PK \Eoa,mimetypeapplication/epub+zipPK\EiTunesMetadata.plisto artistName Oracle Corporation book-info cover-image-hash 935960053 cover-image-path OEBPS/dcommon/oracle-logo.jpg package-file-hash 329164880 publisher-unique-id E10541-05 unique-id 465284326 genre Oracle Documentation itemName Oracle® Fusion Middleware System Administrator's Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition, 11g Release 1 (11.1.1) releaseDate 2012-05-03T10:54:12Z year 2012 PKzZ"PK\EMETA-INF/container.xml PKYuPK\EOEBPS/deliversconfigset.htm Configuring and Managing Agents

19 Configuring and Managing Agents

This chapter describes how configure and manage agents in Oracle Business Intelligence. If your organization licenses Oracle BI Delivers and if you have the appropriate privileges, then you can use the agents functionality as part of a default installation with no additional configuration. For information about using agents, see "Delivering Content" in Oracle Fusion Middleware User's Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition.

This chapter includes the following sections:


Note:

If you are migrating an Oracle Business Intelligence environment to a new system, then ensure that you also migrate the Oracle Business Intelligence repository file, the Oracle BI Presentation Catalog, and the Oracle BI Scheduler tables. The Oracle BI Scheduler tables are required for agents.

See Section 8.5.6, "Diagnosing Issues with Agents" for information about diagnostics and log files for agents.


19.1 How Are Agents Used?

Agents deliver targeted analytics to users based on a combination of schedule and trigger event. Delivery can be by a variety of routes, for example to Dashboard Alerts or to email.

To create an agent, Oracle Business Intelligence users (with the Create Agent privilege) define the operations that the agent is to perform. Oracle BI Presentation Services packages information such as priority, delivery devices, and user, into a job, and tells Oracle BI Scheduler when to execute the job. For information, see "What is Oracle BI Scheduler?" in Oracle Fusion Middleware Scheduling Jobs Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition

19.2 How Do Antivirus Software and Privileges Affect Agents?

This section provides the following information about agents:

19.2.1 How Does Antivirus Software Affect Agents?

Some antivirus software programs, such as Norton AntiVirus, enable a script-blocking feature, which tries to block all calls made by scripts to system objects (such as the Windows file system object) that the antivirus software deems unsafe.

If you start a script as part of post-agent processing, then this antivirus feature might cause unexpected results. If you run antivirus software with a script-blocking feature on the computer where Oracle BI Scheduler is installed, then you should disable the script-blocking feature to prevent the software from unexpectedly blocking agent script calls.

19.2.2 What Privileges Affect Agents?

You access the privilege settings for agents in the Delivers section of the Manage Privileges page in Oracle BI Presentation Services Administration.

To create an agent, users must be granted the Create Agent privilege. To enable users with the Publish Agents for Subscription privilege, which provides the ability to change or to delete an agent, you must grant them the Modify permission to the shared agent objects and child objects in the Oracle BI Presentation Catalog. For information, see "Managing Presentation Services Privileges" in Oracle Fusion Middleware Security Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition.


Note:

If the Oracle BI Server is configured to authenticate users through database logons, then impersonation is permitted until the number of associated variables exceeds one (for example, when session variables other than USER are associated with the initialization block). If the number of associated variables exceeds one, then the impersonated user does not have the password to log in to the database and to fill the other session variables. Agents work with database authentication, if only the initialization block that is set up for authentication in the Oracle BI Administration Tool uses a connection pool with pass-through login. That connection pool cannot be used for any other initialization block or request.

For information about user authentication options, see Oracle Fusion Middleware Security Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition. For information about pass-through login, see Oracle Fusion Middleware Metadata Repository Builder's Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition.


19.3 Configuring Settings that Affect Agents

You configure settings for agents by changing values for Oracle BI Presentation Services or Oracle BI Scheduler. You configure delivery options for agents using the SA System subject area. This section contains the following topics:

19.3.1 Manually Configuring Presentation Services Settings that Affect Agents

Use various elements in the instanceconfig.xml file for Presentation Services to change these settings. You must apply changes to both the primary and secondary scheduler's instanceconfig.xml in a cluster.

Before you begin this procedure, ensure that you are familiar with the information in Section 3.4, "Using a Text Editor to Update Configuration Settings."

To manually edit Presentation Services settings that affect agents:

  1. Open the Presentation Services instanceconfig.xml file for editing, as described in Section 3.6, "Where Are Configuration Files Located?"

  2. Locate the section in which you must add the elements that are described in Table 19-1.

  3. Include the elements and their ancestor elements as appropriate, as shown in the following example:

    
    
    <ServerInstance>
      <Alerts>
         <Enabled>false</Enabled>
         <DefaultDeliveryFormat>pdf</DefaultDeliveryFormat>
      </Alerts>
    </ServerInstance>
    
  4. Save your changes and close the file.

  5. Restart Presentation Services.

Table 19-1 Presentation Services Settings That Affect Agents

ElementDescriptionDefault Value

Enabled

Specifies whether Oracle BI Delivers is enabled. Allowed values are true or false.

Delivers is an optional component of Presentation Services that is enabled by default for organizations that have purchased the appropriate license. You use the Delivers component to create agents.

true

DefaultDeliveryFormat

Specifies the default format for sending emailed reports through an agent.

For example, a content designer can create an agent to send a report every day to a development team to share how many bugs have been fixed in the past day. When the content designer creates the agent, he can specify the format of the email. As the administrator, you can specify the default format that is used for such emails, using one of the following values:


html
pdf
excel
text

html


19.3.2 Manually Changing Additional Scheduler Settings that Affect Agents

In addition to the scheduler settings that you can change in Fusion Middleware Control, you can change other settings manually. Use various elements in the instanceconfig.xml file to change these settings. You must apply changes to both the primary and secondary scheduler's instanceconfig.xml in a cluster.

Before you begin this procedure, ensure that you are familiar with the information in Section 3.4, "Using a Text Editor to Update Configuration Settings."

To manually change additional Oracle BI Scheduler settings that affect agents:

  1. Open the Oracle BI Scheduler version of the instanceconfig.xml file for editing, as described in Section 3.6, "Where Are Configuration Files Located?"

  2. Locate the sections in which you must add or update the elements that are described in Section 19.3.3, "What Additional Scheduler Configuration Settings Affect Agents?"

  3. Include the elements and their ancestor elements as appropriate. The entry for Log_Dir is shown in the following example:

    <xs:element name="Log_Dir" type="xs:string" default="ibots" minOccurs="0">
       <xs:annotation>
          <xs:documentation xml:lang="en">
             The directory where Agent logs are stored.
          </xs:documentation>
       </xs:annotation>
    </xs:element>
    

    Note:

    You cannot specify values for user name and password in the instanceconfig.xml file. Instead you specify values in Fusion Middleware Control that are stored securely within the central credentials wallet, along with all other user names and passwords.


  4. Save your changes and close the file.

  5. Restart Oracle Business Intelligence.

19.3.3 What Additional Scheduler Configuration Settings Affect Agents?

You can change the following additional Oracle BI Scheduler configuration settings that affect agents:

19.3.3.1 General Scheduler Configuration Settings that Affect Agents

General configuration settings include access to, and configuration of, the Scheduler back-end database, some behavior settings, and settings for secure sockets and clustering configuration. Table 19-2 describes the settings.

Table 19-2 General Scheduler Configuration Settings that Affect Agents

ElementDescriptionDefault Value

PoolTimeout

Specifies the amount of time in minutes that a connection to the data source remains open after an operation completes.

During this time, new operations use this connection rather than open a new one, up to the number specified for Maximum Connections. The time is reset after each completed connection request.

Specify a value of 1 or greater.

60

NumDbConnections

Specifies the maximum number of database connections that Oracle BI Scheduler can open concurrently. Specify a value of 1 or greater. When this limit is reached, the connection request waits until a connection becomes available.

5

TABLE_JOBS

Specifies the name of a database table used to store information about scheduled jobs.

Note: For information about modifying the database table names, see "Changing Oracle BI Scheduler Table Names" in Oracle Fusion Middleware Scheduling Jobs Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition and see Oracle Business Intelligence Applications Installation and Configuration Guide.

S_NQ_JOB

TABLE_INSTANCES

Specifies the name of a database table used to store information about job instances.

S_NQ_INSTANCE

TABLE_PARAMS

Specifies the name of a database table used to store information about job parameters.

S_NQ_JOB_PARAM

TABLE_ERRMSGS

Specifies the name of a database table used to store information about job instances that do not complete successfully.

S_NQ_ERR_MSG

SchedulerScriptPath

Refers to the path where Oracle BI Scheduler-created job scripts are stored. In general, you should not add or remove scripts from this directory. By default, this field is set to ORACLE_INSTANCE\bifoundation\OracleBISchedulerComponent\coreapplication_obischn\scripts\scheduler, for example D:\OBI11g\instances\instance1\bifoundation\OracleBISchedulerComponent\coreapplication_obisch1\scripts\scheduler.

scripts\scheduler

DefaultScriptPath

Specifies the path where user-created job scripts (not agents) are stored.

If a file name is entered in the Script field when adding or modifying a job, then Oracle BI Scheduler examines the contents of this directory for the specified file. However, if a full path is given in the Script field, then this directory is not examined. By default, this field is set to ORACLE_INSTANCE\bifoundation\OracleBISchedulerComponent\coreapplication_obischn\scripts\scheduler\common, for example D:\OBI11g\instances\instance1\bifoundation\OracleBISchedulerComponent\coreapplication_obisch1\scripts\scheduler\common.

scripts\scheduler\common

TempPath

Specifies the path where temporary files are stored during Oracle BI Scheduler execution.

NA

BulkFetchBufferSize

Used in the database gateways. Specifies the maximum size in bytes of a bulk fetch page for retrieving data from a data source.

33,792 bytes.

LogAllSqlStmts

Occasionally you might set up the Scheduler to point to a database using a generic protocol like ODBC. This is usually done when the Target Type is not specified. When this happens, and a SQL statement fails, you must be able to determine which statement failed. Turning this setting on places the SQL statements in the Scheduler log file. Do not set this to TRUE in production mode as the overhead for this is quite high.

false

ServerPortNumber

Specifies the port number for the server. Defaults to the Oracle BI Scheduler port number.

The port number set for the Scheduler.

PurgeInstDays

Specifies the number of days after which old job instances are deleted from the back-end database automatically. To prevent old job instances from being deleted automatically, set the value to 0 (zero).

7 days

PurgeIntervalMinutes

Specifies the number of minutes in which Oracle BI Scheduler updates the tables and flags the affected rows as deleted.

Note: Oracle BI Scheduler does not actually issue SQL DELETE statements when jobs or instances are removed, instead rows are flagged for deletion.

After every X minutes (where X is defined as the value of this field), the actual SQL DELETE statements are issued.

60 minutes

MinExecThreads

Specifies the minimum number of multiple threads in the Oracle BI Scheduler thread pool that executes jobs at runtime.

1

MaxExecThreads

Specifies the maximum number of multiple threads in the Oracle BI Scheduler thread pool that executes jobs at runtime.

100

PauseOnStartup

Specifies that no jobs should execute when Oracle BI Scheduler starts. While Oracle BI Scheduler pauses, users can add, modify, and remove jobs. However, no jobs execute. From the Service Management menu, select Continue Scheduling to continue with regular execution.

false

CertificateFileName

Specifies the SSL Certificate File Path.

This setting supports SSL.

NA

CertPrivateKeyFileName

Specifies the SSL Certificate Private Key File.

This setting supports SSL.

NA

PassphraseFileName

Specifies the SSL File Containing Passphrase.

This setting supports SSL.

NA

PassphraseProgramName

Specifies the SSL Program Producing Passphrase.

This setting supports SSL.

NA

CertificateVerifyDepth

Specifies the SSL Certificate Verification Depth.

NA

CACertificateDir

Specifies the CA Certificate Directory.

This setting supports SSL.

NA

CACertificateFile

Specifies the CA Certificate File.

This setting supports SSL.

NA

TrustedPeerDNs

Specifies the SSL Trusted Peer DNs.

NA

VerifyPeer

Specifies whether to verify the peer.

This setting supports SSL.

false

CipherList

Specifies the Cipher List.

This setting supports SSL.

NA

ScriptRPCPort

Specifies the port used for interprocess communication between the script processes and the Oracle BI Scheduler process. This port accepts connections only from the same computer on which Oracle BI Scheduler is running.

9707


19.3.3.2 Email Scheduler Configuration Settings that Affect Agents

Table 19-3 Email Scheduler Configuration Settings that Affect Agents

ElementDescriptionDefault Value

SmtpCipherList

Specifies the list of ciphers that match the cipher suite name that the SMTP server supports. For example, RSA+RC4+SHA. For information, see "Advanced SSL Configuration Options" in Oracle Fusion Middleware Security Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition.

NA

UseStartTLS

Ignored unless UseSSL is true. If UseStartTls is true, then use the STARTTLS option (RFC 2487) for the SMTP session. Initial connection is through an unsecured link, usually port 25. The connection is then promoted to a secure link using the STARTTLS SMTP command. If UseStartTls is false, then a secured connection is created immediately, before the SMTP protocol is started. This is also known as SMTPS. SMTPS typically uses port 465.

true


19.3.3.3 Agent Scheduler Configuration Settings

Agents are functionally a combination of data that is stored in Oracle BI Presentation Services and Oracle BI Scheduler. The elements in the Scheduler instanceconfig.xml file describe the behavior of all agents that run on a specific Oracle BI Scheduler. Table 19-4 describes each agent configuration element.

Table 19-4 Agent Scheduler Configuration Settings

ElementDescriptionDefault Value

Log_Dir

Agents can create log files if exceptional error conditions occur. Log_Dir specifies the directory where these files are saved. The directory must be accessible to the Oracle BI Scheduler server. In Windows, the default installation runs the service as a system account, which prevents Oracle BI Scheduler from writing to or reading from network directories. If you put script files on network shares, or your scripts access network shares, then Oracle BI Scheduler must be run as a network user. For example:

For information about log files, see Section 8.5.6, "Diagnosing Issues with Agents."

ibots

LogPurgeDays

Specifies the number of days after which old agent logs are deleted automatically. To prevent old logs from being deleted automatically, set the value to 0 (zero).

7

NumGlobalRetries

A web or mail server that has too many people logged on might reject new connections, including connections from Oracle BI Scheduler. To cope with such overload, an agent retries the connection. This element sets the maximum number of retries to obtain global information about what to deliver and to whom before the agent gives up. If you set this value to 0 (zero), then no retries are attempted.

2

MinGlobalSleepSecs

Specifies the minimum number of seconds that the agent randomly sleeps after its connection is refused before it attempts to reconnect to the server to obtain global information about what to deliver and to whom.

3

MaxGlobalSleepSecs

Specifies the maximum number of seconds that the agent randomly sleeps after its connection is refused before it attempts to reconnect to the server to obtain global information about what to deliver and to whom.

10

NumRequestRetries

After an agent has received the global information, it issues a series of unique requests to the server for each user. This element specifies the number of times Oracle BI Scheduler retries its attempts to connect to the server to issue these requests. If you set this value to 0 (zero), then no retries are attempted.

3

MinRequestSleepSecs

Specifies the minimum number of seconds that the agent randomly sleeps after its connection is refused before it attempts to reconnect to the server to issue requests.

2

MaxRequestSleepSecs

Specifies the maximum number of seconds that the agent randomly sleeps after its connection is refused before it attempts to reconnect to the server to issue requests.

10

NumDeliveryRetries

After a unique request has executed, the agent tries to deliver the results to specified devices. This specifies the number of times that Oracle BI Scheduler attempts to retry to connect to the server to deliver the results. If you set this value to 0 (zero), then no retries are attempted.

4

MinDeliverySleepSecs

Specifies the minimum number of seconds that the agent randomly sleeps after its connection is refused before it attempts to reconnect to the server to deliver results.

5

MaxDeliverySleepSecs

Specifies the maximum number of seconds that the agent randomly sleeps after its connection is refused before it attempts to reconnect to the server to deliver results.

10

MaxRowsTimesColumns

When agents are chained, this value governs the size of filters passed between agents. When you pass a filter to another agent in a chain, Oracle BI Scheduler creates a union of the result sets for the Conditional Report for each personalized recipient. This report can grow very large in some cases (1000 users with 100 unique rows each with ten columns per report = 1,000,000 column values in the filter). The Oracle Business Intelligence servers might not be able to handle such a large filter, so this element specifies the maximum number of rows*columns in the filter.

10,000

Debug

Debug Enabled.

Set this element to have Oracle BI Scheduler generate a log file for each agent. This log file has useful logging messages when trying to diagnose a problem. This log file is stored in ORACLE_INSTANCE\diagnostics\logs\OracleBISchedulerComponent\coreapplication_obischn.

A new log file named Agent-<Job number>-<Instance number>.log is created for each job instance. The Job Manager can also be used to override the Debug setting for an individual job.

For more information, see Section 8.5.6, "Diagnosing Issues with Agents."

false

KeepErrorLogFiles

Set this element to true to generate an error log file for each agent. This log file is created only when an agent execution encounters errors and contains only error messages. The file is stored in ORACLE_INSTANCE\diagnostics\logs\OracleBISchedulerComponent\coreapplication_obischn.

true


19.3.4 Controlling Delivery Options for Agents

Delivery options (that is, delivery devices and delivery profiles) determine how the contents of agents are delivered to users. Delivery options can be configured by users, in the LDAP server (for email addresses), or in the SA System subject area. See "Setting Up the SA System Subject Area" in Oracle Fusion Middleware Scheduling Jobs Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition for information.

19.4 Managing Device Types for Agents

You can use different device types from such categories as mobile phones and pagers to deliver the content of agents to users. You can create, view, edit, and delete device types for a device category. Many device types are provided automatically. You can add types that are required for your users.


Note:

You can only view system-seeded device types (such as AT&T Wireless); you cannot edit or delete them.


The capability to manage device types is available to users who have the Manage Device Types privilege. For information about privileges, see "Managing Presentation Services Privileges" in Oracle Fusion Middleware Security Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition.

To create a device type:

  1. Log in to Oracle Business Intelligence.

  2. In the global header, click Administration.

  3. Click the Manage Device Types link to display the Manage Device Types page.

  4. Click the Create New Device Type link.

  5. Complete the Create New Device Type dialog, and click OK.

  6. Click Create Device Type to return to the Manage Device Types screen.

To view or edit a device type:

  1. In the global header, click Administration.

  2. Click the Manage Device Types link.

  3. Click the Edit button for the appropriate device type.

  4. Complete the Edit Device Type dialog, and click OK.

To delete a device type:

  1. In the global header, click Administration.

  2. Click the Manage Device Types link.

  3. Click the Delete button for the device type to delete.

    A confirmation box is displayed.

  4. Click OK to confirm the deletion.

For more information about the Administration page in Oracle Business Intelligence, see "Administration page" in Oracle Fusion Middleware User's Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition.

19.5 Monitoring Active Agent Sessions

Using the Manage Agent Sessions page in Oracle BI Presentation Services Administration, you monitor currently active agent sessions that are triggered by Oracle BI Scheduler. For example, you can see a list of active agents per session.

When one or more agent sessions are active, information about each agent session is displayed, such as the job identifier and the instance identifier that are assigned to the agent session by the Oracle BI Scheduler. Expanding the agent session shows the individual agents (one agent, or multiple agents if they are chained). The state of the agent is either Created, Populated, or Conditional Request Resolved.

Expanding a specific agent in a particular session shows the recipients for the agent and their type, such as the Engineering recipients defined in a group, or individual users. When the recipient is a group, the individual members of the group are not listed.


Note:

When agents are chained, the recipient list is depends on the parent agent. The recipients are shown for the parent agent definition only, and not for the actual execution of chained agents.


To view information about active agent sessions:

  1. In the global header, click Administration.

  2. Click the Manage Agent Sessions link to display the Manage Agent Sessions page and do one of the following:

    • To sort agent sessions by their values in a particular column, click the Sort button for that column.

      Re-sorting the list causes the page to refresh so the number of active agent sessions might increase or decrease as a result.

    • To view more information about an agent session or about agents within a particular session, click the Expand button.

    • To view the definition of an individual agent, click its link.

For more information about the Administration page in Oracle Business Intelligence, see "Administration page" in Oracle Fusion Middleware User's Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition.

PK $!PK\EOEBPS/usage_track.htm Managing Usage Tracking

9 Managing Usage Tracking

This chapter describes how to manage usage tracking for Oracle Business Intelligence. The Oracle BI Server supports the collection of usage tracking data. When usage tracking is enabled, the Oracle BI Server collects usage tracking data for each query and writes statistics to a usage tracking log file or inserts them directly to a database table. It is strongly recommended that you use direct insertion instead of writing to a log file.

If you are upgrading from previous versions of Usage Tracking, then see the usage tracking topics in Oracle Fusion Middleware Installation Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence.


Note:

The Oracle BI Summary Advisor feature works in conjunction with the usage tracking feature. Summary Advisor only works with direct insertion usage tracking.

Oracle BI Summary Advisor is only available when you are running Oracle Business Intelligence on the Oracle Exalytics Machine. See "Using Oracle BI Summary Advisor to Identify Query Candidates for Aggregation" in Oracle Fusion Middleware Metadata Repository Builder's Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition for more information about the Summary Advisor feature.


This chapter includes the following sections:

9.1 About Usage Tracking

The Oracle BI Server supports the accumulation of c. The BI Server tracks usage at the detailed query level.

When you enable usage tracking, statistics for every query are inserted into a database table or are written to a usage tracking log file. If you use direct insertion, then the BI Server directly inserts the usage tracking data into a relational database table. It is recommended that you use direct insertion to write statistics to a database table.

