System Administration Guide: IP Services

NIS+ Problems

If you decide to use NIS+ as the DHCP data store, problems you might encounter can be categorized as follows:

Cannot Select NIS+ as a Data Store

If you try to use NIS+ as your data store, you might find that DHCP Manager does not offer it as a choice for data store, or dhcpconfig returns a message saying NIS+ does not appear to be installed and running. This means that NIS+ has not been configured for this server, although NIS+ might be in use on the network. Before you can select NIS+ as a data store, the server system must be configured as an NIS+ client.

Before you set up the server as an NIS+ client, the domain must have already been configured and its master server must be running. The master server of the domain's tables should be populated, and the hosts table must have an entry for the new client system (the DHCP server system). “Setting Up NIS+ Client Machines” in System Administration Guide: Naming and Directory Services (FNS and NIS+) provides detailed information about configuring an NIS+ client.

NIS+ Not Adequately Configured

After you successfully use NIS+ with DHCP, you might encounter errors if changes are made to NIS+ and introduce configuration problems. Use the following table to help you determine the cause of configuration problems.

Table 11–1 NIS+ Configuration Problems

Possible Problem 

Gather Information 

Solution 

Root object does not exist in the NIS+ domain.  

Enter the following command:  

/usr/lib/nis/nisstat

This command displays statistics for the domain. If the root object does not exist, no statistics are returned.

Set up the NIS+ domain using the System Administration Guide: Naming and Directory Services (FNS and NIS+).

NIS+ is not used for passwd and publickey information.

Enter the following command to view the name service switch configuration file:  

cat /etc/nsswitch.conf

Check the passwd and publickey entries for the “nisplus” keyword.

Refer to the System Administration Guide: Naming and Directory Services (FNS and NIS+) for information about configuring the name service switch.

The domain name is empty. 

Enter the following command:  

domainname

If the command lists an empty string, no domain name has been set for the domain. 

Use local files for your data store, or set up an NIS+ domain for your network. Refer to System Administration Guide: Naming and Directory Services (FNS and NIS+).

The NIS_COLD_START file does not exist.

Enter the following command on the server system to determine if the file exists:  

cat /var/nis/NIS_COLD_START

Use local files for your data store, or create an NIS+ client. Refer to System Administration Guide: Naming and Directory Services (FNS and NIS+).

NIS+ Access Problems

NIS+ access problems might cause error messages about incorrect DES credentials, or inadequate permissions to update NIS+ objects or tables. Use the following table to determine the cause of NIS+ errors you receive.

Table 11–2 NIS+ Access Problems

Possible Problem 

Gather Information 

Solution 

The DHCP server system does not have create access to the org_dir object in the NIS+ domain.

Enter the following command:  

nisls -ld org_dir

The access rights are listed in the form r---rmcdrmcdr---, where the permissions apply respectively to nobody, owner, group, and world. The owner of the object is listed next.

Use the nischmod command to change the permissions for org_dir.

For example, to add create access to the group, type the following command:  

nischmod g+c org_dir

 

Normally the org_dir directory object provides full (read, modify, create, and destroy) rights to both the owner and the group, while providing only read access to the world and nobody classes.

See the nischmod(1) man page for more information.

 

The DHCP server name must either be listed as the owner of the org_dir object, or be listed as a principal in the group, and that group must have create access. List the group with the command:

nisls -ldg org_dir

 

The DHCP server does not have access rights to create a table under the org_dir object.

Usually, this means the server system's principal name is not a member of the owning group for the org_dir object, or no owning group exists.

Enter this command to find the owning group name:  

niscat -o org_dir

Look for a line similar to  

Group : "admin.example.com."

List the principal names in the group using the command:  

nisgrpadm -l groupname

Add the server system's name to the group using the nisgrpadm command.

For example, to add the server name pacific to the group admin.example.com, type the following command:

nisgrpadm -a admin.example.com pacific.example.com

 

For example: 

nisgrpadm -l admin.example.com

The server system's name should be listed as an explicit member of the group or included as an implicit member of the group. 

See the nisgrpadm(1) man page for more information.

The DHCP server does not have valid Data Encryption Standard (DES) credentials in the NIS+ cred table.

If this is the problem, an error message states that the user does not have DES credentials in the NIS+ name service. 

Use the nisaddcred command to add security credentials for the DHCP server system.

The following example shows how to add DES credentials for the system mercury in the domain example.com:

  

nisaddcred -p unix.mercury@example.com \ -P mercury.example.com. DES example.com.

  

The command prompts for the root password (which is required to generate an encrypted secret key).  

See the nisaddcred(1M) man page for more information.