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System Administration Guide: Oracle Solaris Containers-Resource Management and Oracle Solaris Zones
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Part I Resource Management

1.  Introduction to Solaris 10 Resource Management

Resource Management Overview

Resource Classifications

Resource Management Control Mechanisms

Constraint Mechanisms

Scheduling Mechanisms

Partitioning Mechanisms

Resource Management Configuration

Interaction With Solaris Zones

When to Use Resource Management

Server Consolidation

Supporting a Large or Varied User Population

Setting Up Resource Management (Task Map)

2.  Projects and Tasks (Overview)

3.  Administering Projects and Tasks

4.  Extended Accounting (Overview)

5.  Administering Extended Accounting (Tasks)

6.  Resource Controls (Overview)

7.  Administering Resource Controls (Tasks)

8.  Fair Share Scheduler (Overview)

9.  Administering the Fair Share Scheduler (Tasks)

10.  Physical Memory Control Using the Resource Capping Daemon (Overview)

11.  Administering the Resource Capping Daemon (Tasks)

12.  Resource Pools (Overview)

13.  Creating and Administering Resource Pools (Tasks)

14.  Resource Management Configuration Example

15.  Resource Control Functionality in the Solaris Management Console

Part II Zones

16.  Introduction to Solaris Zones

17.  Non-Global Zone Configuration (Overview)

18.  Planning and Configuring Non-Global Zones (Tasks)

19.  About Installing, Halting, Cloning, and Uninstalling Non-Global Zones (Overview)

20.  Installing, Booting, Halting, Uninstalling, and Cloning Non-Global Zones (Tasks)

21.  Non-Global Zone Login (Overview)

22.  Logging In to Non-Global Zones (Tasks)

23.  Moving and Migrating Non-Global Zones (Tasks)

24.  Solaris 10 9/10: Migrating a Physical Solaris System Into a Zone (Tasks)

25.  About Packages and Patches on a Solaris System With Zones Installed (Overview)

26.  Adding and Removing Packages and Patches on a Solaris System With Zones Installed (Tasks)

27.  Solaris Zones Administration (Overview)

28.  Solaris Zones Administration (Tasks)

29.  Upgrading a Solaris 10 System That Has Installed Non-Global Zones

30.  Troubleshooting Miscellaneous Solaris Zones Problems

Part III lx Branded Zones

31.  About Branded Zones and the Linux Branded Zone

32.  Planning the lx Branded Zone Configuration (Overview)

33.  Configuring the lx Branded Zone (Tasks)

34.  About Installing, Booting, Halting, Cloning, and Uninstalling lx Branded Zones (Overview)

35.  Installing, Booting, Halting, Uninstalling and Cloning lx Branded Zones (Tasks)

36.  Logging In to lx Branded Zones (Tasks)

37.  Moving and Migrating lx Branded Zones (Tasks)

38.  Administering and Running Applications in lx Branded Zones (Tasks)



When to Use Resource Management

Use resource management to ensure that your applications have the required response times.

Resource management can also increase resource utilization. By categorizing and prioritizing usage, you can effectively use reserve capacity during off-peak periods, often eliminating the need for additional processing power. You can also ensure that resources are not wasted because of load variability.

Server Consolidation

Resource management is ideal for environments that consolidate a number of applications on a single server.

The cost and complexity of managing numerous machines encourages the consolidation of several applications on larger, more scalable servers. Instead of running each workload on a separate system, with full access to that system's resources, you can use resource management software to segregate workloads within the system. Resource management enables you to lower overall total cost of ownership by running and controlling several dissimilar applications on a single Solaris system.

If you are providing Internet and application services, you can use resource management to do the following:

Supporting a Large or Varied User Population

Use resource management features in any system that has a large, diverse user base, such as an educational institution. If you have a mix of workloads, the software can be configured to give priority to specific projects.

For example, in large brokerage firms, traders intermittently require fast access to execute a query or to perform a calculation. Other system users, however, have more consistent workloads. If you allocate a proportionately larger amount of processing power to the traders' projects, the traders have the responsiveness that they need.

Resource management is also ideal for supporting thin-client systems. These platforms provide stateless consoles with frame buffers and input devices, such as smart cards. The actual computation is done on a shared server, resulting in a timesharing type of environment. Use resource management features to isolate the users on the server. Then, a user who generates excess load does not monopolize hardware resources and significantly impact others who use the system.