When the BI Server starts, it validates the column names in the metadata against the list of valid columns in the usage tracking table. The following events occur:


Note:

A sample usage tracking implementation is provided with the Oracle Business Intelligence installation at:

ORACLE_INSTANCE\bifoundation\OracleBIServerComponent\coreapplication_obisn\sample\usagetracking


9.2 Setting Up Direct Insertion to Collect Information for Usage Tracking

Direct insertion is the recommended method for setting up usage tracking. This section describes how to set up direct insertion, and contains the following topics:

9.2.1 Setting Up the Usage Tracking Statistics Database

Before you can use direct insertion usage tracking, you must set up a database to store the usage tracking statistics. You must run the Repository Creation Utility (RCU) on the target database to create the required statistics schema.

Typically, you use the database you installed for use with Oracle Business Intelligence as the statistics database because this database already has the RCU-created schemas. The RCU-created table name for usage tracking is S_NQ_ACCT.

You also need to import the database into the Physical layer of the Oracle BI repository.

To set up the usage tracking statistics database:

  1. Run the Repository Creation Utility on an external database of your choice. You can skip this step if you choose to use the database you installed for use with Oracle Business Intelligence for usage tracking statistics, because this database has the RCU-created tables already.

  2. Open the Administration Tool and import the database into the Physical layer. See Oracle Fusion Middleware Metadata Repository Builder's Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition for more information.

  3. Save and close the repository.

  4. Use Fusion Middleware Control to upload the repository and make it available for queries. See Section 10.2, "Using Fusion Middleware Control to Upload a Repository and Set the Oracle BI Presentation Catalog Location" for more information.

9.2.2 Setting Direct Insertion Parameters

To set up direct insertion for new (non-upgraded) installations, use the System MBean Browser in Fusion Middleware Control.

To set up direct insertion usage tracking using the System MBean Browser:

  1. Display the Fusion Middleware Control MBean Browser.

    For information, see Section 2.4.2, "Displaying the Fusion Middleware Control MBean Browser."

  2. Expand Application Defined MBeans, then expand oracle.biee.admin, then expand Domain: bifoundation_domain.

  3. Lock the domain, as follows:

    1. Expand BIDomain and select the BIDomain MBean where group=Service.

    2. Display the Operations tab.

    3. Click the lock link.

  4. Expand BIDomain.BIInstance.ServerConfiguration, then select the BIDomain.BIInstance.ServerConfiguration MBean.

  5. Ensure that the UsageTrackingCentrallyManaged attribute is set to true. When UsageTrackingCentrallyManaged is set to false, the following parameters are managed using the NQSConfig.INI file on each Oracle BI Server computer rather than the System MBean Browser:

    • SummaryAdvisorTableName

    • SummaryStatisticsLogging

    • UsageTrackingConnectionPool

    • UsageTrackingDirectInsert

    • UsageTrackingEnabled

    • UsageTrackingPhysicalTableName

  6. Set the UsageTrackingEnabled attribute to true to enable usage tracking.

  7. Set the UsageTrackingDirectInsert attribute to true to enable direct insertion.

  8. Set the UsageTrackingPhysicalTableName attribute to the name of the fully-qualified database table for collecting query statistic information, as it appears in the Physical layer of the Oracle BI repository. For example:

    "My_DB"."DEV_BIPLATFORM"."S_NQ_ACCT"

  9. Set the UsageTrackingConnectionPool attribute to the name of the fully-qualified connection pool for the query statistics database, as it appears in the Physical layer of the Oracle BI repository. For example:

    "My_DB"."Usage Connection Pool"


    Note:

    For Usage Tracking insertions to succeed, the connection pool must be configured with a user ID that has write access to the back-end database. Also, it is recommended that the connectivity type supports international data.


  10. After applying your changes, release the lock on the domain, as follows:

    1. Return to the BIDomain MBean where group=Service under oracle.biee.admin, Domain:bifoundation_domain, BIDomain.

    2. Display the Operations tab.

    3. Click one of the commit operations.

  11. Go to the Oracle Business Intelligence Overview page and click Restart.

For upgrading customers, the usage tracking parameters are not centrally managed by default. You can set UsageTrackingCentrallyManaged to true as described in the previous procedure, and use the System MBean Browser to update the parameters, or you can manage the usage tracking parameters using NQSConfig.INI.

To enable direct insertion usage tracking in NQSConfig.INI when central management is disabled for these parameters, follow these steps:

  1. On the Oracle BI Server computer, open the NQSConfig.INI file in a text editor. You can find this file at:

    ORACLE_INSTANCE/config/OracleBIServerComponent/coreapplication_obisn
    

    Make a backup copy of the file before editing.

  2. In the [USAGE_TRACKING] section, update the following parameters:

    • Set ENABLE to YES.

    • Set DIRECT_INSERT to YES.

    • Set PHYSICAL_TABLE_NAME to the name of the fully-qualified database table for collecting query statistic information, as it appears in the Physical layer of the Oracle BI repository. For example:

      PHYSICAL_TABLE_NAME = "My_DB"."DEV_BIPLATFORM"."S_NQ_ACCT";
      
    • Set CONNECTION_POOL to the name of the fully-qualified connection pool for the query statistics database, as it appears in the Physical layer of the Oracle BI repository. For example:

      CONNECTION_POOL = "My_DB"."Usage Connection Pool";
      

      Note:

      For Usage Tracking insertions to succeed, the connection pool must be configured with a user ID that has write access to the back-end database. Also, it is recommended that the connectivity type supports international data.


  3. Save and close the file.

  4. Restart the Oracle BI Server.

  5. If you have multiple Oracle BI Server instances, then repeat these steps in each NQSConfig.INI file for all Oracle BI Server instances.

9.2.3 Setting Optional Direct Insert Parameters

In addition to the setup parameters described previously, you can also update the following optional parameters in the Usage Tracking section of the NQSConfig.INI file:

  • BUFFER_SIZE. This parameter indicates how much memory the BI Server should allocate for buffering the insert statements. Such a buffer lets the BI Server submit multiple insert statements as part of a single transaction, improving Usage Tracking insert throughput. It also means that ordinary analyses do not have to wait on Usage Tracking insertions, which improves average query response time. You might want to adjust this value based on available memory and memory utilization on the server computer.

  • BUFFER_TIME_LIMIT_SECONDS. This parameter indicates the maximum amount of time that an insert statement remains in the buffer before the Usage Tracking subsystem attempts to issue it. This time limit ensures that the BI Server issues the insert statements quickly, even during periods of extended quiescence.

  • NUM_INSERT_THREADS. This parameter indicates the number of threads that remove insert statements from the buffer and issue them to the Usage Tracking database. Assuming separate connection pools for readers and inserters, the number of insert threads should typically equal the Maximum Connections setting in the connection pool.

  • MAX_INSERTS_PER_TRANSACTION. This parameter indicates the maximum number of insert statements that the Usage Tracking subsystem attempts to issue as part of a single transaction. The larger this number, the greater potential throughput for UsageMarathon Tracking inserts. However, a larger number also increases the likelihood of transactions failing due to deadlocks. A small value for BUFFER_TIME_LIMIT_SECONDS can limit the number of inserts per transaction.

See Appendix A, "NQSConfig.INI File Configuration Settings" for additional information about the usage tracking configuration parameters.

9.3 Setting Up a Log File to Collect Information for Usage Tracking

Log file collection is an alternate method for configuring usage tracking. Although this feature is supported, it is recommended that you use direct insertion to collect information for usage tracking. See Section 9.2, "Setting Up Direct Insertion to Collect Information for Usage Tracking" for details.

The following sections explain how to configure log file collection for usage tracking. Before you configure the log file parameters, you must set the ENABLE parameter in the Usage Tracking section of the NQSConfig.INI file to YES (or set the UsageTrackingEnabled attribute of the BIDomain.BIInstance.ServerConfiguration MBean to true using the System MBean Browser, if central management of usage tracking is enabled). See Appendix A, "NQSConfig.INI File Configuration Settings" for more information about the usage tracking configuration parameters.

This section contains the following topics:

9.3.1 Selecting an Output Location

The STORAGE_DIRECTORY parameter in the Usage Tracking section of the NQSConfig.INI file determines the location of usage tracking log files. If usage tracking is enabled, but no storage folder is specified, then the files are written in the logs folder in the software installation folder (for example, in \OBI11g\logs).

Current files are periodically written to disk, and new files are created. The CHECKPOINT_INTERVAL_MINUTES parameter controls the frequency with which usage tracking data is flushed to disk, and the FILE_ROLLOVER_INTERVAL_MINUTES parameter controls the frequency with which the current usage tracking log file is closed and a new file is created.

When usage tracking is enabled, every query is logged to a usage tracking log file. This might require a large amount of available storage. For example, assume an average of 300 bytes of data output for each query and 10 queries per second over an 8 hour day. This results in approximately 83 MB of usage tracking data that is written to storage per day. If this example is extended to a 24 x 7 operation, then the result is approximately 0.25 GB of storage per day.

The BI Server has no limit on the size or quantity of usage tracking log files that can exist in the specified location. You must ensure that sufficient space is available and that you remove or archive old usage tracking files.


Caution:

Insufficient storage space might cause you to lose usage tracking data. If the BI Server encounters an error while accessing a usage tracking output file, then it immediately discontinues the collection of usage tracking statistics and issues an error message to the nqserver.log and, on Windows, to the Windows Event log. Even if additional storage space is made available, the collection of usage tracking statistics does not resume until the server is restarted.


9.3.2 File Naming Conventions

The file naming scheme for the usage tracking log files is NQAcct.yyyymmdd.hhmmss.log, where yyyy is the year, mm is the month, dd is the day, hh is the hour, mm is the minute, and ss is the second of the timestamp when the file was created. For example, if the server creates the usage tracking log file at 07:15:00 a.m. on February 12, 2010, the file name would be NQAcct.20100212.071500.log. After the specified rollover interval, this file is flushed to disk and closed and a new log file, with the current date and timestamp, is created.

9.3.3 Output File Format

The usage tracking log files are text files, in semicolon-delimited ( ; ) format. A semicolon is used as the column delimiter because the logical SQL text contains commas. A line feed delimits the end of each row of data.

Although there is no guaranteed unique key for the usage tracking data, a combination of User name, Node ID, Start timestamp, and Query text is usually sufficient. Query_Key can be used as an unique key but Query_Key is available only in direct insert.

For information about sample scripts to help you extract data from usage tracking log files and load it to appropriately formatted relational database tables, see Chapter 9, "Managing Usage Tracking." See also Section 9.4, "Description of the Usage Tracking Data" for more information about the contents of each column.

Table 9-1 shows the format of the usage tracking output file.

Table 9-1 Usage Tracking Output File Format

Column NumberColumn NameData TypeMax Data SizeNullable

1

User name

Varchar

128

No

2

Repository name

Varchar

128

No

3

Subject area name

Varchar

128

No

4

Node ID

Varchar

15

No

5

Start timestamp

Char (Timestamp)

19

No

6

Start date

Char (yyyy-mm-dd)

10

No

7

Start hourMin

Char (hh:mm)

5

No

8

End timestamp

Char (Timestamp)

19

No

9

End date

Char (yyyy-mm-dd)

10

No

10

End hourMin

Char (hh:mm)

5

No

11

Query Text

Varchar

1024

No

12

Success indicator

Integer

4

No

13

Row count

Integer

4

Yes

14

Total time (secs)

Integer

4

Yes

15

Compilation time (secs)

Integer

4

Yes

16

Number of database queries

Integer

4

Yes

17

Cumulative db time (secs)

Integer

4

Yes

18

Cumulative db rows

Integer

4

Yes

19

Cache indicator

Char

1

No

20

Query source

Varchar

30

No

21

Presentation Catalog path

Varchar

250

No

22

Dashboard name

Varchar

150

Yes


Table 9-1 describes the schema. The following list contains more detail about Integer data types and Timestamp columns:

  • Integers data types. All data in the output file is in character format. The data in columns 12 through 18 are output as text representations of integer numbers. Therefore, they behave more like Varchar(10) columns than integers. For example, if the row count is one million rows, then 1000000 appears in the output file in column 13 (Row count). This constitutes 7 bytes of data, even though the data represents a 4-byte internal integer value.

    In column 12, a Success indicator value of 0 signifies a successful query. All nonzero values indicate failure. The following failure indicators are currently defined:

    • 1 indicates timeout

    • 2 indicates row limit violation

    • 3 indicates unknown error

    The subsequent integer columns are valid only if the Success indicator (column 12) signifies a successful query (value is 0):

  • Timestamp columns. The Start timestamp and End timestamp columns indicate the wall clock time (local time) when the logical query started and finished. Each value is 19 bytes of character data that represents a SQL-92 timestamp. The format is yyyy-mm-dd-hh:mm:ss. The related columns, Start date and End date, contain just the date component from the respective timestamps (in the yyyy-mm-dd format). Finally, the related columns, Start hourMin and End hourMin, contain just the hour and minute components from the respective timestamps (in a char hh:mm format).

9.3.4 Performance Considerations

When usage tracking is enabled, the BI Server collects usage tracking data for every query. This data, however, is written to disk only at user-specified intervals, known as checkpoints. The default setting is to have checkpoints every 5 minutes.

Although you can modify this value in the NQSConfig.INI file, reducing the interval adds overhead and, if set low enough, could potentially impact server performance. Setting the value to a larger number increases the amount of usage tracking data that could be lost in the unlikely event of an abnormal shutdown of the BI Server.

The BI Server periodically initiates usage tracking log file rollovers. A rollover consists of closing the current usage tracking log file and opening a newly created one for writing subsequent data. The frequency at which rollovers occur is called a rollover interval. The default rollover interval is 240 minutes (every 4 hours).

Usage tracking log files that are closed are available for analysis. Setting a lower rollover interval makes usage tracking log files available for analysis sooner, but at the cost of additional overhead.

If the checkpoint interval equals or exceeds the rollover interval, then only the rollover occurs explicitly. The checkpoint occurs implicitly only when the old usage tracking log file is closed.

9.4 Description of the Usage Tracking Data

Table 9-2 describes each column in the S_NQ_ACCT usage tracking table. Where appropriate, the data type and length is also included.

As you review the descriptions in Table 9-2, you might assume that certain of the time-related columns can be added or subtracted to equal exact values. For example, you might assume that TOTAL_TIME_SEC is equal to END_TS minus START_TS. The following list explains why the columns do not provide such exact values:

Table 9-2 Usage Tracking Data in S_NQ_ACCT

ColumnDescription

CACHE_IND_FLG

Default is N.

Y indicates a cache hit for the query; N indicates a cache miss.

COMPILE_TIME_SEC

The time in seconds that is required to compile the query. The number for COMPILE_TIME_SEC is included in TOTAL_TIME_SEC, as described in this table.

CUM_DB_TIME_SEC

The total amount of time in seconds that the BI Server waited for back-end physical databases on behalf of a logical query.

CUM_NUM_DB_ROW

The total number of rows that are returned by the back-end databases.

END_DT

The date the logical query was completed.

END_HOUR_MIN

The hour and minute the logical query was completed.

END_TS

The date and time the logical query finished. The start and end timestamps also reflect any time that the query spent waiting for resources to become available.

Note: If the user submitting the query navigates away from the page before the query finishes, then the final fetch never happens, and a timeout value of 3600 is recorded. However, if the user navigates back to the page before the timeout, then the fetch completes at that time, and this is recorded as the end_ts time.

ERROR_TEXT

Default is Null. Varchar(250)

Error message from the back-end database. This column is only applicable if the SUCCESS_FLG (for more information, see entry later in this table) is set to a value other than 0 (zero). Multiple messages are concatenated and are not parsed by the BI Server.

NODE_ID

The host name of the computer where the BI Server is running.

NUM_CACHE_HITS

Default is Null. Number(10,0).

For DB2, the data type and length is Decimal(10,0).

Indicates the number of times that the cache result returned for query.

NUM_CACHE_INSERTED

Default is Null. Number(10,0).

For DB2, the data type and length is Decimal(10,0).

Indicates the number of times that the query generated a cache entry.

NUM_DB_QUERY

The number of queries that were submitted to back-end databases to satisfy the logical query request. For successful queries (SuccessFlag = 0) this number is 1 or greater.

PRESENTATION_NAME

Default is Null. Varchar(128)

The name of the Oracle BI Presentation Catalog.

QUERY_BLOB

The data type is ntext when using SQLServer, and is CLOB when using ORACLE, DB2, or TERRADATA databases.

Contains the entire logical SQL statement without any truncation.

QUERY_KEY

Default is Null. Varchar(128).

An MD5 hash key that is generated by Oracle Business Intelligence from the logical SQL statement.

QUERY_SRC_CD

The source of the request (for example, Drill or Report).

QUERY_TEXT

Varchar(1024).

The SQL statement that was submitted for the query.

You can change the length of this column (using the ALTER TABLE command), but note that the text that is written into this column is always truncated to the size that is defined in the physical layer. It is the responsibility of the repository administrator not to set the length of this column to a value greater than the maximum query length that is supported by the back-end physical database.

For example, Oracle Databases enable a maximum Varchar of 4000, but Oracle Databases truncate to 4000 bytes, not 4000 characters. Hence, if you use a multibyte character set, the actual maximum string size has a varying number of characters, depending on the character set and characters used.

REPOSITORY_NAME

The name of the repository that the query accesses.

ROW_COUNT

The number of rows that are returned to the query client.

Note: When a large amount of data is returned from a query, this column is not populated until the user displays all of the data.

IMPERSONATOR_USER_NAME

Default is Null. Varchar(128)

The user name of the impersonated user. If the request is not run as an impersonated user, then the value is NULL.

SAW_DASHBOARD

The path name of the dashboard. If the query was not submitted through a dashboard, then the value is NULL.

SAW_DASHBOARD_PG

Default is Null. Varchar(150)

The page name in the dashboard. If the request is not a dashboard request, then the value is NULL.

SAW_SRC_PATH

The path name in the Oracle BI Presentation Catalog for the analysis.

START_DT

The date that the logical query was submitted.

START_HOUR_MIN

The hour and minute that the logical query was submitted.

START_TS

The date and time that the logical query was submitted.

SUBJECT_AREA_NAME

The name of the business model that is being accessed.

SUCCESS_FLG

The completion status of the query, as defined in the following list:

  • 0 - The query completed successfully with no errors.

  • 1 - The query timed out.

  • 2 = The query failed because row limits were exceeded.

  • 3 = The query failed due to some other reason.

TOTAL_TIME_SEC

The time in seconds that the BI Server spent working on the query while the client waited for responses to its analyses. TOTAL_TIME_SEC includes the time for COMPILE_TIME_SEC.

This setting is the same as the Response time in the nqquery.log file, as described in Section 8.4.1.1, "Setting the Query Logging Level."

USER_NAME

The name of the user who submitted the query.


Table 9-3 describes the S_NQ_DB_ACCT table, which supplements the usage tracking table by providing the physical SQL information for the logical queries stored in S_NQ_ACCT. S_NQ_DB_ACCT has a foreign key relationship back to S_NQ_ACCT.

Table 9-3 Usage Tracking Data in S_NQ_DB_ACCT

ColumnDescription

END_DT

The date the physical query was completed.

END_HOUR_MIN

The hour and minute the physical query was completed.

END_TS

The date and time the physical query finished. The start and end timestamps also reflect any time that the query spent waiting for resources to become available.

ID

The unique row ID.

LOGICAL_QUERY_ID

Varchar2(50).

Refers to the logical query in the S_NQ_ACCT table.

QUERY_BLOB

The data type is ntext when using SQLServer, and is CLOB when using ORACLE, DB2, or TERRADATA databases.

Contains the entire physical SQL statement without any truncation.

QUERY_TEXT

Varchar(1024).

The SQL statement that was submitted for the query.

ROW_COUNT

The number of rows that are returned to the query client.

TIME_SEC

The physical query execution time.

START_DT

The date that the physical query was submitted.

START_HOUR_MIN

The hour and minute that the physical query was submitted.

START_TS

The date and time that the physical query was submitted.


PKMBtQGPK\EOEBPS/getting_started.htm Introduction to Oracle Business Intelligence System Administration

1 Introduction to Oracle Business Intelligence System Administration

This chapter introduces system administration in Oracle Business Intelligence, explains what a system administrator does; describes where to get started with typical system administration tasks; describes the Oracle Business Intelligence architecture; lists the tools that can help you complete system administration tasks, and provides links to system requirements and certification information.

This chapter includes the following sections:

1.1 What Are the Oracle Business Intelligence System Administration Tasks?

Administering an Oracle Business Intelligence system involves the following tasks:

For more information about these tasks, see Section 1.2, "Getting Started with Managing Oracle Business Intelligence."

1.2 Getting Started with Managing Oracle Business Intelligence

Use this section to identify a task to complete, then click the corresponding link to display the appropriate content.

Table 1-1 describes the typical system administration tasks that you perform in Oracle Business Intelligence and indicates where to find related information.

Table 1-1 Oracle Business Intelligence System Administration Tasks

System Administration TaskMore Information

Learning about Oracle Business Intelligence system administration

For more information, see the topics in this section.

Contains information about the system architecture, components, tools, links to other related topics, and certification information.

Viewing Oracle Business Intelligence status

Section 2.2.3, "Using Fusion Middleware Control to Manage Oracle Business Intelligence System Components"

Also contains information about using Fusion Middleware Control and using WebLogic Server Administration Console.

Configuring Oracle Business Intelligence

Chapter 3, "Configuring the Oracle Business Intelligence System"

Contains information about the available methods for updating configuration settings and where configuration files are located.

