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Oracle® Automatic Storage Management Administrator's Guide
11g Release 2 (11.2)

Part Number E16102-05
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Oracle ACFS Command-line Tools for the Solaris Environment

Table 13-6 contains a summary of the Oracle ACFS commands for Solaris.

Table 13-6 Summary of Oracle ACFS commands for Solaris

Command Description

fsck

Checks and repairs an Oracle ACFS file system on Solaris.

mkfs

Creates an Oracle ACFS file system on Solaris.

mount

Mounts an Oracle ACFS file system on Solaris.

umount/umountall

Dismounts an Oracle ACFS file system on Solaris.


The commands in Table 13-6 have been extended with additional options to support Oracle ACFS on Solaris.

fsck

Purpose

Checks and repairs an Oracle ACFS file system on the Solaris operating system.

Syntax and Description


fsck -F acfs -o h /dev/null
fsck -F acfs [{-n|N}|{-y|Y}] [-o options] volume_device

fsck -F acfs -o h /dev/null displays usage text and exits.

Table 13-7 contains the options available with the fsck command.

Table 13-7 Options for the Solaris fsck command

Option Description

-F acfs

Specifies the type of file system on Solaris. acfs designates the Oracle ACFS type.

-n |N

Answers no to any prompts.

-y|Y

Answers yes to any prompts.

-o

Specifies that options follow (a, f, h, v). Options are preceded with the -o flag and entered as a comma-delimited string. For example: -o a,v

  • a

    Specifies to automatically fix the file system.

  • f

    Forces the file system into mountable state without completing a file system check or fix.

  • h

    Displays the usage text and exits.

  • v

    Specifies verbose mode. The progress is displayed as the operation occurs.

volume_device

Specifies an Oracle ADVM device file.


fsck checks and repairs an existing Oracle ACFS file system. This command can only be run on a dismounted file system. root privileges are required to run fsck. The Oracle ACFS driver must be loaded for fsck to work.

By default, fsck only checks for and reports any errors. The -o a option must be specified to instruct fsck to fix errors in the file system.

In a few cases, fsck prompts for questions before proceeding to check a file system. These cases include:

  • If fsck detects that another fsck is in progress on the file system

  • If fsck detects that the Oracle ACFS driver is not loaded

  • If the file system does not appear to be Oracle ACFS

In checking mode, fsck also prompts if there are transaction logs that have not been processed completely due to an incomplete shutdown. To run in a non-interactive mode, include either the -y or -n options to answer yes or no to any questions.

fsck creates working files before it checks a file system. These working files are created in /usr/tmp if space is available. /tmp is used if /usr/tmp does not exist. If insufficient space is available in the tmp directory, fsck attempts to write to the current working directory. The files that fsck creates are roughly the size of the file system being checked divided by 32K. At most two such files are allocated. For example, a 2 GB file system being checked causes fsck to generate one or two 64K working files in the /usr/tmp directory. These files are deleted after fsck has finished.

In the event that fsck finds a file or directory in the file system for which it cannot determine its name or intended location (possibly due to a corruption in its parent directory), it places this object in the /lost+found directory when fsck is run in fix mode. For security reasons only the root user on Linux can read files in /lost+found. If the administrator can later determine the original name and location of the file based on its contents, the file can be moved or copied into its intended location.

The file names in the /lost+found directory are in the following formats:

parent.id.file.id.time-in-sec-since-1970
parent.id.dir.id.time-in-sec-since-1970

The id fields are the internal Oracle ACFS numeric identifiers for each file and directory in the file system.

You can use acfsutil info id id mount_point to attempt to determine the directory associated with parent.id. This directory is assumed to be where the deleted object originated. For information about acfsutil info, see "acfsutil info file".

If the parent directory is not known, the parent id field is set to UNKNOWN.

Note:

It is not possible to see the contents of the /lost+found directory from a snapshot.

Examples

The following example shows how to check and repair an Oracle ACFS file system.

Example 13-5 Using the fsck command

# /usr/sbin/fsck -F acfs -y -o a,v /dev/asm/volume1-123

mkfs

Purpose

Creates an Oracle ACFS file system on the Solaris operating system.

Syntax and Description


mkfs -F acfs -o h /dev/null
mkfs -F acfs [-o options] volume_device size

mkfs -F acfs -o h /dev/null displays usage text and exits.

Table 13-8 contains the options available with the mkfs command.

Table 13-8 Options for the Solaris mkfs command

Option Description

-F acfs

Specifies the type of file system on Solaris. acfs designates the Oracle ACFS type.

-o options

Specifies that options follow (b, f, h, n, v). Options are preceded with the -o flag and entered as a comma-delimited string. For example: -o f,v

  • b=blocksize

    Specifies the block size of the new file system. The default block size is 4K and this is the only size supported.

  • h

    Displays the usage text and exits.

  • f

    Specifies the force option. This action creates the file system even if there is an existing Oracle ACFS on the volume device, although only if the file system is dismounted. This option overwrites structures on the original file system. Use this option with caution.

  • n=name

    Specifies the name for the file system. A name can be a maximum of 64 characters. acfsutil info fs returns the name if one was specified.

  • v

    Specifies verbose mode. The progress is displayed as the operation occurs.

volume_device

Specifies an Oracle ADVM device file.

size

Specifies the size of the file system in 512-byte units or in units of K|M|G|T|P. Units specified are in K (kilobytes), M (megabytes), G (gigabytes), T (terabytes), or P (petabytes).


mkfs is used to create the on disk structure needed for Oracle ACFS file system to be mounted. The mkfs command is the traditional UNIX command used to build a file system. After mkfs runs successfully, the USAGE column in the V$ASM_VOLUME view displays ACFS. root privilege is not required. The ownership of the volume device file dictates who can run this command. The minimum file system size is 200 MB. The Oracle ACFS driver must be loaded for mkfs to work.

