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System Administration Guide: IP Services     Oracle Solaris 10 8/11 Information Library
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Document Information


Part I Introducing System Administration: IP Services

1.  Oracle Solaris TCP/IP Protocol Suite (Overview)

Part II TCP/IP Administration

2.  Planning Your TCP/IP Network (Tasks)

3.  Introducing IPv6 (Overview)

4.  Planning an IPv6 Network (Tasks)

5.  Configuring TCP/IP Network Services and IPv4 Addressing (Tasks)

6.  Administering Network Interfaces (Tasks)

7.  Configuring an IPv6 Network (Tasks)

8.  Administering a TCP/IP Network (Tasks)

9.  Troubleshooting Network Problems (Tasks)

10.  TCP/IP and IPv4 in Depth (Reference)

11.  IPv6 in Depth (Reference)


12.  About DHCP (Overview)

13.  Planning for DHCP Service (Tasks)

14.  Configuring the DHCP Service (Tasks)

15.  Administering DHCP (Tasks)

16.  Configuring and Administering the DHCP Client

17.  Troubleshooting DHCP (Reference)

18.  DHCP Commands and Files (Reference)

Part IV IP Security

19.  IP Security Architecture (Overview)

20.  Configuring IPsec (Tasks)

21.  IP Security Architecture (Reference)

22.  Internet Key Exchange (Overview)

23.  Configuring IKE (Tasks)

24.  Internet Key Exchange (Reference)

25.  IP Filter in Oracle Solaris (Overview)

26.  IP Filter (Tasks)

Part V Mobile IP

27.  Mobile IP (Overview)

What's New in Mobile IP

Introduction to Mobile IP

Mobile IP Functional Entities

How Mobile IP Works

Agent Discovery

Agent Advertisement

Agent Advertisement Over Dynamic Interfaces

Agent Solicitation

Care-of Addresses

Mobile IP With Reverse Tunneling

Limited Private Addresses Support

Mobile IP Registration

Network Access Identifier (NAI)

Mobile IP Message Authentication

Mobile Node Registration Request

Registration Reply Message

Foreign Agent Considerations

Home Agent Considerations

Dynamic Home Agent Discovery

Routing Datagrams to and From Mobile Nodes

Encapsulation Methods

Unicast Datagram Routing

Broadcast Datagrams

Multicast Datagram Routing

Security Considerations for Mobile IP

28.  Administering Mobile IP (Tasks)

29.  Mobile IP Files and Commands (Reference)


30.  Introducing IPMP (Overview)

31.  Administering IPMP (Tasks)

Part VII IP Quality of Service (IPQoS)

32.  Introducing IPQoS (Overview)

33.  Planning for an IPQoS-Enabled Network (Tasks)

34.  Creating the IPQoS Configuration File (Tasks)

35.  Starting and Maintaining IPQoS (Tasks)

36.  Using Flow Accounting and Statistics Gathering (Tasks)

37.  IPQoS in Detail (Reference)



Agent Discovery

A mobile node uses a method that is known as agent discovery to determine the following information:

Mobility agents transmit agent advertisements to advertise services on a network. In the absence of agent advertisements, a mobile node can solicit advertisements. This capability is known as agent solicitation. If a mobile node is capable of supporting its own colocated care-of address, the mobile node can use regular router advertisements for the same purposes.

Agent Advertisement

Mobile nodes use agent advertisements to determine the current point of attachment to the Internet or to an organization's network. An agent advertisement is an Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) router advertisement that has been extended to also carry a mobility agent advertisement extension.

A foreign agent (FA) can be too busy to serve additional mobile nodes. However, a foreign agent must continue to send agent advertisements. Then, the mobile node, which is already registered with a foreign agent, knows that the mobile node has not moved out of range of the foreign agent. The mobile node also knows that the foreign agent has not failed. A mobile node that is registered with a foreign agent from which it no longer receives agent advertisements probably knows that the mobile node can no longer contact that foreign agent.

Agent Advertisement Over Dynamic Interfaces

You can configure the implementation of the foreign agent to send advertisements over dynamically created interfaces. You have options to enable or disable limited unsolicited advertisements over the advertising interfaces. Dynamically created interfaces are defined as only those interfaces that are configured after the mipagent daemon starts. Advertisement over dynamic interfaces is useful for applications that support transient mobility interfaces. Moreover, by limiting unsolicited advertisement, network bandwidth might be saved.

Agent Solicitation

Every mobile node should implement agent solicitation. The mobile node uses the same procedures, defaults, and constants for agent solicitation that are specified for solicitation messages of ICMP routers.

The rate that a mobile node sends solicitations is limited by the mobile node. The mobile node can send three initial solicitations at a maximum rate of one solicitation per second while the mobile node searches for an agent. After the mobile node registers with an agent, the rate that solicitations are sent is reduced to limit the overhead on the local network.