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System Administration Guide: IP Services     Oracle Solaris 10 8/11 Information Library
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Document Information


Part I Introducing System Administration: IP Services

1.  Oracle Solaris TCP/IP Protocol Suite (Overview)

Part II TCP/IP Administration

2.  Planning Your TCP/IP Network (Tasks)

3.  Introducing IPv6 (Overview)

4.  Planning an IPv6 Network (Tasks)

5.  Configuring TCP/IP Network Services and IPv4 Addressing (Tasks)

6.  Administering Network Interfaces (Tasks)

7.  Configuring an IPv6 Network (Tasks)

8.  Administering a TCP/IP Network (Tasks)

9.  Troubleshooting Network Problems (Tasks)

10.  TCP/IP and IPv4 in Depth (Reference)

11.  IPv6 in Depth (Reference)


12.  About DHCP (Overview)

About the DHCP Protocol

Advantages of Using DHCP

How DHCP Works

The DHCP Server

DHCP Server Management

DHCP Data Store

The dhcptab Table

DHCP Network Tables

DHCP Manager

DHCP Command-Line Utilities

Role-Based Access Control for DHCP Commands

DHCP Server Configuration

IP Address Allocation

Network Configuration Information

About DHCP Options

About DHCP Macros

Macro Processing by the DHCP Server

Order of Macro Processing

Size Limit for DHCP Macros

The DHCP Client

13.  Planning for DHCP Service (Tasks)

14.  Configuring the DHCP Service (Tasks)

15.  Administering DHCP (Tasks)

16.  Configuring and Administering the DHCP Client

17.  Troubleshooting DHCP (Reference)

18.  DHCP Commands and Files (Reference)

Part IV IP Security

19.  IP Security Architecture (Overview)

20.  Configuring IPsec (Tasks)

21.  IP Security Architecture (Reference)

22.  Internet Key Exchange (Overview)

23.  Configuring IKE (Tasks)

24.  Internet Key Exchange (Reference)

25.  IP Filter in Oracle Solaris (Overview)

26.  IP Filter (Tasks)

Part V Mobile IP

27.  Mobile IP (Overview)

28.  Administering Mobile IP (Tasks)

29.  Mobile IP Files and Commands (Reference)


30.  Introducing IPMP (Overview)

31.  Administering IPMP (Tasks)

Part VII IP Quality of Service (IPQoS)

32.  Introducing IPQoS (Overview)

33.  Planning for an IPQoS-Enabled Network (Tasks)

34.  Creating the IPQoS Configuration File (Tasks)

35.  Starting and Maintaining IPQoS (Tasks)

36.  Using Flow Accounting and Statistics Gathering (Tasks)

37.  IPQoS in Detail (Reference)



About the DHCP Protocol

The DHCP protocol enables host systems in a TCP/IP network to be configured automatically for the network as the systems boot. DHCP uses a client-server mechanism. Servers store and manage configuration information for clients and provide that information upon a client's request. The information includes the client's IP address and information about network services that are available to the client.

DHCP evolved from an earlier protocol, BOOTP, which was designed for booting over a TCP/IP network. DHCP uses the same format as BOOTP for messages between the client and server. However, unlike BOOTP messages, DHCP messages can include network configuration data for the client.

A primary benefit of DHCP is its ability to manage IP address assignments through leases. Leases allow IP addresses to be reclaimed when they are not in use. The reclaimed IP addresses can be reassigned to other clients. A site that uses DHCP can use a smaller pool of IP addresses than would be needed if all clients were assigned a permanent IP address.