RMAN generates names for the duplicate control files, datafiles, tempfiles, and online redo log files. Therefore, you must decide on a naming strategy for these files.

Oracle recommends the simplest duplication strategy, which is to configure the duplicate database to use the same names as the source database. Using the same names means that your environment meets the following requirements:

  • If the source database uses ASM disk groups, then the duplicate database must use ASM disk groups with the same names.

  • If the source database files are Oracle Managed Files, then the auxiliary instance must set DB_FILE_CREATE_DEST to the same directory location as the source database. Although the directories are the same on the source and destination hosts, Oracle Database chooses the relative names for the duplicate files.

  • If this is an Oracle RAC environment, then you must use the same ORACLE_SID for both the source and destination hosts.

  • If the names of the database files in the source database contain a path, then this path name must be the same in the duplicate database.

When you configure your environment as suggested, no additional configuration is required to name the duplicate files.

See Also:

"Specifying Alternative Names for Duplicate Database Files" explains the more complex strategy of using different names for the duplicate files

Step 3: Making Backups Accessible to the Duplicate Instance

Note:

If you are performing active database duplication, then skip this section and proceed to "Step 4: Preparing Remote Access to Databases".

When duplicating with a target and recovery catalog or just a target connection, RMAN uses metadata in the RMAN repository to locate backups and archived redo log files needed for duplication. If RMAN is connected to a recovery catalog, then RMAN obtains the backup metadata from the catalog. If RMAN is not connected to a catalog, as may be the case when performing backup-based duplication with a target connection, then RMAN obtains metadata from the control file.

Unless you are duplicating without a connection to the target and to the recovery catalog, the names of the backups must be available with the same names recorded in the RMAN repository. Ensure that auxiliary channels on the destination host can access all datafile backups and archived redo log files (required to restore and recover the duplicate database to the desired point in time). If not, duplication fails. The archived redo log files can be available either as image copies or backup sets.

Note:

The database backup need not have been generated with BACKUP DATABASE. You can mix full and incremental backups of individual datafiles, but a full backup of every datafile is required.

Making SBT Backups Accessible to the Auxiliary Instance

The steps in this task are specific to your media manager configuration.

To make SBT backups accessible to the auxiliary instance:

  1. If necessary, install media management software on the destination host.

  2. Make the tapes with the backups accessible to the destination host. Typically, you do one of the following:

    • Physically move the tapes to a drive attached to the remote host.

    • Use a network-accessible tape server.

  3. If necessary, inform the remote media management software about the existence of the tapes.

Making Disk Backups Accessible to the Auxiliary Instance

When making disk backups accessible to the auxiliary instance, your strategy depends on whether or not you duplicate while connected to the target or recovery catalog. If you do not connect to the target and recovery catalog, then you must designate a BACKUP LOCATION for the duplication.

When using a BACKUP LOCATION, the backups and copies can reside in a shared location or can be moved to the BACKUP LOCATION on the destination host. In the latter case, you do not need to preserve the name or the original path of the backup or copy. The location specified by the BACKUP LOCATION option must contain sufficient backup sets, image copies, and archived logs to restore all of the files being duplicated, and recover them to the desired point in time.

It is not required that all of the backups be from the same point in time, or that they all be backup sets, or all image copies. Datafile backups can be supplied as either image copies or backup sets. Archived logs can be supplied either in their normal format or as backup sets of archived logs.

When using backups from different points in time, the backup location must contain archived logs covering the time from the start of the oldest backup, until the desired recovery point.

If the backup location contains backup files from more than one database, then the DATABASE clause must specify the name of the database that is to be duplicated. If the backup location contains backup files from multiple databases having the same name, then the DATABASE clause must specify both the name and DBID of the database that is to be duplicated.

The source database's Fast Recovery Area is particularly well suited for use as a backup location because it almost always contains all of the files needed for the duplication. If you want to use a Fast Recovery Area as a backup location, you can either remotely access it from the destination system, or copy its contents to the destination system.

