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Oracle® Communications Network Intelligence Concepts
Release 7.2.2

E17891-03
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Glossary

A node

An A Node is a physical or logical location where a stream of information transmitted as part of a distinct communication, conversation or for a particular purpose begins. See Z node.

air-gap

Air-gap is a type of network security where the network is secured by keeping it separate from other local networks and the Internet.

black spot

A black spot is an area of the network where capacity utilization is low, leading to higher costs and an impact to customer service.

capacity

The bit rate in megabytes per second by which a trail is transmitted.

Capacity also applies to trail holders and ports, to indicate the type of trail carried, or terminated.

capex

See capital expenditure.

capital expenditure

Outlay by a communication service provider on the acquisition of physical assets, particularly network equipment and associated property.

card

A card is a printed circuit board added to a slot.

channel

A channel is the smallest time division dedicated to a communication device. For the GSM system, a channel is 577 microseconds.

See timeslot.

channelized trail

A channelized trail is a communication line (carrier) divided into multiple logical communication channels. See trail.

child trail

A child trail is a functional element of a telecom network dependent on another trail, its parent.

See trail and parent trail.

communication service provider

A communication service provider is a company in the telecom (land line and wireless), internet, cable, satellite, and managed services businesses that typically transports information electronically.

configuration plan

A configuration plan is a collection of network configuration tasks that are recorded for audit purposes, to create a report for senior management, to provide the inputs required to generate a works order for field staff, or for a variety of other uses.

core database

The core database is a storage area created to model and manage application data, typically from an ims, or multiple inventories. It is the production database for Network Intelligence, and uses a core schema to describe the way in which the application data is organized into tables.

core schema

Network Intelligence extracts data from database tables in the staging schema and loads it into the equivalent tables in the core schema. The data loading process is generally scheduled to frequently run-often every night- to ensure that the data presented in Network Intelligence is accurate and up to date.

To create extensible attributes for an equipment entity, use SQL to insert and update metadata in the core schema.

customer

An individual or organization that uses a service. Certain Network Intelligence reports display data that is specifically applicable to a customer. For example, the customer bandwidth view lists all customers subscribing to a service carried on the network.

customer trail

A customer trail is a trail carrying customer traffic. See trail.

data dictionary

The logical repository of data elements used in Network Intelligence, particularly in relation to the database tables that comprise the core schema and staging schema. The Data Dictionary defines data types and structures that can be used to implement code to structurally or functionally extend Network Intelligence. For example, you can check the syntax of the date value in the INSERVICE_DATE field in the EQUIPMENT_STG table.

See core schema and staging schema.

equipment

An equipment is a device that terminates or transits trails (for example, a Huawei OptiX OSN 3500 or Cisco E3000 wireless router).

equipment definition

An equipment definition provides the blueprint that specifies how an equipment is created and configured.

equipment holder

A generic term that refers to a model used to define any of the sub-components of an equipment, such as the following:

forecast

A collection of service demands with expected future trail growth counts for one, or more, future time periods.

forecast manager

Creates service demand plans based on current network utilization trends, and on cost data. For example, you can generate future network requirements based on how much service growth is forecast each month. Forecast manager converts sales, marketing, and engineering data regarding forecasted growth into network point to point routing demands in the following formats:

  • Trail Routing Plan: Listing all new trail build routing

  • Network Build Plan: Itemizing new link and node build requirements

  • Network Financial Budget: Tabulating cost line items

  • Network Impact: Outlining the effect of the forecast plan on existing network capacity.

forecast plan

Defines a collection of service demands with expected future trail growth counts for one, or more, future time periods. The result is then converted to individual network point-to-point service demands, each of which consists of a route with a quantity of trails that require routing. The service demands are used to automatically configure routes for multiple trails over the existing, and new planned network.

For example, to increase your network capacity, the forecast plan can assess the amount of new network build required, calculate the costs, and mandate that new network is built only when, and where, it is needed. New build costs are used to generate a sales bid, and network capacity for the bid can be reserved with forecast manager.

See forecast manager.

hop

A hop is the single path between a transmitter and a receiver.

hub

A hub is a communication device that distributes communication to several devices in a network through the re-broadcasting of data that it has received from one (or more) of the devices connected to it. A hub generally is a simple device that re-distributes data messages to multiple receivers. However, hubs can include switching functional and multi-point routing connection and other advanced system control functions. Hubs can be passive or active. Passive hubs simply re-direct (re-broadcast) data received. Active hubs both receive and regenerate data received.

hub site

A hub site is the location of the communication devices used to propagate communication to other network devices through data re-broadcasting.

