Writing Device Drivers

Register Identifiers

You can discover what machine registers are available on your processor architecture using the $r command. This example shows the output of $r on a SPARC system with the sun4 architecture:

kadb[0]: $r
g0    0                                 l0      0
g1    100130a4      debug_enter         l1      edd00028
g2    10411c00      tsbmiss_area+0xe00  l2      10449c90
g3    10442000      ti_statetbl+0x1ba   l3      1b
g4    3000061a004                       l4      10474400
g5    0                                 l5      3b9aca00
g6    0                                 l6      0
g7    2a10001fd40                       l7      0
o0    0                                 i0      0
o1    c                                 i1      10449e50
o2    20                                i2      0
o3    300006b2d08                       i3      10
o4    0                                 i4      0
o5    0                                 i5      b0
sp    2a10001b451                       fp      2a10001b521
o7    1001311c      debug_enter+0x78    i7      1034bb24
y     0
tstate: 1604  (ccr=0x0, asi=0x0, pstate=0x16, cwp=0x4)
pstate: ag:0 ie:1 priv:1 am:0 pef:1 mm:0 tle:0 cle:0 mg:0 ig:0
winreg: cur:4 other:0 clean:7 cansave:1 canrest:5 wstate:14
tba   0x10000000
pc    edd000d8 edd000d8:        ta      %icc,%g0 + 125
npc   edd000dc edd000dc:        nop

kadb exports each of these registers as a debugger variable with the same name. Reading from the variable fetches the current value of the register. Writing to the variable changes the value of the associated machine register. For example, you can change the value of the '%o0' register:

kadb[0]: <o0=K
kadb[0]: 0x1>o0
kadb[0]: <o0=K