Skip Headers
Oracle® Text Reference
11g Release 2 (11.2)

Part Number E16593-02
Go to Documentation Home
Home
Go to Book List
Book List
Go to Table of Contents
Contents
Go to Index
Index
Go to Master Index
Master Index
Go to Feedback page
Contact Us

Go to previous page
Previous
Go to next page
Next
View PDF

7 CTX_DDL Package

This chapter provides reference information for using the CTX_DDL PL/SQL package to create and manage the preferences, section groups, and stoplists required for Text indexes.

CTX_DDL contains the following stored procedures and functions:

Name Description
ADD_ATTR_SECTION Adds an attribute section to an XML section group.
ADD_FIELD_SECTION Creates a field section and assigns it to the specified section group.
ADD_INDEX Adds an index to a catalog index preference.
ADD_MDATA Changes the MDATA value of a document.
ADD_MDATA_COLUMN Maps a FILTER BY column to the specified MDATA section.
ADD_MDATA_SECTION Adds an MDATA metadata section to a document.
ADD_NDATA_SECTION Adds an NDATA section to a document.
ADD_SDATA_COLUMN Maps a FILTER BY column to the specified SDATA section.
ADD_SDATA_SECTION Adds an SDATA structured data section to a document.
ADD_SPECIAL_SECTION Adds a special section to a section group.
ADD_STOPCLASS Adds a stopclass to a stoplist.
ADD_STOP_SECTION Adds a stop section to an automatic section group.
ADD_STOPTHEME Adds a stoptheme to a stoplist.
ADD_STOPWORD Adds a stopword to a stoplist.
ADD_SUB_LEXER Adds a sub-lexer to a multi-lexer preference.
ADD_ZONE_SECTION Creates a zone section and adds it to the specified section group.
COPY_POLICY Creates a copy of a policy.
CREATE_INDEX_SET Creates an index set for CTXCAT index types.
CREATE_POLICY Creates a policy to use with ORA:CONTAINS().
CREATE_PREFERENCE Creates a preference in the Text data dictionary.
CREATE_SECTION_GROUP Creates a section group in the Text data dictionary.
CREATE_SHADOW_INDEX Creates a policy for the passed-in index. For non-partitioned index, also creates an index table.
CREATE_STOPLIST Creates a stoplist.
DROP_INDEX_SET Drops an index set.
DROP_POLICY Drops a policy.
DROP_PREFERENCE Deletes a preference from the Text data dictionary.
DROP_SECTION_GROUP Deletes a section group from the Text data dictionary.
DROP_SHADOW_INDEX Drops a shadow index.
DROP_STOPLIST Drops a stoplist.
EXCHANGE_SHADOW_INDEX Swaps the shadow index metadata and data.
OPTIMIZE_INDEX Optimizes the index.
POPULATE_PENDING Populates the pending queue with every rowid in the base table or table partition.
RECREATE_INDEX_ONLINE Recreates the passed-in index.
REMOVE_INDEX Removes an index from a CTXCAT index preference.
REMOVE_MDATA Removes MDATA values from a document.
REMOVE_SECTION Deletes a section from a section group.
REMOVE_STOPCLASS Deletes a stopclass from a stoplist.
REMOVE_STOPTHEME Deletes a stoptheme from a stoplist.
REMOVE_STOPWORD Deletes a stopword from a stoplist.
REMOVE_SUB_LEXER Deletes a sub-lexer from a multi-lexer preference.
REPLACE_INDEX_METADATA Replaces metadata for local domain indexes.
SET_ATTRIBUTE Sets a preference attribute.
SYNC_INDEX Synchronizes the index.
UNSET_ATTRIBUTE Removes a set attribute from a preference.
UPDATE_POLICY Updates a policy.


ADD_ATTR_SECTION

Adds an attribute section to an XML section group. This procedure is useful for defining attributes in XML documents as sections. This enables you to search XML attribute text with the WITHIN operator.

Note:

When you use AUTO_SECTION_GROUP, attribute sections are created automatically. Attribute sections created automatically are named in the form tag@attribute.

Syntax

CTX_DDL.ADD_ATTR_SECTION(
  group_name     in    varchar2,
  section_name   in    varchar2,
  tag            in    varchar2);
group_name

Specify the name of the XML section group. You can add attribute sections only to XML section groups.

section_name

Specify the name of the attribute section. This is the name used for WITHIN queries on the attribute text.

The section name you specify cannot contain the colon (:), comma (,), or dot (.) characters. The section name must also be unique within group_name. Section names are case-insensitive.

Attribute section names can be no more than 64 bytes long.

tag

Specify the name of the attribute in tag@attr form. This parameter is case-sensitive.

Examples

Consider an XML file that defines the BOOK tag with a TITLE attribute as follows:

<BOOK TITLE="Tale of Two Cities"> 
  It was the best of times. 
</BOOK> 

To define the title attribute as an attribute section, create an XML_SECTION_GROUP and define the attribute section as follows:

begin
ctx_ddl.create_section_group('myxmlgroup', 'XML_SECTION_GROUP');
ctx_ddl.add_attr_section('myxmlgroup', 'booktitle', 'BOOK@TITLE');
end;

When you define the TITLE attribute section as such and index the document set, you can query the XML attribute text as follows:

'Cities within booktitle'

ADD_FIELD_SECTION

Creates a field section and adds the section to an existing section group. This enables field section searching with the WITHIN operator.

Field sections are delimited by start and end tags. By default, the text within field sections are indexed as a sub-document separate from the rest of the document.

Unlike zone sections, field sections cannot nest or overlap. As such, field sections are best suited for non-repeating, non-overlapping sections such as TITLE and AUTHOR markup in e-mail- or news-type documents.

Because of how field sections are indexed, WITHIN queries on field sections are usually faster than WITHIN queries on zone sections.

Syntax

CTX_DDL.ADD_FIELD_SECTION(
  group_name     in    varchar2,
  section_name   in    varchar2,
  tag            in    varchar2,
  visible        in    boolean default FALSE
);
group_name

Specify the name of the section group to which section_name is added. You can add up to 64 field sections to a single section group. Within the same group, section zone names and section field names cannot be the same.

section_name

Specify the name of the section to add to the group_name. Use this name to identify the section in queries. Avoid using names that contain non-alphanumeric characters such as _, because these characters must be escaped in queries. Section names are case-insensitive.

Within the same group, zone section names and field section names cannot be the same. The terms Paragraph and Sentence are reserved for special sections.

Section names need not be unique across tags. You can assign the same section name to more than one tag, which makes details transparent to searches.

tag

Specify the tag that marks the start of a section. For example, if the tag is <H1>, then specify H1. The start tag you specify must be unique within a section group.

If group_name is an HTML_SECTION_GROUP, then you can create field sections for the META tag's NAME/CONTENT attribute pairs. To do so, specify tag as meta@namevalue where namevalue is the value of the NAME attribute whose CONTENT attribute is to be indexed as a section. Refer to the example "Creating Sections for <META> Tags".

Oracle Text knows what the end tags look like from the group_type parameter you specify when you create the section group.

visible

Specify TRUE to make the text visible within the rest of the document.

By default the visible flag is FALSE. This means that Oracle Text indexes the text within field sections as a sub-document separate from the rest of the document. However, you can set the visible flag to TRUE if you want text within the field section to be indexed as part of the enclosing document.

Examples

Visible and Invisible Field Sections

The following example defines a section group basicgroup of the BASIC_SECTION_GROUP type. It then creates a field section in basicgroup called Author for the <A> tag. It also sets the visible flag to FALSE:

begin
ctx_ddl.create_section_group('basicgroup', 'BASIC_SECTION_GROUP');
ctx_ddl.add_field_section('basicgroup', 'Author', 'A', FALSE);
end;

Because the Author field section is not visible, to find text within the Author section, you must use the WITHIN operator as follows:

'(Martin Luther King) WITHIN Author'

A query of Martin Luther King without the WITHIN operator does not return instances of this term in field sections. To query text within field sections without specifying WITHIN, you must set the visible flag to TRUE when you create the section as follows:

begin
ctx_ddl.add_field_section('basicgroup', 'Author', 'A', TRUE);
end;

Creating Sections for <META> Tags

When you use the HTML_SECTION_GROUP, you can create sections for META tags.

Consider an HTML document that has a META tag as follows:

<META NAME="author" CONTENT="ken">

To create a field section that indexes the CONTENT attribute for the <META NAME="author"> tag:

begin
ctx_ddl.create_section_group('myhtmlgroup', 'HTML_SECTION_GROUP');
ctx_ddl.add_field_section('myhtmlgroup', 'author', 'META@AUTHOR');
end

After indexing with section group mygroup, query the document as follows:

'ken WITHIN author'

Limitations

Nested Sections

Field sections cannot be nested. For example, if you define a field section to start with <TITLE> and define another field section to start with <FOO>, the two sections cannot be nested as follows:

<TITLE> dog <FOO> cat </FOO> </TITLE>

To work with nested section define them as zone sections.

Repeated Sections

Repeated field sections are allowed, but WITHIN queries treat them as a single section. The following is an example of repeated field section in a document:

<TITLE> cat </TITLE>
<TITLE> dog </TITLE>

The query (dog and cat) within title returns the document, even though these words occur in different sections.

To have WITHIN queries distinguish repeated sections, define them as zone sections.

Related Topics

WITHIN operator in Chapter 3, "Oracle Text CONTAINS Query Operators".

Section Group Types in Chapter 2, "Oracle Text Indexing Elements".

CREATE_SECTION_GROUP

ADD_ZONE_SECTION

ADD_SPECIAL_SECTION

REMOVE_SECTION

DROP_SECTION_GROUP


ADD_INDEX

Use this procedure to add a sub-index to a catalog index preference. Create this preference by naming one or more columns in the base table.

Because you create sub-indexes to improve the response time of structured queries, the column you add should be used in the structured_query clause of the CATSEARCH operator at query time.

Syntax

CTX_DDL.ADD_INDEX(set_name in varchar2,
column_list varchar2,
storage_clause varchar2);
set_name

Specify the name of the index set.

column_list

Specify a comma separated list of columns to index. At index time, any column listed here cannot have a NULL value in any row in the base table. If any row is NULL during indexing, then an error is raised.

Always ensure that your columns have non-NULL values before and after indexing.

storage_clause

Specify a storage clause.

Example

Consider a table called AUCTION with the following schema:

create table auction(
item_id number,
title varchar2(100),
category_id number,
price number,
bid_close date);

Assume that queries on the table involve a mandatory text query clause and optional structured conditions on category_id. Results must be sorted based on bid_close.

You can create a catalog index to support the different types of structured queries a user might enter.

To create the indexes, first create the index set preference then add the required indexes to it:

begin
  ctx_ddl.create_index_set('auction_iset');
  ctx_ddl.add_index('auction_iset','bid_close');
  ctx_ddl.add_index('auction_iset','category_id, bid_close');
end;

Create the combined catalog index with CREATE INDEX as follows:

create index auction_titlex on AUCTION(title) indextype is CTXCAT parameters
('index set auction_iset');

Querying

To query the title column for the word pokemon, enter regular and mixed queries as follows:

select * from AUCTION where CATSEARCH(title, 'pokemon',NULL)> 0;
select * from AUCTION where CATSEARCH(title, 'pokemon', 'category_id=99 order by
bid_close desc')> 0;

Notes

VARCHAR2 columns in the column list of a CTXCAT index of an index set cannot exceed 30 bytes.

Related Topic

"REMOVE_INDEX".


ADD_MDATA

Use this procedure to change the metadata of a document that has been specified as an MDATA section. After this call, MDATA queries involving the named MDATA value will find documents with the given MDATA value.

There are two versions of CTX_DDL.ADD_MDATA: one for adding a single metadata value to a single rowid, and one for handing multiple values, multiple rowids, or both.

CTX_DDL.ADD_MDATA is transactional; it takes effect immediately in the calling session, can be seen only in the calling session, can be reversed with a ROLLBACK command, and must be committed to take permanent effect.

Use CTX_DDL.REMOVE_MDATA to remove metadata values from already-indexed documents. Only the owner of the index is allowed to call ADD_MDATA and REMOVE_MDATA.