Starting and stopping Oracle Business Intelligence

Chapter 4, "Starting and Stopping Oracle Business Intelligence"

Contains various topics on starting and stopping components, in addition to troubleshooting information.

Managing availability and capacity

Part III, "Scaling and Deploying for High Availability and Performance"

Contains chapters about scaling the environment, deploying for high availability, performance tuning, and query caching.

Diagnosing problems and resolving issues

Part IV, "Resolving Issues"

Contains chapters about diagnosing and resolving issues and about usage tracking.

Configuring Oracle Business Intelligence

Part V, "Configuring Oracle Business Intelligence"

Contains chapters about required configuration such as configuring repositories and connections to external systems.

Modifying advanced configuration settings

Part VI, "Advanced Configuration Settings"

Contains chapters about advanced and optional configuration settings for features such as analyses, dashboards, and maps.

Configuring Oracle BI Scheduler

For more information, see Oracle Fusion Middleware Scheduling Jobs Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition

Automating management of an Oracle Business Intelligence system

Part VII, "Automating Management of Oracle Business Intelligence"

Describes the Oracle BI Systems Management API.

Managing the life cycle.

Part VIII, "Managing the Life Cycle"

Contains chapters about life cycle management tasks such as patching, moving between environments, and backup and recovery.

Securing the system


1.3 What Is the Oracle Business Intelligence System Logical Architecture?

The Oracle Business Intelligence system logical architecture comprises a single integrated set of manageable components called the Oracle BI domain which can be installed and configured to work together on a single host or can be clustered across multiple hosts for performance and availability.


Note:

You can improve the performance of your production system by using a web server with Oracle Business Intelligence, such as Oracle HTTP Server or Apache HTTP Server. A web server is not included by default in the Oracle Business Intelligence installer and is not part of the Oracle Business Intelligence system logical architecture. You must install and configure a web server separately.


1.3.1 Oracle Business Intelligence on a Single Host

You can install Oracle Business Intelligence on a single host using either an Enterprise Install type or a Simple Install type. The architecture differs slightly depending on install type, as described in the following sections.

See "Installation Types" in Oracle Fusion Middleware Installation Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence for more information.

1.3.1.1 A Single Host and Enterprise Install

In an Enterprise Install type, the following components are installed in the Oracle BI Domain on the single host. The BI Domain consists of Java components that are deployed into one or more Java EE (JEE) containers within a single WebLogic server domain; system (non-JEE) components and processes; and required configuration files, metadata repositories, and infrastructure.

Figure 1-1 illustrates the Oracle Business Intelligence system architecture on a single host for an Enterprise Install type.

Figure 1-1 System Logical Architecture for Enterprise Install (Single Host)

BI architecture on one host.

1.3.1.2 A Single Host and Simple Install

The architecture for the Simple Install type is similar to that of the Enterprise Install type, with the differences that are outlined in the following list:

  • The Node Manager is not installed.

  • All components that are part of the Managed Server in an Enterprise Install type are instead part of the Administration Server. The Managed Server is not installed.

Figure 1-2 illustrates the Oracle Business Intelligence system architecture on a single host for a Simple Install type.

Figure 1-2 System Logical Architecture for Simple Install (Single Host)

Description of Figure 1-2 follows

1.3.2 Oracle Business Intelligence on Multiple Hosts

If you perform an Enterprise Installation, then Oracle Business Intelligence can be installed and configured on multiple hosts. Figure 1-3 illustrates the system architecture on two hosts.

Figure 1-3 Oracle Business Intelligence System Logical Architecture (Two Hosts)

BI architecture on two hosts.

In Figure 1-3, the Java components (WebLogic server domain) and the system components (BI instance) are clustered on each host as part of the single BI domain. The Administration Server exists on both hosts, but is only active on one host (in this example, Host 1).

1.3.3 About Java Components and System Components for Oracle Business Intelligence

The Oracle Business Intelligence Java and system components are described in the following sections:

For more information, see Oracle Fusion Middleware Administrator's Guide.

1.3.3.1 About Java Components

Java components are deployed as one or more Java EE applications and are described in the following list:

  • Administrative Components — Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console, Fusion Middleware Control, and JMX MBeans for managing all configuration and runtime settings for Oracle Business Intelligence.

  • Oracle BI Publisher — This component provides an enterprise reporting solution for authoring, managing, and delivering all types of highly formatted documents to employees, customers, and suppliers.

  • Oracle BI for Microsoft Office — This component provides the integration between Oracle Business Intelligence and Microsoft Office products.

  • Oracle BI Action Services — This component provides the dedicated web services that are required by the Action Framework and that enable an administrator to manually configure which web service directories can be browsed by users when they create actions.

  • Oracle Real-Time Decisions (Oracle RTD) — This component provides enterprise analytics software solutions that enable companies to make better decisions in real time at key, high-value points in operational business processes.

  • Oracle BI Security Services — This component provides dedicated web services that enable the integration of the Oracle BI Server with the Oracle Fusion Middleware security platform.

  • Oracle BI SOA Services — This component provides dedicated web services for objects in the Oracle BI Presentation Catalog, to invoke analyses, agents, and conditions. These services make it easy to invoke Oracle Business Intelligence functionality from Business Process Execution Language (BPEL) processes.

  • Oracle BI Presentation Services Plug-in — This component is a JEE application that routes HTTP and SOAP requests to Oracle BI Presentation Services.

1.3.3.2 About System Components

System components are deployed as non-JEE components, such as processes and services written in C++ and J2SE, and are described in the following list:

  • Oracle BI Server — This component provides the query and data access capabilities at the heart of Oracle Business Intelligence and provides services for accessing and managing the enterprise semantic model (stored in a file with an .RPD extension).

  • Oracle BI Presentation Services — This component provides the framework and interface for the presentation of business intelligence data to web clients. It maintains an Oracle BI Presentation Catalog service on the file system for the customization of this presentation framework.

  • Oracle BI Scheduler — This component provides extensible scheduling for analyses to be delivered to users at specified times. (Oracle BI Publisher has its own scheduler.)

  • Oracle BI JavaHost — This component provides component services that enable Oracle BI Presentation Services to support various components such as Java tasks for Oracle BI Scheduler, Oracle BI Publisher, and graph generation. It also enables Oracle BI Server query access to Hyperion Financial Management and Oracle OLAP data sources.

  • Oracle BI Cluster Controller — This component distributes requests to the BI Server, ensuring requests are evenly load-balanced across all BI Server process instances in the BI domain.

1.3.4 What Is the Administration Server?

The Administration Server contains the administrative components that enable administration of a single or multinode (that is, distributed) BI domain, as described in the following list:

  • For Enterprise and Simple Install types, the Administration Server contains the following components:

    • JMX MBeans — Java components that provide programmatic access for managing a BI domain.

    • Fusion Middleware Control — An administrative user interface that is used to manage the BI domain.

    • WebLogic Server Administration Console — An administrative user interface that provides advanced management for WebLogic, JEE components, and security.

  • For Simple Install types, the Administration Server also contains the components that comprise the Managed Server in an Enterprise Install type, such as Action Services and Oracle BI Publisher.

1.4 What System Administration Tools Manage Oracle Business Intelligence?

The following sections describe system administration tools that are available to help you to manage Oracle Business Intelligence. Table 1-2 outlines the tools and their purpose.

Table 1-2 System Administration Tools for Oracle Business Intelligence

SectionToolPurpose

Section 1.4.1


Fusion Middleware Control


Monitor, manage, and configure system components for Oracle Business Intelligence.

Section 1.4.2


Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console

Monitor and manage JEE Java components for Oracle Business Intelligence.

Section 1.4.3


Oracle Process Manager and Notification Server (OPMN)

Manage system components for Oracle Business Intelligence (for advanced users).

Section 1.4.4


Oracle WebLogic Scripting Tool (WLST)

Programmatically administer Oracle Business Intelligence.

Section 1.4.5


Oracle BI Administration Tool


Manage the metadata repository for Oracle Business Intelligence.

Section 1.4.6


Job Manager

Manage the Oracle BI Scheduler


1.4.1 Fusion Middleware Control

Fusion Middleware Control is a browser-based tool and the recommended method for monitoring, managing, and configuring Oracle Business Intelligence components.

Fusion Middleware Control is used principally for managing the system components of a BI domain and provides support for the following:

  • Starting, stopping, and restarting all system components and Managed Servers

  • Configuring preferences and defaults

  • Scaling out of system components

  • Providing high availability configuration and status of system components

  • Managing performance and monitoring system metrics

  • Performing diagnostics and logging

Fusion Middleware Control also provides access to Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console, where you monitor and manage Oracle Business Intelligence Java components.

Fusion Middleware Control is available only if the Administration Server is running, as described in Section 4.2, "Starting the Oracle Business Intelligence System."

For more information, see Chapter 2, "Managing Oracle Business Intelligence."

1.4.2 Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console

Oracle WebLogic Server is a Java EE application server that supports the deployment of Oracle Business Intelligence Java components in a robust, secure, highly available, and scalable environment.

For more information, see Chapter 2, "Managing Oracle Business Intelligence."

Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console enables you to monitor and manage a WebLogic Server domain. Its capabilities include the following:

  • Monitoring the health and performance of JEE servers

  • Configuring WebLogic server domains

  • Stopping and starting JEE servers

  • <~4p>Viewing JEE server logs

  • Managing user populations in the LDAP Server of the Oracle WebLogic Server

For more information, see Oracle Technology Network at the following location:

http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/index.html.

1.4.3 Oracle Process Manager and Notification Server (OPMN) Tool

OPMN is a process management tool that manages the Oracle Business Intelligence system components. OPMN supports both local and distributed process management, automatic process recycling, and the communication of process state (up, down, starting, and stopping). OPMN detects process unavailability and automatically restarts processes).


Note:

Fusion Middleware Control is the recommended approach for starting, stopping, and viewing the status of components. However, following a restart on Linux you must use the opmnctl start, or startall command. OPMN is suitable only for advanced users.


OPMN provides the following functionality to manage the Oracle Business Intelligence system components:

1.4.4 Oracle WebLogic Scripting Tool (WLST)

The Oracle WebLogic Scripting Tool (WLST) is a command-line scripting environment (for advanced administrator use), which enables you to programmatically administer Oracle Business Intelligence. The WLST scripting environment is based on the Java scripting interpreter Jython. You can use this tool interactively on the command line, in batch scripts that are supplied in a file (Script Mode, where scripts invoke a sequence of WLST commands without requiring your input), or embedded in Java code. You can extend the WebLogic scripting language by following the Jython language syntax.

For more information, see:

1.4.5 Oracle BI Administration Tool

The Oracle BI Administration Tool enables you to manage the metadata repository. For information, see Oracle Fusion Middleware Metadata Repository Builder's Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition.

1.4.6 Job Manager

The Job Manager is a Windows tool that is the interface with the Oracle BI Scheduler. Through Job Manager, you can connect to, start and stop the Oracle BI Scheduler, add and manage jobs, and manage job instances. For information, see Oracle Fusion Middleware Scheduling Jobs Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition.

1.5 Working with the Sample Application

By default, Oracle Business Intelligence is configured with a simplified "Sample Application." This application is often referred to as "SampleApp Lite."

You can also download and configure a more robust sample application. Instructions for this configuration are available at the following location:

http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/middleware/bi-enterprise-edition/overview/index.html

See "About the SampleApp.rpd Demonstration Repository" in Oracle Fusion Middleware Metadata Repository Builder's Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition for information about the sample repository that is provided with Oracle Business Intelligence.

1.6 Oracle BI Publisher Integration

This guide assumes that Oracle BI EE and BI Publisher have been installed and configured to run as fully integrated components at your organization. If this is not the case, then some mentions of BI Publisher in this guide might not be applicable to you. For information about running BI Publisher, see Oracle Fusion Middleware User's Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Publisher.

1.7 Topics of Interest in Other Guides

Some topics that might be of interest to system administrators are covered in other guides. Table 1-3 lists these topics and indicates where to go for more information.

Table 1-3 Topics Covered in Other Guides

TopicWhere to Go for More Information

Third-party tools and relational data source adapters

Section 1.8, "System Requirements and Certification"


Configuration tasks for Oracle BI Scheduler

Oracle Fusion Middleware Scheduling Jobs Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition


Configuring data sources

Oracle Fusion Middleware Metadata Repository Builder's Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition


Security, including configuring SSO and SSL

Oracle Fusion Middleware Security Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition


Installing and upgrading

Oracle Fusion Middleware Installation Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence

Oracle Fusion Middleware Upgrade Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence


Configuring comments and status overrides in Oracle Scorecard and Strategy Management

Oracle Fusion Middleware Metadata Repository Builder's Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition


Converting Oracle Business Intelligence proprietary metadata to an XML file and importing the metadata into your Oracle or IBM DB2 database

Oracle Fusion Middleware Metadata Repository Builder's Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition


Propagating UI hints (labels and tooltips) from an ADF data source to display in Oracle BI Answers

Oracle Fusion Middleware Metadata Repository Builder's Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition



1.8 System Requirements and Certification

Refer to the system requirements and certification documentation for information about hardware and software requirements, platforms, databases, and other information. Both of these documents are available on Oracle Technology Network (OTN).

The system requirements document covers information such as hardware and software requirements, minimum disk space and memory requirements, and required system libraries, packages, or patches:

http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/middleware/ias/downloads/fusion-requirements-100147.html

The certification document covers supported installation types, platforms, operating systems, databases, JDKs, and third-party products:

http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/middleware/ias/downloads/fusion-certification-100350.html

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All rights reserved. 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Part VIII

Managing the Life Cycle

This part describes life cycle management tasks for Oracle Business Intelligence. Life cycle management consists of installing, upgrading, patching, moving to a new environment, moving to a production environment, and backing up and recovering systems.

For information about installation, see Oracle Fusion Middleware Installation Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence.

For information about upgrade, see Oracle Fusion Middleware Upgrade Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence.

This part includes the following chapters on life-cycle management tasks:

PKu p PK\EOEBPS/part5.htmX Configuring Oracle Business Intelligence

Part V

Configuring Oracle Business Intelligence

Although the installer installs Oracle Business Intelligence with a functional sample application, some functionality requires additional configuration changes (for example, the specification of connection details to external systems and email systems). You can also modify default configuration settings to adapt Oracle Business Intelligence to your environment and user needs.

This part includes the following chapters:

PK,] X PK\EOEBPS/part2.htm& Managing Processes and Components

Part II

Managing Processes and Components

This part explains how to manage processes and components in Oracle BI Enterprise Edition. It includes the following chapter:

PKѪZ+&PK\EOEBPS/disable_em.htm1) Manually Updating Fusion Middleware Control Settings

D Manually Updating Fusion Middleware Control Settings

This appendix describes how to manually update configuration settings for Oracle Business Intelligence that are normally managed by Fusion Middleware Control.

This appendix includes the following sections:


Note:

Use Fusion Middleware Control to update Oracle Business Intelligence configuration settings rather than manually updating configuration files using a text editor. For information, see Section 3.2, "Using Fusion Middleware Control to Update Oracle Business Intelligence Configuration Settings."


D.1 Disabling Fusion Middleware Control from Managing Oracle Business Intelligence Configuration Settings


Caution:

Do not attempt to manually update configuration settings that are normally managed by Fusion Middleware Control unless you have been specifically instructed by Oracle Support Services.


Complete this task to prevent manual updates from being overwritten by Fusion Middleware Control for Oracle Business Intelligence configuration settings that are normally managed by Fusion Middleware Control.

You should not manually update configuration settings (that are normally managed by Fusion Middleware Control) without disabling Fusion Middleware Control. Otherwise, your manual changes are overwritten when the Administration Server is restarted, or if changes are activated.

When Fusion Middleware Control is disabled, the Oracle Business Intelligence configuration settings are disabled in the user interface, the Lock Configuration buttons are unavailable, and a message ("Central Configuration is disabled") is displayed.

If you disable Fusion Middleware Control from managing Oracle Business Intelligence configuration settings, then you can continue to use Fusion Middleware Control for other functions such as starting, stopping, restarting, monitoring performance, and viewing diagnostics.

You can disable Fusion Middleware Control from managing Oracle Business Intelligence configuration settings by manually updating a setting in the biee-domain.xml file, as described in the following procedure.

To disable Fusion Middleware Control from managing Oracle Business Intelligence configuration settings:


Caution:

Do not attempt to manually update a configuration setting that is normally managed by Fusion Middleware Control unless you have been specifically instructed by Oracle Support Services.


  1. Stop Oracle Business Intelligence.

    For information, see Chapter 4, "Starting and Stopping Oracle Business Intelligence."

  2. Complete the following steps to set the centralConfigurationEnabled setting in the biee-domain.xml file:

    1. Open the biee-domain.xml file in a text editor.

      The biee-domain.xml file is located in:

      user_projects\domains\bifoundation_domain\config\fmwconfig\biee-domain.xml

    2. Locate the centralConfigurationEnabled element and ensure that its value is set to false.

      To reenable the element, set it to true.

    3. Save the biee-domain.xml file.

  3. Restart Oracle Business Intelligence.

D.2 Manually Updating Oracle Business Intelligence Configuration Settings Normally Managed by Fusion Middleware Control

Do not disable Fusion Middleware Control from updating Oracle Business Intelligence configuration settings unless specifically instructed to by Oracle Support Services. If you must update configuration settings normally managed by Fusion Middleware Control, then you can use this procedure.

Configuration settings that are normally managed by Fusion Middleware Control, and which you manually update in a text editor, are overwritten by Fusion Middleware Control when you restart the Administration Server. Therefore you must disable Fusion Middleware Control from overwriting manual configuration changes for parts of the Oracle Business Intelligence system that are centrally managed.


Caution:

If you manually update configuration settings that are normally managed by Fusion Middleware Control (when Fusion Middleware Control is disabled), then you are likely to have to make identical changes in multiple copies of configuration files on multiple computers. If you fail to make appropriate changes in all of the necessary configuration files, then the system is incorrectly configured.


Configuration elements that are normally managed by Fusion Middleware Control are clearly marked in the configuration file as follows:

<!--This Configuration setting is managed by Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control-->

To manually update the Oracle Business Intelligence configuration settings that are normally managed by Fusion Middleware Control:

  1. If not yet done, disable Fusion Middleware Control from being able to update Oracle Business Intelligence configuration settings.

    For information, see Section D.1, "Disabling Fusion Middleware Control from Managing Oracle Business Intelligence Configuration Settings."

  2. Stop Oracle Business Intelligence.

    For information, see Chapter 4, "Starting and Stopping Oracle Business Intelligence."

  3. Make a backup copy of each configuration file that you plan to edit.

  4. Open the configuration file in a text editor.


    Note:

    If Oracle Business Intelligence is installed on multiple computers or in multiple locations, then a copy of the configuration file exists for each installation, and each file contains duplicate settings. Therefore, you must locate and make the same changes in each copy of a configuration file.


    For information, see Section 3.6, "Where Are Configuration Files Located?"

  5. In each configuration file to change, locate the element, or create the new element if a setting must be added to the file.

    For information, see Appendix C, "Mapping User Interface Labels with Configuration File Elements."

  6. Enter the appropriate changes.

  7. Save your changes and close the configuration file.

  8. Restart Oracle Business Intelligence.

    For information, see Section 4.1, "About Starting and Stopping Oracle Business Intelligence."

PK#nC46)1)PK\EOEBPS/configloadproxy.htm+v Configuring Resource Availability and URL Generation

21 Configuring Resource Availability and URL Generation

This chapter describes how to configure how resources are made available for HTTP access and how URLs are generated by Oracle BI Presentation Services.

To perform this configuration, you modify the instanceconfig.xml file to include the URL element and its interrelated subelements, as described in the following procedure.

Before you begin this procedure, ensure that you are familiar with the information in Section 3.4, "Using a Text Editor to Update Configuration Settings."

To manually edit the settings for resource availability and URL generation:

  1. Open the instanceconfig.xml file for editing, as described in Section 3.6, "Where Are Configuration Files Located?"

  2. Locate the section in which you must add the elements that are described in Table 21-1.

  3. Include the elements and their ancestor elements as appropriate, as shown in the following example:

    <ServerInstance>
      <URL>
        <AbsoluteCommandURLPrefix>value</AbsoluteCommandURLPrefix>
        <CustomerResourcePhysicalPath>value</CustomerResourcePhysicalPath>
        <CustomerResourceVirtualPath>value</CustomerResourceVirtualPath>
        <ForceAbsoluteResourceURL>value</ForceAbsoluteResourceURL>
        <ResourcePhysicalPath>value</ResourcePhysicalPath>
        <ResourceServerPrefix>value</ResourceServerPrefix>
        <ResourceVirtualPath>value</ResourceVirtualPath>
      </URL>
    </ServerInstance>
    
  4. Save your changes and close the file.

  5. Restart Oracle Business Intelligence.

Table 21-1 Elements for URL Generation and Resource File Location

ElementDescriptionDefault Value

AbsoluteCommandURLPrefix

Specifies how Presentation Services generates command URLs. If you explicitly specify an value, then it must be of the following form:

protocol://server/virtualpath

where virtualpath is the complete virtual path to Presentation Services. The default is determined separately for each client, based on the URL that the client sends to Presentation Services.

Varies

CustomerResourcePhysicalPath

Specifies the physical location of resource files that are not part of a default installation. Such resource files include customized styles and skins. The internal default is ORACLE_HOME\bifoundation\web\app\res.

You must provide a full path. Presentation Services must have read permission to this path. For example, if this is a shared network resource, then you must ensure that the user under which Presentation Services is running has read access to the shared resource and read access to the file system from which the shared resource is exported.

