Skip Headers
Oracle® Database Appliance Getting Started Guide
Release 2.10 for Linux x86-64

E22692-36
Go to Documentation Home
Home
Go to Book List
Book List
Go to Table of Contents
Contents
Go to Index
Index
Go to Feedback page
Contact Us

Go to previous page
Previous
Go to next page
Next
PDF · Mobi · ePub

C Database Sizing for Oracle Database Appliance

This appendix provides information about database sizing and other configuration options. This appendix contains the following sections:

Using Templates for Consolidation with Instance Caging

Oracle Database Appliance enables you to consolidate multiple databases onto a single system by using instance caging on a multi-CPU server. Instance caging, in conjunction with Oracle Database Resource Manager (the Resource Manager) support the desired levels of service across multiple instances. Consolidation can minimize idle resources, maximize efficiency, and lower costs.

Oracle Database Appliance templates are already tuned for the size of each database instance workload. They are designed to run on a specific number of cores. Caging assures that each database workload is restricted to the set of cores allocated by the template, enabling multiple databases to run concurrently with no performance degradation, up to the capacity of Oracle Database Appliance. You could select database template sizes larger than your current needs to provide for planned growth, which you accommodate later by adjusting System Global Area (SGA) and Program Global Area (PGA) sizes as well as the number of cores.

Note:

Oracle strongly recommends that you use the Oracle Database Appliance templates, because they implement best practices and are configured specifically for Oracle Database Appliance.

Use either Oracle Appliance Manager or Oracle Database Configuration Assistant (DBCA) to create databases on Oracle Database Appliance. The templates are available with both utilities.

Tip:

Oracle Appliance Manager configurator refers to the database sizing templates as classes of databases.

Use the following tables to help select the best templates for your databases. When using these tables remember:

  • The CPU_COUNT values are not core count values. If you use this table to determine Oracle Database Appliance licensing requirements, then divide the CPU_COUNT value by two to find the minimum number of cores you will need to license. The license you need for a Very Small (or Very Very Small) database, which only requires one core, depends on your configuration as described below:

    • License two cores on Oracle Database Appliance X3-2 or Oracle Database Appliance X4-2 Virtualized Platforms

    • License four cores on Oracle Database Appliance X3-2 or Oracle Database Appliance X4-2 bare metal installations

    • License two cores on Oracle Database Appliance, either bare metal or Virtualized Platform.

  • The information in the tables assume that you are creating disk backups. With external tape backups, database size can be up to 3.2 TB.

  • I/O per second (IOps) values are derived from an 8 K random read/write response time of 5 milliseconds to service an online transaction processing (OLTP) I/O request. The rates are not based on the number of CPUs and assume that the system is running at capacity. For example, on an Oracle Database Appliance X4-2 system with no expansion storage shelf and 12 small databases all running, each database would experience about 275 IOps. With only one database running on the system, IOps should be 3,300. Similarly, on an Oracle Database Appliance system with one large and six very small databases all running, the very small databases would experience about 300 IOps each and the large database would experience about 2,000 IOps.

  • Throughput, in MB/second (MBps). is based on a1 MB sequential read/write for a data warehousing system. As with IOps, the MBps is a measure of throughput when the system is at capacity. With just a single small database running, the MBps would be the maximum available on the system for a large database.

  • The log file size assumes four redo log groups for each instance with a log switch every 15 minutes when the system is running at full capacity.

Find the information that is appropriate to your hardware:

  • Use Table C-1 if your database is on Oracle Database Appliance X4-2.

  • Use Table C-2 if your database is on Oracle Database Appliance X3-2.

  • Use Table C-3 if your database is on Oracle Database Appliance.

Table C-1 Oracle Database Appliance X4-2 Database Template Sizes

System Component Very Very Small Very Small Small Medium Large Extra Large Extra Extra Large Extra Extra Extra Large

CPU_COUNT (for each instance)

2

2

4

8

12

24

32

48

SGA (GB)

2

4

8

16

24

48

64

96

PGA (GB)

1

2

4

8

12

24

32

48

Processes

200

200

400

800

1200

2400

3200

4800

Log file size (GB)

1

1

1

2

4

4

4

4

Number of databases using this template that you can deploy

24

24

12

6

4

2

1

1

I/O per second with single storage shelf

137

137

275

550

825

1650

3300

3300

Throughput (MB/second) with single storage shelf

145

145

292

583

875

1750

3500

3500

I/O per second with storage shelf plus storage expansion shelf

275

275

550

1100

1650

3300

6600

6600

Throughput (MB/second) with storage shelf plus storage expansion shelf

230

230

458

917

1375

2750

5500

5500

Log generation (MB/second)

6.83

6.83

6.83

13.65

27.30

27.30

27.30

27.30


Table C-2 Oracle Database Appliance X3-2 Database Template Sizes

System Component Very Very Small Very Small Small Medium Large Extra Large Extra Extra Large

CPU_COUNT (for each instance)

2

2

4

8

12

24

32

SGA (MB)

2048

4096

8192

16384

24576

49152

65536

PGA (MB)

1024

2048

4096

8192

12288

24576

32768

Processes

200

200

400

800

1200

2400

3200

Log file size (GB)

