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Oracle GlassFish Server 3.1 Application Development Guide
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Document Information


Part I Development Tasks and Tools

1.  Setting Up a Development Environment

2.  Class Loaders

3.  Debugging Applications

Part II Developing Applications and Application Components

4.  Securing Applications

5.  Developing Web Services

6.  Using the Java Persistence API

7.  Developing Web Applications

8.  Using Enterprise JavaBeans Technology

9.  Using Container-Managed Persistence

10.  Developing Java Clients

11.  Developing Connectors

12.  Developing Lifecycle Listeners

Server Life Cycle Events

The LifecycleListener Interface

The LifecycleEvent Class

The Server Lifecycle Event Context

Deploying a Lifecycle Module

Considerations for Lifecycle Modules

13.  Developing OSGi-enabled Java EE Applications

Part III Using Services and APIs

14.  Using the JDBC API for Database Access

15.  Using the Transaction Service

16.  Using the Java Naming and Directory Interface

17.  Using the Java Message Service

18.  Using the JavaMail API


Considerations for Lifecycle Modules

The resources allocated at initialization or startup should be freed at shutdown or termination. The lifecycle module classes are called synchronously from the main server thread, therefore it is important to ensure that these classes don’t block the server. Lifecycle modules can create threads if appropriate, but these threads must be stopped in the shutdown and termination phases.

The LifeCycleModule class loader is the parent class loader for lifecycle modules. Each lifecycle module’s classpath is used to construct its class loader. All the support classes needed by a lifecycle module must be available to the LifeCycleModule class loader or its parent, the Connector class loader.

You must ensure that the server.policy file is appropriately set up, or a lifecycle module trying to perform a System.exec() might cause a security access violation. For details, see The server.policy File.

The configured properties for a lifecycle module are passed as properties after the INIT_EVENT. The JNDI naming context is not available before the STARTUP_EVENT. If a lifecycle module requires the naming context, it can get this after the STARTUP_EVENT, READY_EVENT, or SHUTDOWN_EVENT.