Varies

CustomerResourceVirtualPath

Specifies the virtual path used for resource files that are not part of a default installation as specified in the CustomerResourcePhysicalPath element.

NA

ForceAbsoluteResourceURL

Specifies whether Presentation Services always generates fully qualified URLs for resource files that have fully qualified virtual paths.

When set to False, resources and the Presentation Services extension are served from one server. When set to True, default resources are served from the same server as the Presentation Services extension, and customer resources are served from another server. Depending on the value of the other settings described in this table, you can also configure to have default and customer resources served from one server, and the Presentation Services extension served from another server.

False

ResourcePhysicalPath

Specifies the physical location of the primary resource files for Presentation Services. These are the resource files that are distributed with Presentation Services, not user-customized files such as custom styles or skins. The internal default is ORACLE_HOME\bifoundation\web\app\res.

You must provide a full path. Presentation Services must have read permission to this path. For example, if this is a shared network resource, then you must ensure that the user under which Presentation Services is running has read access to the shared resource and read access to the file system from which the shared resource is exported.

If the value for this entry is different from the physical location of the DLLs for Presentation Services, then you must specify a value for the ResourceVirtualPath element.

NA

ResourceServerPrefix

Specifies how Presentation Services generates URLs for static resources such as images, script files, style sheets, and other user-specified files. The default is protocol://server from the AbsoluteCommandURLPrefix element.

If you explicitly specify a value, then it must be of this form:

protocol://server

If you specify a virtual path, then it is removed.

This element designates a separate web server for delivering static resources, thereby reducing the load on the main web server. This prefix is used for the resources that have a fully qualified virtual path of the form '/Path/file'. If a resource file has a relative virtual path of the form 'Path/file', then the prefix used is the same one that is used for commands to the Presentation Services extension.

protocol://server

ResourceVirtualPath

Specifies the virtual path used for the primary resource files for Presentation Services, as specified by the ResourcePhysicalPath element. These resource files and customer-defined resource files must be served from the same web server.

For generating relative URLs, the virtual path defaults to res, if the resource folder is present under the same virtual directory as the Oracle BI Presentation Services DLL files.

For generating absolute URLs, the value of the AbsoluteCommandURLPrefix element is used as the default.

The value must be a fully qualified virtual path of this form:

'/VirtualPath'

If you omit the leading slash, then one is added.

res


PK7 E ++PK\E OEBPS/toc.ncx"Z Oracle® Fusion Middleware System Administrator's Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition, 11g Release 1 (11.1.1) Cover Title and Copyright Information Contents Preface New Features for Oracle Business Intelligence System Administrators Part I Administering Oracle Business Intelligence 1 Introduction to Oracle Business Intelligence System Administration 2 Managing Oracle Business Intelligence 3 Configuring the Oracle Business Intelligence System Part II Managing Processes and Components 4 Starting and Stopping Oracle Business Intelligence Part III Scaling and Deploying for High Availability and Performance 5 Scaling Your Deployment 6 Deploying Oracle Business Intelligence for High Availability 7 Managing Performance Tuning and Query Caching Part IV Resolving Issues 8 Diagnosing and Resolving Issues in Oracle Business Intelligence 9 Managing Usage Tracking Part V Configuring Oracle Business Intelligence 10 Configuring Repositories 11 Configuring Connections to External Systems 12 Configuring Presentation Setting Defaults 13 Configuring Mapping and Spatial Information 14 Configuring Time Zones 15 Localizing Oracle Business Intelligence 16 Configuring Currency Options 17 Configuring and Managing the Oracle BI Presentation Catalog Part VI Advanced Configuration Settings 18 Configuring and Managing Analyses and Dashboards 19 Configuring and Managing Agents 20 Configuring Advanced Options for Mapping and Spatial Information 21 Configuring Resource Availability and URL Generation Part VII Automating Management of Oracle Business Intelligence 22 Introducing the Oracle BI Systems Management API Part VIII Managing the Life Cycle 23 Patching Oracle Business Intelligence Systems 24 Moving Between Environments 25 Backup and Recovery of Oracle Business Intelligence Systems Part IX Reference Information A NQSConfig.INI File Configuration Settings B Advanced Configuration Reference C Mapping User Interface Labels with Configuration File Elements D Manually Updating Fusion Middleware Control Settings Glossary Index Copyright PKk Ҫ""PK\EOEBPS/content.opf/d Oracle® Fusion Middleware System Administrator's Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition, 11g Release 1 (11.1.1) en-US E10541-05 Oracle Corporation Oracle Corporation Oracle® Fusion Middleware System Administrator's Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition, 11g Release 1 (11.1.1) 2012-05-03T10:54:12Z Explains how to manage Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition processes and components, including how to start and stop, configure, and extend deployments. Includes how to customize, monitor, troubleshoot, and migrate an Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise system. PKܯ&&//PK\EOEBPS/configrepos.htmf6 Configuring Repositories

10 Configuring Repositories

This chapter describes how to upload the metadata repository for Oracle Business Intelligence and to set the location of the Oracle BI Presentation Catalog.

This chapter includes the following sections:

10.1 Why Upload a Repository and Set the Catalog Location?

As the administrator, you must ensure that users can access the metadata repositories and Oracle BI Presentation Catalogs that contain the information that they require. The following list describes the importance of uploading the repository and setting the catalog location:

  • Upload Repository — Uploading a repository enables the Oracle BI Server to load the repository into memory upon startup and makes the repository available for queries.

    When you upload a repository file, you provide the name and location of the repository file and the current repository password. The uploaded repository is available to clients of Oracle BI Server, including to Oracle BI Presentation Services.

    You can only upload a repository in binary (RPD) format. You cannot upload an MDS XML repository.

  • Set Catalog Location — Setting the location of the Oracle BI Presentation Catalog ensures that its objects are available to users of Oracle Business Intelligence. The catalog is never uploaded. Instead, you copy the catalog files manually to either a local or shared location, then you set the location in Fusion Middleware Control.

10.1.1 Understanding Modes

You can upload the repository in either shared mode, which is recommended, or in distributed mode, as described in the following list:

  • In shared mode, you specify an RPD publishing directory using Fusion Middleware Control so that online repository changes are propagated in a cluster. The master BI Server copies its local repository to this directory when online changes are made. When slave BI Servers start up, if the version in the publishing directory is newer, then each slave server copies the version in the shared directory to its local disk.

    You typically upload the repository in the recommended mode of shared when you have multiple Oracle BI Server components in the deployment.

  • In distributed mode, each Oracle BI Server instance loads the repository from its default local directory. Repositories uploaded through Fusion Middleware Control are uploaded to each default local directory. Any changes made to the repository using the Administration Tool in online mode affect only the Oracle BI Server component that is associated with the changed repository file.

Similarly to the metadata repository, the Oracle BI Presentation Catalog can be accessed in shared mode (which is recommended), or in distributed mode. Each Presentation Services component loads the Oracle BI Presentation Catalog from the catalog location that is specified in Fusion Middleware Control. In shared mode, changes to the catalog are propagated to all Presentation Services components. In distributed mode, if you make changes to a local catalog, then you must propagate the changes to all components.

10.1.2 Understanding Repository Version Numbers

When you upload a repository, it is copied to the local repository directory for each Oracle BI Server component, located at:

ORACLE_INSTANCE\bifoundation\OracleBIServerComponent\coreapplication_obisn\repository

After the repository is uploaded, it is given a version number suffix (for example, SampleApp_bi001.rpd). This version number is incremented each time that the repository is uploaded. This numbering ensures that the previous version is not overwritten. To revert to a previous version, you must re-upload the specific version of the repository to use.

Note that you can delete older versions from the repository directory or shared network directory to reclaim disk space.

10.2 Using Fusion Middleware Control to Upload a Repository and Set the Oracle BI Presentation Catalog Location

You can use Fusion Middleware Control to upload the metadata repository and to provide a shared location for the repository and a local or shared location for the Oracle BI Presentation Catalog.

Before you begin this procedure, ensure that you are familiar with the information in Section 3.2, "Using Fusion Middleware Control to Update Oracle Business Intelligence Configuration Settings."

To use Fusion Middleware Control to upload a repository and set the location of the Oracle BI Presentation Catalog:

  1. Go to the Business Intelligence Overview page, as described in Section 2.2.3, "Using Fusion Middleware Control to Manage Oracle Business Intelligence System Components."

  2. Display the Repository tab of the Deployment page.

    On the Repository tab, you can view the name of the current uploaded repository (called the Default RPD). Note that the Data Source Name (DSN) visible to Oracle BI Server clients for the repository that is uploaded through Fusion Middleware Control is always Star.

  3. Click Lock and Edit Configuration to allow changes to be made.

  4. To upload the repository in shared mode, select Share Repository and provide an RPD Publishing Directory. If you do not select this option, then the repository that you upload on this page uses distributed mode by default.

  5. To upload a repository and to set the location for the Oracle BI Presentation Catalog, complete the elements using the descriptions in the help topic for the page. Click the Help button on the page to access the page-level help for the following options:

    • Repository File option

    • Repository Password option

    • Catalog Location option

  6. Click Apply, then click Activate Changes.

  7. Return to the Business Intelligence Overview page and click Restart.

By default, Oracle Business Intelligence is configured with a sample default repository called SampleAppLite.rpd. See Section 1.5, "Working with the Sample Application" for more information.

See Appendix A, "NQSConfig.INI File Configuration Settings" for information about advanced configuring settings for repositories. Note that hosting multiple repositories on a single Oracle BI Server is not recommended for production systems.

For information about using methods in the Oracle BI Systems Management API to change configuration settings, see Chapter 22, "Introducing the Oracle BI Systems Management API."

10.3 Using the System MBeans to Upload the Metadata Repository

The recommended approach for uploading the metadata repository is to use the Repository tab of the Deployment page, as described in Section 10.2, "Using Fusion Middleware Control to Upload a Repository and Set the Oracle BI Presentation Catalog Location." You might encounter specific situations in which you must upload the repository using a different approach. For example, the size of the repository file can be too large for Fusion Middleware Control to handle, or you might be working in a development environment and have unique needs.

In such exception cases, you can use the System MBeans to manage repositories programmatically or from scripts, as described in Chapter 22, "Introducing the Oracle BI Systems Management API." You can also use the Fusion Middleware Control System MBean Browser to upload the default metadata repository, as described in the following procedure.

To use the System MBean Browser to upload the metadata repository:

  1. Manually copy the repository file to upload to the local repository directory for each Oracle BI Server component in the deployment, at:

    ORACLE_INSTANCE\bifoundation\OracleBIServerComponent\coreapplication_obisn\repository

  2. If the name or password of the repository has changed, then complete the following steps:

    1. Use the System MBean Browser to specify the new name for the repository. See Section 3.5, "Using the Fusion Middleware Control MBean Browser to Update Configuration Settings" for more information.

    2. Commit your changes.

    3. You must change the password for the repository file in the oracle.bi.enterprise credential map. Otherwise you cannot restart the BI Server, which requires this password to decrypt the file.

      In Fusion Middleware Control, navigate to the bifoundation_domain node and from the menu, select Security, then select Credentials.

    4. Drill the oracle.bi.enterprise map, select the appropriate repository, and click Create Key to display the Create Key dialog in which you create a new credential.

    5. Create the key for the repository by completing the fields as follows:

      • Key = Set the key for the repository to repository.name, where name is the name of the repository, without the .rpd suffix.

      • User Name = Set the value to any name.

      • Password = Enter the password for the repository file, then retype it in the Confirm Password field.

    6. Click OK.

  3. Restart Oracle Business Intelligence.

Note that if you perform this procedure and then later scale out the deployment to include additional Oracle BI Server components, then you must manually copy the repository file to the local repository directory for the new Oracle BI Server component. Perform this copy step after the Oracle BI Server component has been created, but before restarting the system.

PKbHk6f6PK\EOEBPS/configtimezones.htmP Configuring Time Zones

14 Configuring Time Zones

This chapter describes how to configure time zones for Oracle Business Intelligence.

This chapter includes the following sections:

14.1 Why and Where are Time Zones Used?

Time zones are used throughout Oracle Business Intelligence for a variety of purposes. A time stamp can indicate when an object was changed, and users can specify a time for an agent to run. Users often are most comfortable working in their local time zones. As the administrator, you can configure the preferred time zones for users for various components.

Before you begin to set preferred time zones, see Table 14-1 for information about where time zones are used.

Table 14-1 Time Zone Usage

TypeDescription

Oracle BI Presentation Services


If you have users in time zones that are different from the zone for Presentation Services, then you as the administrator can specify the time stamps that those users see in Oracle Business Intelligence. For example, suppose the server is located in the Pacific time zone in the United States. You can specify that users on the east coast of the United States see time stamps that are displayed in Eastern Standard Time.

If you make no time zone settings and if a user does not specify a preferred time zone using the My Account dialog, then that user sees time displayed according to the local time zone for Presentation Services.

For information about how users specify their preferred time zones, see Oracle Fusion Middleware User's Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition.

Data from the database

The Oracle BI Administrator specifies the time zone for the data that is retrieved from the database.

If you make no time zone settings, then users see the time stamp data in the time zone of the original data as set by the Oracle BI Administrator.

Content that is displayed in Oracle Business Intelligence

Users who create analyses can specify the time zone that is displayed in their analyses and dashboard prompts. This specification overrides those made by you as the administrator and by end users if they have previously used the column in their queries and have set the time zone.

If the specified display time zone supports daylight saving time, then the timestamp values that are displayed are automatically adjusted for daylight saving time.

General time stamps that indicate when events happen

End users can specify the time zone for many general stamps including the following ones:

  • The scheduled time of agents.

  • The generated time of alerts or analyses.

  • The time on which objects in the Oracle BI Presentation Catalog are created, modified, and accessed.

Log files

Log files contain time stamps for various activities.


14.2 Setting Time Zones

Use the following procedure to set time zones for users.

To set preferred time zones for users:

  1. Determine the time zone that is set for the server on which Presentation Services is running.

  2. Use elements in the Presentation Services configuration file (instanceconfig.xml) or session variables. Consult the following for more information:

  3. Encourage end users to specify their preferred time zones using the My Account dialog.

  4. Encourage users who create analyses to do the following to set the time stamps for their analyses:

    1. Use the Data Format tab of the Column Properties dialog to specify the time zone that is displayed in the columns of their analyses.

    2. Use the Time Zone dialog to set the time zone that is displayed in dashboard prompts.

14.3 What is the Precedence Order for Time Zones

The actual time zone in which various types of content are displayed follows a precedence order that Table 14-2 describes. In the table, the items with lower numbers override those with higher numbers. For example, Item 1 takes precedence over Item 2.

Table 14-2 Precedence Order for Time Zones

Time Zone ForDetermined By

Data

  1. The setting of the DATA_TZ session variable.

  2. The setting of the DefaultDataOffset element in the instanceconfig.xml file.

  3. The time zone of the original data as set by the Oracle BI Administrator (because the time zone is unknown for Presentation Services).

Data display

  1. The setting that a content designer makes.

  2. The setting of the DATA_DISPLAY_TZ session variable.

  3. The setting of the DefaultDataDisplay element in the instanceconfig.xml file.

  4. "User-Preferred Time Zone"

General time stamps (not including column data and log files)

  1. "User-Preferred Time Zone"

  2. The time zone for Oracle BI Presentation Services.

Log file information

  1. The setting of the Logging element in the instanceconfig.xml file.

  2. The time zone for Presentation Services.


14.3.1 User-Preferred Time Zone

The user-preferred time zone is determined by the following:

  1. The specification that a user makes in the My Account dialog.

  2. The setting of the TIMEZONE session variable.

  3. The setting of the DefaultUserPreferred element in the instanceconfig.xml file.

14.4 Where are Time Zone Specifications Stored?

Whenever a time zone specification is displayed in a list or as the value of a session variable or element in the instanceconfig.xml file, that specification originates from the TimeZones.xml file. This file is stored in the ORACLE_INSTANCE\bifoundation\OracleBIApplication\coreapplication\timezone directory.

The TimeZones.xml file contains nearly all time zones from around the world. You should not have to add zones to this file, but you are free to edit this file if you care to. You can delete those zones that users in your organization does not use.

14.4.1 Specifying Time Zone Values

Various editors show the ampersand that appears in time zone values in one of two ways: either the ampersand character itself or its escape sequence. Use care when entering a time zone value, as follows:

  • When you use the ampersand in the value of a session variable, include the ampersand character (&) in the value, such as "Pacific Time (US & Canada); Tijuana".

  • When you use the ampersand in the value of an element in the Oracle BI Presentation Services configuration file (instanceconfig.xml), include the escape sequence for the ampersand in the value, such as "Pacific Time (US &amp; Canada); Tijuana"

14.5 Description of Time Zone Settings

Table 14-3 describes the session variables and the elements in the instanceconfig.xml file with which you set time zones. When you include elements in the instanceconfig.xml file, you specify the time zone that all users see. When you use session variables, you can specify a different time zone for each user. If you use session variables and you specify values for the appropriate elements in the instanceconfig.xml file, then the values of the session variables override the settings in the instanceconfig.xml file.

Table 14-3 Time Zone Settings

ElementSession VariableDescriptionValue

DefaultDataOffset

DATA_TZ

The time zone offset of the original data. To allow the time zone to be converted so that users see the appropriate zone, you must set the value of this element or variable.

If you do not set this option, then no time zone conversion occurs because the value is "unknown".

For example, suppose you want to convert to Eastern Standard Time (EST), which is Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) - 5. You must specify this value to enable the conversion to EST.

An offset that indicates the number of hours away from GMT time. For example:

"GMT-05:00" or "-300", which means minus 5 hours.

DefaultDataDisplay

DATA_DISPLAY_TZ

Specifies the time zone to use for displaying data.

If you do not set this option, then the value is the "User-Preferred Time Zone".

One of the time zones that are specified in the TimeZones.xml file.

See Section 14.4.1, "Specifying Time Zone Values."

DefaultUserPreferred

TIMEZONE

Specifies the users' default preferred time zone before they select their own in the My Account dialog.

If you do not set this option, then the value is the local time zone from Oracle BI Presentation Services.

One of the time zones that are specified in the TimeZones.xml file.

See Section 14.4.1, "Specifying Time Zone Values."

Logging

na

The time zone of the time stamps that appear in log files that are generated by Presentation Services.

If you do not set this option, then the value is the local time zone from Presentation Services

One of the time zones that are specified in the TimeZones.xml file.

See Section 14.4.1, "Specifying Time Zone Values."

TimeZone

na

The parent element for the elements that modify the preferred time zone. A child of the ServerInstance element.

na


14.6 Example: Configuration File Settings for Specifying the Time Zone

The following shows a sample section of the instanceconfig.xml file in which the TimeZone element has been added.

<TimeZone>
     <DefaultDataOffset>0</DefaultDataOffset>
     <Logging>(GMT-08:00) Pacific Time (US &amp; Canada); Tijuana</Logging>
     <DefaultUserPreferred>(GMT-08:00) Pacific Time (US &amp; Canada);      Tijuana</DefaultUserPreferred>
     <DefaultDataDisplay>(GMT-06:00) Central Time (US &amp;      Canada)</DefaultDataDisplay>
</TimeZone>

See Section 3.4, "Using a Text Editor to Update Configuration Settings" for information about editing the instanceconfig.xml file.

PKs!KPPPK\EOEBPS/components.htm Starting and Stopping Oracle Business Intelligence

4 Starting and Stopping Oracle Business Intelligence

This chapter describes how to start and stop Oracle Business Intelligence using Fusion Middleware Control and other methods.

This chapter includes the following sections:

4.1 About Starting and Stopping Oracle Business Intelligence

System administrators start and stop the Oracle Business Intelligence system and its components to perform a range of maintenance operations that require process downtime. Understanding the state (that is, up, down, starting, and stopping) of each component in the Oracle Business Intelligence system is an essential activity when diagnosing and resolving availability and performance issues, and when performing life-cycle and management operations.

Oracle Business Intelligence runs within Oracle WebLogic Server, and therefore Oracle WebLogic Server must be started before Oracle Business Intelligence components can be started and maintained.

To make changes to server configuration settings, the Oracle BI Presentation Catalog, the repository (.rpd file offline), and other settings, you must restart the appropriate Oracle Business Intelligence components before those changes can take effect.

When you stop Oracle Business Intelligence, end users are logged out, and when ready, the system prompts you to log in again, ensuring session state consistency.


Note:

This chapter provides details on starting and stopping the Oracle Business Intelligence system when an Enterprise Installation has been performed. See Section 1.3.1, "Oracle Business Intelligence on a Single Host" for information on the components that are installed with an Enterprise Installation and with a Simple Installation.


4.2 Starting the Oracle Business Intelligence System

To start the Oracle Business Intelligence system, you start the Administration Server, the Managed Servers, and the system components. The system does not include a Managed Server if the Simple Install type was selected during installation.

If the computer that hosts the Administration Server is not running or has been rebooted, then you must ensure that the computer is running and you must start the Oracle Business Intelligence system.

The following conditions must be met to start the Oracle Business Intelligence system:

The procedure for starting the system differs slightly depending on the platform, as described in the following sections.

4.2.1 Starting Oracle Business Intelligence on Windows Platforms

To start the Oracle Business Intelligence system on Windows platforms:

  1. From the Start menu, select Programs, Oracle Business Intelligence, and Start BI Services.

Note the following points about this command:

  • For a Simple Install type, this command starts the Administration Server and Oracle Business Intelligence system and OPMN components.

  • For an Enterprise or Software Only Install type, the command starts the Administration Server, system and OPMN components, Managed Server, and Node Manager. (Node Manager normally starts automatically on Windows.)

