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System Administration Guide: Oracle Solaris Containers-Resource Management and Oracle Solaris Zones     Oracle Solaris Legacy Containers
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Document Information

Preface

Part I Resource Management

1.  Introduction to Solaris 10 Resource Management

2.  Projects and Tasks (Overview)

3.  Administering Projects and Tasks

4.  Extended Accounting (Overview)

5.  Administering Extended Accounting (Tasks)

6.  Resource Controls (Overview)

7.  Administering Resource Controls (Tasks)

8.  Fair Share Scheduler (Overview)

9.  Administering the Fair Share Scheduler (Tasks)

10.  Physical Memory Control Using the Resource Capping Daemon (Overview)

What's New in Physical Memory Control Using the Resource Capping Daemon?

Introduction to the Resource Capping Daemon

How Resource Capping Works

Attribute to Limit Physical Memory Usage for Projects

rcapd Configuration

Using the Resource Capping Daemon on a System With Zones Installed

Memory Cap Enforcement Threshold

Determining Cap Values

rcapd Operation Intervals

Determining rcapd Scan Intervals

Determining Sample Intervals

Monitoring Resource Utilization With rcapstat

Commands Used With rcapd

11.  Administering the Resource Capping Daemon (Tasks)

12.  Resource Pools (Overview)

13.  Creating and Administering Resource Pools (Tasks)

14.  Resource Management Configuration Example

15.  Resource Control Functionality in the Solaris Management Console

Part II Zones

16.  Introduction to Solaris Zones

17.  Non-Global Zone Configuration (Overview)

18.  Planning and Configuring Non-Global Zones (Tasks)

19.  About Installing, Halting, Cloning, and Uninstalling Non-Global Zones (Overview)

20.  Installing, Booting, Halting, Uninstalling, and Cloning Non-Global Zones (Tasks)

21.  Non-Global Zone Login (Overview)

22.  Logging In to Non-Global Zones (Tasks)

23.  Moving and Migrating Non-Global Zones (Tasks)

24.  Oracle Solaris 10 9/10: Migrating a Physical Oracle Solaris System Into a Zone (Tasks)

25.  About Packages and Patches on an Oracle Solaris System With Zones Installed (Overview)

26.  Adding and Removing Packages and Patches on an Oracle Solaris System With Zones Installed (Tasks)

27.  Oracle Solaris Zones Administration (Overview)

28.  Oracle Solaris Zones Administration (Tasks)

29.  Upgrading an Oracle Solaris 10 System That Has Installed Non-Global Zones

30.  Troubleshooting Miscellaneous Oracle Solaris Zones Problems

Part III lx Branded Zones

31.  About Branded Zones and the Linux Branded Zone

32.  Planning the lx Branded Zone Configuration (Overview)

33.  Configuring the lx Branded Zone (Tasks)

34.  About Installing, Booting, Halting, Cloning, and Uninstalling lx Branded Zones (Overview)

35.  Installing, Booting, Halting, Uninstalling and Cloning lx Branded Zones (Tasks)

36.  Logging In to lx Branded Zones (Tasks)

37.  Moving and Migrating lx Branded Zones (Tasks)

38.  Administering and Running Applications in lx Branded Zones (Tasks)

Glossary

Index

How Resource Capping Works

The daemon repeatedly samples the resource utilization of projects that have physical memory caps. The sampling interval used by the daemon is specified by the administrator. See Determining Sample Intervals for additional information. When the system's physical memory utilization exceeds the threshold for cap enforcement, and other conditions are met, the daemon takes action to reduce the resource consumption of projects with memory caps to levels at or below the caps.

The virtual memory system divides physical memory into segments known as pages. Pages are the fundamental unit of physical memory in the Solaris memory management subsystem. To read data from a file into memory, the virtual memory system reads in one page at a time, or pages in a file. To reduce resource consumption, the daemon can page out, or relocate, infrequently used pages to a swap device, which is an area outside of physical memory.

The daemon manages physical memory by regulating the size of a project workload's resident set relative to the size of its working set. The resident set is the set of pages that are resident in physical memory. The working set is the set of pages that the workload actively uses during its processing cycle. The working set changes over time, depending on the process's mode of operation and the type of data being processed. Ideally, every workload has access to enough physical memory to enable its working set to remain resident. However, the working set can also include the use of secondary disk storage to hold the memory that does not fit in physical memory.

Only one instance of rcapd can run at any given time.