Syntax

This is the syntax for adding a single value to a single rowid:

CTX_DDL.ADD_MDATA(
     idx_name           IN VARCHAR2, 
     section_name       IN VARCHAR2, 
     mdata_value        IN VARCHAR2,
     mdata_rowid        IN VARCHAR2,
     [part_name]        IN VARCHAR2]
);
idx_name

Name of the text index that contains the named rowid.

section_name

Name of the MDATA section.

mdata_value

The metadata value to add to the document.

mdata_rowid

The rowid to which to add the metadata value.

[part_name]

Name of the index partition, if any. Must be provided for local partitioned indexes and must be NULL for global, non-partitioned indexes.

This is the syntax for handling multiple values, multiple rowids, or both. This version is more efficient for large numbers of new values or rowids.

CTX_DDL.ADD_MDATA(
     idx_name           IN VARCHAR2, 
     section_name       IN VARCHAR2, 
     mdata_values       SYS.ODCIVARCHAR2LIST,
     mdata_rowids       SYS.ODCIRIDLIST,
     [part_name]        IN VARCHAR2]
);
idx_name

Name of the text index that contains the named rowids.

section_name

Name of the MDATA section.

mdata_values

List of metadata values. If a metadata value contains a comma, the comma must be escaped with a backslash.

mdata_rowids

The rowids to which to add the metadata values.

[part_name]

Name of the index partition, if any. Must be provided for local partitioned indexes and must be NULL for global, non-partitioned indexes.

Example

This example updates a single value:

select rowid from mytab where contains(text, 'MDATA(sec, value')>0;
No rows returned
exec ctx_ddl.add_mdata('my_index', 'sec', 'value', 'ABC');
select rowid from mytab where contains(text, 'MDATA(sec, value')>0;
ROWID
-----
ABC

This example updates multiple values:

begin
ctx_ddl.add_mdata('my_index', 'sec',
     sys.odcivarchar2list('value1','value2','value3'),
     sys.odciridlist('ABC','DEF'));
end;

This is equivalent to:

begin
ctx_ddl.add_mdata('my_index', 'sec', 'value1', 'ABC');
ctx_ddl.add_mdata('my_index', 'sec', 'value1', 'DEF');
ctx_ddl.add_mdata('my_index', 'sec', 'value2', 'ABC');
ctx_ddl.add_mdata('my_index', 'sec', 'value2', 'DEF');
ctx_ddl.add_mdata('my_index', 'sec', 'value3', 'ABC');
ctx_ddl.add_mdata('my_index', 'sec', 'value3', 'DEF');
end;

Notes

If a rowid is not yet indexed, CTX_DDL.ADD.MDATA completes without error, but an error is logged in CTX_USER_INDEX_ERRORS.

These updates are updates directly on the index itself, not on the actual contents stored in the base table. Therefore, they will not survive when the Text index is rebuilt.

Related Topics

See also "ADD_MDATA_SECTION"; "REMOVE_MDATA"; "MDATA"; as well as the Section Searching chapter of the Oracle Text Application Developer's Guide.


ADD_MDATA_COLUMN

Use this procedure to map the FILTER BY column named in column_name to the MDATA section named in section_name.

Syntax

The syntax is as follows:

CTX_DDL.ADD_MDATA_COLUMN(
     group_name         IN VARCHAR2,
     section_name       IN VARCHAR2,
     column_name        IN VARCHAR2,
);
group_name

Name of the group that contains the section.

section_name

Name of the MDATA section.

column_name

Name of the FILTER BY column to add to the MDATA section.

Restrictions

MDATA sections that are created with CTX_DDL.ADD_MDATA_COLUMN cannot have their values changed using CTX_DDL.ADD_MDATA or CTX_DDL.REMOVE_MDATA. Doing so will result in errors being returned. The section values must be updated using SQL.

Notes

Related Topics

MDATA

ADD_MDATA_SECTION

REMOVE_MDATA

ADD_SDATA_COLUMN

See Also:

Chapter 8, "Searching Document Sections in Oracle Text" in Oracle Text Application Developer's Guide

ADD_MDATA_SECTION

Use this procedure to add an MDATA section, with an accompanying value, to an existing section group. MDATA sections cannot be added to Null Section groups, Path Section groups, or Auto Section groups.

Section values undergo a simplified normalization:

Use CTX_DDL.REMOVE_SECTION to remove sections.

Syntax

CTX_DDL.ADD_MDATA_SECTION(
     group_name    IN VARCHAR2,
     section_name  IN VARCHAR2, 
     tag           IN VARCHAR2, 
);
group_name

Name of the section group that will contain the MDATA section.

section_name

Name of the MDATA section.

tag

The value of the MDATA section. For example, if the section is <AUTHOR>, the value could be Cynthia Kadohata (author of the novel The Floating World). More than one tag can be assigned to a given MDATA section.

Example

This example creates an MDATA section called auth.

ctx_ddl.create_section_group('htmgroup', 'HTML_SECTION_GROUP');
ctx_ddl.add_mdata_section('htmgroup', 'auth', 'author');

Related Topics

ADD_MDATA

REMOVE_MDATA

MDATA in Chapter 3, "Oracle Text CONTAINS Query Operators"

CREATE_SECTION_GROUP of this chapter

The Section Searching chapter of the Oracle Text Application Developer's Guide


ADD_NDATA_SECTION

Use this procedure to find matches that are spelled in a similar way. The value of an NDATA section is extracted from the document text like other sections, but is indexed as name data. NDATA sections are stored in the CTX_USER_SECTIONS view.

Syntax

CTX_DDL.ADD_NDATA_SECTION (
   group_name    IN VARCHAR2,
   section_name  IN VARCHAR2,
   tag           IN VARCHAR2);
group_name

Name of the group that contains the section.

section_name

Name of the NDATA section.

tag

Name of the tag that marks the start of a section. For example, if the tag is <H1>, specify H1. The start tag you specify must be unique within a section group.

Notes

NDATA sections support both single and multi-byte data, however, there are character- and term-based limitations. NDATA section data that is indexed is constrained as follows:

NDATA section data that exceeds these constraints are truncated.

Example

The following example defines a section group namegroup of the BASIC_SECTION_GROUP type. It then creates an NDATA section in namegroup called firstname.

begin
  ctx_ddl.create_section_group('namegroup', 'BASIC_SECTION_GROUP');
  ctx_ddl.add_ndata_section('namegroup', 'firstname', 'fname1');
end;

ADD_SDATA_COLUMN

Use this procedure to map the FILTER BY or ORDER BY column named in column_name to the SDATA section named in section_name. By default, all FILTER BY columns are mapped as SDATA.

Syntax

The syntax is as follows:

CTX_DDL.ADD_SDATA_COLUMN(
     group_name         IN VARCHAR2, 
     section_name       IN VARCHAR2, 
     column_name        IN VARCHAR2,
);
group_name

Name of the group that contains the section.

section_name

Name of the SDATA section.

column_name

Name of the FILTER BY column to add to the SDATA section.

Notes

Related Topics

SDATA in Chapter 3, "Oracle Text CONTAINS Query Operators"

ADD_SDATA_SECTION

See Also:

Chapter 8, "Searching Document Sections in Oracle Text" in Oracle Text Application Developer's Guide

ADD_SDATA_SECTION

This procedure adds an SDATA section to a section group. By default, all FILTER BY columns are mapped as SDATA.

Syntax

The syntax is as follows:

CTX_DDL.ADD_SDATA_SECTION(
     group_name         IN VARCHAR2, 
     section_name       IN VARCHAR2, 
     tag                IN VARCHAR2,
     datatype           IN VARCHAR2, default NULL,
);
group_name

Name of the group that contains the section.

section_name

Name of the SDATA section.

tag

Name of the tag to add to the SDATA section.

datatype

Specifies the stored format for the data, as well as the semantics of comparison in later use in SDATA operators. The default is VARCHAR2, but if specified must be one of the following values:

  • VARCHAR2

  • CHAR

  • RAW

  • NUMBER

  • DATE

The VARCHAR2 datatype stores up to 249 bytes of character data in the database character set. Values larger than this result in a per-document indexing error. Note that leading and trailing whitespace are always trimmed from SDATA section values when extracted by the sectioner. This is different than SDATA columns. Column values are never trimmed. No lexing is performed on the value from either kind of SDATA.

The CHAR datatype stores up to 249 bytes of character data in the database character set. Values larger than this result in a per-document indexing error. Note that leading and trailing whitespace are always trimmed from SDATA section values when extracted by the sectioner. This is different than SDATA columns. Column values are never trimmed. No lexing is performed on the value from either kind of SDATA. To be consistent with SQL, the comparisons of CHAR datatype SDATA values are blank-padded comparisons.

RAW datatype stores up to 249 bytes of binary data. Values larger than this result in a per-document indexing error. The value is converted from hexadecimal string representation. That is, to store a value of 65, the document should look like <TAG>40</TAG>, and not <TAG>65</TAG> or <TAG>A</TAG>.

The DATE datatype values must conform to the following format: YYYY-MM-DD or YYYY-MM-DD HH24:MI:SS. That is, to store a DATE value of "Nov. 24, 2006 10:32pm 36sec", the document should look like <TAG>2006-11-24 22:32:36</TAG>.

Limitations

Related Topics

"SDATA" in Chapter 3, "Oracle Text CONTAINS Query Operators"

"ADD_SDATA_COLUMN" of this chapter

See Also:

Chapter 8, "Searching Document Sections in Oracle Text" in Oracle Text Application Developer's Guide

ADD_SPECIAL_SECTION

Adds a special section, either SENTENCE or PARAGRAPH, to a section group. This enables searching within sentences or paragraphs in documents with the WITHIN operator.

A special section in a document is a section which is not explicitly tagged like zone and field sections. The start and end of special sections are detected when the index is created. Oracle Text supports two such sections: paragraph and sentence.

The sentence and paragraph boundaries are determined by the lexer. For example, the lexer recognizes sentence and paragraph section boundaries as follows:

Table 7-1 Paragraph and Sentence Section Boundaries

Special Section Boundary

SENTENCE

WORD/PUNCT/WHITESPACE

 

WORD/PUNCT/NEWLINE

PARAGRAPH

WORD/PUNCT/NEWLINE/WHITESPACE (indented paragraph)

 

WORD/PUNCT/NEWLINE/NEWLINE (block paragraph)


The punctuation, whitespace, and newline characters are determined by your lexer settings and can be changed.

If the lexer cannot recognize the boundaries, no sentence or paragraph sections are indexed.

Syntax

CTX_DDL.ADD_SPECIAL_SECTION(
                 group_name    IN VARCHAR2, 
                 section_name  IN VARCHAR2);
group_name

Specify the name of the section group.

section_name

Specify SENTENCE or PARAGRAPH.

Example

The following example enables searching within sentences within HTML documents:

begin
ctx_ddl.create_section_group('htmgroup', 'HTML_SECTION_GROUP');
ctx_ddl.add_special_section('htmgroup', 'SENTENCE');
end;

Add zone sections to the group to enable zone searching in addition to sentence searching. The following example adds the zone section Headline to the section group htmgroup:

begin
ctx_ddl.create_section_group('htmgroup', 'HTML_SECTION_GROUP');
ctx_ddl.add_special_section('htmgroup', 'SENTENCE');
ctx_ddl.add_zone_section('htmgroup', 'Headline', 'H1');
end;

If you are only interested in sentence or paragraph searching within documents and not interested in defining zone or field sections, then use the NULL_SECTION_GROUP as follows:

begin
ctx_ddl.create_section_group('nullgroup', 'NULL_SECTION_GROUP');
ctx_ddl.add_special_section('nullgroup', 'SENTENCE');
end;

Related Topics

WITHIN operator in Chapter 3, "Oracle Text CONTAINS Query Operators".

"Section Group Types" in Chapter 2, "Oracle Text Indexing Elements".

CREATE_SECTION_GROUP

ADD_ZONE_SECTION

ADD_FIELD_SECTION

REMOVE_SECTION

DROP_SECTION_GROUP


ADD_STOPCLASS

Adds a stopclass to a stoplist. A stopclass is a class of tokens that is not to be indexed.

Syntax

CTX_DDL.ADD_STOPCLASS(
  stoplist_name  in   varchar2,
  stopclass      in   varchar2
);
stoplist_name

Specify the name of the stoplist.

stopclass

Specify the stopclass to be added to stoplist_name. Currently, only the NUMBERS class is supported. It is not possible to create a custom stopclass.