  • The command does not support horizontally or vertically scaled-out Oracle WebLogic Servers, but does work on the first computer in the cluster.

  • The command prompts for your credentials at first login, then stores the credentials in the boot.properties file of Oracle WebLogic Server for future use.

When you select the Start BI Services option, you are not prompted for administrator credentials if boot.properties files exist for both the Administration Server and for the Oracle BI Server. If either file does not exist, then you are prompted for administrator credentials and the boot.properties file is automatically created using those credentials. For information on this file see "Boot Identity Files" in Oracle Fusion Middleware Managing Server Startup and Shutdown for Oracle WebLogic Server.

If the file is automatically created but the Administration Server does not start, then the file is deleted on the assumption that the credentials are invalid. This deletion avoids including readable text for passwords in the boot.properties file before Oracle WebLogic Server encrypts that text. However, the Administration Server can fail to start for reasons other than invalid credentials.

If the boot.properties file exists and was created by a user but the server does not start, then the file is not deleted.

4.2.2 Starting Oracle Business Intelligence on UNIX Platforms

To start the Oracle Business Intelligence system on UNIX platforms:

  1. Start the Administration Server (which includes Oracle Business Intelligence Java components).

    For information, see Section 4.7, "Starting and Stopping the Administration Server and All Oracle Business Intelligence Java Components on Windows and UNIX."

  2. If an Enterprise or Software Only Install type was performed, then start Oracle WebLogic Node Manager manually as follows:

    1. Navigate to:

      /<MW_HOME>/wlserver_10.3/server/bin

      If a Software-Only Install type was selected during installation, then a directory other than /wlserver_10.3 might be used.

    2. Enter the following command (which requires the administrator user name and password):

      ./startNodeManager.sh

    You can also start Node Manager using a script. For information, see Oracle Fusion Middleware Node Manager Administrator's Guide for Oracle WebLogic Server.

  3. If an Enterprise or Software Only Install type was performed, then use the Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console to check whether the Managed Server is running, and start it if necessary.

    Note: To start the Managed Server using the WebLogic Server Administration Console, the Node Manager must be running.

    For information, see Section 4.8.1, "Confirming If the Managed Server Is Running and Starting It."

  4. Start system components.

4.3 Using Fusion Middleware Control to Start and Stop Oracle Business Intelligence System Components and Java Components

If the Oracle Business Intelligence system has been started, then you can start, stop, and restart the Oracle Business Intelligence system, including selected system components and Java components using Fusion Middleware Control.

If Fusion Middleware Control is not available, then see Section 4.6, "Confirming Whether the Administration Server Is Running."

To start, stop, and restart Oracle Business Intelligence system components and Java components using Fusion Middleware Control:

  1. Go to the Business Intelligence Overview page, as described in Section 2.2.3, "Using Fusion Middleware Control to Manage Oracle Business Intelligence System Components" and shown in Figure 4-1.

    Figure 4-1 Overview Page in Fusion Middleware Control

    Description of Figure 4-1 follows

  2. Use the buttons in the System Shutdown & Startup area to start, stop, or restart the entire Oracle Business Intelligence system, including all Java components and system components.

    Restart stops the system before starting it again.

  3. To start, stop, or restart individual Oracle Business Intelligence system components, display the Processes tab of the Availability page, then select a process for a selected server and use the appropriate button to start, stop, or restart individual system components as appropriate, as shown in Figure 4-2.

    Figure 4-2 Starting and Stopping on the Processes Tab of the Availability Page

    Description of Figure 4-2 follows

You can use other methods to start and stop Oracle Business Intelligence system and Java components. For more information, see:

4.4 Using Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console to Start and Stop Java Components

You can use Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console to start and stop Java components. You can also use Fusion Middleware Control to start and stop the Java components, as described in Section 4.3, "Using Fusion Middleware Control to Start and Stop Oracle Business Intelligence System Components and Java Components."

To use the Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console to start and stop Java components:

  1. Start the Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console.

    For more information, see Section 2.3, "Centrally Managing Oracle Business Intelligence Java Components Using the Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console."

  2. In the Domain Structure region, click Deployments.

  3. The Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console displays the Summary of Deployments page.

  4. Display the Control tab.

  5. Select a check box for each component to start or stop.

  6. Click Start or Stop to start or stop the selected components as required, as shown in Figure 4-3.

    Figure 4-3 Starting and Stopping in Administration Console

    Oracle Web Logic Server Deployments page

4.5 Alternative Methods for Starting and Stopping System Components

You can start and stop Oracle Business Intelligence system components using the methods that are described in the following sections:

4.5.1 Using the OPMN Command Line to Start, Stop, Restart, and View the Status of System Components

You can control Oracle Business Intelligence system components across a network using opmnctl commands. For information about OPMN, see Section 1.4.3, "Oracle Process Manager and Notification Server (OPMN) Tool."

To start, stop, restart, and view the status of Oracle Business Intelligence system components using the OPMN command line:

  1. For the Oracle instance to administer, go to the following directory that contains the OPMN command-line tool:

    ORACLE_INSTANCE/bin

  2. Run the OPMN tool using the appropriate opmnctl command.

    Use the following commands to view status, start, stop, and restart the system components using OPMN on Windows (for UNIX use the command ./opmnctl).

    • opmnctl status

      Shows the component names and the status of all system components, as shown in Figure 4-4.

      Figure 4-4 Status of Components in OPMN

      The OPMN status command displays system components status.

    • opmnctl startall

      Starts OPMN and all Oracle Business Intelligence system components.

      The bi_server1 (Managed Server) must be running before you can start OPMN. For information, see Section 4.8.1, "Confirming If the Managed Server Is Running and Starting It" and Section 4.8, "Starting and Stopping Managed Servers on Windows and UNIX."

    • opmnctl start

      Starts OPMN only.

    • opmnctl startproc ias-component= <component_name>

      Starts a particular system component. For example, where coreapplication_obips1 is Oracle BI Presentation Services:

      opmnctl startproc ias-component=coreapplication_obips1

      You view system component names in Fusion Middleware Control by displaying the system components Availability region of the Availability tab in the Capacity Management page, and expanding the required entry in the Name column. For more information, see Section 2.2.3, "Using Fusion Middleware Control to Manage Oracle Business Intelligence System Components." System component names are displayed in the format coreapplication_<component_name> (for example coreapplication_obips1 is the name of the Oracle BI Presentation Services component).

    • opmnctl stopall

      Stops all managed system components.

    • opmnctl stopproc ias-component= <component_name>

      Stops a particular system component.

    • opmnctl restartproc ias-component= <component_name>

      Restarts a particular system component.

    • opmnctl shutdown

      Stops opmn and all managed system components.

The OPMN configuration file is in the ORACLE_INSTANCE/config/OPMN/opmn/opmn.xml directory on UNIX and specifies the exact environment that is used to start each Oracle Business Intelligence system component. It contains the PATH and LD_LIBRARY_PATH values for the system components and the port number for OPMN and optional SSL configuration.

You can configure OPMN to start Oracle Business Intelligence system components automatically when a Linux operating system starts, and to stop when the operating system shuts down. To configure OPMN to start and stop automatically on Linux, you must include the following commands in the OPMN startup or shutdown scripts respectively:

daemon <ORACLE_INSTANCE>/bin ./opmnctl startall
daemon <ORACLE_INSTANCE>/bin ./opmnctl stopall

For more information, see the operating system documentation.

4.5.2 Using a Windows Service to Start and Stop System Components

On Windows, the Oracle Business Intelligence system components are controlled by the Oracle Process Manager (OPMN) Windows Service. To view and manage Windows Services, use one of the following methods:

  • Run the following command: C:\WINDOWS\system32\services.msc

  • From the Start Menu, select Programs, then Administrative Tools, then Services.

The bi_server1 (Managed Server) must be running before you can start OPMN. For information, see Section 4.8.1, "Confirming If the Managed Server Is Running and Starting It" and Section 4.8, "Starting and Stopping Managed Servers on Windows and UNIX."

To start or restart Oracle Business Intelligence system components using a Windows Service:

  1. In the Services window, locate and start the Oracle Process Management (instance_number) option. The Oracle Business Intelligence system components take as long as a minute to start.


    Note:

    In the Microsoft Windows environment, the Services Manager returns a false error that it cannot start the server. This Microsoft Services Manager issue causes the Services Manager to time out after 5 minutes. Refreshing the Services window, however, shows that Oracle Business Intelligence is still starting.


    If the Oracle Process Manager fails to start, then errors are logged. Use Fusion Middleware Control to check log file entries and determine why a service has failed. For information, see Chapter 8, "Diagnosing and Resolving Issues in Oracle Business Intelligence."

  2. If you run Microsoft IIS, then start the World Wide Web Publishing service.

  3. In the ODBC Driver Manager, test that the DSN called AnalyticsWeb_coreapplication (of type Oracle BI Server) connects to the Oracle BI Server.

    Use the user name and password (case-sensitive) that was created during installation for the demonstration repository database.

To stop the Oracle Business Intelligence system components using a Windows Service:

  1. In the Services window, locate and stop the Oracle Process Manager service.

  2. If you run Microsoft IIS, then also stop the World Wide Web Publishing service.

  3. If you run Oracle WebLogic Server, then see Section 4.4, "Using Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console to Start and Stop Java Components."

4.5.3 Using the Oracle BI Systems Management API to Programmatically Start and Stop Oracle Business Intelligence

You can use the Oracle BI Systems Management API to programmatically start and stop Oracle Business Intelligence.

For information, see Section 22.3.2, "Starting and Stopping Oracle Business Intelligence Using the Oracle BI Systems Management API."

4.6 Confirming Whether the Administration Server Is Running

The Administration Server must be running before you can administer Oracle Business Intelligence system and Java components.

You can confirm whether the Administration Server is running by starting a web browser and entering a URL that should display the Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console login page.

To confirm whether the Administration Server is running:

  1. Enter the following URL into a web browser:

    http://<host>:<port>/console/

    For example:

    http://mycomputer:7001/console/

  2. Refresh the web browser window.

  3. If the Administration Server is running, then the Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console login page is displayed.

    If the login page for Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console is not displayed, then the Administration Server is not running, and you must start it.

    For information, see Section 4.7, "Starting and Stopping the Administration Server and All Oracle Business Intelligence Java Components on Windows and UNIX."

4.7 Starting and Stopping the Administration Server and All Oracle Business Intelligence Java Components on Windows and UNIX

You can start or stop the Administration Server and all Oracle Business Intelligence Java components on Windows and UNIX.

For information, see Section 4.6, "Confirming Whether the Administration Server Is Running."

To start the Administration Server and all Oracle Business Intelligence Java components on Windows and UNIX:

If the Administration Server is not running, then start it using the following information.

Use the appropriate method for the operating system:

Before you can start the Administration Server, the database that you specified during installation must be running, or JDBC errors prevent startup.

  • On Windows, use the following method:

    • Open an MS-DOS window and change the directory to MW_HOME\user_projects\domains\bifoundation_domain\bin. Then, run the following command (which requires the administrator user name and password):

      startWebLogic.cmd -start
      

      You can also stop the Java components from the MS-DOS window in which they were started, if you press Ctrl+C.

  • On UNIX, open a shell prompt and change the directory to MW_HOME/user_projects/domains/bifoundation_domain/bin. Then, run the following command (which requires the administrator user name and password):

    ./startWebLogic.sh
    

    Caution:

    If you start the Administration Server from a Windows or UNIX command-line window, then do not close the window later on, or the server terminates (unless the server is started as a background process from the command line). For more information, see "Setting Up a WebLogic Server Instance as a Windows Service" in Oracle Fusion Middleware Managing Server Startup and Shutdown for Oracle WebLogic Server.


To stop the Administration Server and Oracle Business Intelligence Java components on Windows and UNIX:

Use the appropriate method for the operating system:

  • On Windows, use one of the following methods:

    • Display the Start Menu, click All Programs, Oracle WebLogic, User Projects, and bifoundation_domain.

      Select the Stop Admin Server for WebLogic Server Domain menu option.

      An MS-DOS window indicates the progress of the processing steps of stopping the Administration Server.

    • Open an MS-DOS window and change the directory to MW_HOME\user_projects\domains\bifoundation_domain\bin. Then, run the following command (which requires the administrator user name and password):

      stopWebLogic.cmd -stop
      

      You can also stop the Java components from the MS-DOS window in which they were started, if you press Ctrl+C.

  • On UNIX, open a shell prompt and change the directory to MW_HOME/user_projects/domains/bifoundation_domain/bin. Then, run the following command (which requires the administrator user name and password):

    ./stopWebLogic.sh
    

    You can also use the process termination command for the operating system in use (for example, kill on UNIX). Java indicates on the console window that it is shutting down when it receives a shutdown signal.

4.8 Starting and Stopping Managed Servers on Windows and UNIX

You can start and stop Managed Servers on Windows and UNIX. The system does not include a Managed Server if the Simple Install type was selected during installation.

To start Managed Servers on Windows and UNIX:

Use the appropriate method for the operating system:

  • Open an MS-DOS window and change the directory to MW_HOME\user_projects\domains\bifoundation_domain\bin. Then, run the following command (which requires the administrator user name and password), for example:

    startManagedWebLogic.cmd bi_server1 http://<administration_server_host_name>:7001
    

    You can also stop the Java components from the MS-DOS window in which they were started, if you press Ctrl+C.

  • On UNIX, open a shell prompt and change the directory to MW_HOME/user_projects/domains/bifoundation_domain/bin. Then, run the following command (which requires the administrator user name and password), for example:

    ./startManagedWebLogic.sh bi_server1 http://<administration_server_host_name>:7001
    

    Caution:

    If you start Managed Servers from a Windows or UNIX command-line window, then do not close the window later on, or the server terminates. For more information, see "Setting Up a WebLogic Server Instance as a Windows Service" in Oracle Fusion Middleware Managing Server Startup and Shutdown for Oracle WebLogic Server.

    Do not use the startManagedWebLogic.sh script that is located in MW_HOME/wlserver_10.3/common/bin/ because it is not supported.


To stop Managed Servers on Windows and UNIX:

Use the appropriate method for the operating system:

  • On Windows, open an MS-DOS window and change the directory to MW_HOME\user_projects\domains\bifoundation_domain\bin. Then, run the following command (which requires the administrator user name and password), for example:

    stopManagedWebLogic.cmd bi_server1 http://<administration_server_host_name>:7001
    

    You can also stop the Java components from the MS-DOS window in which they were started, if you press Ctrl+C.

  • On UNIX, open a shell prompt and change the directory to MW_HOME/user_projects/domains/bifoundation_domain/bin. Then, run the following command (which requires the administrator user name and password), for example:

    ./stopManagedWebLogic.sh bi_server1 http://<administration_server_host_name>:7001
    

    You can also use the process termination command for the operating system in use (for example, kill on UNIX). Java indicates on the console window that it is shutting down when it receives a shutdown signal.

4.8.1 Confirming If the Managed Server Is Running and Starting It

You can use Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console or Fusion Middleware Control to confirm whether the Managed Server is running, and start it if necessary. The system does not include a Managed Server if the Simple Install type was selected during installation.

To confirm whether the Managed Server is running, and start it if necessary using Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console:

  1. Log in to Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console using the following URL:

    http://<host>:7001/console

    For information, see Section 2.3, "Centrally Managing Oracle Business Intelligence Java Components Using the Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console."

  2. Under the bifoundation_domain, expand the Environment node in the navigation tree, and click Servers.

  3. Display the Configuration tab.

    There should be two servers listed: AdminServer (the Administration Server) and bi_server1 (Managed Server).

  4. Start the Managed Server, if not running:

    1. Display the Control tab.

    2. Select the box next to the Managed Server (for example, bi_server1).

    3. Click Start.

      Repeat this step for each Managed Server.

    For information about starting Managed Servers on Windows and UNIX, see Section 4.8, "Starting and Stopping Managed Servers on Windows and UNIX."

  5. (Optional) Perform an OPMN stopall for the system components, and then a startall. For information, see Section 4.5.1, "Using the OPMN Command Line to Start, Stop, Restart, and View the Status of System Components."

To confirm whether a Managed Server is running, and start it if necessary using Fusion Middleware Control:

  1. Log in to Fusion Middleware Control using the following URL:

    http://<host>:7001/em

    For information, see Section 2.2, "Centrally Managing Oracle Business Intelligence Components Using Fusion Middleware Control."

  2. Under the WebLogic Domain expand the bifoundation_domain node in the navigation tree, and select bi_cluster.

    Expand the bi_cluster node to display the Managed Servers (for example, bi_server1). Fusion Middleware Control displays the status in the Deployments region.

  3. Select bi_cluster, and click the WebLogic Cluster menu.

  4. Select the Control option from the menu, and select Start Up to start the Managed Servers.

  5. (Optional) Perform an OPMN stopall for the system components, and then a startall. For information, see Section 4.5.1, "Using the OPMN Command Line to Start, Stop, Restart, and View the Status of System Components."

4.9 Troubleshooting System Startup

This section contains solutions that are related to system startup:

4.9.1 Administration Server Fails to Start When the Database Is Not Running

When you start the Administration Server, the repository database that was specified during installation must be running, or else you see JDBC errors that prevent startup.

Problem: The Administration Server fails to start.

If the Administration Server fails to start, then:

  • View the Administration Server and Managed Server log files in the following directory:

    \user_projects\domains\bifoundation_domain\servers\AdminServer\logs

    You can also check the Managed Server log files in the following directory:

    \user_projects\domains\bifoundation_domain\servers\bi_server1\logs

Cause: Database Down: in AdminServer.log, "Caused By: java.net.UnknownHostException: yourcomputername" deep in the trace from:

####<Jan 19, 2010 8:04:09 PM PST> <Info> <JDBC> <username> <AdminServer> <[ACTIVE] ExecuteThread: '0' for queue: 'weblogic.kernel.Default (self-tuning)'> <<anonymous>> <Stack trace associated with message 001129 follows:

java.sql.SQLException: The Network Adapter could not establish the connection.

Resolution: Start the database.

4.9.2 Managed Server Is Down

If the Managed Server is down, then use the Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console, or the command line to start it.

For information, see Section 4.8.1, "Confirming If the Managed Server Is Running and Starting It."

4.9.3 Oracle BI Server Fails to Start

If the BI Server fails to start, then view the log files in the following directory:

<ORACLE_INSTANCE>\diagnostics\logs\OracleBIServerComponent\coreapplication_obis1, or use the log viewer.

4.9.4 Oracle BI Presentation Services Fails to Start

If Presentation Services fails to start, then view the log files in the following directory:

<ORACLE_INSTANCE>\diagnostics\logs\OracleBIPresentationServicesComponent\coreapplication_obips1, or use the log viewer.

If you experience either of the following problems related to Presentation Services failing to start, then refer to the appropriate causes and resolutions:

4.9.5 Cannot Log In

PKqԂxPK\EOEBPS/configmap.htmxZ Configuring Mapping and Spatial Information

13 Configuring Mapping and Spatial Information

This chapter describes how to configure mapping and spatial information for map views in Oracle Business Intelligence. When you install Oracle Business Intelligence, you install functionality for users to see maps that display data. Before users can see maps in analyses and dashboards, you must understand the system requirements, specify layers and maps, and configure the metadata, as described in this chapter.

This chapter includes the following sections:

See Chapter 20, "Configuring Advanced Options for Mapping and Spatial Information" for information about advanced configuration options for maps.

13.1 What Are the System Requirements for Map Views?

To include map views on dashboards, the system must include the following components:

  • Oracle MapViewer, which is a J2EE service that serves as an engine for rendering maps using spatial data managed by Oracle Spatial. MapViewer is closely integrated with Oracle BI EE. MapViewer is installed as part of Oracle BI EE and deployed in the same domain as Oracle BI EE on the web application server.

    MapViewer provides services and tools that hide the complexity of spatial data queries and cartographic rendering, while providing customizable options for more advanced users. MapViewer is designed to integrate with Location-Based services and applications.

    For information, see Section 20.1, "Configuring MapViewer to Support Map Views."

  • Spatial boundary data. NAVTEQ is one provider of this data to Oracle customers, which can be downloaded from the Oracle Technology Network. This spatial data and any other spatial metadata, including themes and styles, must be stored in an Oracle Database to be accessed by Oracle MapViewer for display in map views.

  • Hosted maps. Oracle BI EE allows users to access hosted maps from the Oracle eLocation service. Terms and conditions of use are located at the following URL:

    http://elocation.oracle.com/elocation/legal.html

  • Oracle Database, version 10g or later, to store the spatial data.

    Oracle Locator, which is a feature of Oracle Database (all editions) that provides core location functionality needed by most customer applications.

    If you use an Oracle Database as the Repository Creation Utility (RCU) database, then you can use that same Oracle Database for spatial data also. See Oracle Fusion Middleware Installation Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence for information.

  • (Optional) Oracle Spatial is an option for Oracle Database Enterprise Edition that provides advanced spatial features to support high-end geographic information systems (GIS) and location-based services (LBS) solutions. The Spatial option is required only if you plan to make use of maps or features that require advanced spatial capabilities that are not available with the Locator option. Additional Oracle Spatial features include raster and 3D data management, spatial web services, topology, network data modeling, resource description framework (RDF), and semantic web capabilities.

  • Metadata of the mapping between Oracle BI EE data and spatial data, which can be stored in a file system, in the Oracle BI Presentation Catalog.

Figure 13-1 shows the default architecture for map views when Oracle BI EE is installed. You can store the data either in an Oracle Database or in other databases that Oracle BI EE supports. See Figure 20-1 for a diagram of the preferred architecture for map views.