When not using a BACKUP LOCATION, your strategy depends on the following mutually exclusive scenarios:

  • Identical file systems for source and destination hosts

    This scenario is the simplest and Oracle recommends it. For example, assume that the backups of the source database are stored in /dsk1/bkp. In this case, you can make disk backups accessible to the destination host in either of these ways:

    • Manually transfer backups from the source host to an identical path in the destination host. For example, if the backups are in /dsk1/bkp on the source host, then FTP them to /dsk1/bkp on the destination host.

    • Use NFS or shared disks and make sure that the same path is accessible in the destination host. For example, assuming the source host can access /dsk1/bk, use NFS to mount /dsk1/bkp on the destination host and use /dsk1/bkp as the mount point name.

  • Different file systems for source and destination hosts

    In this case you cannot use the same directory name on the destination host as you use on the source host. You have the following options:

Assume that you have two hosts, srchost and dsthost, and access to NFS or shared disk. The database on srchost is called srcdb. The backups of srcdb reside in /dsk1/bkp on host srchost. The directory /dsk1/bkp is already in use on the destination host, but the directory /dsk2/dup is not in use in either host.

To transfer the backups from the source host to the destination host:

  1. Create a backup storage directory in either the source or destination host.

    For this example, create backup directory /dsk2/dup on the destination host.

  2. Mount the directory created in the previous step on the other host, making sure that the directory and the mount point names are the same.

    For example, if you created /dsk2/dup on the destination host, then use NFS to mount this directory as /dsk2/dup on the source host.

  3. Make the backups available in the new location on the destination host. You can use either of the following techniques:

    • Connect RMAN to the source database as TARGET and use the BACKUP command to back up the backups, as explained in "Backing Up RMAN Backups". For example, use the BACKUP COPY OF DATABASE command to copy the backups in /dsk1/bkp on the source host to /dsk2/dup on the source host. In this case, RMAN automatically catalogs the backups in the new location.

    • Use an operating system utility to transfer the backups to the new location. For example, FTP the backups from /dsk1/bkp on the source host to /dsk2/dup on the destination host, or use the cp command to copy the backups from /dsk1/bkp on the source host to /dsk2/dup on the source host. Afterward, connect RMAN to the source database as TARGET and use the CATALOG command to update the RMAN repository with the location of the manually transferred backups.

Step 4: Preparing Remote Access to Databases

When a database needs to be accessed from another host, you must set up a password file and Oracle Net Connectivity. Be aware of the potential security consequences of this type of set up.

Establishing Connectivity in Required Cases

To create a password file manually:

  • Follow the instructions in Oracle Database Administrator's Guide to create a password file.

    The types of file names allowed for password files and the location for the password file are platform and operating system-specific.

See Also:

To establish Oracle Net connectivity and set up a static listener:

Creating a Password File for the Auxiliary Instance

You have the following options for creating a password file for the auxiliary instance on the destination host:

  • Create the password file manually.

    There are additional requirements for the case of DUPLICATE ... FROM ACTIVE. You must use the SYS user ID and the password must match the password of the source database. You may want to create the password file with a single password so you can start the auxiliary instance and enable the source database to connect to it.

  • Specify the PASSWORD FILE option on the DUPLICATE... FROM ACTIVE command.

    In this case, RMAN copies the source database password file to the destination host and overwrites any existing password file for the auxiliary instance. This technique is useful if the source database password file has multiple passwords that you want to make available on the duplicate database.

See Also:

Oracle Database Administrator's Guide

Note:

If you create a standby database with the FROM ACTIVE DATABASE option, then RMAN always copies the password file to the standby host.

Step 5: Creating an Initialization Parameter File and Starting the Auxiliary Instance

The location and content of the initialization parameter file depend on your choice in "Step 2: Choosing a Strategy for Naming Duplicate Files". This chapter makes the following assumptions:

  • You choose the recommended technique of using the same naming strategy for the source and destination hosts. For Oracle RAC environments, this means that you use the same ORACLE_SID for source and destination hosts.