See hub.

inventory management system

Software used to manage telecommunications network inventory. Network Intelligence loads data from inventory management systems.

leased trail

A leased trail is a telecommunication link with part or all of its transmission capacity reserved for the exclusive use of a single customer or company.

link trail

A link trail is a point-to-point connection at the highest level of the logical network. Parents of links are normally cable fiber pairs. From a planning point of view, a link trail is considered a link with a capacity to be managed between two network nodes. Link trails transport child trails of group type Path.

mesh view

A graphical view showing network site locations or network equipment connected using links. For example, the Inter Site Trail Mesh report displays the links between selected sites.

You use mesh views to see details about equipment and trails. For example, you can click a route to display all of its trails. You can select what to display (for example, only nodes or links).

migration manager

Enables the creation of migration plans that can be used to assist in the bulk migration of services from a resource, such as a topology, site, node, link, or card, that is no longer required. Also determines the impact on your network for migrations, such as upgrading the capacity of carrying trails. See migration plan.

migration plan

Used to generate network requirements changes to your network. For example, if you plan to upgrade bandwidth capacity, you can find the impact such an upgrade has on the trails in the network. migration manager facilitates asset relocation, premises closure, or the mapping of old services, sites, or nodes to new services, sites or nodes by generating a plan for network development and a decommissioning plan for entity removal, as required.

NE

See network element.

network

Consists of a series of points or nodes connected by trails; it may be made up of sub-networks.

network element

Active elements within a network subsystem used to provide a telecommunications service (for example, a network, topology, site, equipment, or trail).

node

A terminal of any branch of a telecom network, or a terminal common to two or more branches of a telecom network.

operating expenditure

Outlay by a communication service provider on the day to day running and ongoing upkeep of physical assets, particularly network equipment and associated property.

outage manager

Enables the creation of an outage plan to identify the customer and service impact on your network from a planned or unplanned outage. For example, if there is a planned shutdown of a link trail, you can find which customers are affected and send emails to the contacts at each customer, detailing all impacted entities. See outage plan.

outage plan

Used to create a report for an outage on a network element, or set of network elements. For example, if there is a planned outage for some part of your network, such as an underground cable, you can run outage manager to find out which core entities (for example, sites, equipment, customers, and services) are affected. Outage plans can be planned or unplanned. Affected customers can be notified through email.

parent trail

A parent trail is a functional element of a telecom network that has dependent trails called child trails that use or consume information or data from the parent trail. See child trail.

path

Any communication link or trail through which any information can be transferred.

path trail

A path trail is a trail that logically carries customer trails between two points in the network. Path trails have link trails as parents and child trails of group type Trail as children.

plan

A plan is a collection of network configuration tasks to be applied to the network.

A plan normally consists of service demands.

Plans can also include proposed sites, equipment, or links.

Plans are presented in the tree browser as My Plans (plans created by the current user) or Other Plans (plans created by other users.)

Plans can take several forms:

policy

A policy is a set of rules that are applied when looking for a path between two points in the network. So, for example, policies specify class of service, or quality of service constraints when looking for suitable network resources to satisfy service demand requirements on a service level agreement (SLA.)

port

A port is a physical interface through which information is transferred.

resource group

A collection of network elements used in outage planning, configuration planning, and the bulk updating of trails.

For example, you can use outage manager to generate an outage report by first selecting the entity type associated with the outage and then adding a resource group containing the specific network elements in the application. Bundling entities into resource groups makes it easier to define and import the inputs for supported plans. See outage manager.

resource topology

A resource topology is typically used to divide a network into logical groupings (for example, to partition a network into nodes and edges).

ring

A network topology that takes a circular format. Data travels around the ring in one direction and each device on the right acts as a repeater to keep the signal strong as it travels. Each device incorporates a receiver for the incoming signal and a transmitter to send the data on to the next device in the ring. The network depends on the ability of the signal to travel around the ring.

route

A route is a collection of one of more trails that have the same start site, end site, capacity and service type.

rule

A rule is a routing constraint applied when looking for a path between two points in the network. So, for example, rules can be used to specify class of service, or quality of service constraints when looking for suitable network resources to satisfy service demand requirements on a service level agreement (SLA).

service

A service is a product offering delivered to a customer location through trails (for example, Metro Ethernet and IPTV).