NUMBERS includes tokens that follow the number pattern: digits, numgroup, and numjoin only. Therefore, 123ABC is not a number, nor is A123. These are labeled as MIXED. $123 is not a number (this token is not common in a text index because non-alphanumerics become whitespace by default). In the United States, 123.45 is a number, but 123.456.789 is not; in Europe, where numgroup may be '.', the reverse is true.

The maximum number of stopwords, stopthemes, and stopclasses you can add to a stoplist is 4095.

Example

The following example adds a stopclass of NUMBERS to the stoplist mystop:

begin
ctx_ddl.add_stopclass('mystop', 'NUMBERS');
end;

Related Topics

CREATE_STOPLIST

REMOVE_STOPCLASS

DROP_STOPLIST


ADD_STOP_SECTION

Adds a stop section to an automatic section group. Adding a stop section causes the automatic section indexing operation to ignore the specified section in XML documents.

Note:

Adding a stop section causes no section information to be created in the index. However, the text within a stop section is always searchable.

Adding a stop section is useful when your documents contain many low information tags. Adding stop sections also improves indexing performance with the automatic section group.

The number of stop sections you can add is unlimited.

Stop sections do not have section names and hence are not recorded in the section views.

Syntax

CTX_DDL.ADD_STOP_SECTION(
                 section_group IN VARCHAR2, 
                 tag  IN VARCHAR2);
section_group

Specify the name of the automatic section group. If you do not specify an automatic section group, then this procedure returns an error.

tag

Specify the tag to ignore during indexing. This parameter is case-sensitive. Defining a stop tag as such also stops the tag's attribute sections, if any.

Qualify the tag with document type in the form (doctype)tag. For example, if you wanted to make the <fluff> tag a stop section only within the mydoc document type, specify (mydoc)fluff for tag.

Example

Defining Stop Sections

The following example adds a stop section identified by the tag <fluff> to the automatic section group myauto:

begin
ctx_ddl.add_stop_section('myauto', 'fluff');
end;

This example also stops any attribute sections contained within <fluff>. For example, if a document contained:

<fluff type="computer">

Then the preceding example also stops the attribute section fluff@type.

Doctype Sensitive Stop Sections

The following example creates a stop section for the tag <fluff> only in documents that have a root element of mydoc:

begin
ctx_ddl.add_stop_section('myauto', '(mydoc)fluff');
end;

Related Topics

ALTER INDEX in Chapter 1, "Oracle Text SQL Statements and Operators".

CREATE_SECTION_GROUP


ADD_STOPTHEME

Adds a single stoptheme to a stoplist. A stoptheme is a theme that is not to be indexed.

In English, query on indexed themes using the ABOUT operator.

Syntax

CTX_DDL.ADD_STOPTHEME(
  stoplist_name  in   varchar2,
  stoptheme      in   varchar2
);
stoplist_name

Specify the name of the stoplist.

stoptheme

Specify the stoptheme to be added to stoplist_name. The system normalizes the stoptheme you enter using the knowledge base. If the normalized theme is more than one theme, then the system does not process your stoptheme. For this reason, Oracle recommends that you submit single stopthemes.

The maximum number of stopwords, stopthemes, and stopclasses you can add to a stoplist is 4095.

Example

The following example adds the stoptheme banking to the stoplist mystop:

begin
ctx_ddl.add_stoptheme('mystop', 'banking');
end;

Related Topics

CREATE_STOPLIST

REMOVE_STOPTHEME

DROP_STOPLIST

ABOUT operator in Chapter 3, "Oracle Text CONTAINS Query Operators".


ADD_STOPWORD

Use this procedure to add a single stopword to a stoplist.

To create a list of stopwords, you must call this procedure once for each word.

Syntax

CTX_DDL.ADD_STOPWORD(
stoplist_name  in   varchar2,
stopword       in   varchar2,
language       in varchar2 default NULL
);
stoplist_name

Specify the name of the stoplist.

stopword

Specify the stopword to be added.

Language-specific stopwords must be unique across the other stopwords specific to the language. For example, it is valid to have a German die and an English die in the same stoplist.

The maximum number of stopwords, stopthemes, and stopclasses you can add to a stoplist is 4095.

language

Specify the language of stopword when the stoplist you specify with stoplist_name is of type MULTI_STOPLIST. You must specify the globalization support name or abbreviation of an Oracle Text-supported language.

To make a stopword active in multiple languages, specify ALL for this parameter. For example, defining ALL stopwords is useful when you have international documents that contain English fragments that need to be stopped in any language.

An ALL stopword is active in all languages. If you use the multi-lexer, the language-specific lexing of the stopword occurs, just as if it had been added multiple times in multiple specific languages.

Otherwise, specify NULL.

Example

Single Language Stoplist

The following example adds the stopwords because, notwithstanding, nonetheless, and therefore to the stoplist mystop:

begin
ctx_ddl.add_stopword('mystop', 'because');
ctx_ddl.add_stopword('mystop', 'notwithstanding');
ctx_ddl.add_stopword('mystop', 'nonetheless');
ctx_ddl.add_stopword('mystop', 'therefore');
end;

Multi-Language Stoplist

The following example adds the German word die to a multi-language stoplist:

begin
ctx_ddl.add_stopword('mystop', 'Die','german');
end;

Note:

Add stopwords after you create the index with ALTER INDEX.

Adding An ALL Stopword

The following adds the word the as an ALL stopword to the multi-language stoplist globallist:

begin
ctx_ddl.add_stopword('globallist','the','ALL');
end;

Related Topics

CREATE_STOPLIST

REMOVE_STOPWORD

DROP_STOPLIST

ALTER INDEX in Chapter 1, "Oracle Text SQL Statements and Operators".

Appendix E, "Oracle Text Supplied Stoplists"


ADD_SUB_LEXER

Add a sub-lexer to a multi-lexer preference. A sub-lexer identifies a language in a multi-lexer (multi-language) preference. Use a multi-lexer preference when you want to index more than one language.

Restrictions

The following restrictions apply to using CTX_DDL.ADD_SUB_LEXER:

Syntax

CTX_DDL.ADD_SUB_LEXER(
             lexer_name in varchar2,
             language  in varchar2,
             sub_lexer in varchar2,
             alt_value in varchar2 default null
);
lexer_name

Specify the name of the multi-lexer preference.

language

Specify the globalization support language name or abbreviation of the sub-lexer. For example, specify JAPANESE or JA for Japanese.

The sub-lexer you specify with sub_lexer is used when the language column has a value case-insensitive equal to the globalization support name of abbreviation of language.

Specify DEFAULT to assign a default sub-lexer to use when the value of the language column in the base table is null, invalid, or unmapped to a sub-lexer. The DEFAULT lexer is also used to parse stopwords.

If a sub-lexer definition for language already exists, then it is replaced by this call.

sub_lexer

Specify the name of the sub-lexer to use for this language.

alt_value

Optionally specify an alternate value for language.

If you specify DEFAULT for language, then you cannot specify an alt_value.

The alt_value is limited to 30 bytes and cannot be a globalization support language name, abbreviation, or DEFAULT.

Example

This example shows how to create a multi-language text table and how to set up the multi-lexer to index the table.

Create the multi-language table with a primary key, a text column, and a language column as follows:

create table globaldoc (
   doc_id number primary key,
   lang varchar2(3),
   text clob
);

Assume that the table holds mostly English documents, with an occasional German or Japanese document. To handle the three languages, you must create three sub-lexers: one for English, one for German, and one for Japanese as follows:

ctx_ddl.create_preference('english_lexer','basic_lexer');
ctx_ddl.set_attribute('english_lexer','index_themes','yes');
ctx_ddl.set_attribtue('english_lexer','theme_language','english');

ctx_ddl.create_preference('german_lexer','basic_lexer');
ctx_ddl.set_attribute('german_lexer','composite','german');
ctx_ddl.set_attribute('german_lexer','mixed_case','yes');
ctx_ddl.set_attribute('german_lexer','alternate_spelling','german');

ctx_ddl.create_preference('japanese_lexer','japanese_vgram_lexer');

Create the multi-lexer preference:

ctx_ddl.create_preference('global_lexer', 'multi_lexer');

Because the stored documents are mostly English, make the English lexer the default:

ctx_ddl.add_sub_lexer('global_lexer','default','english_lexer');

Add the German and Japanese lexers in their respective languages. Also assume that the language column is expressed in ISO 639-2, so add those as alternative values.

ctx_ddl.add_sub_lexer('global_lexer','german','german_lexer','ger');
ctx_ddl.add_sub_lexer('global_lexer','japanese','japanese_lexer','jpn');

Create the index globalx, specifying the multi-lexer preference and the language column in the parameters string as follows:

create index globalx on globaldoc(text) indextype is ctxsys.context
parameters ('lexer global_lexer language column lang');

ADD_ZONE_SECTION

Creates a zone section and adds the section to an existing section group. This enables zone section searching with the WITHIN operator.

Zone sections are sections delimited by start and end tags. The <B> and </B> tags in HTML, for instance, marks a range of words which are to be rendered in boldface.

Zone sections can be nested within one another, can overlap, and can occur more than once in a document.

Syntax

CTX_DDL.ADD_ZONE_SECTION(
  group_name     in    varchar2,
  section_name   in    varchar2,
  tag            in    varchar2
);
group_name

Specify the name of the section group to which section_name is added.

section_name

Specify the name of the section to add to the group_name. Use this name to identify the section in WITHIN queries. Avoid using names that contain non-alphanumeric characters such as _, because most of these characters are special must be escaped in queries. Section names are case-insensitive.

Within the same group, zone section names and field section names cannot be the same. The terms Paragraph and Sentence are reserved for special sections.

Section names need not be unique across tags. You can assign the same section name to more than one tag, making details transparent to searches.

tag

Specify the pattern which marks the start of a section. For example, if <H1> is the HTML tag, specify H1 for tag. The start tag you specify must be unique within a section group.

Oracle Text knows what the end tags look like from the group_type parameter you specify when you create the section group.

If group_name is an HTML_SECTION_GROUP, you can create zone sections for the META tag's NAME/CONTENT attribute pairs. To do so, specify tag as meta@namevalue where namevalue is the value of the NAME attribute whose CONTENT attributes are to be indexed as a section. Refer to the example.

If group_name is an XML_SECTION_GROUP, you can optionally qualify tag with a document type (root element) in the form (doctype)tag. Doing so makes section_name sensitive to the XML document type declaration. Refer to the example.

Examples

Creating HTML Sections

The following example defines a section group called htmgroup of type HTML_SECTION_GROUP. It then creates a zone section in htmgroup called headline identified by the <H1> tag:

begin
ctx_ddl.create_section_group('htmgroup', 'HTML_SECTION_GROUP');
ctx_ddl.add_zone_section('htmgroup', 'heading', 'H1');
end;

After indexing with section group htmgroup, query within the heading section by issuing a query as follows:

'Oracle WITHIN heading'

Creating Sections for <META NAME> Tags

You can create zone sections for HTML META tags when you use the HTML_SECTION_GROUP.

Consider an HTML document that has a META tag as follows:

<META NAME="author" CONTENT="ken">

To create a zone section that indexes all CONTENT attributes for the META tag whose NAME value is author:

begin
ctx_ddl.create_section_group('htmgroup', 'HTML_SECTION_GROUP');
ctx_ddl.add_zone_section('htmgroup', 'author', 'meta@author');
end

After indexing with section group htmgroup, query the document as follows:

'ken WITHIN author'

Creating Document Type Sensitive Sections (XML Documents Only)

You have an XML document set that contains the <book> tag declared for different document types (DTDs). You want to create a distinct book section for each document type.

Assume that myDTDname is declared as an XML document type as follows:

<!DOCTYPE myDTDname>
<myDTDname>
 ...

(Note: the DOCTYPE must match the top-level tag.)

Within myDTDname, the element <book> is declared. For this tag, create a section named mybooksec that is sensitive to the tag's document type as follows:

begin
ctx_ddl.create_section_group('myxmlgroup', 'XML_SECTION_GROUP');
ctx_ddl.add_zone_section('myxmlgroup', 'mybooksec', '(myDTDname)book');
end;

Notes

Repeated Sections

Zone sections can repeat. Each occurrence is treated as a separate section. For example, if <H1> denotes a heading section, they can repeat in the same documents as follows:

<H1> The Brown Fox </H1>

<H1> The Gray Wolf </H1>

Assuming that these zone sections are named Heading, the query Brown WITHIN Heading returns this document. However, a query of (Brown and Gray) WITHIN Heading does not.