Figure 13-1 Default Architecture for Map Views

Description of Figure 13-1 follows

When these pieces are in place, you administer the map using the Oracle BI Presentation Services Administration page, as described in Section 13.3, "Administering Maps."

13.2 Hardware Sizing and Deployment Strategy for Maps

Rendering map views is computationally more intensive than rendering tabular views, due to the requirements to:

  • Query spatial data.

  • Create the polygons and shapes that correspond to geographical entities such as countries and states.

  • Place the polygons and shapes on a background map.

  • Provide end-user interactivity such as the ability to pan and zoom, to adjust color thresholds, and to show or hide formats.

You should assess the extent of expected usage of map views at your organization including the number of users that are expected to use map views, the amount of data to be displayed on map views, and the amount of spatial data that is expected to be displayed (such as only city boundaries or street level details). Based on this assessment, decide on an appropriate hardware sizing and deployment strategy. You should also review the available documentation on best practices for achieving optimal performance and scalability with your Oracle MapViewer deployment.

13.3 Administering Maps

Before content designers can create map views, you as the Oracle BI Administrator must specify layers and maps and configure the metadata. This section discusses the following:

13.3.1 Working with Maps and Layers

The first step is to select the layers for use on maps. An administrator has configured layers using the Map Builder tool of Oracle Spatial. You next select at least one map from a list of those that an administrator has configured using the Map Builder tool of Oracle Spatial. This map becomes the background on which the layers are applied. You can optionally specify images for use with map formats. This section provides the following information about maps and layers:

13.3.1.1 Associating Layers with Columns

After selecting layers and maps, you can associate certain layers with columns in the Oracle Business Intelligence subject area folders. If the association between a column and a layer is incorrect, then the layer cannot be displayed correctly on the map. The association ensures that shape definitions can be found in the database for the column values during map rendering. You must ensure that a shape geometry definition exists for each column value in the database. If a shape geometry definition does not exist for a particular column value, then the shape cannot be shown on the map and might inhibit user interactions on the map.

Shape lookup is based on the column values, and column-to-layer mapping is independent of locale or language. Therefore, you must ensure that the spatial column that is being associated with a layer does not itself have values that are affected by locale or language. To ensure this association, do one of the following:

  • Model spatial columns as double columns in the business modeling layer, which is the recommended method.

  • Create special spatial columns that have values that do not change across locale or language. You must ensure that content designers are not confused seeing these special columns in the Subject Areas pane when working with analyses.

If you decide to use double columns, then see Oracle Fusion Middleware Metadata Repository Builder's Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition for more information on double columns. The advantages of using double columns are the following:

  • You can provide code values (that is, descriptor IDs) for each shape definition and at the same time show display values (that is, descriptor values) according to locale or language.

  • Code values are passed only as layer key values for lookup.

  • You eliminate the need for the complex joining of various columns to uniquely locate the shape. For example, a layer geometry table might contain multiple cities with the name of London. To uniquely distinguish these cities, you might use a pattern of Country_State_City, as in US_Kansas_London or Canada_Ontario_London. The problem with this approach is that it might require three separate columns to be grouped, joined by a delimiter (such as an underscore), and associated with a layer. This association requires the content designer to select three columns (Country, State, City) in the criteria to create a single layer.

A BI layer can be associated with multiple columns in multiple subject areas. You must ensure that a layer is associated with at least one spatial column. If the layer association is missing, then the map might not be updated when a user drills on the mapped BI column. You can also have non-BI layers, which are layers that have not been associated with a BI column.

13.3.1.2 Ordering Layers on Maps

The ordering of map layers is very important. You must pay close attention to ensure that users have a seamless experience while navigating on the map (that is, drilling and zooming). In the Edit Background Map dialog, you assign each layer a minimum and maximum zoom range. Given that the map zoom slider can slide only from bottom to top vertically, the layers with lower minimum zoom levels are placed at the bottom of the slider. Ensure that the layer grid on the Interactive BI Layers section of the dialog follows a similar pattern, so that you place layers with lower minimum zoom levels at the bottom of the list. Ensure the following:

  • That you sort the layers (by clicking the sort icon) before closing the dialog.

  • That BI layers are ordered higher than non-BI layers. If a non-BI layer is ordered higher than any BI layers, then the non-BI layer is displayed on top of the lower BI layers on the map, which prevents the BI layers from being interactive.

Layer ordering becomes irrelevant when the zoom ranges of layers do not intersect on the scale. Ordering becomes very important when layers have a common minimum and maximum zoom range. Use care to ensure that detailed layers are not hidden by the aggregated layers during drilling or zooming operations.

Example 13-1 World Map with Three Layers

Suppose that a world map has three layers (Country, State, and City) and 15 zoom levels defined on it. The Country layer has a minimum and maximum zoom range of 0-5, the State layer range is 6-10, and the City layer range is 11-15. As the user navigates from the minimum to the maximum zoom level on the map, the layer order (also known as the visual order) is displayed as Country, State, and City.

Figure 13-2 shows the Edit Background Map dialog with the Interactive BI Layers section specified for this example. Reading from bottom to top, you see the layer order in that section as Country, City, and State. Even though the layer order configuration and their respective zoom levels are not consistent with each other, the end user's perception is not affected.

Figure 13-2 Edit Background Map Dialog with No Intersection

Description of Figure 13-2 follows

Example 13-2 World Map with Common Levels

Consider the same world map with layers that have common zoom ranges. Suppose that the user zooms to level 4 on the map that corresponds to the Edit Background Map dialog that is shown in Figure 13-3. Notice that all three layers include zoom level 4.

Figure 13-3 Edit Background Map Dialog with Intersection

Description of Figure 13-3 follows

The layer ordering at zoom level 4 is unclear, because multiple layers can be shown. Because of the layer order that is specified in the Interactive BI Layers section of the dialog, the map renders with the following order at zoom level 4: Country, City, and State (reading from bottom to top), which is incorrect.

To correct this problem, you must ensure that layers are always ordered properly in the dialog. You can re-order layers by clicking the Move Down and Move Up buttons on the zoom grid of the dialog, or by clicking the Sort Layers by Zoom Level button. For example, you can click the Sort Layers button in the dialog to specify that the layer ordering at zoom level 4 is Country, State, and City.

See Oracle Fusion Middleware User's Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition for more information about layers.

13.3.1.3 Changes to Spatial Metadata Require Restart

An administrator can edit the spatial metadata that is stored in the Oracle Database and accessed by MapViewer. For example, an administrator can add a new layer. These edits are not visible on the Oracle BI Presentation Services Administration pages for managing maps until MapViewer is restarted and so refreshed with the latest updates.

13.3.2 Administration Page Functions

The Oracle BI Presentation Services Administration page provides the Manage Map Data link. This link displays the Manage Map Data page, where you can manage the logical and display versions of the data from various physical data sources. This defines the layers that content designers use when creating map views. The data that is available for managing maps and data is stored in Oracle Database as part of MapViewer.

Using this page, you provide:

  • Logical names to prevent any existing BI column mappings and map analyses from breaking because of changes to the physical data or to the data source.

  • Display names so that the geographic data is meaningful to end users.

13.3.3 Administering Maps Using Administration Pages

This section assumes that you installed Oracle BI Enterprise Edition and that Oracle MapViewer was automatically configured and deployed. For information on MapViewer, see Oracle Fusion Middleware User's Guide for Oracle MapViewer.

To administer maps using Administration pages:

  1. Sign in to Oracle Business Intelligence.

  2. In the global header, click Administration.

  3. Click the Manage Map Data link to display the Manage Map Data page.

  4. Click the Layers tab.

  5. Click the Import Layers button to display the Import Layers dialog.

  6. In the dialog, select the connection and the layers that are needed for zooming and drilling. (This tab is not prepopulated by other selections on the Administration pages. You can use any layers or images with any map.)

    Click OK when you have finished selecting layers that are appropriate for the subject area with which you are working.

  7. Back on the Layers tab, select a layer, then click the Edit Layer button to display the Edit Layer dialog in which you associate layers with attribute columns so that you can display BI data in the map view.

    Click OK when you have finished editing the layer.

    You use this tab to associate layers with BI data. If you use the City column in multiple subject areas, then you must associate it with a layer for each subject area.

  8. Click the Background Maps tab, then click the Import Background Maps button to display the Import Background Maps dialog.

  9. In the dialog, select the connection and the main maps to use.

    The connection that you select for the main map can be different from the connection for the layers or images.

    Click OK when you have finished selecting main maps.

  10. Back on the Background Maps tab, select a map, then click the Edit Background Map button to display the Edit Background Map dialog in which you name the map and specify the order of layers and their zoom levels.

    Click OK when you have finished editing the map.

  11. Optionally, click the Images tab, then click the Import Images button to display the Import Images dialog. You can import images if you plan to use them as a format on maps.

  12. In the dialog, select the connection and the images to use.

    Click OK when you have finished selecting images.

  13. Click Back when you have finished working with the Administration page. Your changes are saved automatically.

After you have specified background maps, layers, and the associations between BI columns and spatial columns, MapViewer creates a static image for a map using this information and sends that image for rendering in the browser for use by content designers and end users in map views.

13.3.4 Handling the Translation of Layers in Maps

You can use the functionality of MapViewer to label the features of a theme (called a layer for maps in Oracle BI EE) using a specific language or locale. To configure these translated labels for maps, use the information that is provided in Oracle Fusion Middleware User's Guide for Oracle MapViewer.

PKj}ZxZPK\EOEBPS/part9.htmb Reference Information PKgbPK\EOEBPS/highavail.htm Deploying Oracle Business Intelligence for High Availability

6 Deploying Oracle Business Intelligence for High Availability

This chapter describes how to configure Oracle Business Intelligence components for high availability. It also describes the functionality available in Fusion Middleware Control to manage system availability, and provides information about using the Cluster Manager in the Administration Tool.

This chapter does not provide information about setting up additional high availability configuration for other components in the stack, including database tier, web tier, Administration Server, and identity management availability. For more information about these topics and how they relate to Oracle Business Intelligence deployments, see the following documents:

This chapter includes the following sections:

6.1 About Oracle Business Intelligence Components in a Clustered Environment

Figure 6-1 shows the system components and Java components in a highly available Oracle Business Intelligence deployment. See Section 1.3.3, "About Java Components and System Components for Oracle Business Intelligence" for more information about system components and Java components.

Figure 6-1 A Highly Available Oracle Business Intelligence Deployment

Description of Figure 6-1 follows

In Figure 6-1, the Oracle Business Intelligence Java components are deployed on the BI_SERVER1 and BI_SERVER2 Managed Servers on APPHOST1 and APPHOST2. These Managed Servers are configured in an Oracle WebLogic cluster.

Oracle BI Presentation Services, JavaHost, Oracle BI Cluster Controller, Oracle BI Scheduler, and Oracle BI Server are system components installed on APPHOST1 and APPHOST2 and configured as a cluster. The Cluster Controller and Oracle BI Scheduler on APPHOST2 are passive (they are started but do not service requests) and are only made active if APPHOST1 components fail.

In the data tier, shared external storage is configured to store the Oracle BI Presentation Catalog, Oracle BI Server global cache, Oracle BI repository, and Oracle BI Scheduler script data.

6.1.1 Recommendations for Availability

In a production system, it is recommended that you deploy two or more instances of every component on two or more computers, so that each component type has an instance running on more than one computer for fault tolerance. This configuration provides redundancy for Managed Servers and system components, an essential requirement for high availability and failover. You can see whether the system has any single points of failure by using the Availability tab of the Capacity Management page in Fusion Middleware Control. See Section 6.1.2, "Using Fusion Middleware Control to Identify Single Points of Failure" for more information.

You can also ensure high availability by configuring redundancy in the database tier (Oracle RAC recommended), web tier, and for the Administration Server. See "Configuring High Availability for Oracle Business Intelligence and EPM" in Oracle Fusion Middleware High Availability Guide for more information.

Note also the following requirements:

  • All Oracle BI Servers participating in the cluster must be within the same domain and on the same LAN subnet. Geographically separated computers are not supported.

  • The clock on each server participating in a cluster must be kept in synchronization. Out-of-sync clocks can skew reporting.

6.1.2 Using Fusion Middleware Control to Identify Single Points of Failure

Before you begin this procedure, ensure that you are familiar with the information in Section 3.2, "Using Fusion Middleware Control to Update Oracle Business Intelligence Configuration Settings."

To identify single points of failure:

  1. Go to the Business Intelligence Overview page, as described in Section 2.2.3, "Using Fusion Middleware Control to Manage Oracle Business Intelligence System Components."

  2. Display the Failover tab of the Availability page.

    On this page, you can view recommendations about whether to scale out system components or configure primary/secondary system components.

    Click the Help button on the page to access the page-level help for its elements.

  3. If you must scale out the Oracle BI Server, Oracle BI JavaHost, or Oracle BI Presentation Services, then you can click Scale Out Selected in the Single Points of Failure section to go to the Scalability tab of the Capacity Management page to scale out a system component. See Section 5.5, "Using Fusion Middleware Control to Scale System Components" for more information.

  4. If you have a Cluster Controller or Oracle BI Scheduler that must be configured, the Single Points of Failure table displays the message "Configure Primary/Secondary." See Section 6.2.1, "Using Fusion Middleware Control to Configure Primary and Secondary Instances" for information about how to do this.

6.1.3 Achieving High Availability Using an Active-Passive Model

As an alternative to setting up the active-active configuration described in the previous sections, you can set up Oracle Business Intelligence in an active-passive configuration using Oracle Fusion Middleware Cold Failover Cluster (Cold Failover Cluster). In a Cold Failover Cluster configuration, two or more application server instances are configured to serve the same application workload, but only one is active at any particular time.

A two-node Cold Failover Cluster can be used to achieve active-passive availability for Oracle Business Intelligence. In a Cold Failover Cluster, one node is active while the other is passive, on standby. In the event that the active node fails, the standby node is activated, and Oracle Business Intelligence continues servicing clients from that node. All Oracle Business Intelligence components are failed over to the new active node. No Oracle Business Intelligence components run on the failed node after the failover.

See "Active-Passive Topologies for Oracle Fusion Middleware High Availability" in Oracle Fusion Middleware High Availability Guide for detailed information.

6.2 Configuring Oracle Business Intelligence Components for High Availability

To configure Oracle Business Intelligence for high availability, you must ensure that the system has no single points of failure by scaling out the Oracle BI Server, Presentation Services, and the JavaHost so that you have at least two of each component type, distributed across at least two computers.

You also must configure primary and secondary instances of the Cluster Controller and Oracle BI Scheduler, so that the primary and secondary instances for each component type are distributed across two different computers.

Table 6-1 lists the tasks that you must perform to configure high availability for Oracle Business Intelligence.

Table 6-1 Task Summary for Configuring High Availability

TaskWhere to Go for More Information

Horizontally scale out the Oracle Business Intelligence deployment so that it includes two computers with a full set of Java and system components on each host. This task includes running the Oracle Business Intelligence installer, configuring shared files and directories, and scaling out system components using Fusion Middleware Control.

Section 5.3, "Horizontally Scaling Oracle Business Intelligence"


Configure primary and secondary instances of the Cluster Controller and Oracle BI Scheduler.

Section 6.2.1, "Using Fusion Middleware Control to Configure Primary and Secondary Instances"


Verify that the new components are available.

Section 5.6.1, "Using Fusion Middleware Control to View System Component Availability"



6.2.1 Using Fusion Middleware Control to Configure Primary and Secondary Instances

You can use Fusion Middleware Control to configure primary and secondary instances of the Cluster Controller and Oracle BI Scheduler.

Figure 6-2 shows the Failover tab of the Availability page.

Figure 6-2 Failover Tab of Availability Page in Fusion Middleware Control

Description of Figure 6-2 follows

Before you begin this procedure, ensure that you are familiar with the information in Section 3.2, "Using Fusion Middleware Control to Update Oracle Business Intelligence Configuration Settings."

To configure primary and secondary instances of the Cluster Controller and Oracle BI Scheduler:

  1. Go to the Business Intelligence Overview page, as described in Section 2.2.3, "Using Fusion Middleware Control to Manage Oracle Business Intelligence System Components."

  2. Display the Failover tab of the Availability page.

    On this page, you can configure primary and secondary instances of the Cluster Controller and Oracle BI Scheduler.

    Click the Help button on the page to access the page-level help for its elements.

  3. Click Lock and Edit Configuration to allow changes to be made.

  4. In the Primary/Secondary Configuration section, select the host and Oracle instance on which you want to run the primary or secondary Cluster Controller or Oracle BI Scheduler.

  5. Click Apply, then click Activate Changes.

  6. Return to the Business Intelligence Overview page and click Restart.

For information about using methods in the Oracle BI Systems Management API to manage availability, see Chapter 22, "Introducing the Oracle BI Systems Management API."

6.3 Optional Configuration for Oracle Business Intelligence High Availability

Follow the steps in this section to perform optional configuration for Oracle Business Intelligence high availability.

This section contains the following topics:

6.3.1 Setting Optional Cluster Controller Parameters

You can set optional parameters that are related to Cluster Controller heartbeat frequency in the ClusterConfig.xml file.

A copy of the ClusterConfig.xml file must reside on all computers that host a Cluster Controller, Oracle BI Server, or Oracle BI Scheduler component that participates in the cluster. You must set parameters in each copy of the file.

To set optional parameters in the ClusterConfig.xml file:

  1. Open the ClusterConfig.xml file for editing. You can find the file at:

    ORACLE_INSTANCE/config/OracleBIApplication/coreapplication

  2. Table 6-2 describes default values for the cluster communication parameters under the ClusterProperties element. Optionally, modify the parameter values as required for the deployment.

    Table 6-2 ClusterConfig.xml Parameters for Cluster Communication

    ParameterDescriptionDefault Value

    ServerPollSeconds

    The frequency of heartbeat messages between the Cluster Controller and the Oracle BI Server and Oracle BI Scheduler nodes in the cluster.

    5 seconds

    ControllerPollSeconds

    The frequency of heartbeat messages between the Cluster Controllers.

    5 seconds


  3. Save and close the file.

  4. Repeat these steps for every host in the deployment.

  5. Restart Oracle Business Intelligence.

Example 6-1 shows example parameters in the ClusterConfig.xml file. Note that any additional elements that are not shown in this example are centrally managed and cannot be set manually.

Example 6-1 Sample Parameters for Clustering in ClusterConfig.xml

<ClusterProperties>
  <ServerPollSeconds>5</ServerPollSeconds>
  <ControllerPollSeconds>5</ControllerPollSeconds>
</ClusterProperties>

6.3.2 Setting Optional Presentation Services Parameters

You can optionally configure certain parameters that control the communication between Presentation Services and the JavaHost component. To configure Presentation Services, set parameters in the instanceconfig.xml file on each computer that hosts Presentation Services.

To configure Presentation Services for clustering:

  1. Open the configuration file instanceconfig.xml for editing. You can find instanceconfig.xml at:

    ORACLE_INSTANCE/config/OracleBIPresentationServicesComponent/
    coreapplication_obipsn

  2. Under the ServerInstance tag, the JavaHostProxy element has optional subelements. Table 6-3 describes these optional subelements.

    Table 6-3 Optional Subelements for the JavaHostProxy Element

    SubelementAttributeDescription

    LoadBalancer/Ping

    keepAliveMaxFailures

    Specifies the number of ping failures required before the host is declared nonfunctioning. The default value is 5.

    LoadBalancer/Ping

    keepAliveFrequencySecs

    Specifies the ping frequency in seconds. The default value is 20.


  3. Save and close the file.

  4. Repeat these steps for every Presentation Services instance in your deployment.

  5. Restart Oracle Business Intelligence.

6.3.3 Setting Optional Oracle BI Presentation Services Plug-in Parameters

You can optionally configure the Oracle BI Presentation Services Plug-in to control session redirection behavior. To do this, you must perform the steps in this section on each computer where the analytics Java component is installed.

To set optional parameters for the Oracle BI Presentation Services Plug-in:

  1. Open the bridgeconfig.properties file for editing. You can find this file at:

    MW_HOME/user_projects/domains/domain_name/config/fmwconfig/
    biinstances/coreapplication

  2. Optionally, you can include the parameter AlwaysKeepSessionAffiliation to control whether requests that belong to the same session can be redirected to another Presentation Services component if the current Presentation Services component score is too low.

    The instance score is an internal score that the load balancing algorithm associates with each Presentation Services instance in the cluster. It is based on various metrics that are collected by the load balancer.

    Set this parameter to true to disallow request redirection, or false to allow requests to be redirected. For example:

    oracle.bi.presentation.sawconnect.loadbalance.AlwaysKeepSessionAffiliation=true
    
  3. Save and close the file.

  4. Restart the analytics application from the Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console. If Oracle BI Publisher is using the Oracle BI Presentation Catalog, then the xmlpserver application must also be restarted.

  5. Repeat these steps for each computer that hosts the analytics Java component.

6.4 Using the Cluster Manager

The Cluster Manager in the Administration Tool was used in previous releases to monitor and manage Oracle BI Server, Oracle BI Scheduler, and Cluster Controller instances. This tool is still supported in the current release.

Although you use Fusion Middleware Control for most administrative tasks that relate to clustered components, the Cluster Manager provides a useful way to view and change the state of clustered components. For example, you can view the currently active Oracle BI Scheduler instance and change the active instance to a different Oracle BI Scheduler if necessary. You can also see which Oracle BI Server is the Master BI Server. Fusion Middleware Control shows the current status of clustered components, but does not provide a way to view or change the current state.