1

1

1

2

4

4

4

Number of databases using this template that you can deploy

24

16

8

4

2

1

1

I/O per second with single storage shelf

206

206

412

825

1650

3300

3300

Throughput (MB/second) with single storage shelf

146

219

438

875

1750

3500

3500

I/O per second with storage shelf plus storage expansion shelf

275

413

825

1650

3300

6600

6600

Throughput (MB/second) with storage shelf plus storage expansion shelf

230

344

688

1375

2750

5500

5500

Log generation (MB/second)

6.83

6.83

6.83

13.65

27.30

27.30

27.30


Table C-3 Oracle Database Appliance Database Template Sizes

System Component Very Very Small Very Small Small Medium Large Extra Large

CPU_COUNT (for each instance)

2

2

4

8

12

24

SGA (MB)

2048

4096

8192

16384

24576

49152

PGA (MB)

1024

2048

4096

8192

12288

24576

Processes

200

200

400

800

1200

2400

Log file size (GB)

1

1

1

2

4

4

Number of databases using this template that you can deploy

24

12

6

3

2

1

I/O per second

167

333

666

1333

2000

4000

Throughput (MB per second)

125

250

500

1000

1500

3000

Log generation (MB per second)

6.83

6.83

6.83

13.65

27.30

27.30


For a single database, select the template that best fits your expected workload on the hardware that you are using. For multiple databases, sum their requirements and select a template that provides sufficient resources for them all. If you expect a database to grow or if you plan to add more databases, then select a template large enough to accommodate the increase.

Note:

Disk hardware capacity is measured using 1 KB = 1,000 bytes whereas software storage requirements are based on 1 KB = 1,024 bytes. This means that a disk with a rated capacity of 900 GB has only about 860 GB of space for software storage.

Enabling Instance Caging for Oracle Database Appliance

By default, instance caging is not enabled on Oracle Database Appliance. To enable instance caging, set the initialization parameter, RESOURCE_MANAGER_PLAN, for each database on Oracle Database Appliance. The parameter specifies the plan to be used by Resource Manager for the current instance. Setting this parameter will direct Resource Manager to allocate core resources among databases. If no plan is specified with this parameter, then the Resource Manager is not enabled and caging will not be enabled.

Instance caging allocation of core resources is enabled in accordance with the Oracle Database Appliance database template size that you select for each database. The CPU_COUNT initialization parameter is set in the template. Use the CPU_COUNT setting that matches the size of each database to consolidate, and follow the standard instructions for configuring instance caging.

See Also:

Oracle Database Administrator's Guide for more information about enabling and configuring instance caging

Choosing a Database Template

Resources in Oracle Database Appliance are finite. When deciding which database template to use, determine how your applications use these finite resources:

  • Storage: Database size

  • Workload: CPU, Memory, and storage performance (IO per second/MB per second)

Caution:

Use the database sizing examples that are provided later in this chapter only as a guideline. The actual performance that you achieve can depend on other factors. Test your system's performance after deployment to ensure that the performance meets your needs.

Use the numbers from the tables in this chapter as guidelines when choosing the most appropriate database template for Oracle Database Appliance deployments. Remember that only cores are licensed components. Other resources, such as memory and storage, are available, regardless of how many cores are active. After you have deployed a database using one of the Oracle Database Appliance templates, you can use remaining resources on Oracle Database Appliance for additional deployments.

Caution:

Actual performance depends on many factors. Test your system's performance after deployment to ensure that the performance is optimal.

Example 1: Choosing a Database Size Option

The sizing guidelines provided in Table C-3 show that a single Oracle Database Appliance can support one Extra Large database that uses 12 cores (for each node), or 12 Very Small databases that each use one core (for each node). The guidelines also show that a single Oracle Database Appliance can support one Extra Large database capable of 3000 IOps, or six Small databases each of which are capable of 600 IOps.

Assume that you have the following three databases to consolidate on Oracle Database Appliance:

  • The first database, D1, is 800 GB with 300 IOps.

  • The second database, D2, is 200 GB with 500 IOps.

  • The third database, D3, is 75 GB with 600 IOps.

Based on the minimum IOps and size requirements, you could deploy the three databases as follows:

  • D1 as Large

  • D2 as Small

  • D3 as Small

To support the three databases, license 10 cores for each node (20 cores for Oracle Database Appliance).

Example 2: Choosing a Database Size Option

Assume that you have two databases to deploy on a new Oracle Database Appliance X4-2 virtualized platform with a single storage shelf.

  • The first database, DB1, is 2 TB with 3000 IOps.

  • The second database, DB2, is 1 TB with 3000 IOps.

Consider the I/O requirements while referring to the template descriptions in Table C-1. DB1 and DB2 each generate 3000 IOps, which means that Oracle Database Appliance must support a total of 6000 IOps. However, 6000 IOps is greater than Oracle Database Appliance X4-2 can support while maintaining a 5 millisecond response time. Even an Extra Extra Extra Large database supports only up to 3000 IOps.

To support both databases, you would need to add a storage expansion shelf and use the Extra Extra Large template for each database. Alternatively, without adding a storage expansion shelf, you could deploy just one database using the Extra Extra Large template. In either case, license 16 cores for ODA_BASE on each node (a total of 32 cores).