Overlapping Sections

Zone sections can overlap each other. For example, if <B> and <I> denote two different zone sections, they can overlap in document as follows:

plain <B> bold <I> bold and italic </B> only italic </I>  plain

Nested Sections

Zone sections can nest, including themselves as follows:

<TD> <TABLE><TD>nested cell</TD></TABLE></TD>

Using the WITHIN operator, you can write queries to search for text in sections within sections. For example, assume the BOOK1, BOOK2, and AUTHOR zone sections occur as follows in documents doc1 and doc2:

doc1:

<book1> <author>Scott Tiger</author> This is a cool book to read.</book1>

doc2:

<book2> <author>Scott Tiger</author> This is a great book to read.</book2>

Consider the nested query:

'(Scott within author) within book1'

This query returns only doc1.

Related Topics

WITHIN operator in Chapter 3, "Oracle Text CONTAINS Query Operators"

Section Group Types in Chapter 2, "Oracle Text Indexing Elements"

CREATE_SECTION_GROUP

ADD_FIELD_SECTION

ADD_SPECIAL_SECTION

REMOVE_SECTION

DROP_SECTION_GROUP


COPY_POLICY

Creates a new policy from an existing policy or index.

Syntax

ctx_ddl.copy_policy(
    source_policy       VARCHAR2,
    policy_name         VARCHAR2    );
source_policy

The name of the policy or index being copied.

policy_name

The name of the new policy copy.

The preference values are copied from the source_policy. Both the source policy or index and the new policy must be owned by the same database user.


CREATE_INDEX_SET

Creates an index set for CTXCAT index types. Name this index set in the parameter clause of CREATE INDEX when you create a CTXCAT index.

Syntax

CTX_DDL.CREATE_INDEX_SET(set_name in varchar2);
set_name

Specify the name of the index set. Name this index set in the parameter clause of CREATE INDEX when you create a CTXCAT index.


CREATE_POLICY

Creates a policy to use with the CTX_DOC.POLICY_* procedures and the ORA:CONTAINS function. ORA:CONTAINS is a function you use within an XPATH query expression with existsNode().

Syntax

CTX_DDL.CREATE_POLICY(
         policy_name     IN VARCHAR2,
         filter          IN VARCHAR2 DEFAULT NULL,
         section_group   IN VARCHAR2 DEFAULT NULL,
         lexer           IN VARCHAR2 DEFAULT NULL,
         stoplist        IN VARCHAR2 DEFAULT NULL,
         wordlist        IN VARCHAR2 DEFAULT NULL);
policy_name

Specify the name for the new policy. Policy names and Text indexes share the same namespace.

filter

Specify the filter preference to use.

section_group

Specify the section group to use. You can specify any section group that is supported by CONTEXT index.

lexer

Specify the lexer preference to use. Your INDEX_THEMES attribute must be disabled.

stoplist

Specify the stoplist to use.

wordlist

Specify the wordlist to use.

Example

Create mylex lexer preference named mylex.

begin 
   ctx_ddl.create_preference('mylex', 'BASIC_LEXER'); 
   ctx_ddl.set_attribute('mylex', 'printjoins', '_-'); 
   ctx_ddl.set_attribute ( 'mylex', 'index_themes', 'NO');  
   ctx_ddl.set_attribute ( 'mylex', 'index_text', 'YES'); 
end; 

Create a stoplist preference named mystop.

begin 
  ctx_ddl.create_stoplist('mystop', 'BASIC_STOPLIST'); 
  ctx_ddl.add_stopword('mystop', 'because');
  ctx_ddl.add_stopword('mystop', 'nonetheless');
  ctx_ddl.add_stopword('mystop', 'therefore');
end;

Create a wordlist preference named 'mywordlist'.

begin 
 ctx_ddl.create_preference('mywordlist', 'BASIC_WORDLIST');
 ctx_ddl.set_attribute('mywordlist','FUZZY_MATCH','ENGLISH'); 
 ctx_ddl.set_attribute('mywordlist','FUZZY_SCORE','0'); 
 ctx_ddl.set_attribute('mywordlist','FUZZY_NUMRESULTS','5000'); 
 ctx_ddl.set_attribute('mywordlist','SUBSTRING_INDEX','TRUE'); 
 ctx_ddl.set_attribute('mywordlist','STEMMER','ENGLISH'); 
end; 
exec ctx_ddl.create_policy('my_policy', NULL, NULL, 'mylex', 'mystop', 
'mywordlist');

or

exec ctx_ddl.create_policy(policy_name => 'my_policy', 
                           lexer => 'mylex',
                           stoplist => 'mystop',
                           wordlist => 'mywordlist');

Then enter the following existsNode() query with your own defined policy:

select id from xmltab 
  where existsNode(doc, '/book/chapter[ ora:contains(summary,"dog or cat", 
  "my_policy") >0 ]', 'xmlns:ora="http://xmlns.oracle.com/xdb" ')=1;

Update the policy with the following:

exec ctx_ddl.update_policy(policy_name => 'my_policy', lexer => 'my_new_lex');

Drop the policy with the following:

exec ctx_ddl.drop_policy(policy_name => 'my_policy');

CREATE_PREFERENCE

Creates a preference in the Text data dictionary. Specify preferences in the parameter string of CREATE INDEX or ALTER INDEX.

Caution:

CTX_DDL.CREATE_PREFERENCE does not respect the current schema as set by ALTER SESSION SET current_schema. Therefore, if you need to create or delete a preference owned by another user, then you must explicitly state this, and you must have the CREATE ANY TABLE system privilege.

The WebIV note 249991.1 discusses this issue further.

Workaround: Change dbms_xdbt to prepend the index name with XDB as follows:

indexname     CONSTANT VARCHAR2(32) := 'XDB.XDB$CI'
;

Where indexname is the name of the CONTEXT index.

Syntax

CTX_DDL.CREATE_PREFERENCE(preference_name  in varchar2, 
                          object_name      in varchar2); 
preference_name

Specify the name of the preference to be created.

object_name

Specify the name of the preference type.

See Also:

For a complete list of preference types and their associated attributes, see Chapter 2, "Oracle Text Indexing Elements"

Examples

Creating Text-only Index

The following example creates a lexer preference that specifies a text-only index. It does so by creating a BASIC_LEXER preference called my_lexer with CTX_DDL.CREATE_PREFERENCE. It then calls CTX_DDL.SET_ATTRIBUTE twice, first specifying YES for the INDEX_TEXT attribute, then specifying NO for the INDEX_THEMES attribute.

begin
ctx_ddl.create_preference('my_lexer', 'BASIC_LEXER');
ctx_ddl.set_attribute('my_lexer', 'INDEX_TEXT', 'YES');
ctx_ddl.set_attribute('my_lexer', 'INDEX_THEMES', 'NO');
end;

Specifying File Data Storage

The following example creates a data storage preference called mypref that tells the system that the files to be indexed are stored in the operating system. The example then uses CTX_DDL.SET_ATTRIBUTE to set the PATH attribute of to the directory /docs.

begin
ctx_ddl.create_preference('mypref', 'FILE_DATASTORE');
ctx_ddl.set_attribute('mypref', 'PATH', '/docs'); 
end;

See Also:

For more information about data storage, see Datastore Types in Chapter 2, "Oracle Text Indexing Elements"

Creating Master/Detail Relationship

Use CTX_DDL.CREATE_PREFERENCE to create a preference with DETAIL_DATASTORE. Use CTX_DDL.SET_ATTRIBUTE to set the attributes for this preference. The following example shows how this is done:

begin
ctx_ddl.create_preference('my_detail_pref', 'DETAIL_DATASTORE');
ctx_ddl.set_attribute('my_detail_pref', 'binary', 'true');
ctx_ddl.set_attribute('my_detail_pref', 'detail_table', 'my_detail');
ctx_ddl.set_attribute('my_detail_pref', 'detail_key', 'article_id');
ctx_ddl.set_attribute('my_detail_pref', 'detail_lineno', 'seq');
ctx_ddl.set_attribute('my_detail_pref', 'detail_text', 'text');
end;

See Also:

For more information about master/detail, see "DETAIL_DATASTORE" in Chapter 2, "Oracle Text Indexing Elements"

Specifying Storage Attributes

The following examples specify that the index tables are to be created in the foo tablespace with an initial extent of 1K:

begin
ctx_ddl.create_preference('mystore', 'BASIC_STORAGE');
ctx_ddl.set_attribute('mystore', 'I_TABLE_CLAUSE',
                        'tablespace foo storage (initial 1K)'); 
ctx_ddl.set_attribute('mystore', 'K_TABLE_CLAUSE',
                        'tablespace foo storage (initial 1K)'); 
ctx_ddl.set_attribute('mystore', 'R_TABLE_CLAUSE',
                        'tablespace foo storage (initial 1K)'); 
ctx_ddl.set_attribute('mystore', 'S_TABLE_CLAUSE',
                        'tablespace foo storage (initial 1K)'); 
ctx_ddl.set_attribute('mystore', 'N_TABLE_CLAUSE',
                        'tablespace foo storage (initial 1K)'); 
ctx_ddl.set_attribute('mystore', 'I_INDEX_CLAUSE',
                        'tablespace foo storage (initial 1K)'); 
end;

Creating Preferences with No Attributes

When you create preferences with types that have no attributes, you need only create the preference, as in the following example which sets the filter to the NULL_FILTER:

begin
ctx_ddl.create_preference('my_null_filter', 'NULL_FILTER');
end;

Notes

If s_table_clause is specified for a storage preference in an index without SDATA, then it has no effect on the index, and the index creation will still succeed.

Related Topics

SET_ATTRIBUTE

DROP_PREFERENCE

CREATE INDEX in Chapter 1, "Oracle Text SQL Statements and Operators"

ALTER INDEX in Chapter 1, "Oracle Text SQL Statements and Operators"

Chapter 2, "Oracle Text Indexing Elements"


CREATE_SECTION_GROUP

Creates a section group for defining sections in a text column.

When you create a section group, you can add to it zone, field, or special sections with ADD_ZONE_SECTION, ADD_FIELD_SECTION, ADD_MDATA_SECTION, or ADD_SPECIAL_SECTION.

When you index, name the section group in the parameter string of CREATE INDEX or ALTER INDEX.

After indexing, query within your defined sections with the WITHIN operator.

Syntax

CTX_DDL.CREATE_SECTION_GROUP(
  group_name     in    varchar2,
  group_type     in    varchar2
);
group_name

Specify the section group name to create as [user.]section_group_name. This parameter must be unique within an owner.

group_type

Specify section group type. The group_type parameter can be one of:

Section Group Preference Description
NULL_SECTION_GROUP Use this group type when you define no sections or when you define only SENTENCE or PARAGRAPH sections. This is the default.
BASIC_SECTION_GROUP Use this group type for defining sections where the start and end tags are of the form <A> and </A>.

Note: This group type dopes not support input such as unbalanced parentheses, comments tags, and attributes. Use HTML_SECTION_GROUP for this type of input.

HTML_SECTION_GROUP Use this group type for indexing HTML documents and for defining sections in HTML documents.
XML_SECTION_GROUP Use this group type for indexing XML documents and for defining sections in XML documents.
AUTO_SECTION_GROUP Use this group type to automatically create a zone section for each start-tag/end-tag pair in an XML document. The section names derived from XML tags are case sensitive as in XML.

Attribute sections are created automatically for XML tags that have attributes. Attribute sections are named in the form attribute@tag.

Stop sections, empty tags, processing instructions, and comments are not indexed.

The following limitations apply to automatic section groups:

  • You cannot add zone, field, or special sections to an automatic section group.

  • Automatic sectioning does not index XML document types (root elements.) However, you can define stop sections with document type.

  • The length of the indexed tags, including prefix and namespace, cannot exceed 64 bytes. Tags longer than this are not indexed.

PATH_SECTION_GROUP Use this group type to index XML documents. Behaves like the AUTO_SECTION_GROUP.

The difference is that with this section group you can do path searching with the INPATH and HASPATH operators. Queries are also case-sensitive for tag and attribute names.

NEWS_SECTION_GROUP Use this group for defining sections in newsgroup formatted documents according to RFC 1036.