  • You create a text-based initialization parameter file for the auxiliary instance. See Table 25-5, "Auxiliary Instance Initialization Parameters".

  • The initialization parameter file is located in the operating system-specific default location of the host on which SQL*Plus runs.

    For example, on Linux and UNIX the default initialization parameter file name is ORACLE_HOME/dbs/initORACLE_SID.ora and on Windows the file name is ORACLE_HOME\database\initORACLE_SID.ora.

  • You plan to specify the SPFILE clause on the DUPLICATE command.

    The DUPLICATE ... SPFILE technique is easiest because during duplication RMAN automatically copies the server parameter file from the source database to the auxiliary instance or restores it from backup.

If you cannot meet the preceding requirements, then see "Duplicating a Database When No Server Parameter File Exists".

To create an initialization parameter file and start the auxiliary instance:

  1. Using a text editor, create an empty file for use as a text-based initialization parameter file.

  2. Copy the initialization parameter file to the operating system-specific default location on the host where SQL*Plus runs.

  3. In the parameter file, set DB_NAME to an arbitrary value.

    DB_NAME is the only required initialization parameter. The following example shows a sample DB_NAME setting:

    DB_NAME=somevalue
    
  4. If necessary, set other initialization parameters like those needed for Oracle RAC, and for connecting using a user ID that has SYSDBA privileges through Oracle Net.

  5. Start the auxiliary instance in NOMOUNT mode (no PFILE parameter on the STARTUP command is necessary if the file is in the default location):

    SQL> STARTUP NOMOUNT
    
  6. Start SQL*Plus and connect to the auxiliary instance with SYSDBA privileges.

    Start the auxiliary instance in NOMOUNT mode (no PFILE parameter on the STARTUP command is necessary if the file is in the default location):

    Note:

    Ensure that the auxiliary instance is started with a text-based initialization parameter file and not a server parameter file. Do not create a control file or try to mount or open the auxiliary instance.

Placing the Source Database in the Proper State

Note:

If you are performing backup-based duplication without a target connection, then skip to "Configuring RMAN Channels for Use in Duplication".

If RMAN is connected to the source database as TARGET, then the source database must be in the proper state for the duplication.

To ensure that the source database is in the proper state:

  1. If the source database instance is not mounted or open, then mount or open it.

  2. If you are performing active database duplication, then ensure that the following additional requirements are met:

    • If the source database is open, then archiving must be enabled.

    • If the source database is not open, then the database does not require instance recovery.

Starting RMAN and Connecting to Databases

In this task, you must start the RMAN client and connect to the database instances required by the duplication technique chosen in "Step 1: Choosing a Duplication Technique". The RMAN client can be located on any host so long as it can connect to the necessary databases over the network.

To start RMAN and connect to the target and auxiliary instances:

  1. Start the RMAN client on any host that can connect to the necessary database instances.

    For example, enter the following command at the operating system prompt on the destination host:

    % rman
    
  2. At the RMAN prompt, run CONNECT commands for the database instances required for your duplication technique:

    • For active database duplication, you must connect to the source database as TARGET and to the auxiliary instance as AUXILIARY. You must use the same SYSDBA password for both instances and must supply the net service name to connect to the AUXILIARY instance. A recovery catalog connection is optional.

    • For backup-based duplication without a target connection, you must connect to the auxiliary instance as AUXILIARY and the recovery catalog as CATALOG.

    • For backup-based duplication with a target connection, you must connect to the source database as TARGET and auxiliary instance as AUXILIARY. A recovery catalog is optional.

    • For backup-based duplication without target and recovery catalog connections, you must connect to the auxiliary instance as AUXILIARY.

    In the following example of active database duplication, a connection is established to three database instances, all through the use of net service names:

    RMAN> CONNECT TARGET SYS/sysdba@prod;    # source database
    connected to target database: PROD (DBID=39525561)
    
    RMAN> CONNECT AUXILIARY SYS/sysdba@dupdb; # duplicate database instance
    connected to auxiliary database: DUPDB (not mounted)
    
    RMAN> CONNECT CATALOG rman/rman@catdb;    # recovery catalog database
    connected to recovery catalog database
    

Configuring RMAN Channels for Use in Duplication

The channel on the auxiliary instance, not the source database instance, restores RMAN backups in backup-based duplication. The channel configuration depends on your duplication technique.

