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Oracle GlassFish Server Message Queue 4.5 Administration Guide
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Document Information


Part I Introduction to Message Queue Administration

1.  Administrative Tasks and Tools

2.  Quick-Start Tutorial

Part II Administrative Tasks

3.  Starting Brokers and Clients

4.  Configuring a Broker

5.  Managing a Broker

6.  Configuring and Managing Connection Services

7.  Managing Message Delivery

Configuring and Managing Physical Destinations

Command Utility Subcommands for Physical Destination Management

Creating and Destroying Physical Destinations

Naming Destinations

Setting Property Values

Destroying Destinations

Pausing and Resuming a Physical Destination

Purging a Physical Destination

Updating Physical Destination Properties

Viewing Physical Destination Information

Managing Physical Destination Disk Utilization

Using the Dead Message Queue

Managing the Dead Message Queue

Enabling Dead Message Logging

Managing Broker System-Wide Memory

Managing Durable Subscriptions

Managing Transactions

8.  Configuring Persistence Services

9.  Configuring and Managing Security Services

10.  Configuring and Managing Broker Clusters

11.  Managing Administered Objects

12.  Configuring and Managing Bridge Services

13.  Monitoring Broker Operations

14.  Analyzing and Tuning a Message Service

15.  Troubleshooting

Part III Reference

16.  Command Line Reference

17.  Broker Properties Reference

18.  Physical Destination Property Reference

19.  Administered Object Attribute Reference

20.  JMS Resource Adapter Property Reference

21.  Metrics Information Reference

22.  JES Monitoring Framework Reference

Part IV Appendixes

A.  Distribution-Specific Locations of Message Queue Data

B.  Stability of Message Queue Interfaces

C.  HTTP/HTTPS Support

D.  JMX Support

E.  Frequently Used Command Utility Commands


Managing Broker System-Wide Memory

Once clients are connected to the broker, the routing and delivery of messages can proceed. In this phase, the broker is responsible for creating and managing different types of physical destinations, ensuring a smooth flow of messages, and using resources efficiently. You can use the broker configuration properties described under Routing and Delivery Properties to manage these tasks in a way that suits your application’s needs.

The performance and stability of a broker depend on the system resources (such as memory) available and how efficiently they are utilized. You can set configuration properties to prevent the broker from becoming overwhelmed by incoming messages or running out of memory. These properties function at three different levels to keep the message service operating as resources become scarce:

The triggering of these system memory thresholds is a sign that systemwide and destination message limits are set too high. Because the memory thresholds cannot always catch potential memory overloads in time, you should not rely on them to control memory usage, but rather reconfigure the system-wide and destination limits to optimize memory resources.