Example

The following command creates a section group called htmgroup with the HTML group type.

begin
ctx_ddl.create_section_group('htmgroup', 'HTML_SECTION_GROUP');
end;

The following command creates a section group called auto with the AUTO_SECTION_GROUP group type to be used to automatically index tags in XML documents.

begin
ctx_ddl.create_section_group('auto', 'AUTO_SECTION_GROUP');
end;

Related Topics

WITHIN operator in Chapter 3, "Oracle Text CONTAINS Query Operators"

"Section Group Types" in Chapter 2, "Oracle Text Indexing Elements"

ADD_ZONE_SECTION

ADD_FIELD_SECTION

ADD_MDATA_SECTION

ADD_SPECIAL_SECTION

REMOVE_SECTION

DROP_SECTION_GROUP


CREATE_SHADOW_INDEX

Creates index metadata (or policy) for the specified index. If the index is not partitioned, then it also creates the index tables. This procedure is only supported in Enterprise Edition of Oracle Database.

The following changes are not supported:

Note:

For a partitioned index, you must first call this procedure to create the shadow index metadata. This procedure will not create index tables. It has no effect on query, DML, sync, or optimize operations.

Syntax

CTX_DDL.CREATE_SHADOW_INDEX(
  idx_name          IN VARCHAR2,
  parameter_string  IN VARCHAR2 DEFAULT NULL,
  parallel_degree   IN NUMBER, DEFAULT 1
);
idx_name

The name of a valid CONTEXT indextype.

parameter_string

For non-partitioned index, the same string as in ALTER INDEX. For partitioned index, the same string as in ALTER INDEX PARAMETER.

parallel_degree

Reserved for future use. Specify the degree of parallelism. Parallel operation is not currently supported.

Example

Example 7-1 Scheduled Global Index Recreate (Incremental Rebuild)

In this example, you have the finest control over each stage of RECREATE_INDEX_ONLINE. Since SYNC_INDEX can take a time limit, you can limit SYNC_INDEX during non-business hours and incrementally recreate the index.

/* create lexer and original index */
exec ctx_ddl.create_preference('us_lexer','basic_lexer');
create index idx on tbl(text) indextype is ctxsys.context
  parameters('lexer us_lexer');
 
/* create a new lexer */
begin
  ctx_ddl.create_preference('e_lexer','basic_lexer');
  ctx_ddl.set_attribute('e_lexer','base_letter','yes');
  ctx_ddl.create_preference('m_lexer','multi_lexer');
  ctx_ddl.add_sub_lexer('m_lexer','default','us_lexer');
  ctx_ddl.add_sub_lexer('m_lexer','e','e_lexer');
end;
/
 
/* add new language column to the table for multi-lexer */
alter table tbl add(lang varchar2(10) default 'us');
 
/* create shadow index */
exec ctx_ddl.create_shadow_index('idx',
  'replace lexer m_lexer language column lang NOPOPULATE');
 
declare
  idxid integer;
begin
  /* figure out shadow index name */
  select idx_id into idxid from ctx_user_indexes
     where idx_name ='IDX';
  /* populate pending */
  ctx_ddl.populate_pending('RIO$'||idxid);
  /* time limited sync */
  ctx_ddl.sync_index(idx_name =>'RIO$'||idxid,
                     maxtime =>480);
  /* more sync until no pending rows for the shadow index */
end;
/* swap in the shadow index */
exec ctx_ddl.exchange_shadow_index('idx');

Notes

The index name for the shadow index is RIO$index_id. By default it will also populate index tables for non-partitioned indexes, unless NOPOPULATE is specified in CREATE INDEX or in ALTER INDEX. For a local partitioned index, it will only create index metadata without creating the index tables for each partition. Each index can have only one shadow index.

When building a non-partitioned index online, you can first call this procedure to create index metadata and index tables. If you specify POPULATE, then this procedure will populate the index, but will not do swapping. You can schedule the swapping at a later, preferred time.

If you specify NOPOPULATE, it will only create metadata for the index tables, but will not populate them. You must perform POPULATE_PENDING (CTX_DDL.POPULATE_PENDING) to populate the pending queues after running this procedure, and then sync the indexes. This is referred to as incremental recreate.

Queries are all processed normally when this procedure is running.

If POPULATE is specified, then DML is blocked for a very short time at the beginning of populate, after which all further DML is logged into an online pending queue and processed later.

Sync with CTX_DDL.SYNC_INDEX runs normally on the index. OPTIMIZE_INDEX runs without doing anything, but does not return an error.

Related Topics

See also POPULATE | NOPOPULATE in ALTER INDEX and CREATE INDEX in Chapter 1, "Oracle Text SQL Statements and Operators", and CTX_DDL.DROP_SHADOW_INDEX, CTX_DDL.EXCHANGE_SHADOW_INDEX, CTX_DDL.SYNC_INDEX, and CTX_DDL.POPULATE_PENDING in this chapter.


CREATE_STOPLIST

Use this procedure to create a new, empty stoplist. Stoplists can contain words or themes that are not to be indexed.

You can also create multi-language stoplists to hold language-specific stopwords. A multi-language stoplist is useful when you index a table that contains documents in different languages, such as English, German, and Japanese. When you do so, the text table must contain a language column.

Add either stopwords, stopclasses, or stopthemes to a stoplist using ADD_STOPWORD, ADD_STOPCLASS, or ADD_STOPTHEME. Specify a stoplist in the parameter string of CREATE INDEX or ALTER INDEX to override the default stoplist CTXSYS.DEFAULT_STOPLIST.

Syntax

CTX_DDL.CREATE_STOPLIST(
stoplist_name IN VARCHAR2,
stoplist_type IN VARCHAR2 DEFAULT 'BASIC_STOPLIST');
stoplist_name

Specify the name of the stoplist to be created.

stoplist_type

Specify BASIC_STOPLIST to create a stoplist for a single language. This is the default.

Specify MULTI_STOPLIST to create a stoplist with language-specific stopwords.

At indexing time, the language column of each document is examined, and only the stopwords for that language are eliminated. At query time, the session language setting determines the active stopwords, like it determines the active lexer when using the multi-lexer.

Note:

When indexing a multi-language table with a multi-language stoplist, the table must have a language column.

Examples

Example 7-2 Single Language Stoplist

The following example creates a stoplist called mystop:

begin
ctx_ddl.create_stoplist('mystop', 'BASIC_STOPLIST');
end;

Example 7-3 Multi-Language Stoplist

The following example creates a multi-language stoplist called multistop and then adds tow language-specific stopwords:

begin
ctx_ddl.create_stoplist('multistop', 'MULTI_STOPLIST');
ctx_ddl.add_stopword('mystop', 'Die','german');
ctx_ddl.add_stopword('mystop', 'Or','english');
end;

Related Topics

ADD_STOPWORD

ADD_STOPCLASS

ADD_STOPTHEME

DROP_STOPLIST

CREATE INDEX in Chapter 1, "Oracle Text SQL Statements and Operators".

ALTER INDEX in Chapter 1, "Oracle Text SQL Statements and Operators".

Appendix E, "Oracle Text Supplied Stoplists"


DROP_INDEX_SET

Drops a CTXCAT index set created with CTX_DDL.CREATE_INDEX_SET.

Syntax

CTX_DDL.DROP_INDEX_SET(
     set_name    IN VARCHAR2
);
set_name

Specify the name of the index set to drop.

Dropping an index set drops all of the sub-indexes it contains.


DROP_POLICY

Drops a policy created with CTX_DDL.CREATE_POLICY.

Syntax

CTX_DDL.DROP_POLICY(
     policy_name    IN VARCHAR2
);
policy_name

Specify the name of the policy to drop.


DROP_PREFERENCE

The DROP_PREFERENCE procedure deletes the specified preference from the Text data dictionary. Dropping a preference does not affect indexes that have already been created using that preference.

Syntax

CTX_DDL.DROP_PREFERENCE(
     preference_name    IN VARCHAR2
);
preference_name

Specify the name of the preference to be dropped.

Example

The following example drops the preference my_lexer.

begin
ctx_ddl.drop_preference('my_lexer');
end;

Related Topics

See also CTX_DDL.CREATE_PREFERENCE.


DROP_SECTION_GROUP

The DROP_SECTION_GROUP procedure deletes the specified section group, as well as all the sections in the group, from the Text data dictionary.

Syntax

CTX_DDL.DROP_SECTION_GROUP(
     group_name     IN VARCHAR2
);
group_name

Specify the name of the section group to delete.

Example

The following example drops the section group htmgroup and all its sections:

begin
ctx_ddl.drop_section_group('htmgroup');
end;

Related Topics

See also CTX_DDL.CREATE_SECTION_GROUP.


DROP_SHADOW_INDEX

Drops a shadow index for the specified index. When you drop a shadow index, if it is partitioned, then its metadata and the metadata of all this shadow index's partitions are dropped. This procedure also drops all the shadow index tables and cleans up any online pending queue.

Syntax

CTX_DDL.DROP_SHADOW_INDEX(
     idx_name       in VARCHAR2
);
idx_name

The name of a valid CONTEXT indextype.

Example

The following example drops the shadow index myshadowidx:

begin
ctx_ddl.drop_shadow_index('myshadowidx');
end;

Related Topics

See also CTX_DDL.CREATE_SHADOW_INDEX.


DROP_STOPLIST

Drops a stoplist from the Text data dictionary. When you drop a stoplist, you must re-create or rebuild the index for the change to take effect.

Syntax

CTX_DDL.DROP_STOPLIST(stoplist_name in varchar2);
stoplist_name

Specify the name of the stoplist.

Example

The following example drops the stoplist mystop:

begin
ctx_ddl.drop_stoplist('mystop');
end;

Related Topics

See also CTX_DDL.CREATE_STOPLIST.


EXCHANGE_SHADOW_INDEX

This procedure swaps the index (or index partition) metadata and index (or index partition) data.

For non-partitioned indexes, this procedure swaps both the metadata and the index data, and processes the online pending queue.

Syntax

CTX_DDL.EXCHANGE_SHADOW_INDEX(
     idx_name        IN VARCHAR2
     partition_name  IN VARCHAR2 default NULL
);
idx_name

Specify the name of the CONTEXT indextype.

partition_name

Specify the name of the shadow index partition. May also be NULL.

Example

Example 7-4 Global Index Recreate with Scheduled Swap

This example demonstrates running CTX_DDL.EXCHANGE_SHADOW_INDEX during non-business hours when query failures and DML blocking can be tolerated.

/* create lexer and original index */
exec ctx_ddl.create_preference('us_lexer','basic_lexer');
create index idx on tbl(text) indextype is ctxsys.context
  parameters('lexer us_lexer');
 
/* create a new lexer */
begin
  ctx_ddl.create_preference('e_lexer','basic_lexer');
  ctx_ddl.set_attribute('e_lexer','base_letter','yes');
  ctx_ddl.create_preference('m_lexer','multi_lexer');
  ctx_ddl.add_sub_lexer('m_lexer','default','us_lexer');
  ctx_ddl.add_sub_lexer('m_lexer','e','e_lexer');
end;
/
 
/* add new language column to the table for multi-lexer */
alter table tbl add(lang varchar2(10) default 'us');
 
/* recreate index online with the new multip-lexer */
exec ctx_ddl.create_shadow_index('idx',
  'replace lexer m_lexer language column lang');
exec ctx_ddl.exchange_shadow_index('idx');

Notes

Using EXCHANGE_SHADOW_INDEX with Non-partitioned Indexes

For non-partitioned indexes, this procedure will swap both metadata and index data, and will process the online pending queue.

Queries will return column not indexed errors when swapping metadata and index data, but queries are processed normally when processing online pending queue. The period of errors being raised should be short.

If you specify POPULATE when you create the shadow index, and if many DML operations have been issued since the creation of the shadow index, then there could be a large pending queue. However, if you use incremental recreate, that is, specify NOPOPULATE when you create the shadow index, and you then populate the pending queue and sync, then the online pending queue is always empty no matter how many DML operations have occurred since CREATE_SHADOW_INDEX was issued.

When this procedure is running, DML will first fail with an error about index being in in-progress status. After that DML could be blocked (hang) if there are rows in online pending queue that need to be reapplied.

Note:

When this procedure is running, DML statements will fail with an error that the index is in "in-progress status." If, when this error occurs, there are rows in the online pending queue that need to be reapplied, then the DML could be blocked and hang.

Using EXCHANGE_SHADOW_INDEX with Partitioned Indexes

For partitions that are recreated with NOSWAP: when the index is partitioned, and if partition_name is a valid index partition, then this procedure will swap the index partition data and the index partition metadata, and will process the online pending queue for this partition.