Configuring Channels for Active Database Duplication

In active database duplication, you do not have to change your source database channel configuration or configure AUXILIARY channels. However, you may want to increase the parallelism setting of your source database disk channels so that RMAN copies files over the network in parallel.

See Also:

Oracle Database Backup and Recovery Reference for information about the CONFIGURE command

Configuring Channels for Backup-Based Duplication

RMAN can use the same channel configurations on the source database for duplication on the destination host. RMAN can use these configurations even if the source database channels do not specify the AUXILIARY option.

Note the following additional considerations:

  • The channel type (DISK or sbt) of the auxiliary channel must match the backup media. In general, the more channels you allocate for disk backups, the faster the duplication. You cannot increase the speed of duplication once the disks reach their maximum read/write rate. For tape backups, limit the number of channels to the number of devices available.

  • If the auxiliary channels need special parameters (for example, to point to a different media manager), then you can configure an automatic channel with the AUXILIARY option of the CONFIGURE command.

  • When performing duplication without a target connection and without a recovery catalog, only disk channels can be used. If no user allocated channels are used, then only one channel initially restores the control file. After the control file is mounted, the number of allocated channels depends on the configuration in the restored controlfile.

Duplicating a Database

This section describes the most basic procedure to duplicate a database. This section makes the following assumptions:

To duplicate a database to a remote host with the same directory structure:

  1. Ensure that you have completed Steps 1 through 4 in "Basic Steps of Database Duplication".

  2. Run the DUPLICATE command.

    Example 24-1 illustrates how to perform active duplication when the SPFILE clause is specified. DUPLICATE requires the NOFILENAMECHECK option because the source database files have the same names as the duplicate database files.

    Example 24-1 Duplicating to a Host with the Same Directory Structure (Active)

    DUPLICATE TARGET DATABASE TO dupdb
      FROM ACTIVE DATABASE
      PASSWORD FILE
      SPFILE
      NOFILENAMECHECK;
    

    The PASSWORD FILE option specifies that RMAN should copy the password file to the destination host. RMAN automatically copies the server parameter file to the destination host, starts the auxiliary instance with the server parameter file, copies all necessary database files and archived redo logs over the network to the destination host, and recovers the database. Finally, RMAN opens the database with the RESETLOGS option to create the online redo log.

Backup-Based Duplication Without a Target Connection: Example

In this variation of Example 24-1, RMAN does not use a TARGET connection to the source database. Example 24-2 creates a duplicate of the source database prod as it appeared in 2007 in a previous database incarnation. RMAN is not connected to the source database but must be connected to a recovery catalog since no BACKUP LOCATION is provided.

Example 24-2 Duplicating a Database to a Past Point in Time (Backup-Based)

DUPLICATE DATABASE prod TO dupdb
  DBID 8675309 # DBID of source database
  UNTIL TIME "TO_DATE('11/01/2007', 'MM/DD/YYYY')"
  SPFILE
  NOFILENAMECHECK;

Note the following characteristics of Example 24-2:

  • The FROM ACTIVE DATABASE clause is not specified. By not specifying this clause, you instruct RMAN to perform backup-based duplication.

  • The DBID is specified since the source database name prod is not unique in the recovery catalog.

  • NOFILENAMECHECK check is specified because it is necessary when the duplicate database files use the same names as the source database files.

Assume a variation in which you want to restore an archival backup, which is all-inclusive in the sense that every file needed to restore and recover the database is included. The recommended technique for restoring an archival backup for testing is to create a temporary instance and use the DUPLICATE command. In this way, you avoid interfering with the source database.

In the DUPLICATE command you must specify the restore point that was created with the archival backup. You can only specify TO RESTORE POINT if RMAN is connected to a catalog, or to the source database when the restore point exists in the control file. Example 24-3 specifies restore point TESTDB103107.

