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Oracle® Fusion Middleware Administrator's Guide
11g Release 1 (11.1.1)

Part Number E10105-11
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I Troubleshooting Oracle Fusion Middleware

This appendix provides information on how to troubleshoot problems that you might encounter when using Oracle Fusion Middleware. It contains the following topics:

I.1 Diagnosing Oracle Fusion Middleware Problems

Oracle Fusion Middleware components generate log files containing messages that record all types of events, including startup and shutdown information, errors, warning messages, access information on HTTP requests, and additional information. The log files can be used to identify and diagnose problems. See Chapter 12, "Managing Log Files and Diagnostic Data" for more information about using and reading log files.

Oracle Fusion Middleware includes a Diagnostic Framework which aids in detecting, diagnosing, and resolving problems. The problems that are targeted in particular are critical errors such as those caused by code bugs, metadata corruption, and customer data corruption, deadlocked threads, and inconsistent state.

When a critical error occurs, it is assigned an incident number, and diagnostic data for the error (such as log files) are immediately captured and tagged with this number. The data is then stored in the Automatic Diagnostic Repository (ADR), where it can later be retrieved by incident number and analyzed. See Chapter 13, "Diagnosing Problems" for more information about the Diagnostic Framework.

I.2 Common Problems and Solutions

This section describes common problems and solutions. It contains the following topics:

I.2.1 Running out of Data Source Connections

If the database performance has slowed or you receive the following message in the Oracle WebLogic Server log files, you may have leaks in the data source connections:

No resources currently available in pool datasource name
 
Any product functionality that depend on the datasource will not function as it can't connect database to get required data.

If you receive this message, monitor the connection usage from the Administration Console data source monitoring page:

  1. From Domain Structure, expand Services, then Data Sources.

  2. Click the data source that you want to monitor.

  3. Select the Monitoring tab, then the Statistics tab.

  4. If the table does not display Active Connection Current Count, click Customize this table.

  5. In Column Display, select Active Connection Current Count and move it from the Available to the Chosen box. Click Apply.

  6. In the table, note the number in the Active Connection Current Count column.

If the active current count for a data source keeps increasing and does not go down, this data source is leaking connections. Contact Oracle Support.

I.2.2 Using a Different Version of Spring

When you configure a Managed Server with JRF, Spring 2.0.6 is installed and is placed in the Oracle WebLogic Server system classpath. If a custom application running in a JRF environment requires a different version of Spring, you must use the Filtering ClassLoader mechanism to specify the version of Spring.

Oracle WebLogic Server provides the FilteringClassLoader mechanism so that you can configure deployment descriptors to explicitly specify that certain packages should always be loaded from the application, rather than being loaded by the system classloader. This allows you to use alternate versions of applications such as Spring or Ant.

For more information about using the FilteringClassLoader mechanism, see "Using a Filtering ClassLoader" in the Oracle Fusion Middleware Developing Applications for Oracle WebLogic Server.

I.2.3 ClassNotFound Errors When Starting Managed Servers

If a Managed Server is started by Node Manager (as is the case when the servers are started by the Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console or Fusion Middleware Control), you may receive a ClassNotFound error if Node Manager has not been configured to use the start scripts when starting Managed Servers. See Section 4.2.4 for information about resolving this problem.

I.3 Troubleshooting Fusion Middleware Control

The following sections describe problems and issues when using Fusion Middleware Control:

I.3.1 Troubleshooting the Display of Performance Metrics and Charts in Fusion Middleware Control

If you are using Fusion Middleware Control to manage system components, then you might encounter situations where the performance metrics and charts do not display properly for certain managed targets.

The following sections provide information about managed targets and describe some common troubleshooting tasks to perform if Fusion Middleware Control displays errors when attempting to display performance metrics, such as response time and load metrics:

I.3.1.1 What Are Agent-Monitored Targets?

To discover and view the following components with Fusion Middleware Control, an Oracle Management Agent must be available and running:

  • Oracle Internet Directory

  • Oracle Virtual Directory

  • Oracle Directory Integration Platform

  • Oracle Identity Federation

  • Oracle Reports Application, Oracle Reports Server

These components can be referred to as agent-monitored targets.

When you install and configure an Oracle Fusion Middleware environment that includes these components, a management agent, Oracle Management Agent, is also installed and running in the Oracle instance.

In contrast, Java components and some system components can be managed by Fusion Middleware Control without a management agent.

For more information about the Oracle Management Agent, refer to the Oracle Enterprise Manager documentation on the Oracle Technology Network (OTN):

http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/oem/grid-control/documentation/index.html

I.3.1.2 Setting Monitoring Credentials for All Agent-Monitored Targets in a Farm

To make it easier to manage the monitoring credentials for all of your agent-monitored targets, you can use the Monitoring Credentials page to set the monitoring credentials for all of the agent-monitored targets in the farm:

  1. From the Farm menu, select Monitoring Credentials.

  2. Enter the user name and password of an Oracle WebLogic Server user account that has at least the monitoring level of privileges.

When you set the monitoring credentials on this page, you override all the monitoring credentials for the agent-monitored targets in the farm. However, after you set the monitoring credentials for all the targets, you can override the credentials for a specific target by using the Agent-Monitored Targets page, as described in Section I.3.1.3.