This procedure swaps only one partition at a time. When you run this procedure on partitions that are recreated with NOSWAP:

If the partition_name is NULL, then this procedure will swap the index metadata. Run this procedure as the last step when recreating a local partitioned index online.

Related Topics

See also CTX_DDL.RECREATE_INDEX_ONLINE, CTX_DDL.CREATE_SHADOW_INDEX, and CTX_DDL.DROP_SHADOW_INDEX.


OPTIMIZE_INDEX

Use this procedure to optimize the index. Optimize your index after you synchronize it. Optimizing an index removes old data and minimizes index fragmentation, which can improve query response time. Querying and DML may proceed while optimization takes place.

You can optimize in fast, full, rebuild, token, or token-type mode.

A common strategy for optimizing indexes is to perform regular token optimizations on frequently referenced terms, and to perform rebuild optimizations less frequently. (Use CTX_REPORT.QUERY_LOG_SUMMARY to find out which queries are made most frequently.) You can perform full, fast, or token-type optimizations instead of token optimizations.

Some users choose to perform frequent time-limited full optimizations along with occasional rebuild optimizations.

Note:

Optimizing an index can result in better response time only if you insert, delete, or update documents in the base table after your initial indexing operation.

Using this procedure to optimize the index is recommended over using the ALTER INDEX statement.

Optimization of a large index may take a long time. To monitor the progress of a lengthy optimization, log the optimization with CTX_OUTPUT.START_LOG and check the resultant logfile from time to time.

Note that, unlike serial optimize full, CTX_DDL.OPTIMIZE_INDEX() run with optlevel of FULL and parallel_degree > 1 is not resumable. That is, it will not resume from where it left after a time-out or failure.

Note:

There is a very small window of time when a query might fail in CTX_DDL.OPTIMIZE_INDEX REBUILD mode when the $I table is being swapped with the optimized shadow $I table.

Syntax

CTX_DDL.OPTIMIZE_INDEX( 
idx_name        IN  VARCHAR2, 
optlevel        IN  VARCHAR2, 
maxtime         IN  NUMBER DEFAULT NULL, 
token           IN VARCHAR2 DEFAULT NULL,
part_name       IN VARCHAR2 DEFAULT NULL,
token_type      IN NUMBER DEFAULT NULL,
parallel_degree IN NUMBER DEFAULT 1); 
); 
idx_name

Specify the name of the index. If you do not specify an index name, then Oracle Text chooses a single index to optimize.

optlevel

Specify optimization level as a string. You can specify one of the following methods for optimization:

optlevel value Description
FAST or CTX_DDL.OPTLEVEL_FAST This method compacts fragmented rows. However, old data is not removed.

FAST optimization is not supported for CTXCAT indexes. FAST optimization will not optimize $S index table.

FULL or CTX_DDL.OPTLEVEL_FULL In this mode you can optimize the entire index or a portion of the index. This method compacts rows and removes old data (deleted rows). Optimizing in full mode runs even when there are no deleted rows.

Full optimization is not supported for CTXCAT indexes.

REBUILD or CTX_DDL.OPTLEVEL_REBUILD This optlevel rebuilds the $I table (the inverted list table) to produce more compact token info rows. Like FULL optimize, this mode also deletes information pertaining to deleted rows of the base table.

REBUILD is not supported for CTCAT, CTXRULE, or CTXXPATH indexes. REBUILD optimization is also not supported for CONTEXT indexes that have substring indexing enabled.

REBUILD is not supported when the $I table is partitioned.

TOKEN or CTX_DDL.OPTLEVEL_TOKEN This method lets you specify a specific token to be optimized. Oracle Text does a full optimization on the token you specify with token. If no token type is provided, 0 (zero) will be used as the default.

Use this method to optimize those tokens that are searched frequently.

Token optimization is not supported for CTXCAT, CTXRULE, and CTXXPATH indexes.

TOKEN_TYPE or CTX_DDL.OPTLEVEL_TOKEN_TYPE This optlevel optimizes on demand all tokens in the index matching the input token type.

When optlevel is TOKEN_TYPE, token_type must be provided.TOKEN_TYPE performs FULL optimize on any token of the input token_type. Like a TOKEN optimize, TOKEN_TYPE optimize does not change the FULL optimize state, and runs to completion on each invocation.

Token_type optimization is not supported for CTXCAT, CTXRULE, and CTXXPATH indexes.


The behavior of CTX_DDL.OPTIMIZE_INDEX with respect to the $S index table is as follows:

optlevel value Will Optimize $S Index Table Yes/No Notes
FAST or CTX_DDL.OPTLEVEL_FAST No  
FULL or CTX_DDL.OPTLEVEL_FULL Yes
  • The optimize process will optimize $I table first. Once $I table optimize is finished, CTX_DDL.OPTIMIZE_INDEX will continue on to optimize $S index table.
  • MAXTIME will also be honored. Once CTX_DDL.OPTIMIZE_INDEX completes optimizing $S rows for a given SDATA_ID, it will check MAXTIME and exit if total elapsed time (including time taken to optimize $I) exceeds specified MAXTIME. The next CTX_DDL.OPTIMIZE_INDEX with optlevel=>'FULL' will pick up where it left off.

  • $S table optimize will be done in serial.

REBUILD or CTX_DDL.OPTLEVEL_REBUILD Yes
  • $S optimize will start after $I rebuild finishes.
  • $S optimize in this case will be processed the same way as $S optimize in FULL mode. $S table is optimized in place, not rebuilt.

    Note: If for some reason $S optimize exits abnormally, then it is recommended that you use optlevel=>TOKEN_TYPE to optimize $S to avoid rebuilding the $I table again.

  • $S table optimize will be done in serial.

TOKEN or CTX_DDL.OPTLEVEL_TOKEN No  
TOKEN_TYPE or CTX_DDL.OPTLEVEL_TOKEN_TYPE Yes You can optimize $S rows for a given SDATA_ID by setting optlevel => TOKEN_TYPE and the TOKEN_TYPE parameter to the target SDATA_ID.

maxtime

Specify maximum optimization time, in minutes, for FULL optimize.

When you specify the symbol CTX_DDL.MAXTIME_UNLIMITED (or pass in NULL), the entire index is optimized. This is the default.

token

Specify the token to be optimized.

part_name

If your index is a local index, then you must specify the name of the index partition to synchronize otherwise an error is returned.

If your index is a global, non-partitioned index, then specify NULL, which is the default.

token_type

Specify the token_type to be optimized.

parallel_degree

Specify the parallel degree as a number for parallel optimization. The actual parallel degree depends on your resources. Note that when using REBUILD, setting parallel_degree to a value greater than 1 still results in serial execution.

Because the following optlevel values are executed serially, this setting is ignored for them:

  • TOKEN or CTX_DDL.OPTLEVEL_TOKEN

  • FAST or CTX_DDL.OPTLEVEL_FAST

Examples

The following two examples are equivalent ways of optimizing an index using fast optimization:

begin 
  ctx_ddl.optimize_index('myidx','FAST'); 
end;

begin
  ctx_ddl.optimize_index('myidx',CTX_DDL.OPTLEVEL_FAST);
end;

The following example optimizes the index token Oracle:

begin
  ctx_ddl.optimize_index('myidx','token', TOKEN=>'Oracle');
end;

To optimize all tokens of field section MYSEC in index MYINDEX:

begin
  ctx_ddl.optimize_index('myindex', ctx_ddl.optlevel_token_type,
     token_type=> ctx_report.token_type('myindex','field mysec text'));end;

Notes

You can run CTX_DDL.SYNC and CTX_DDL.OPTIMIZE at the same time. You can also run CTX_DDL.SYNC and CTX_DDL.OPTIMIZE with parallelism at the same time. However, you should not:

If you should run one of these combinations, no error is generated; however, one operation will wait until the other is done.

Related Topics

See also CTX_DDL.SYNC_INDEX and ALTER INDEX in Chapter 1, "Oracle Text SQL Statements and Operators".


POPULATE_PENDING

This procedure populates the pending queue with every rowid in the base table or table partition. This procedure is only supported for CONTEXT indexes.

This procedure is valuable for large installations that cannot afford to have the indexing process run continuously, and, therefore, need finer control over creating text indexes. The preferred method is to create an empty index, place all the rowids into the pending queue, and build the index through CTX_DDL.SYNC_INDEX.

Syntax

ctx_ddl.populate_pending(
  idx_name  IN VARCHAR2,
  part_name IN VARCHAR2 DEFAULT NULL
);
idx_name

Name of the CONTEXT indextype.

part_name

Name of the index partition, if any. Must be provided for local partitioned indexes and must be NULL for global, non-partitioned indexes.

Notes

The SYNC_INDEX is blocked for the duration of the processing. The index unit must be totally empty (idx_docid_count = 0, idx_nextid = 1). The rowids of rows waiting to be indexed are inserted into table ctxsys.dr$pending. You should ensure that there is sufficient space in this table to hold the rowids of the base table.

Related Topics

See also SYNC_INDEX, CREATE_SHADOW_INDEX, DROP_SHADOW_INDEX, EXCHANGE_SHADOW_INDEX, RECREATE_INDEX_ONLINE.


RECREATE_INDEX_ONLINE

Recreates the specified index, or recreates the passed-in index partition if the index is local partitioned. For global non-partitioned indexes, this is a one-step procedure. For local partitioned indexes, this procedure must be run separately on every partition after first using CREATE_SHADOW_INDEX to create a shadow policy (or metadata). This procedure is only supported in Enterprise Edition of Oracle Database.

The following changes are not supported:

Syntax

CTX_DDL.RECREATE_INDEX_ONLINE(
   idx_name          IN VARCHAR2,
   parameter_string  IN VARCHAR2 default NULL,
   parallel_degree   IN NUMBER default 1,
   partition_name    IN VARCHAR2 default NULL
);
idx_name

The name of a valid CONTEXT indextype.

parameter_string

If the index is a global non-partitioned index, specify the same index-level parameter string as in ALTER INDEX. Must start with REPLACE, if it is not NULL. Optionally specify SWAP or NOSWAP. The default is SWAP.

parallel_degree

Reserved for future use. Specify the degree of parallelism. Parallel operation is not supported in the current release.

partition_name

Specify the name of a valid index partition for a local partitioned index. Otherwise, the default is NULL. If the index is partitioned, then first pass a partition name, and then specify the partition-level parameter string for ALTER INDEX REBUILD PARTITION.

Examples

Example 7-5 Recreate Simple Global Index

The following example creates an index idx with a BASIC_LEXER-based preference us_lexer. It then recreates the index with a new MULTI_LEXER based preference m_lexer in one step. You can use this one step approach when you do not mind that a query might fail for a small window of time at the end of the operation, and DML might get blocked at the beginning for a short time and again at the end.

/* create lexer and original index */
exec ctx_ddl.create_preference('us_lexer','basic_lexer');
create index idx on tbl(text) indextype is ctxsys.context
  parameters('lexer us_lexer');
 
/* create a new lexer */
begin
  ctx_ddl.create_preference('e_lexer','basic_lexer');
  ctx_ddl.set_attribute('e_lexer','base_letter','yes');
  ctx_ddl.create_preference('m_lexer','multi_lexer');
  ctx_ddl.add_sub_lexer('m_lexer','default','us_lexer');
  ctx_ddl.add_sub_lexer('m_lexer','e','e_lexer');
end;
/
 
/* add new language column to the table for multi-lexer */
alter table tbl add(lang varchar2(10) default 'us');
 
/* recreate index online with the new multip-lexer */
exec ctx_ddl.recreate_index_online('idx',
  'replace lexer m_lexer language column lang');

Example 7-6 Local Index Recreate with All-At-Once Swap

The following example creates a local partitioned index idxp with a basic lexer us_lexer. It has two index partitions idx_p1 and idx_p2. It then recreates a local partitioned index idxp online with partition idx_p1, which will have a new storage preference new_store. The swapping of the partition metadata and index partition data occur at the end. In this example, queries spanning multiple partitions return consistent results across partitions when recreate is in process, except at the end when EXCHANGE_SHADOW_INDEX is running. The extra space required is the combined index size of partition idx_p1 and idx_p2.

