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System Administration Guide: Oracle Solaris Zones, Oracle Solaris 10 Containers, and Resource Management     Oracle Solaris 11 Express 11/10
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Part I Oracle Solaris Resource Management

1.  Introduction to Resource Management

2.  Projects and Tasks (Overview)

3.  Administering Projects and Tasks

4.  Extended Accounting (Overview)

5.  Administering Extended Accounting (Tasks)

6.  Resource Controls (Overview)

7.  Administering Resource Controls (Tasks)

8.  Fair Share Scheduler (Overview)

9.  Administering the Fair Share Scheduler (Tasks)

10.  Physical Memory Control Using the Resource Capping Daemon (Overview)

11.  Administering the Resource Capping Daemon (Tasks)

12.  Resource Pools (Overview)

13.  Creating and Administering Resource Pools (Tasks)

14.  Resource Management Configuration Example

Part II Oracle Solaris Zones

15.  Introduction to Oracle Solaris Zones

Zones Overview

About Oracle Solaris Zones in This Release

About Branded Zones

Processes Running in a Branded Zone

Branded Zones Available in this Release

When to Use Zones

How Zones Work

Summary of Oracle Solaris Zone Features

How Non-Global Zones Are Administered

How Non-Global Zones Are Created

Non-Global Zone State Model

Non-Global Zone Characteristics

Using Resource Management Features With Non-Global Zones

Monitoring Non-Global Zones

Features Provided by Non-Global Zones

Setting Up Zones on Your System (Task Map)

16.  Non-Global Zone Configuration (Overview)

17.  Planning and Configuring Non-Global Zones (Tasks)

18.  About Installing, Halting, Uninstalling, and Cloning Non-Global Zones (Overview)

19.  Installing, Booting, Halting, Uninstalling, and Cloning Non-Global Zones (Tasks)

20.  Non-Global Zone Login (Overview)

21.  Logging In to Non-Global Zones (Tasks)

22.  Moving and Migrating Non-Global Zones (Tasks)

23.  About Packages on an Oracle Solaris 11 Express System With Zones Installed

24.  Oracle Solaris Zones Administration (Overview)

25.  Administering Oracle Solaris Zones (Tasks)

26.  Troubleshooting Miscellaneous Oracle Solaris Zones Problems

Part III Oracle Solaris 10 Zones

27.  Introduction to Oracle Solaris 10 Zones

28.  Assessing an Oracle Solaris 10 System and Creating an Archive

29.  (Optional) Migrating an Oracle Solaris 10 native Non-Global Zone Into an Oracle Solaris 10 Container

30.  Configuring the solaris10 Branded Zone

31.  Installing the solaris10 Branded Zone

32.  Booting a Zone and Zone Migration

33.  solaris10 Branded Zone Login and Post-Installation Configuration



Zones Overview

The Oracle Solaris Zones partitioning technology is used to virtualize operating system services and provide an isolated and secure environment for running applications. A zone is a virtualized operating system environment created within a single instance of the Oracle Solaris operating system. When you create a zone, you produce an application execution environment in which processes are isolated from the rest of the system. This isolation prevents processes that are running in one zone from monitoring or affecting processes that are running in other zones. Even a process running with superuser credentials cannot view or affect activity in other zones. With Oracle Solaris Zones, you can maintain the one-application-per-server deployment model while simultaneously sharing hardware resources.

A zone also provides an abstract layer that separates applications from the physical attributes of the machine on which they are deployed. Examples of these attributes include physical device paths.

Zones can be used on any machine that is running the Oracle Solaris 10 or later Oracle Solaris release. The upper limit for the number of zones on a system is 8192. The number of zones that can be effectively hosted on a single system is determined by the total resource requirements of the application software running in all of the zones, and the size of the system.

The zone root file system model supported on this release is the whole root zone. This model provides the maximum configurability. All of the required system software and any additional packages are installed into the private file systems of the zone.

These concepts are discussed in Chapter 17, Planning and Configuring Non-Global Zones (Tasks).