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Oracle® Database Administrator's Guide
11g Release 2 (11.2)

Part Number E17120-05
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Altering and Maintaining Tablespaces

This section covers various subjects that relate to altering and maintaining tablespaces.

This section covers the following topics:

Increasing the Size of a Tablespace

You can increase the size of a tablespace by either increasing the size of a datafile in the tablespace or adding one. See "Creating Datafiles and Adding Datafiles to a Tablespace" for more information.

Additionally, you can enable automatic file extension (AUTOEXTEND) to datafiles and bigfile tablespaces. See "Enabling and Disabling Automatic Extension for a Datafile".

Altering a Locally Managed Tablespace

You cannot alter a locally managed tablespace to a locally managed temporary tablespace, nor can you change its method of segment space management. Coalescing free extents is unnecessary for locally managed tablespaces. However, you can use the ALTER TABLESPACE statement on locally managed tablespaces for some operations, including the following:

Altering a Bigfile Tablespace

Two clauses of the ALTER TABLESPACE statement support datafile transparency when you are using bigfile tablespaces:

  • RESIZE: The RESIZE clause lets you resize the single datafile in a bigfile tablespace to an absolute size, without referring to the datafile. For example:

    ALTER TABLESPACE bigtbs RESIZE 80G;
    
  • AUTOEXTEND (used outside of the ADD DATAFILE clause):

    With a bigfile tablespace, you can use the AUTOEXTEND clause outside of the ADD DATAFILE clause. For example:

    ALTER TABLESPACE bigtbs AUTOEXTEND ON NEXT 20G;
    

An error is raised if you specify an ADD DATAFILE clause for a bigfile tablespace.

Altering a Locally Managed Temporary Tablespace

Note:

You cannot use the ALTER TABLESPACE statement, with the TEMPORARY keyword, to change a locally managed permanent tablespace into a locally managed temporary tablespace. You must use the CREATE TEMPORARY TABLESPACE statement to create a locally managed temporary tablespace.

You can use ALTER TABLESPACE to add a tempfile, take a tempfile offline, or bring a tempfile online, as illustrated in the following examples:

ALTER TABLESPACE lmtemp
   ADD TEMPFILE '/u02/oracle/data/lmtemp02.dbf' SIZE 18M REUSE;

ALTER TABLESPACE lmtemp TEMPFILE OFFLINE;
ALTER TABLESPACE lmtemp TEMPFILE ONLINE;

Note:

You cannot take a temporary tablespace offline. Instead, you take its tempfile offline. The view V$TEMPFILE displays online status for a tempfile.

The ALTER DATABASE statement can be used to alter tempfiles.

The following statements take offline and bring online tempfiles. They behave identically to the last two ALTER TABLESPACE statements in the previous example.

ALTER DATABASE TEMPFILE '/u02/oracle/data/lmtemp02.dbf' OFFLINE;
ALTER DATABASE TEMPFILE '/u02/oracle/data/lmtemp02.dbf' ONLINE;

The following statement resizes a tempfile:

ALTER DATABASE TEMPFILE '/u02/oracle/data/lmtemp02.dbf' RESIZE 18M;

The following statement drops a tempfile and deletes its operating system file:

ALTER DATABASE TEMPFILE '/u02/oracle/data/lmtemp02.dbf' DROP
    INCLUDING DATAFILES;

The tablespace to which this tempfile belonged remains. A message is written to the alert log for the tempfile that was deleted. If an operating system error prevents the deletion of the file, the statement still succeeds, but a message describing the error is written to the alert log.

It is also possible to use the ALTER DATABASE statement to enable or disable the automatic extension of an existing tempfile, and to rename a tempfile. See Oracle Database SQL Language Reference for the required syntax.

Note:

To rename a tempfile, you take the tempfile offline, use operating system commands to rename or relocate the tempfile, and then use the ALTER DATABASE RENAME FILE command to update the database controlfiles.

Shrinking a Locally Managed Temporary Tablespace

Large sort operations performed by the database may result in a temporary tablespace growing and occupying a considerable amount of disk space. After the sort operation completes, the extra space is not released; it is just marked as free and available for reuse. Therefore, a single large sort operation might result in a large amount of allocated temporary space that remains unused after the sort operation is complete. For this reason, the database enables you to shrink locally managed temporary tablespaces and release unused space.

You use the SHRINK SPACE clause of the ALTER TABLESPACE statement to shrink a temporary tablespace, or the SHRINK TEMPFILE clause of the ALTER TABLESPACE statement to shrink a specific tempfile of a temporary tablespace. Shrinking frees as much space as possible while maintaining the other attributes of the tablespace or tempfile. The optional KEEP clause defines a minimum size for the tablespace or tempfile.

Shrinking is an online operation, which means that user sessions can continue to allocate sort extents if needed, and already-running queries are not affected.

The following example shrinks the locally managed temporary tablespace lmtmp1 to a size of 20M.

ALTER TABLESPACE lmtemp1 SHRINK SPACE KEEP 20M;

The following example shrinks the tempfile lmtemp02.dbf of the locally managed temporary tablespace lmtmp2. Because the KEEP clause is omitted, the database attempts to shrink the tempfile to the minimum possible size.

ALTER TABLESPACE lmtemp2 SHRINK TEMPFILE '/u02/oracle/data/lmtemp02.dbf';