/* create a basic lexer and a local partition index with the lexer*/
exec ctx_ddl.create_preference('us_lexer','basic_lexer');
create index idxp on tblp(text) indextype is ctxsys.context local
  (partition idx_p1,
   partition idx_p2)
 parameters('lexer us_lexer');
 
/* create new preferences  */
begin
  ctx_ddl.create_preference('my_store','basic_storage');
  ctx_ddl.set_attribute('my_store','i_table_clause','tablespace tbs');
end;
/
begin
  ctx_ddl.create_preference('e_lexer','basic_lexer');
  ctx_ddl.set_attribute('e_lexer','base_letter','yes');
  ctx_ddl.create_preference('m_lexer','multi_lexer');
  ctx_ddl.add_sub_lexer('m_lexer','default','us_lexer');
  ctx_ddl.add_sub_lexer('m_lexer','e','e_lexer');
end;
/
 
/* add new language column */
alter table tblp add column (lang varchar2(10) default 'us');
 
/* create a shadow policy with a new lexer */
exec ctx_ddl.create_shadow_index('idxp', null,
  'replace lexer m_lexer language column lang');
 
/* recreate every index partition online without swapping */
exec ctx_ddl.recreate_index_online('idxp',
   'replace storage my_store NOSWAP', 1, 'idx_p1');
exec ctx_ddl.recreate_index_online('idxp','replace NOSWAP',1,'idx_p2');
 
/* exchange in shadow index partition all at once */
exec ctx_ddl.exchange_shadow_index('idxp',
      'idx_p1') /* exchange index partition data*/
exec ctx_ddl.exchange_shadow_index('idxp',
      'idx_p2') /* exchange index partition data*/
 
/* exchange in shadow index metadata */
exec ctx_ddl.exchange_shadow_index('idxp')

Example 7-7 Local Index Recreate with Per-Partition Swap

This example performs the same tasks as Example 7-6, "Local Index Recreate with All-At-Once Swap", except that each index partition is swapped in as it is completed. Queries across all partitions may return inconsistent results in this example.

/* create a basic lexer and a local partition index with the lexer*/
exec ctx_ddl.create_preference('us_lexer','basic_lexer');
create index idxp on tblp(text) indextype is ctxsys.context local
  (partition idx_p1,
   partition idx_p2)
 parameters('lexer us_lexer');
 
/* create new preferences  */
begin
  ctx_ddl.create_preference('my_store','basic_storage');
  ctx_ddl.set_attribute('my_store','i_table_clause','tablespace tbs');
end;
/
begin
  ctx_ddl.create_preference('e_lexer','basic_lexer');
  ctx_ddl.set_attribute('e_lexer','base_letter','yes');
  ctx_ddl.create_preference('m_lexer','multi_lexer');
  ctx_ddl.add_sub_lexer('m_lexer','default','us_lexer');
  ctx_ddl.add_sub_lexer('m_lexer','e','e_lexer');
end;
/
 
/* add new language column */
alter table tblp add column (lang varchar2(10) default 'us');
 
/* create a shadow policy with a new lexer *
exec ctx_ddl.create_shadow_index('idxp',
  'replace lexer m_lexer language column lang');
 
/* recreate every index partition online and swap (default) */
exec ctx_ddl.recreate_index_online('idxp',
       'replace storage my_store', 1, 'idx_p1');
exec ctx_ddl.recreate_index_online('idxp', 'replace SWAP', 1, 'idx_p2',
   
    /* exchange in shadow index metadata */
exec ctx_ddl.exchange_shadow_index('idxp') 

Example 7-8 Scheduled Local Index Recreate with All-At-Once Swap

This example shows the incremental recreation of a local partitioned index, where partitions are all swapped at the end.

/* create a basic lexer and a local partition index with the lexer*/
exec ctx_ddl.create_preference('us_lexer','basic_lexer');
create index idxp on tblp(text) indextype is ctxsys.context local
  (partition idx_p1,
   partition idx_p2)
 parameters('lexer us_lexer');
 
/* create new preferences  */
begin
  ctx_ddl.create_preference('my_store','basic_storage');
  ctx_ddl.set_attribute('my_store','i_table_clause','tablespace tbs');
end;
/
begin
  ctx_ddl.create_preference('e_lexer','basic_lexer');
  ctx_ddl.set_attribute('e_lexer','base_letter','yes');
  ctx_ddl.create_preference('m_lexer','multi_lexer');
  ctx_ddl.add_sub_lexer('m_lexer','default','us_lexer');
  ctx_ddl.add_sub_lexer('m_lexer','e','e_lexer');
end;
/
 
/* add new language column */
alter table tblp add column (lang varchar2(10) default 'us');
 
/* create a shadow policy with a new lexer *
exec ctx_ddl.create_shadow_index('idxp',
  'replace lexer m_lexer language column lang');
/* create shadow partition with new storage preference */
exec ctx_ddl.recreate_index_online('idxp', 'replace storage ctxsys.default_storage nopopulate',1,'idx_p1');
exec ctx_ddl.recreate_index_online('idxp', 'replace storage ctxsys.default_storage nopopulate',1,'idx_p2');
 
declare
  idxid integer;
  ixpid integer;
begin
  select idx_id into idxid from ctx_user_indexes
    where idx_name = 'IDXP';
  select ixp_id into ixpid from ctx_user_index_partitions
    where ixp_index_name = 'IDXP'
          and ixp_index_partition_name = 'IDX_P1';
  /* populate pending */
  ctx_ddl.populate_pending('RIO$'||idxid, 'RIO$'||idxid||'#'||ixpid);
  /* incremental sync
  ctx_ddl.sync_index('RIO$'||idxid, null, 'RIO$'||idxid||'#'||ixpid,
                      maxtime=>400);
  /* more incremental sync until no more pending rows */
 
  select ixp_id into ixpid from ctx_user_index_partitions
    where ixp_index_name = 'IDXP'
          and ixp_index_partition_name = 'IDX_P2';
  /* populate pending */
  ctx_ddl.populate_pending('RIO$'||idxid, 'RIO$'||idxid||'#'||ixpid);
  /* incremental sync
  ctx_ddl.sync_index('RIO$'||idxid, null, 'RIO$'||idxid||'#'||ixpid,
                      maxtime=>400);
  /* more incremental sync until no more pending rows */
end;
/
  
exec ctx_ddl.exchange_shadow_index('idxp','idx_p1');
exec ctx_ddl.exchange_shadow_index('idxp','idx_p2');
exec ctx_ddl.exchange_shadow_index('idxp');

Example 7-9 Schedule Local Index Recreate with Per-Partition Swap

For incremental recreate where partitions are swapped as they becomes available, follow the steps in example Example 7-8, "Scheduled Local Index Recreate with All-At-Once Swap", except instead of waiting until all syncs are finished before starting exchange shadow index, EXCHANGE_SHADOW_INDEX is done for each partition right after sync is finished.

Notes

Using RECREATE_INDEX_ONLINE with Global Non-partitioned Indexes

For global indexes, this procedure provides a one-step process to recreate an index online. It recreates an index, with new preference values, while preserving base table DML and query capability during the recreate process.

Note:

Because the new index is created alongside the existing index, this operation requires additional storage roughly equal to the size of the existing index.
DML Behavior

Because this procedure is performed online, DML on the base table are permitted during this operation, and are processed as normal. All DML statements that occur during RECREATE_INDEX_ONLINE are logged into an online pending queue.

Towards the end of the recreate operation, there will be a short duration when DML will fail with an error being raised stating that the index is in an in-progress status. DML may hang again during the process, and the duration will depend on how many DML are logged in the online pending queue since the start of the recreate process.

Note that after the recreate index operation is complete, new information, from all the DML that becomes pending since RECREATE_INDEX_ONLINE started, may not be immediately reflected. As with creating an index with INDEXTYPE IS ctxsys.context ONLINE, the index should be synchronized after the recreate index operation is complete, to bring it fully up-to-date.

See Also:

Sync and Optimize Behavior

Syncs issued against the index during the recreate operation are processed against the old, existing data. Syncs are also blocked during the same window when queries return errors. Optimize commands issued against the index during the recreate operation return immediately without error and without processing.

Query Behavior

During the recreate operation, the index can be queried normally most of the time. Queries return results based on the existing index and policy (or metadata) until after the final swap.

There is a short interval towards the end of RECREATE_INDEX_ONLINE when queries will return an error indicating that the column is not indexed. This duration should be short for regular queries. It is mainly the time taken for swapping data segments of the shadow index tables and the index tables, plus the time to delete all the rows in the pending queue. This is the same window of time when DML will fail.

During RECREATE_INDEX_ONLINE, if you issue DML statements and synchronize them, then you will be able to see the new rows when you query on the existing index. However, after RECREATE_INDEX_ONLINE finishes (swapping completes and query is on the new index) and before sync is performed, it is possible that you will not be able to query on the new rows, which once could be queried on the old index.

Note:

Transactional queries are not supported.

Using RECREATE_INDEX_ONLINE with Local Partitioned Indexes

If the index is local partitioned, you cannot recreate index in one step. You must first create a shadow policy, and then run this procedure for every partition. You can specify SWAP or NOSWAP to indicate whether RECREATE_INDEX_ONLINE partition will swap the index partition data and index partition metadata or not. If the partition was built with NOSWAP, then another call to EXCHANGE_SHADOW_INDEX must be invoked later against this partition.

This procedure can also be used to update the metadata (for example, storage preference) of each partition when you specify NOPOPULATE in the parameter string. This is useful for incremental building of a shadow index through time-limited sync.

If NOPOPULATE is specified, then NOSWAP is silently enforced.

NOSWAP Behavior

During the recreate of the index partition, since no swapping is performed, queries on the partition are processed regularly. Until the swapping stage is reached, queries spanning multiple partitions return consistent results across partitions.

DML and sync are processed normally. Running optimize on partitions that are being recreated, or that have been built (but not swapped), simply returns without doing anything. Running optimize on a partition that has not been rebuilt processes normally.

As with a global index, when all of the partitions use NOSWAP, the additional storage requirement is roughly equal to the size of the existing index.

SWAP Behavior

Because index partition data and metadata are swapped after index recreate, queries that span multiple partitions will not return consistent results from partition to partition, but will always be correct with respect to each index partition. There is also a short interval towards the end of partition recreate, when the index partition is swapped, during which a query will return a "column not indexed" error.

When partitions are recreated with SWAP, the additional storage requirement for the operation is equal to the size of the existing index partition.

DML on the partition is blocked. Sync is also blocked during swapping.

Related Topics

See also CREATE_SHADOW_INDEX and DROP_SHADOW_INDEX, and EXCHANGE_SHADOW_INDEX, as well as Oracle Text Application Developer's Guide.


REMOVE_INDEX

Removes the index with the specified column list from a CTXCAT index set preference.

Note:

This procedure does not remove a CTXCAT sub-index from the existing index. To do so, you must drop your index and re-index with the modified index set preference.

Syntax

CTX_DDL.REMOVE_INDEX(
set_name       IN VARCHAR2,
     column_list    IN VARCHAR2
     language       IN VARCHAR2 default NULL
);
set_name

Specify the name of the index set.

column_list

Specify the name of the column list to remove.


REMOVE_MDATA

Use this procedure to remove metadata values, which are associated with an MDATA section, from a document. Only the owner of the index is allowed to call ADD_MDATA and REMOVE_MDATA.

Syntax

CTX_DDL.REMOVE_MDATA(
     idx_name           IN VARCHAR2, 
     section_name       IN VARCHAR2, 
     values             SYS.ODCIVARCHAR2LIST,
     rowids             SYS.ODCIRIDLIST,
     [part_name]        IN VARCHAR2]
);
idx_name

Name of the text index that contains the named rowids.

section_name

Name of the MDATA section.

values

List of metadata values. If a metadata value contains a comma, the comma must be escaped with a backslash.

rowids

Rowids from which to remove the metadata values.

[part_name]

Name of the index partition, if any. Must be provided for local partitioned indexes and must be NULL for global, non-partitioned indexes.

Example

This example removes the MDATA value blue from the MDATA section BGCOLOR.

ctx_ddl.remove_mdata('idx_docs', 'bgcolor', 'blue', 'rows'); 

Related Topics

See also "ADD_MDATA"; "ADD_MDATA_SECTION"; "MDATA"; as well as the Section Searching chapter of Oracle Text Application Developer's Guide.

Notes

These updates are updates directly on the index itself, not on the actual contents stored in the base table. Therefore, they will not survive when the Text index is rebuilt.


REMOVE_SECTION

The REMOVE_SECTION procedure removes the specified section from the specified section group. You can specify the section by name or ID. View section ID with the CTX_USER_SECTIONS view.