A service can also refer to an internal network service such as a transport path or link (a trail must reference a service)

service definition

A service definition provides the blueprint that specifies how a service is created and configured.

Each service has an associated service definition. For example, a service definition may have a particular policy associated with it, which in turn may have rules and other policies associated with it.

service demand

A customer requirement for a service over a particular route (for example, Customer A requires a business data service between Site A4 and Site A5).

service level agreement

Defines the level of service offered to customer by a communication service provider. It typically measures service interruptions in terms of mean time between failures (MTBF), mean time to repair, or mean time to recovery (MTTR); data rates; throughput; jitter; and so on.

service topology

A service topology is used to model multipoint services. It is made up of the interconnection of the links and nodes of one of the following:

  • A point-to-point service;

  • A multipoint-to-multipoint service;

  • A rooted-multipoint service.

service trail

A service trail is a trail required by a service to define its network connectivity. As with services and service definitions, each trail also requires a trail definition to define the type of trail to be built, principally whether the trail is structured or unstructured. See trail and service.

shelf

A shelf is part of a sub-rack, into which a card can be added. It consists of a configurable number of slots.

site

A site is any entity in the network that contains equipment entities.

slot

A slot is part of a shelf, into which a card is added. Each slot can take only one card.

You can configure default, or allowed, cards for each slot.

staging database

The staging database is a storage area created to provide continuous access to application data. The core data loader extracts the data from each table in the staging schema and loads it into the equivalent table in the core schema.

staging schema

The staging schema consists of a subset of database tables based on the equivalent tables in the Network Intelligence core schema. These tables may be populated with data from inventory systems. The loader executes PL/SQL procedures to extract the data from each table in the staging schema and load it into the equivalent table in the core schema.

Records in the staging schema must be marked as newly created or modified so that they can be identified by the loader and loaded into the core schema. Records in the staging schema may also be marked for deletion by setting a deleted identifier and a deleted date; these records are then deleted from the core schema.

structured trail

A structured trail contains channels or timeslots used to divide and coordinate a communication channel (information transfer) into logical channels, frames (groups) of data, and fields within the frames that hold specific types of information.

See unstructured trail.

sub-rack

A sub-rack is a frame into which equipment modules are added. It consists of a configurable number of shelves.

terminating trail

A terminating trail has a start point or an end point associated with a particular network element, typically a site or equipment. A terminating trail is distinct from a transiting trail, which passes through, but does not terminate on, a particular network entity.

timeslot

A timeslot is the smallest time division dedicated to a communication device (for example, in the GSM system a timeslot is 577 microseconds).

topology

A topology is a structure containing equipment and trail links (for example, a ring).

There are two different types of topology in Network Intelligence.

A service topology is used to model multipoint services; it is made up of the interconnection of the links and nodes of one of the following:

  • A point-to-point service

  • A multipoint-to-multipoint service

  • A rooted-multipoint service

A resource topology is typically used to divide a network into logical groupings (for example, to partition a network into nodes and edges).

Each individual topology in the tree browser contains the following subfolders:

  • Links (containing the associated trails of all the topology links)

  • Nodes (containing the associated equipment of all the topology nodes).

trail

A trail is a connection between two sites or two pieces of equipment. A trail can transport services or other trails. A trail has a given capacity.

trail definition

A trail definition provides the blueprint that specifies how to create and configure a trail.

trail group

A trail group is used to associate trails of a particular type (for example, link, trail, path, or undefined).

trail holder

A trail holder is a channel or timeslot used to transport a trail between two network sites. Trails that are structured normally have one, or more, child trail holders that are used to channelize lower level trails carrying services.

trail holder definition

A trail holder definition provides the blueprint for creating a trail holder that specifies how a trail holder is configured and defines the types of trail definition that it can enable.

transiting trail

A transiting trail passes through, but does not terminate on, a particular network entity, typically a site or equipment.

See terminating trail.

unstructured trail

An unstructured trail is a transmission line or communication channel that does not have a channeled format.

See structured trail.

Z node

A Z Node is a physical or logical location where a stream of information transmitted as part of a distinct communication, conversation or for a particular purpose ends.

See A node.