Example 24-3 Using an Archival Backup for Backup-Based Duplication

DUPLICATE DATABASE prod TO dupdb
  TO RESTORE POINT TESTDB103107
  DBID 8675309 # DBID of source database
  SPFILE
  NOFILENAMECHECK;

Backup-Based Duplication with a Target Connection: Example

Assume a backup-based variation of Example 24-1 in which RMAN is connected as TARGET to the source database. Example 24-4 recovers the duplicate database to one week ago in order to view the data in the source database as it appeared a week ago.

Example 24-4 Duplicating a Database to a Past Point in Time (Backup-Based)

DUPLICATE TARGET DATABASE TO dupdb
  SPFILE
  NOFILENAMECHECK
  UNTIL TIME 'SYSDATE-7';

Note the following characteristics of Example 24-4:

  • The FROM ACTIVE DATABASE clause is not specified. By not specifying this clause, you instruct RMAN to perform backup-based duplication.

  • NOFILENAMECHECK is specified because it is necessary when the duplicate database files use the same names as the source database files.

Backup-Based Duplication Without a Target and a Recovery Catalog Connection: Example

In this variation of Example 24-1, RMAN does not use a TARGET connection to the source database or a CATALOG connection to a recovery catalog. All backup and copies necessary for duplication until November 11 of 2007 at 2:00 pm, including a control file backup or copy have been placed under /prod_backups.

Example 24-5 Duplicating a Database Without a Target and Recovery Catalog Connection - Backup-Based

DUPLICATE DATABASE TO dupdb
  UNTIL TIME "TO_DATE('11/01/2007 14:00:00', 'MM/DD/YYYY HH24:MI:SS')"
  SPFILE
  BACKUP LOCATION '/prod_backups'
  NOFILENAMECHECK;

Note the following characteristics of Example 24-5:

  • The database name is not specified. By not specifying a database name with the DATABASE keyword, DUPLICATE obtains the database name and DBID from the backups. An error is displayed if backups for more than one database were found in the BACKUP LOCATION.

  • Use of the BACKUP LOCATION clause identifies the type of duplication as having no target connection, no recovery catalog and being backup-based.

  • UNTIL TIME option is specified and is the only UNTIL subclause permitted with BACKUP LOCATION.

  • NOFILENAMECHECK check is specified because it is necessary when the duplicate database files use the same names as the source database files.

Example 24-6 Duplicating a Database to a Past Point in Time - Backup-Based

DUPLICATE TARGET DATABASE TO dupdb
  SPFILE
  NOFILENAMECHECK
  UNTIL TIME 'SYSDATE-7';

Note the following characteristics of Example 24-6:

  • The FROM ACTIVE DATABASE clause is not specified. Omitting this clause instructs RMAN to perform backup-based duplication.

  • NOFILENAMECHECK check is specified because it is necessary when the duplicate database files use the same names as the source database files.

Restarting DUPLICATE After a Failure

RMAN automatically optimizes a DUPLICATE command that is a repeat of a previously failed DUPLICATE command. The repeat DUPLICATE command notices which datafiles were successfully copied earlier and does not copy them again. This applies to all forms of duplication, whether they are backup-based (with and without a target connection) or active database duplication. The automatic optimization of the DUPLICATE command can be especially useful when a failure occurs during the duplication of very large databases.

If a DUPLICATE operation fails, you need only run the DUPLICATE again, using the same parameters contained in the original DUPLICATE command. The second DUPLICATE:

Before attempting to resume a failed duplicate, the auxiliary instance must be reset to NOMOUNT mode. One way to do this is to exit RMAN, use SQL*Plus to reset the auxiliary instance to NOMOUNT mode, start RMAN and then repeat the DUPLICATE statement. If you do not want RMAN to automatically recover from a failed duplication operation, specify the keyword NORESUME to disable the functionality. Using the keyword NORESUME in the first invocation of DUPLICATE prevents a subsequent DUPLICATE command for the new database from using this automatic optimization.