Syntax 1

Use the following syntax to remove a section by section name:

CTX_DDL.REMOVE_SECTION(
  group_name       in    varchar2, 
  section_name     in    varchar2
);
group_name

Specify the name of the section group from which to delete section_name.

section_name

Specify the name of the section to delete from group_name.

Syntax 2

Use the following syntax to remove a section by section ID:

CTX_DDL.REMOVE_SECTION(
  group_name     in    varchar2,
  section_id     in    number
);
group_name

Specify the name of the section group from which to delete section_id.

section_id

Specify the section ID of the section to delete from group_name.

Example

The following example drops a section called Title from the htmgroup:

begin
ctx_ddl.remove_section('htmgroup', 'Title');
end;

Related Topics

ADD_FIELD_SECTION

ADD_SPECIAL_SECTION

ADD_ZONE_SECTION


REMOVE_STOPCLASS

Removes a stopclass from a stoplist.

Syntax

CTX_DDL.REMOVE_STOPCLASS(
  stoplist_name  in   varchar2,
  stopclass      in   varchar2
);
stoplist_name

Specify the name of the stoplist.

stopclass

Specify the name of the stopclass to be removed.

Example

The following example removes the stopclass NUMBERS from the stoplist mystop.

begin
ctx_ddl.remove_stopclass('mystop', 'NUMBERS');
end;

Related Topics

ADD_STOPCLASS


REMOVE_STOPTHEME

Removes a stoptheme from a stoplist.

Syntax

CTX_DDL.REMOVE_STOPTHEME(
  stoplist_name   in   varchar2,
  stoptheme       in   varchar2
);
stoplist_name

Specify the name of the stoplist.

stoptheme

Specify the stoptheme to be removed from stoplist_name.

Example

The following example removes the stoptheme banking from the stoplist mystop:

begin
ctx_ddl.remove_stoptheme('mystop', 'banking');
end;

Related Topics

ADD_STOPTHEME


REMOVE_STOPWORD

Removes a stopword from a stoplist. To have the removal of a stopword be reflected in the index, you must rebuild your index.

Syntax

CTX_DDL.REMOVE_STOPWORD(
stoplist_name  in   varchar2,
stopword       in   varchar2,
language       in   varchar2 default NULL
);
stoplist_name

Specify the name of the stoplist.

stopword

Specify the stopword to be removed from stoplist_name.

language

Specify the language of stopword to remove when the stoplist you specify with stoplist_name is of type MULTI_STOPLIST. You must specify the globalization support name or abbreviation of an Oracle Text-supported language. You can also remove ALL stopwords.

Example

The following example removes a stopword because from the stoplist mystop:

begin
ctx_ddl.remove_stopword('mystop','because');
end;

Related Topics

ADD_STOPWORD


REMOVE_SUB_LEXER

Removes a sub-lexer from a multi-lexer preference. You cannot remove the lexer for DEFAULT.

Syntax

CTX_DDL.REMOVE_SUB_LEXER(
lexer_name  in   varchar2,
language    in   varchar2 default NULL
);
lexer_name

Specify the name of the multi-lexer preference.

language

Specify the language of the sub-lexer to remove. You must specify the globalization support name or abbreviation of an Oracle Text-supported language.

Example

The following example removes a sub-lexer german_lexer of language german:

begin
ctx_ddl.remove_sub_lexer('german_lexer','german');
end;

Related Topics

ADD_SUB_LEXER


REPLACE_INDEX_METADATA

Use this procedure to replace metadata in local domain indexes at the global (index) level.

Note:

The ALTER INDEX PARAMETERS command performs the same function as this procedure and can replace more than just metadata. For that reason, using ALTER INDEX PARAMETERS is the preferred method of replacing metadata at the global (index) level and should be used in place of this procedure when possible. For more information, see "ALTER INDEX PARAMETERS Syntax".

CTX_REPLACE_INDEX_METADATA may be deprecated in a future release of Oracle Text.

Syntax

CTX_DDL.REPLACE_INDEX_METADATA(idx_name IN VARCHAR2,  
                      parameter_string IN VARCHAR2); 
idx_name

Specify the name of the index whose metadata you want to replace.

parameter_string

Specify the parameter string to be passed to ALTER INDEX. This must begin with 'REPLACE METADATA'.

Notes

ALTER INDEX REBUILD PARAMETERS ('REPLACE METADATA') does not work for a local partitioned index at the index (global) level; you cannot, for example, use that ALTER INDEX syntax to change a global preference, such as filter or lexer type, without rebuilding the index. Therefore, CTX_DDL.REPLACE_INDEX_METADATA is provided as a method of overcoming this limitation of ALTER INDEX.

Though it is meant as a way to replace metadata for a local partitioned index, CTX_DDL.REPLACE_INDEX_METADATA can be used on a global, non-partitioned index, as well.

REPLACE_INDEX_METADATA cannot be used to change the sync type at the partition level; that is, parameter_string cannot be 'REPLACE METADATA SYNC'. For that purpose, use ALTER INDEX REBUILD PARTITION to change the sync type at the partition level.

Related Topics

See also "ALTER INDEX PARAMETERS Syntax" and "ALTER INDEX REBUILD Syntax".


SET_ATTRIBUTE

Sets a preference attribute. Use this procedure after you have created a preference with CTX_DDL.CREATE_PREFERENCE.

Syntax

CTX_DDL.SET_ATTRIBUTE(preference_name IN VARCHAR2,  
                      attribute_name  IN VARCHAR2,  
                      attribute_value IN VARCHAR2); 
preference_name

Specify the name of the preference.

attribute_name

Specify the name of the attribute.

attribute_value

Specify the attribute value. Specify boolean values as TRUE or FALSE, T or F, YES or NO, Y or N, ON or OFF, or 1 or 0.

Example

Specifying File Data Storage

The following example creates a data storage preference called filepref that tells the system that the files to be indexed are stored in the operating system. The example then uses CTX_DDL.SET_ATTRIBUTE to set the PATH attribute to the directory /docs.

begin
ctx_ddl.create_preference('filepref', 'FILE_DATASTORE');
ctx_ddl.set_attribute('filepref', 'PATH', '/docs'); 
end;

See Also:

For more information about data storage, see "Datastore Types" in Chapter 2, "Oracle Text Indexing Elements"

For more examples of using SET_ATTRIBUTE, see "CREATE_PREFERENCE" in this chapter


SYNC_INDEX

Synchronizes the index to process inserts, updates, and deletes to the base table.

Note:

Because CTX_DDL.SYNC_INDEX issues implicit commits, calling CTX_DDL.SYNC_INDEX in a trigger is strongly discouraged. Doing so can result in errors being raised, as both SYNC_INDEX and post-commit $R LOB maintenance try to update the same $R LOB.

Syntax

CTX_DDL.SYNC_INDEX(
idx_name       IN  VARCHAR2 DEFAULT NULL
memory          IN VARCHAR2 DEFAULT NULL,
part_name       IN VARCHAR2 DEFAULT NULL,
parallel_degree IN NUMBER DEFAULT 1
maxtime         IN NUMBER DEFAULT NULL,
locking         IN NUMBER DEFAULT LOCK_WAIT
); 
idx_name

Specify the name of the index to synchronize.

Note:

When idx_name is null, all CONTEXT, CTXRULE, and CTXXPATH indexes that have pending changes are synchronized. You must be connected as ctxsys to perform this operation. Each index or index partition is synchronized in sequence, one after the other. Because of this, the individual syncs are performed with locking set to NOWAIT and maxtime set to 0. Any values that you specify for locking or maxtime on the SYNC_INDEX call are ignored. However, the memory and parallel_degree parameters are passed on to the individual synchronizations.
memory

Specify the runtime memory to use for synchronization. This value overrides the DEFAULT_INDEX_MEMORY system parameter.

The memory parameter specifies the amount of memory Oracle Text uses for the synchronization operation before flushing the index to disk. Specifying a large amount of memory:

Specifying smaller amounts of memory increases disk I/O and index fragmentation, but might be useful when runtime memory is scarce.

part_name

If your index is a local index, then you must specify the name of the index partition to synchronize otherwise an error is returned.

If your index is a global, non-partitioned index, then specify NULL, which is the default.

parallel_degree

Specify the degree to run parallel synchronize. A number greater than 1 turns on parallel synchronize. The actual degree of parallelism might be smaller depending on your resources.

maxtime

Indicate a suggested time limit on the operation, in minutes. SYNC_INDEX will process as many documents in the queue as possible within the time limit. The maxtime value of NULL is equivalent to CTX_DDL.MAXTIME_UNLIMITED. This parameter is ignored when SYNC_INDEX is invoked without an index name, in which case maxtime value of 0 is used instead. The locking parameter is ignored for automatic syncs (that is, SYNC ON COMMIT or SYNC EVERY).

The time limit specified is treated as approximate. The actual time taken may be somewhat less than or greater than what you specify. The "time clock" for maxtime does not start until the SYNC lock is acquired.

locking

Configure how SYNC_INDEX deals with the situation where another sync is already running on the same index or index partition. When locking is ignored because SYNC_INDEX is invoked without an index name, then locking value of LOCK_NOWAIT is used instead. The locking parameter is ignored for automatic syncs (that is, SYNC ON COMMIT or SYNC EVERY).

The options for locking are:

CTX_DDL.LOCK_WAIT If another sync is running, wait until the running sync is complete, then begin sync. (In the event of not being able to get a lock, it will wait forever and ignore the maxtime setting.).
CTX_DDL.LOCK_NOWAIT If another sync is running, immediately returns without error.
CTX_DDL.LOCK_NOWAIT_ERROR If another sync is running, error "DRG-51313: timeout while waiting for DML or optimize lock" is raised.

Example

The following example synchronizes the index myindex with 2 megabytes of memory:

begin
ctx_ddl.sync_index('myindex', '2M');
end;

The following example synchronizes the part1 index partition with 2 megabytes of memory:

begin
ctx_ddl.sync_index('myindex', '2M', 'part1');
end;

Notes

You can run CTX_DDL.SYNC and CTX_DDL.OPTIMIZE at the same time. You can also run CTX_DDL.SYNC and CTX_DDL.OPTIMIZE with parallelism at the same time. However, you should not run CTX_DDL.SYNC with parallelism at the same time as CTX_DDL.OPTIMIZE, nor CTX_DDL.SYNC with parallelism at the same time as CTX_DDL.OPTIMIZE with parallelism. If you should run one of these combinations, no error is generated; however, one operation will wait until the other is done.

Related Topics

ALTER INDEX in Chapter 1, "Oracle Text SQL Statements and Operators"


UNSET_ATTRIBUTE

Removes a set attribute from a preference.

Syntax

CTX_DDL.UNSET_ATTRIBUTE(preference_name varchar2,
                        attribute_name  varchar2);
preference_name

Specify the name of the preference.

attribute_name

Specify the name of the attribute.

Example

Enabling/Disabling Alternate Spelling

The following example shows how you can enable alternate spelling for German and disable alternate spelling with CTX_DDL.UNSET_ATTRIBUTE:

begin
ctx_ddl.create_preference('GERMAN_LEX', 'BASIC_LEXER');
ctx_ddl.set_attribute('GERMAN_LEX', 'ALTERNATE_SPELLING', 'GERMAN');
end;

To disable alternate spelling, use the CTX_DDL.UNSET_ATTRIBUTE procedure as follows:

begin
ctx_ddl.unset_attribute('GERMAN_LEX', 'ALTERNATE_SPELLING');
end;

Related Topics

SET_ATTRIBUTE


UPDATE_POLICY

Updates a policy created with CREATE_POLICY. Replaces the preferences of the policy. Null arguments are not replaced.

Syntax

CTX_DDL.UPDATE_POLICY(
         policy_name     IN VARCHAR2,
         filter          IN VARCHAR2 DEFAULT NULL,
         section_group   IN VARCHAR2 DEFAULT NULL,
         lexer           IN VARCHAR2 DEFAULT NULL,
         stoplist        IN VARCHAR2 DEFAULT NULL,
         wordlist        IN VARCHAR2 DEFAULT NULL);
policy_name

Specify the name of the policy to update.

filter

Specify the filter preference to use.

section_group

Specify the section group to use.

lexer

Specify the lexer preference to use.

stoplist

Specify the stoplist to use.

wordlist

Specify the wordlist to use.