Examples

Before creating an Oracle ACFS file system, first determine which Oracle ADVM volume devices are available. You can use the ASMCMD volinfo command to display information about the volumes and volume devices.

ASMCMD [+] > volinfo -a
...
         Volume Name: VOLUME1
         Volume Device: /dev/asm/volume1-123
         State: ENABLED
... 

See "volinfo".

Next create an Oracle ACFS file system on the volume device file.

Example 13-6 Using the mkfs command

$ /usr/sbin/mkfs -F acfs /dev/asm/volume1-123

mount

Purpose

Mounts an Oracle ACFS file system on the Solaris operating system.

Syntax and Description


mount -F acfs -o h /tmp /dev/null
mount -F acfs [-r] [-o options] volume_device mount_point

mount -F acfs -o h /tmp /dev/null displays usage text and exits.

Table 13-9 contains the options available with the mount command.

Table 13-9 Options for the Solaris mount command

Option Description

-F acfs

Specifies the type of file system on Solaris. acfs designates the Oracle ACFS type.

-r

Mounts in read-only mode.

-o

Specifies that options follow. Options are preceded with the -o flag followed by a comma-delimited string of options. For example: -o all,v

The following options are available:

  • all

    Reads the Oracle ACFS mount registry created with the acfsutil registry command and mounts all the file systems in it. A mount -o all command is automatically run at Oracle ACFS startup.

    The -o all option requires two placeholders to satisfy the command arguments: a dummy argument for the volume device and any valid directory.

    When the -o all option is specified, other -o options are ignored. To specify mount options for a registry entry, include those options with the acfsutil registry command when you add the entry to the registry.

  • devices/nodevices

    Allows or disallows the opening of any character or block special devices from this mount.

  • exec/noexec

    Allows or disallows the execution of programs in this file system.

  • h

    Displays the usage help text and exits.

  • rootsuid/norootsuid

    Allows or disallows the execution of setuid to root executables (binaries by non-root users whose permissions allow set user Id execution, and are owned by root). rootsuid is the default action. If norootsuid is specified, an attempt to run these executables as a non-root user fails with a permission denied error.

  • ro

    Mounts the file system in read-only mode.

  • rw

    Mounts the file system in read-write mode.

  • setuid/nosetuid

    Allows or disallows the execution of setuid and setgid programs.

  • suid/nosuid

    Allows or disallows the execution of setuid and setgid programs and the opening of any character or block special devices from this mount.

  • v

    Specifies verbose mode. The progress is displayed as the operation occurs.

volume_device

Specifies an Oracle ADVM volume device file that has been formatted by mkfs. device is required but can be a dummy value.

mount_point

Specifies the directory where the file system is mounted. This directory must exist before you run the mount command.


mount attaches a file system to the Oracle ACFS hierarchy at the mount point that is the name of a directory. The mount occurs on the node where the mount command was issued. The mount command returns an error if the file system is not in a dismounted state on this node.

It is not always possible to return the cause of a mount failure to the mount command. When this happens Oracle ACFS writes the cause of the failure to the system console and associated system log file.

After mount runs successfully, the MOUNTPATH field in the V$ASM_VOLUME view displays the directory name on which the file system is now mounted.

An Oracle ACFS file system should only be mounted on one mount point. The same mount point name should be used on all cluster members.

root privilege is required to run mount.

Examples

The first example shows how to mount volume1-123 on the mount point /u01/app/acfsmounts/myacfs. The second example shows how to mount all the registered Oracle ACFS file systems. Placeholder arguments must be provided for the volume device name and mount point when specifying the -o all option. The volume device can be a dummy value, such as none. Any valid directory can be specified for the mount point, such as /tmp.

Example 13-7 Using the mount command

# /sbin/mount -F acfs /dev/asm/volume1-123 /u01/app/acfsmounts/myacfs

# /sbin/mount -F acfs -o all none /tmp

umount/umountall

Purpose

Dismounts an Oracle ACFS file system on the Solaris operating system.

Syntax and Description


umount -V [mount_point | volume_device]
umountall -F acfs

unmountall -F acfs dismounts all Oracle ACFS file systems.

Table 13-10 contains the options available with the umount command.

Table 13-10 Options for the Solaris umount command

Option Description

-V

Echoes the complete command line, but does not run the command. Use this option is used to verify and validate the command line before execution. Valid only with umount.

mount_point

Specifies the directory where the file system is mounted. Valid only with umount.

volume_device

Specifies the Oracle ADVM volume device name associated with the file system. Valid only with umount.

-F acfs

Specifies the type of file system on Solaris. acfs designates the Oracle ACFS type. Valid only with umountall.


umount and umountall detach an Oracle ACFS from the file system hierarchy on the current node. If a file system is busy, umount and umountall fail.

root privileges are required to run the umount and umountall commands.

Examples

The following examples show how to dismount an Oracle ACFS file system. The first example specifies the mount point of the file system that you want to dismount. The second example specifies the volume device associated with the file system that you want to dismount. The third example dismounts all Oracle ACFS file systems.

Example 13-8 Using the umount command

# /sbin/umount /dev/asm/volume1-123

# /sbin/umount /u01/app/acfsmounts/myacfs

# /sbin/umountall -F acfs