The Cluster Manager lets you monitor, analyze, and manage the operations of Oracle BI Server, Oracle BI Scheduler, and Cluster Controller instances in a cluster. It provides status, cache, and session information. The Cluster Manager is available only when the Administration Tool is connected to a clustered DSN.

If all Cluster Controllers or Oracle BI Servers in the cluster are currently stopped or offline, then you cannot access the Cluster Manager to start them. You must manually start one Cluster Controller (generally, the primary) and one Oracle BI Server.

The Cluster Manager window has two panes: the Explorer pane on the left side and the Information pane on the right side. The Explorer pane displays hierarchical information about the servers, schedulers, and controllers that comprise a cluster. The Information pane shows detailed information about an item selected in the Explorer pane.

The Cluster Manager window refreshes every minute by default. You can change the interval.

To set the refresh interval for the display:

  1. In the Administration Tool, open a repository in online mode.

  2. Select Manage, then Clusters.

  3. Select Refresh, then Every, and select another value from the list.

  4. To refresh the display at any time, ensure that the Cluster Manager is the active window and press F5, or select Refresh, then Now. This action retrieves the most current information for the cluster.

To activate an inactive Oracle BI Scheduler instance:

  1. In the Administration Tool, open a repository in online mode.

  2. Select Manage, then Clusters.

  3. In the Cluster Manager dialog, right-click an Oracle BI Scheduler instance.

  4. If the Oracle BI Scheduler instance selected is inactive, then select Activate.

6.4.1 Viewing and Managing Cluster Information

The section describes how to view status, cache, and session information about a cluster and the meaning of the information provided.

6.4.1.1 Status Information

The Status view is automatically displayed when you first open the Cluster Manager window. You can also access the Status view by selecting View, then Status in the Cluster Manager window.

The categories of information that are displayed in the Information pane might vary depending on the server to which the Administration Tool is connected. Table 6-4 describes categories that might appear.

Table 6-4 Status Columns

ColumnDescription

Last Reported Time

The time that the Cluster Controller or Oracle BI Server communicated with the Controlling Cluster Controller. If the server or controller is offline, then this field might be blank.

Name

The name of the computer that is hosting the Oracle BI Server or Cluster Controller.

Role

The role of the object in the cluster:

  • Controlling. A Cluster Controller that is currently assigned the responsibility for control of the cluster.

  • Primary. The Primary Cluster Controller. This role is not displayed if the Primary Cluster Controller is currently the controlling Cluster Controller.

  • Secondary. The Secondary Cluster Controller. This role is not displayed if the SecondaR0ry Cluster Controller is currently the controlling Cluster Controller.

  • Clustered server. An Oracle BI Server that is a member of the cluster. This role is not displayed for the clustered server that is defined as the master server.

  • Master. The clustered server that the Administration Tool connects to for editing repositories in online mode.

  • Active. The Oracle BI Scheduler is active.

Sessions

This field is available when either Servers or an individual server is selected in the Explorer pane. It shows the number of sessions that are currently logged on to a clustered server.

Start Time

The timestamp showing when the Cluster Controller or Oracle BI Server was last started. This field is blank if the Cluster Controller or clustered server is offline.

Status

The status of the object in the cluster:

  • Online. The Cluster Controller or Oracle BI Server is online. Online Cluster Controllers can accept session requests and assign them to available servers within the cluster. Online Oracle BI Servers can be assigned sessions by the Cluster Controller.

  • Quiesce. This status is applicable to clustered servers only. When a server is quiesced, any activity in progress on outstanding sessions is allowed to complete before the server transitions to Offline status.

  • Offline. The Cluster Controller or Oracle BI Server is offline. Offline Cluster Controllers cannot accept session requests or assign sessions to available servers within the cluster. Offline Oracle BI Servers do not communicate with the controlling Cluster Controller and cannot accept sessions assigned by the controlling Cluster Controller. If the server subsequently becomes available, then it is allowed to participate in the cluster. To stop the Cluster Controller or clustered server after quiescing it, issue the Stop command.

  • Forced Offline. This status applies to clustered servers only. The Oracle BI Server has been stopped. This is identical to the offline status, except that if the Oracle BI Server comes back online, it is not assigned requests. The server remains in this state until the Start command is issued against this server from the Administration Tool Cluster Manager, or both Cluster Controllers are shut down and restarted.

  • Online: Active. The Oracle BI Scheduler instance is online, running, and the one to which Oracle BI Scheduler clients connect. This instance executes jobs.

  • Online: Inactive. The Oracle BI Scheduler is online but not running. This instance is ready to take over for the active instance if the active instance becomes unavailable.

  • Online: Inactive Pending. The Oracle BI Scheduler was active and is trying to go into an inactive state. This might take a few minutes (for example, if multiple jobs are running).

Type

When Clusters is selected in the Explorer pane, this field is available. There are three types:

  • Controller. The object is a Cluster Controller.

  • Server. The object is an Oracle BI Server.

  • Scheduler. The object is a Scheduler Server.


6.4.1.2 Cache Information

The Cache view is available in the Cluster Manager window if caching is enabled.

The categories of information and their display sequence are controlled by the Options settings. Table 6-5 describes categories that might appear.

Table 6-5 Cache View Columns

ColumnDescription

Business Model

Name of the business model that is associated with the cache entry.

Column count

Number of columns in each row of this cache entry's result set.

Created

Time the result set of the cache entry was created.

Creation elapsed time

Time, in milliseconds, needed to create the result set for this cache entry.

Full size

Full size is the maximum size used, considering variable length columns, compression algorithm, and other factors. The actual size of the result set is smaller than Full size.

Last used

Last time the result set of the cache entry satisfied a query. (After an unexpected shutdown of an Oracle BI Server, the Last used time might temporarily have a stale value, that is, older than the true value.)

Row count

Number of rows that are generated by the query.

Row size

Size of each row (in bytes) in this cache entry's result set.

SQL

Text of the SQL statement that generated the cache entry.

Use count

Number of times that this cache entry's result set has satisfied a query (since Oracle BI Server startup).

User

Name of the user who submitted the query that resulted in the cache entry.


To view cache information:

  1. Click an individual server in the Explorer pane, and then select View, then Cache.

6.4.1.3 Session Information

The Session view is available for Oracle BI Servers. The information is arranged in two windows, described in Table 6-6.

  • Session window: Appears on the top. Shows users currently logged on to the Oracle BI Server.

  • Request window: Appears on the bottom. Shows active query requests for the user selected in the Session window.

Table 6-6 describes the information that is displayed in the Session window.

Table 6-6 Session Window Columns (Top Window)

ColumnDescription

Catalog

Name of the Oracle BI Presentation Catalog to which the session is connected.

Client Type

Type of client session. The client type of Administration is reserved for the user who is logged in with the Oracle BI Administrator user ID.

Last Active Time

Timestamp of the last activity on the session or the query.

Logon Time

Timestamp when the session logged on to the Oracle BI Server.

Repository

Logical name of the repository to which the session is connected.

Session ID

Unique internal identifier that the Oracle BI Server assigns each session when the session is initiated.

User

Name of the user connected.


Table 6-7 describes the information that is displayed in the Request window.

Table 6-7 Request Window Columns (Bottom Window)

ColumnDescription

Last Active Time

Timestamp of the last activity on the session or the query.

Request ID

Unique internal identifier that the Oracle BI Server assigns each query when the query is initiated.

Session ID

Unique internal identifier that the Oracle BI Server assigns each session when the session is initiated.

Start Time

Time of the initial query request.

Status

These are the possible values. Due to the speed at which some processes complete, not all values for any given request or session might appear.

  • Idle. There is presently no activity on the request or session.

  • Fetching. The request is being retrieved.

  • Fetched. The request has been retrieved.

  • Preparing. The request is being prepared for processing.

  • Prepared. The request has been prepared for processing and is ready for execution.

  • Executing. The request is currently running. To terminate a request, select it and click Kill Request. The user receives an informational message that indicates that the Oracle BI Administrator canceled the request.

  • Executed. The request has finished running.

  • Succeeded. The request ran to completion successfully.

  • Canceled. The request has been canceled.

  • Failed. An error was encountered during the processing or running of the request.


To manage clustered servers:

  1. In the Explorer pane, expand the Server icon to display the servers in the cluster.

  2. In the Information pane, select a server.

  3. Select Action, and then select an option.

    When the operation finishes, the status of the clustered server is refreshed automatically.

To view session information:

  1. Select a server in the Explorer pane, and select View, then Sessions.

    Session information for the server is displayed in the Information pane. It shows all users logged into the server and all current query requests for each user.

To disconnect a session:

  1. In the Session view, right-click the session in the Session window (top window) and click Disconnect.

    When you disconnect a session, the ODBC session is terminated. Client users who were connected over this session receives errors if they attempt to run queries. Users must log out, then log back in again to start a new session.

To terminate a query request:

  1. In the Session view, right-click the request in the Request window (bottom window) and click Kill Request.

    When you terminate a query request, the user who is initiating the query receives an error.

6.4.1.4 Server Information

Selecting Server info from the View menu provides information about the cluster server, such as server version number.

6.5 Troubleshooting an Oracle Business Intelligence Clustered Environment

Use Fusion Middleware Control and the Administration Console to check the status of system processes. See Section 5.6.1, "Using Fusion Middleware Control to View System Component Availability" and Section 5.6.2, "Using the Administration Console to View Managed Server Availability" for more information.

After enabling clustering, load balancing, and failover capabilities, you can troubleshoot issues that might occur in the deployment using the following:

  • Messages and errors that are reported in Fusion Middleware Control

  • Log files for Oracle Business Intelligence components, also available through Fusion Middleware Control

Review the log files for every Oracle Business Intelligence system component in the cluster. Log files record any client-side failures that might occur due to an incorrect configuration. Although some failover events are not logged, the Cluster Controller log file records crashes of any Oracle BI Scheduler or Oracle BI Server component. You can also review the Event Viewer log on Windows and the syslog on Linux or UNIX.

See Chapter 8, "Diagnosing and Resolving Issues in Oracle Business Intelligence" for more information about log files.

6.5.1 Avoiding Errors with Network Appliance Devices When the Oracle BI Server Is Running on Linux or UNIX

The following information applies to deployments with Oracle BI Server components on Linux or UNIX platforms that access Oracle Business Intelligence shared files and directories on a NAS device from Network Appliance. For environments with Oracle BI Server components on Linux or UNIX that use the NTFS security style, the recommended Network Appliance Data ONTAP storage operating system version is 6.3.1 or later.

Linux or UNIX computers saving to an NTFS qtree in Data ONTAP versions 6.0.3 through 6.3 might see permission errors when trying to save designs. Use the following Data ONTAP setting to silently ignore attempts to set UNIX permissions on NTFS qtrees after the design file is saved:

options cifs.ntfs_ignore_unix_security_ops on
PK0PK\EOEBPS/logging.htm Diagnosing and Resolving Issues in Oracle Business Intelligence

8 Diagnosing and Resolving Issues in Oracle Business Intelligence

This chapter describes how to diagnose and resolve issues in Oracle Business Intelligence using tools such as Fusion Middleware Control and log files.

This chapter includes the following sections:

8.1 What Auditing Tools Are Available?

Oracle Business Intelligence provides various auditing tools to assist you in finding the causes and solutions to issues, as described in Table 8-1.

Table 8-1 Auditing Tools

ToolDescriptionReference

Overview page in Fusion Middleware Control

Enables you to view recent issues with the system.

Section 2.2.3, "Using Fusion Middleware Control to Manage Oracle Business Intelligence System Components"


Performance metrics

Enables you to view metrics that affect performance.

Section 7.1, "Monitoring Service Levels"


Diagnostic pages in Fusion Middleware Control

Enables you to drill into problems and view and configure log files.

Section 8.2.1, "Using Fusion Middleware Control to View Log Information, Error Messages, and Alerts"

Section 8.2.2.1, "Using Fusion Middleware Control to Configure Log File Rotation Policy and Specify Log Levels"


Usage tracking

Enables you to generate usage tracking statistics that can be used in a variety of ways such as database optimization, aggregation strategies, or billing users or departments based on the resources that they consume.

Chapter 9, "Managing Usage Tracking"


Reports of Catalog objects

Enables you to learn details of objects in the Oracle BI Presentation Catalog.

Section 17.9, "Creating Reports to Display Catalog Data Using Catalog Manager"


Consistency Check Manager

Enables you to check the validity of the repository.

"Checking the Consistency of a Repository or a Business Model" in Oracle Fusion Middleware Metadata Repository Builder's Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition

Model Check Manager

Enables you to check for modeling problems that might affect Oracle BI Summary Advisor and the aggregate persistence engine.

"Using Model Check Manager to Check for Modeling Problems" in Oracle Fusion Middleware Metadata Repository Builder's Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition

ODBC/JDBC procedures

Enables you to obtain diagnostic information for the Oracle BI Server.

Section 8.6, "Using ODBC/JDBC Procedures to Obtain Oracle BI Server Diagnostics"



8.2 Viewing And Configuring Diagnostic Log Files

You can view diagnostic log files and configure settings that affect diagnostic log files and the information that they contain, as described in the following sections:

8.2.1 Using Fusion Middleware Control to View Log Information, Error Messages, and Alerts

You can search for and view the log entries for Oracle Business Intelligence components using Fusion Middleware Control Log Viewer. The log files can be searched for log messages, and you can apply filters that can, for example, target a certain date range, user, user transaction, or level of message (error, warning, notification, and so on). You can also view log files in their entirety from the Fusion Middleware Control Log Viewer.

When log entries for error messages and warnings are generated across multiple log files, they can be difficult to trace. However, it is possible to view logging information for specific user transactions across multiple log files. Transaction level logging associates a unique transaction ID, which is called the Execution Context ID (ECID), with every log and error message that is generated in response to a user request. This logging enables rapid diagnosis of the cause of underlying issues. However, some messages in the log (for example system messages for server startup or shutdown) do not have a transactional attribute. All log messages that are related to client requests do have a transactional attribute.

Before you begin this procedure, ensure that you are familiar with the information in Section 3.2, "Using Fusion Middleware Control to Update Oracle Business Intelligence Configuration Settings."

To use Fusion Middleware Control to view log information, error messages, and alerts:

  1. Go to the Business Intelligence Overview page, as described in Section 2.2.3, "Using Fusion Middleware Control to Manage Oracle Business Intelligence System Components."

  2. Display the Log Messages tab of the Diagnostics page.

    Click the Help button on the page to access the page-level help for its elements.

  3. View lists of the following:

    • Recent errors under the Most Recent Errors region

    • recent warnings under the Most Recent Warnings region

  4. Select a link under View/Search All Log Files and View/Search Log Files By Component to display messages for all log files, or for the messages for the log files of a specified component. Click the Help button on the page to access the page-level help for the following links:

    • Search the log files using the Log Viewer

    • Presentation Services Log

    • Server Log

    • Scheduler Log

    • JavaHost Log

    • Cluster Controller Log

    • Action Services Log

    • Security Services Log

    • Administrator Services Log

    Fusion Middleware Control displays messages in the Log Messages page that correspond to your selection.

  5. Enter appropriate search criteria to display corresponding error messages.

    To view messages by ECID, click View Related Messages and select the by ECID (Execution Context ID) menu option.

  6. Select one or more rows to view the log file entry details for the selected messages.

    For more information about the elements that are displayed in the Log Viewer, see the Fusion Middleware help.

8.2.2 Configuring Log File Rotation Policy and Specifying Log Levels

You can configure criteria that determine when a new log file must be created, based on the size of the log file and the age of the log file. You can also specify log levels to determine what level of message the log files contain.

This section contains the following topics:

For information about using methods in the Oracle BI Systems Management API to change configuration settings, see Chapter 22, "Introducing the Oracle BI Systems Management API."

8.2.2.1 Using Fusion Middleware Control to Configure Log File Rotation Policy and Specify Log Levels

Before you begin this procedure, ensure that you are familiar with the information in Section 3.2, "Using Fusion Middleware Control to Update Oracle Business Intelligence Configuration Settings."

To use Fusion Middleware Control to configure log file rotation policy and specify log levels:

  1. Go to the Business Intelligence Overview page, as described in Section 2.2.3, "Using Fusion Middleware Control to Manage Oracle Business Intelligence System Components."

  2. Display the Log Configuration tab of the Diagnostics page.

  3. Click Lock and Edit Configuration to enable changes to be made.

  4. Complete the elements using the descriptions in the help topic for the page.

    For example, you can specify which log levels to use, and for some you can set their granularity.

    Click the Help button on the page to access the page-level help for the following options:

    Log Configuration

    • Maximum File Size option

    • Maximum Log Age option

    Query Logs

    • Maximum File Size option

    • Maximum Log Age option

    Default Log Level

    Component Specific Log Levels

  5. Click Apply, then click Activate Changes.

  6. Return to the Business Intelligence Overview page and click Restart.

8.2.2.2 Manually Changing Additional Log File Settings

In addition to the log file settings that you can change in Fusion Middleware Control, you can change other settings manually. Use various elements in the log configuration file for a component to change these settings.


Note:

Editing a diagnostic log configuration file for a single component is not advised, because changes might subsequently be overwritten. For information, see Section 3.4, "Using a Text Editor to Update Configuration Settings."


Before you begin this procedure, ensure that you are familiar with the information in Section 3.4, "Using a Text Editor to Update Configuration Settings."

To manually change the settings that configure the log file format:

  1. Open the component log configuration file as described in Section 8.3.2, "What Are Diagnostic Log Configuration Files and Where Are They Located?"

  2. Locate the section in which you must add the Format element, which specifies the log file format. The default is ODL-TEXT.

    To use the Fusion Middleware Control Log Viewer to view and search through the log files for Oracle Business Intelligence, then the files must be in either ODL-Text or ODL-XML format.

  3. Include the element and its ancestor elements as appropriate, as shown in the following example:

    <server>
       <ServerInstance>
          <Log>
             <Format>ODL-TEXT</Format>
          </Log>
       </ServerInstance>
    </server>
    

    For an example of a JavaHost Server diagnostic log configuration file, see Example 8-2.

  4. Save your changes and close the file.

  5. Restart Oracle Business Intelligence.

8.3 Understanding Diagnostic Log and Log Configuration Files

This section discusses diagnostic log files and diagnostic log configuration files, and contains the following topics:

8.3.1 What Are Diagnostic Log Files and Where Are They Located?

Diagnostic log files are files used to store message information that is generated by Oracle Business Intelligence servers. These log files are stored in the following location:

ORACLE_INSTANCE\diagnostics\logs\component_type\coreapplication

The following diagnostic log files are used in Oracle Business Intelligence:

  • Presentation Services

    • \CatalogCrawler\sawcatalogcrawlerlogsysn.log — The catalog crawler log file, which is not searchable in the Fusion Middleware Control Log Viewer.

    • sawlogn.log — The Presentation Services log file that represents the latest part of diagnostic log output and is searchable in the Fusion Middleware Control Log Viewer.

    For more information specifically about Presentation Services logging, see Section 8.5, "Logging in Oracle BI Presentation Services."

  • Oracle BI Server

    • nqquery<n>.log — The Oracle BI Server query log, which is not searchable in the Fusion Middleware Control Log Viewer.

      <n> = date and timestamp, for example nqquery-20101209-2135.log

    • nqserver<n>.log — The Oracle BI Server main diagnostic log, which is searchable in the Fusion Middleware Control Log Viewer.

      <n> = date and timestamp, for example nqserver-20101209-2135.log

    • nqsadmintool.log — The log for the Oracle BI Administration Tool.

    • Oracle BI Server utilities — For example, biserverxmlexec and equalizerpds, also generate their own logs when they are run.

  • JavaHost

    • jh-n.log — The JavaHost Server main diagnostic log, which is searchable in the Fusion Middleware Control Log Viewer.

      <n> = date and timestamp, for example jh-20100909-2135.log

  • Oracle BI Scheduler

    • nqscheduler-<n>.log — The Oracle BI Scheduler log file, which is searchable in the Fusion Middleware Control Log Viewer.

      <n> = date and timestamp, for example nqscheduler-20100909-2135.log

  • Cluster Controller

    • nqcluster-yyyyMMdd-hhmm.log — The Oracle BI Cluster Controller diagnostic file, which is searchable in the Fusion Middleware Control Log Viewer.

      <n> = date and timestamp, for example nqcluster-20100909-2135.log

  • BI JEE log (Action Services and Security Services), both of the following log files are searchable in the Fusion Middleware Control Log Viewer:

    • AdminServer-diagnostic.log

    • bi_server1-diagnostic.log

  • Upgrade

    Log files for the upgrade of Oracle Business Intelligence are created in the following location:

    ORACLE_HOME\upgrade\logs

    For information about upgrade log files, see Oracle Fusion Middleware Upgrade Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence. These files are not searchable in the Fusion Middleware Control Log Viewer.

8.3.2 What Are Diagnostic Log Configuration Files and Where Are They Located?

Diagnostic log configuration files control output to diagnostic log files for Oracle Business Intelligence.


Note:

Editing a diagnostic log configuration file for a single component is not advised, because changes might subsequently be overwritten. For information, see Section 3.4, "Using a Text Editor to Update Configuration Settings."


Log configuration files for Oracle Business Intelligence are stored in the following locations:

ORACLE_INSTANCE\config\component_type\bi_component_name

For example:

  • \OPMN\opmn\opmn.xml

  • \OracleBIClusterControllerComponent\coreapplication_obiccs1\ccslogconfig.xml

  • \OracleBIJavaHostComponent\coreapplication_obijh1\logging_config.xml

  • \OracleBIPresentationServicesComponent\coreapplication_obips1\instanceconfig.xml

  • \OracleBISchedulerComponent\coreapplication_obisch1\instanceconfig.xml

  • \OracleBIServerComponent\coreapplication_obis1\logconfig.xml

About Formats in Diagnostic Log Configuration Files

Diagnostic log configuration files conform to the Oracle Diagnostic Log (ODL) standard, although they can differ slightly in appearance.

