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System Administration Guide: Devices and File Systems
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Document Information


1.  Managing Removable Media (Overview)

2.  Managing Removable Media (Tasks)

3.  Accessing Removable Media (Tasks)

4.  Writing CDs and DVDs (Tasks)

5.  Managing Devices (Overview/Tasks)

What's New in Device Management?

New Hot Plugging Features

x86: Device Detection Tool

Support for PCI Express (PCIe)

USB and 1394 (FireWire) Support Enhancements

Improved Device In Use Error Checking

Where to Find Device Management Tasks

Managing Devices in the Solaris OS

Power Management of Devices

Power Management of Fibre Channel Devices

About Device Drivers

Automatic Configuration of Devices

Features and Benefits of Autoconfiguration

What You Need for Unsupported Devices

Displaying Device Configuration Information

driver not attached Message

How to Display System Configuration Information

Adding a Peripheral Device to a System

How to Add a Peripheral Device

How to Add a Device Driver

Accessing Devices

How Device Information Is Created

How Devices Are Managed

Device Naming Conventions

Logical Disk Device Names

Specifying the Disk Subdirectory

Direct and Bus-Oriented Controllers

x86: Disks With Direct Controllers

Disks With Bus-Oriented Controllers

Logical Tape Device Names

Logical Removable Media Device Names

6.  Dynamically Configuring Devices (Tasks)

7.  Using USB Devices (Overview)

8.  Using USB Devices (Tasks)

9.  Using InfiniBand Devices (Overview/Tasks)

10.  Managing Disks (Overview)

11.  Administering Disks (Tasks)

12.  SPARC: Adding a Disk (Tasks)

13.  x86: Adding a Disk (Tasks)

14.  Configuring Oracle Solaris iSCSI Targets and Initiators (Tasks)

15.  The format Utility (Reference)

16.  Managing File Systems (Overview)

17.  Creating ZFS, UFS, TMPFS, and LOFS File Systems (Tasks)

18.  Mounting and Unmounting File Systems (Tasks)

19.  Using The CacheFS File System (Tasks)

20.  Configuring Additional Swap Space (Tasks)

21.  Checking UFS File System Consistency (Tasks)

22.  UFS File System (Reference)

23.  Backing Up and Restoring UFS File Systems (Overview)

24.  Backing Up UFS Files and File Systems (Tasks)

25.  Using UFS Snapshots (Tasks)

26.  Restoring UFS Files and File Systems (Tasks)

27.  UFS Backup and Restore Commands (Reference)

28.  Copying UFS Files and File Systems (Tasks)

29.  Managing Tape Drives (Tasks)


Adding a Peripheral Device to a System

Adding a new peripheral device that is not-pluggable usually involves the following:

Use How to Add a Peripheral Device to add the following devices that are not hot-pluggable to a system:

In some cases, you might have to add a third-party device driver to support the new device.

For information on hot-plugging devices, see Chapter 6, Dynamically Configuring Devices (Tasks).

How to Add a Peripheral Device

  1. Become superuser.
  2. (Optional) If you need to add a device driver to support the device, complete the procedure How to Add a Device Driver.
  3. Create the /reconfigure file.
    # touch /reconfigure

    The /reconfigure file causes the Solaris software to check for the presence of any newly installed devices the next time you turn on or boot your system.

  4. Shut down the system.
    # shutdown -i0 -g30 -y

    Brings the system to the 0 init state, which is the appropriate state for turning the system power off for adding and removing devices.


    Shuts the system down in 30 seconds. The default is 60 seconds.


    Continues the system shutdown without user intervention. Otherwise, you are prompted to continue the shutdown process.

  5. Select one of the following to turn off power to the system after it is shut down:
    • For SPARC platforms, it is safe to turn off power if the ok prompt is displayed.

    • For x86 platforms, it is safe to turn off power if the type any key to continue prompt is displayed.

  6. Turn off power to all peripheral devices.

    For the location of power switches on any peripheral devices, refer to the hardware installation guides that accompany your peripheral devices.

  7. Install the peripheral device, making sure that the device you are adding has a different target number than the other devices on the system.

    Often, a small switch is located at the back of the disk for selecting the target number.

    Refer to the hardware installation guide that accompanies the peripheral device for information on installing and connecting the device.

  8. Turn on the power to the system.

    The system boots to multiuser mode, and the login prompt is displayed.

  9. Verify that the peripheral device has been added by attempting to access the device.

    For information on accessing the device, see Accessing Devices.

How to Add a Device Driver

This procedure assumes that the device has already been added to the system. If not, see What You Need for Unsupported Devices.

  1. Become superuser.
  2. Place the tape, diskette, or DVD into the drive.
  3. Install the driver.
    # pkgadd [-d] device package-name
    -d device

    Identifies the device path name that contains the package.


    Identifies the package name that contains the device driver.

  4. Verify that the package has been added correctly.
    # pkgchk package-name

    The system prompt returns with no response if the package is installed correctly.

Example 5-2 Adding a Device Driver

The following example shows how to install and verify a package called XYZdrv.

# pkgadd XYZdrv
(licensing messages displayed)
Installing XYZ Company driver as <XYZdrv>
Installation of <XYZdrv> was successful.
# pkgchk XYZdrv