I.3.1.3 Changing the Monitoring Credentials for a Specific Agent-Monitored Target

To manage a target (an Oracle Fusion Middleware component), the Oracle Management Agent uses an Oracle WebLogic Server administration account to connect to the target. After it connects to the target, the Oracle Management Agent can gather performance metrics and send them back to the Fusion Middleware Control where they appear on monitoring pages and in performance charts.

This administration account and its password are called the monitoring credentials for an agent-monitored target.

If the monitoring credentials for a particular target are changed in Oracle WebLogic Server, then the Oracle Management Agent can no longer obtain the performance metrics. As a result, no metrics for the target appear on the Fusion Middleware Control pages and the performance charts are not rendered.

To fix this problem, you can modify the monitoring credentials of the Agent-Monitored target in Fusion Middleware Control:

  1. From the Farm menu, select Monitoring Credentials.

    The Monitoring Credentials page is displayed.

  2. Click Agent-Monitored Targets.

    The Agent-Monitored Targets page is displayed.

  3. Click the Configure icon for the target that you need to modify.

  4. On the Configuration page, locate the monitoring credentials fields and change the credentials to match those of an Oracle WebLogic Server user account that has at least the monitoring level of privileges.

I.3.1.4 Verifying or Changing the Oracle Management Agent URL

If the performance metrics for all of the agent-monitored targets in the farm are unavailable, and you have verified that the monitoring credentials for the agent-monitored targets are correct, then you might have to modify the URL used by the Oracle Management Agent to communicate with Fusion Middleware Control.

This situation can occur if you have backed up your environment and restored it to another host, or if you have moved your test environment to a production environment. In either case, the host name required in the Oracle Management Agent URL must be changed before the Oracle Management Agent can once again communicate with Fusion Middleware Control.

To modify the Oracle Management Agent URL:

  1. From the Farm menu, select Monitoring Credentials.

    The Monitoring Credentials page is displayed.

  2. Click Agent-Monitored Targets.

    The Agent-Monitored Targets page is displayed.

  3. Click the Configure icon for one of the agent-monitored targets listed on the page.

  4. Change the Oracle Management Agent URL.

I.3.2 Securing the Connection from Fusion Middleware Control to Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console

By default, if you access Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console from Fusion Middleware Control, the connection is a non-SSL connection. To access the Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console using an SSL connection, you need to access it manually using the SSL port. Alternatively, you can enable a secure Administration port.

See "Understanding Network Channels" in the Oracle Fusion Middleware Configuring Server Environments for Oracle WebLogic Server for information about the admin channel and how to establish a channel.

To enable a secure mode of communication with the Administration Server domain and to disable all other non-secure modes, you may need to perform the following explicit steps to enable Oracle Management Agent to monitor agent-monitored targets in Fusion Middleware Control. (See Section I.3.1.1 for information about agent-monitored targets.) These steps are needed only if you are using the default self-signed certificates on the Administration Server instance or other signed certificates whose Certification Authorities (CAs) are not available in the default trust store of the JVM used by Oracle Management Agent.

In this case, take the following steps:

  1. Stop the Oracle Management Agent using the following command:

    ORACLE_HOME/bin/emctl stop agent
    
  2. Export the certificate from Oracle WebLogic Server:

    JAVA_HOME/jdk/bin/keytool -export -alias demoidentity -file /tmp/wlcert -keystore MW_HOME/wlserver_10.3/server/lib/DemoIdentity.jks
    

    When prompted, enter the password.

  3. Update the JDKs default trust store (JAVA_HOME/jre/lib/security/cacerts) with the certificate. (This is the JDK being used by Oracle Management Agent.)

    keytool -import -alias demoidentity -trustcacerts -file /temp/wlcert -keystore  JAVA_HOME/jre/lib/security/cacerts -storepass password 
    

    When asked if you trust this certificate, enter yes.

  4. Start the Oracle Management Agent using the following command:

    ORACLE_HOME/bin/emctl start agent
    

I.4 Troubleshooting SSL

This section describes common problems and solutions when working with SSL configuration. It contains the following topic:

I.4.1 Components May Enable All Supported Ciphers

You should be aware that when no cipher is explicitly configured, some 11g Release 1 (11.1.1) components enable all supported SSL ciphers including DH_Anon (Diffie-Hellman Anonymous) ciphers.

At this time, Oracle HTTP Server is the only component known to set ciphers like this.

Configure the components with the desired cipher(s) if DH_Anon is not wanted.

I.5 Need More Help?

You can find more solutions on My Oracle Support, http://support.oracle.com. If you do not find a solution for your problem, log a service request.

You can also use the Remote Diagnostic Agent, as described in Section I.5.1.

See Also:

Oracle Fusion Middleware Release Notes, available on the Oracle Technology Network:

http://www.oracle.com/technology/documentation/index.html

I.5.1 Using Remote Diagnostic Agent

Remote Diagnostic Agent (RDA) is a command-line diagnostic tool that provides a comprehensive picture of your environment. Additionally, RDA can provide recommendations on various topics, for example configuration and security. This aids you and Oracle Support in resolving issues.

RDA is designed to be as unobtrusive as possible; it does not modify systems in any way. A security filter is provided if required.

For more information about RDA, see the readme file, which is located at:

(UNIX) ORACLE_HOME/rda/README_Unix.txt
(Windows) ORACLE_HOME\rda\README_Windows.txt