Example 8-1 and Example 8-2 illustrate two of the log configuration files for Oracle Business Intelligence.

Example 8-1 BI Server Diagnostic Log Configuration File Format

<server>
   <ServerInstance>
      <Log>
         <MaximumFileSizeKb>10000</MaximumFileSizeKb>
         <MaximumLogAgeDay>60</MaximumLogAgeDay>
         <Format>ODL-TEXT</Format>
            <Level>
               <IncidentError>1</IncidentError>
               <Error>1</Error>
               <Warning>16</Warning>
               <Notification>1</Notification>
               <Trace>16</Trace>
            </Level>
      </Log>
      <UserLog>
         <MaximumFileSizeKb>10000</MaximumFileSizeKb>
         <MaximumLogAgeDay>10</MaximumLogAgeDay>
         <Format>ODL-TEXT</Format>
      </UserLog>
   </ServerInstance>
</server>

Example 8-2 JavaHost Server Diagnostic Log Configuration File Format

<?xml version = '1.0' encoding = 'utf-8'?>
<logging_configuration>
   <log_handlers>
      <log_handler name='odl-handler' class='oracle.core.ojdl.logging.ODLHandlerFactory'>
      <property name='path' value='C:\oracle_bi_ee_BIFNDNPTPSNT0911060426S-Release\jhlogs\javahost.log'/>
      <property name='maxFileSize' value='1000000'/>
      <property name='maxLogSize' value='5000000'/>
      </log_handler>
   </log_handlers>
   <loggers>
      <logger name='saw' level='NOTIFICATION:1' useParentHandlers='false'>         <handler name='odl-handler'/>
      </logger>
   </loggers>
</logging_configuration>

Oracle Business Intelligence components control their diagnostic log files by using server-specific settings in their log configuration files, for example:

  • Oracle BI Presentation Services log configuration file:

    - writerClassId settings configure messages that the system writes to the sawlog.log file.

  • Oracle BI Server log configuration file:

    - Log settings configure messages that the system writes to the nqserver.log file.

    For more information, see Section 8.3.5, "What Messages Are Included in the System Log?"

    - UserLog settings configure messages that the system writes to the nqquery.log file.

    For more information, see Section 8.4, "Managing the Query Log."

  • Oracle BI Scheduler log configuration file:

    - Log settings configure messages that the system writes to the nqscheduler.log file.

  • JavaHost Server log configuration file:

    - log_handlers elements and subelements enable configuration of the log file rotation policy and the specification of the log file name and its location.

    - loggers elements and subelements enable appropriate handling of Java component (JavaHost Server) log levels, by mapping the JavaHost Server log levels to the standard Oracle Diagnostic Log (ODL) log levels.

8.3.3 What Are Log File Message Categories and Levels?

Categories and levels for log file messages define the detail and level of importance with which the system writes messages to a log file. Fusion Middleware Control enables you to control these settings in the logconfig.xml file.

Each message category in a log file for Oracle Business Intelligence is set to a specific default value between 1 and 32, and only messages with a level less than or equal to the log level is logged.

Log file message categories are described in Table 8-2.

Table 8-2 Log File Message Category Levels

Category:LevelDescription

IncidentError:1

A serious problem caused by unknown reasons has occurred. You can fix the problem only by contacting Oracle Support Services.

No performance impact.

Error:1

A problem that requires attention from the system administrator has occurred.

No performance impact.

Warning:1

An action occurred or a condition was discovered that should be reviewed and might require action before an error occurs.

No performance impact.

Notification:1

A report of a normal action or event has occurred. This could be a user operation, such as "login completed" or an automatic operation such as a log file rotation.

No performance impact.

Notification:16

A configuration-related message or problem has occurred.

Low performance impact. It should be possible to enable this level broadly in a production environment without having a significant performance impact in the software.

Trace:1

A trace or debug message that is used for debugging or performance monitoring has been written. Typically this message contains detailed event data that is clear enough to be understood by someone who does not know internal implementation details.

Small performance impact. This level might be enabled broadly occasionally on a production environment to debug issues with the software. Enabling logging at this level might have a small performance impact, but not to the point of making the software unusable.

Trace:16

A fairly detailed trace or debug message has been written. The message is clear enough to be understood by Oracle Support Services engineers who have a deep knowledge of the product but might not know full details of the internal implementation.

High performance impact. This level should not be enabled on a production environment, except on special situations to debug issues with the software.

Trace:32

A highly detailed trace or debug message has been written. The message is intended for an Oracle developer working on the software who knows enough details about the implementation of the subsystem that generates the message.

Very high performance impact. This level is not expected to be enabled in a production environment and developers use it only to debug the software on a test or development environment.


In the following log configuration file example, in the Notification message category, only level 1 messages are logged. If the log level is set to 0, then nothing is logged for that message category.

   <Level>
      <IncidentError>1</IncidentError>
      <Error>1</Error>
      <Warning>1</Warning>
      <Notification>1</Notification>
      <Trace>1</Trace>
    </Level>

Avoid manually changing the default settings in the log file. Use Fusion Middleware Control to make changes. For more information, see Section 8.2.2.1, "Using Fusion Middleware Control to Configure Log File Rotation Policy and Specify Log Levels."

8.3.4 What is Log File Rotation?

Log file rotation is the creation of new log files, when the file exceeds a specified threshold or date. Take the MaximumFileSizeKb setting for the component log configuration file for the Oracle BI Scheduler as an example. Whenever a log file exceeds the size that is specified by this setting, then the existing Scheduler log file is renamed, and a new log file is created. Additionally, a log file date that is older than the MaximumLogAgeDay setting is deleted. The file naming convention for the Scheduler is as follows:

  • nqscheduler.log — The latest log file.

  • nqscheduler-<n>.log — The renamed previous log file.

    where <n> = date and timestamp, for example nqscheduler-20100909-2135.log

The naming convention that is used for settings in log configuration files differs slightly across components.

For more information, see Section 8.2.2.1, "Using Fusion Middleware Control to Configure Log File Rotation Policy and Specify Log Levels."

8.3.5 What Messages Are Included in the System Log?

The Oracle BI Server writes messages to the nqserver.log file, based on configuration settings. In addition to writing messages to this log file, the BI Server writes certain severe messages to the system log file for UNIX systems. The following list includes the kinds of messages that the BI Server writes to the system log file:

  • When the BI Server cannot start (for example, because another server has previously started), then the system log file includes a message such as the following one:

    Another server is already running on : @1%ls and port: @2%ls.

  • When memory problems occur, the system log file includes a message such as the following one:

    Could not enable the Low-Fragmentation Heap.

  • When the hard disk on the computer is full, the system log file includes a message such as the following one:

    Out of disk space.

8.4 Managing the Query Log

The Oracle BI Server provides a facility for logging query activity at the individual user level. Use logging for quality assurance testing, debugging, and troubleshooting by Oracle Support Services. In production mode, query logging is typically disabled.

The query log file is named nqquery.log, and is located in:

ORACLE_INSTANCE\diagnostics\logs\component_type\bi_component_name

Oracle BI Server query logging is tracked at a user level. It is a resource-intensive process if you track the entire user community.


Note:

For production systems, it is recommended that query logging be enabled only for a very targeted user community. In production systems, you can use usage tracking as the production-level logging facility. See Chapter 9, "Managing Usage Tracking" for more information.


It is recommended that you only test users when the user name clearly indicates it is a test user and have verified that query logging is enabled. If logging is enabled for such users, then it is recommended that they be given names such as sales_admin_with_logging, sales_dev_with_logging, or sales_test_with_logging, so that you can readily identify them. Even production administrator logins should not have query logging enabled, because it could strain the available resources.

You should also disable query logging for the following:

  • The SQL statement in the initialization string. The Initialization string field is in the Initialization Block dialog, in the General tab.

    The LOGGING column references stored values for the log level.

  • The logging level should be set to 0 (zero) for each production user. The Logging level field is in the User dialog, in the User tab. In the Administration Tool, select Identity from the Manage option on the main toolbar. In the Identity Manager dialog, double-click a user and select the User tab.

This section contains the following topics:

8.4.1 Configuring Query Logging

This section includes information about setting the size of the query log, choosing a logging level, and enabling query logging for a user.

Because query logging can produce very large log files, the logging system is turned off by default. You can enable logging to test that the repository is configured properly, to monitor activity on the system, to help solve performance problems, or to assist Oracle Support Services. You must enable query logging on the system for each user whose queries you want logged. You do this using the Oracle BI Administration Tool.

8.4.1.1 Setting the Query Logging Level

You can enable query logging levels for individual users, as described in Section 8.4.1.2, "Setting the Query Logging Level for a User." You cannot configure a logging level for a group.

A session variable overrides the logging level for a particular user. For example, if the administrator has a logging level of 4 and the session variable logging level is defined as the default 0 (zero) in the repository, then the logging level for the administrator is 0.

Set the logging level based on the amount of logging that is appropriate for your organization. In normal operations, logging is generally disabled (that is, the logging level is set to 0). If you decide to enable logging, then select a logging level of 1 or 2. These two levels are designed for use by administrators.

You might want to diagnose performance or data issues by setting a temporary log level for a query. You can enable query logging for a select statement by adding a prefix clause in the Advanced SQL Clauses section of the Advanced tab in Oracle BI Presentation Services. For example, for the select statement:

SELECT year, product, sum(revenue) FROM time, products, facts; 

You can specify the logging level of 5 in the Prefix field as follows:

Set Variable LOGLEVEL=5;

For this query, the logging level of 5 is used regardless of the value of the underlying LOGLEVEL variable.


Note:

Use logging levels greater than 2 only with the assistance of Oracle Support Services.


The query logging levels are described in Table 8-3.

Table 8-3 Query Logging Levels

Logging LevelInformation That Is Logged

Level 0

No logging.

Level 1

Logs the SQL statement issued from the client application. Also logs the following:

  • Physical Query Response Time — The time for a query to be processed in the back-end database.

  • Number of physical queries — The number of queries that are processed by the back-end database.

  • Cumulative time — The sum of time for all physical queries for a request (that is, the sum of all back-end database processing times and DB-connect times).

  • DB-Connect time — The time taken to connect to the back-end database.

  • Query cache processing — The time taken to process the logical query from the cache.

  • Elapsed time — The time that has elapsed from when the logical query is presented to the BI Server until the result is returned to the user. Elapsed time can never be less than response time, because elapsed time takes into account the small extra time between the logical query being presented to the BI Server to the start of preparation of the query. In cases where this delta time is negligible, the elapsed time equals the response time.

  • Response time — The time taken for the logical query to prepare, execute, and fetch the last record. This matches the TOTAL_TIME_SEC that is logged in usage tracking, as described in Section 9.4, "Description of the Usage Tracking Data."

  • Compilation time — The time taken to compile the logical query.

  • For each query, logs the query status (success, failure, termination, or timeout), and the user ID, session ID, and request ID.

Level 2

Logs everything logged in Level 1.

Additionally, for each query, logs the repository name, business model name, subject area name, SQL statement issued against the physical database, queries issued against the cache, number of rows returned from each query against a physical database and from queries issued against the cache, and the number of rows returned to the client application.

Level 3

Logs everything logged in Level 2.

Additionally, adds a log entry for the logical query plan, when a query that was supposed to seed the cache was not inserted into the cache, when existing cache entries are purged to make room for the current query, and when the attempt to update the exact match hit detector fails.

Do not select this level without the assistance of Oracle Support Services.

Level 4

Logs everything logged in Level 3.

Additionally, logs the query execution plan. Do not select this level without the assistance of Oracle Support Services.

Level 5

Logs everything logged in Level 4.

Additionally, logs intermediate row counts at various points in the execution plan. Do not select this level without the assistance of Oracle Support Services.

Level 6 and 7

Not used.


8.4.1.2 Setting the Query Logging Level for a User

To set the query logging level for a user:

  1. In the Oracle BI Administration Tool, select Manage, then Identity.

    The Identity Manager dialog is displayed.

  2. Double-click the name of the user for which you want to set the query logging level.

    The User dialog is displayed.

  3. Set the logging level by clicking the Up or Down arrows next to the Logging Level field.

    To disable query logging for a user, set the logging level to 0.

  4. Click OK.

8.4.2 Using the Log Viewer

Use the Oracle Business Intelligence Log Viewer utility (or a text editor) to view the query log. Each entry in the query log is tagged with the name of the user who issued the query, the session ID of the session in which the query was initiated, and the request ID of the individual query.

8.4.2.1 Running the Log Viewer Utility

To run the Log Viewer utility (which is located on Windows in \MW_HOME\ORACLE_HOME\bifoundation\server\bin\nqlogviewer.exe), open a command prompt, and enter nqlogviewer with any combination of its arguments. The syntax is as follows:

nqlogviewer [-u user_name] [-f log_input_filename]
          [-o output_result_filename]
          [-s session_ID] [-r request_ID]

In this syntax:

  • user_name is the name of a user in the Oracle Business Intelligence repository. This parameter limits the scope to entries for a particular user. If not specified, all users for whom query logging is enabled are displayed.

  • log_input_filename is the name of an existing log file from where the content is taken. This parameter is required.

  • output_result_filename is the name of a file in which to store the output of the log. If the file exists, then the results are appended to the file. If the file does not exist, then a new file is created. If this argument is not specified, then output is sent to the monitor screen.

  • session_ID is the session ID of the user session. The BI Server assigns each session a unique ID when the session is initiated. This parameter limits the scope of the log entries to the specified session ID. If not specified, then all session IDs are displayed.

  • request_ID is the request ID of an individual query. The BI Server assigns each query a unique ID when the query is initiated. This parameter limits the scope of the log entries to the specified request ID. If not specified, then all request IDs are displayed.

    The request ID is unique among the active requests, but not necessarily unique during the session. Request IDs are generated in a circular manner, and if a request is closed or if the session is long enough, then a request ID is reused.

You can also locate user names, session IDs, and request IDs through the Session Manager. See Oracle Fusion Middleware Security Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition for information.

Administrators can view the query log using the Manage Sessions option in the Presentation Services Administration page.

8.4.2.2 Interpreting the Log Records

After you have logged some query information and started the log viewer, you can analyze the log. Log entries for levels 1 and 2 are generally self-explanatory. The log entries can provide insights to help database administrators (DBAs) in charge of the underlying databases tune them for optimum query performance. The query log can also help you check the accuracy of applications that use the BI Server.

The log is divided into the following sections:

  • SQL Request — This section lists the SQL statement that is issued from the client application. You can use this information to rerun the query from the same application, or from a different application.

  • General Query Information — This section lists the repository, the business model, and the subject area from which the query was run. You can use this information to provide statistics on query usage that you can use to set priorities for future application development and system management.

  • Database Query — This section begins with an entry that reads "Sending query to the database named <data_source_name>," where <data_source_name> is the name of the data source to which the BI Server is connecting. Multiple database queries can be sent to one or more data sources. Each query has an entry in the log.

    The database query section has several uses, such as recording the SQL statement that was sent to the underlying databases. You can use this logged SQL statement to run queries directly against the database for performance tuning, results verification, or other testing purposes. You can also use this information to examine the tables that are being queried to verify that aggregate navigation is working as you expect. If you understand the structure of the underlying database, then it might also provide some insights into potential performance improvements, such as useful aggregate tables or indexes to build.

  • Query Status — The query success entry in the log indicates whether the query completed successfully, or failed. You can search through the log for failed queries to determine why they failed. For example, all the queries during a particular time period might have failed due to database downtime.

8.5 Logging in Oracle BI Presentation Services

This section describes logging specifically in Presentation Services and contains the following topics:

For general information about logging in Oracle Business Intelligence, see Section 8.3, "Understanding Diagnostic Log and Log Configuration Files."

8.5.1 Using the Oracle BI Presentation Services Logging Facility

By default, Oracle BI Presentation Services is configured to log all error events and informational and warning events of sufficient importance. An example of an important informational event is a server starting up or a server shutting down. Log files are named sawlogxx.log, where the xx is replaced by an incremented number.

To debug specific issues that a user might be encountering, the logging level can be increased to log more information than the default configuration. For example, while debugging a particular Oracle BI Presentation Services connectivity issue, you can increase the maximum logging on the saw.odbc log source only. This adds detailed logging for that component, without cluttering the log with detailed logging from other events. All Oracle BI Presentation Services configuration information is loaded from the instanceconfig.xml file.


Caution:

Because logging affects performance, do not increase the logging on a production implementation, except to diagnose specific issues.


8.5.2 Structure for the Oracle BI Presentation Services Configuration File

The structure of the configuration file is shown in Example 8-3. The cardinality of each node is shown in brackets.

Example 8-3 Structure of Log Section in instanceconfig.xml File

Logging [1..1]
Writers [0..1]
Writer [0..1]
WriterClassGroups [0..1]
Filters [0..1]
FilterRecord [0..n]

An example of an instanceconfig.xml file that has four writers is shown in Example 8-4.

Example 8-4 instanceconfig.xml File with Four Writers

<?xml version="1.0" ?>
<Server>
. . . . . . .
<Logging>
<Writers>
<Writer implementation="FileLogWriter" name="Global File Logger"
writerClassId="1" dir="{%ORACLE_BIPS_INSTANCE_LOGDIR%}" filePrefix="sawlog"
maxFileSizeKb="10000" filesN="10" fmtName="ODL-Text" ODLLogFilePath="{%ORACLE_BIPS_INSTANCE_LOGDIR%}/diagnostic.log"/>
<Writer implementation="CoutWriter" name="Global Output Logger"
writerClassId="2" />
<Writer implementation="EventLogWriter" name="Event Logger"
writerClassId="3" />
<Writer implementation="CrashWriter" name="CrashWriter"
writerClassId="4"
/>
</Writers>
<WriterClassGroups>
<WriterClassGroup name="All">1,2,3,4</WriterClassGroup>
<WriterClassGroup name="File">1</WriterClassGroup>
<WriterClassGroup name="Console">2</WriterClassGroup>
<WriterClassGroup name="EventLog">3</WriterClassGroup>
<WriterClassGroup name="Crash">4</WriterClassGroup>
</WriterClassGroups>
<Filters>
<FilterRecord writerClassGroup="Console" path = "saw" information="1" warning="31" error="31" trace="0" incident_error="32" />
<FilterRecord writerClassGroup="File" path = "saw" information="1" warning="31" error="31" trace="0" incident_error="32" />
<FilterRecord writerClassGroup="File" path="saw.mktgsqlsubsystem.joblog" information="1" warning="2" error="31" trace="0" incident_error="32"/>
<FilterRecord writerClassGroup="File" path="saw.httpserver.request"
information="16" warning="32" error="32" trace="0" incident_error="32"/>
<FilterRecord writerClassGroup="File" path="saw.httpserver.response"
information="16" warning="32" error="32" trace="0" incident_error="32"/>
</Filters>
</Logging>
</Server>

Table 8-4 contains a description of each node in the configuration hierarchy.

Table 8-4 Oracle BI Presentation Services Log Configuration File Elements

ElementAttributeDescription

Writers

None

Contains writers configuration.

This configuration is loaded on startup.

Writer

None

Configures a writer.

Writer

disableCentralControl

(Optional) Determines that this entry is not updated by Fusion Middleware Control. Default value is true.

Writer

implementation

The following implementations are defined:

  • FileLogWriter. Writes to a disk file.

  • CoutWriter. Writes to standard output.

  • EventLogWriter. Writes to a Windows event log or UNIX syslog.

  • CrashWriter. A Windows only facility that writes to a crash dump file when Presentation Services attempts to log from a specific source file and line number.

    Used in a production environment for information of some loggable but irrecoverable error (for example, failed NQTEST).

    Note: Use this implementation with care as it might leave the server in an unstable state. Use this implementation in very rare diagnostic-only scenarios on a test system.

    On Windows, CrashWriter requires the appropriate version of dbghelp.dll (at least 6.0.17.0).

    The correct dbghelp.dll can be found in support/windows/system32.

    Put this DLL in the WINNT/system32 or in the main/bin directory.

    No registration is required.

    

Writer

name

Unique name for the writer.

Writer

writerClassId

Specifies an integer number in the range 1 through 10. This number is used by filters to allow or prohibit logging.

Each distinct writer must have a unique value, which is used later for filter configuration.

Different writers might have the same class ID, but if they do, those writers cannot be distinguished by filters.

Writer

fmtName

(Optional) Specifies the format of logged messages. Valid values are:

  • default - 10g style. Formats messages with identifying headings.

  • ODL-TEXT. Formats messages in Oracle Diagnostic Text format.

  • ODL-XML. Formats messages in Oracle Diagnostic XML format.

If you do not set this attribute, then logged messages are displayed in the default format which for file log writers is 10g style and for console is ODL-TEXT.

See Section 8.5.3, "Examples of the Formats of Logged Messages" for examples.

Writer (FileLogWriter specific attribute)

dir

Specifies the directory where log files are created.

Writer (FileLogWriter specific attribute)

ODLLogFilePath

Specifies the file that Fusion Middleware Control displays in the Log Viewer.

Writer (FileLogWriter specific attribute)

maxFileSizeKb

Specifies the maximum size of the logging file in kilobytes.

When the file size limit is reached, the file is closed and a new logging file is created.

Writer (FileLogWriter specific attribute)

filePrefix

Specifies the prefix for log files.

Writer (FileLogWriter specific attribute)

filesN

Specifies the maximum number of logging files.

When this number is exceeded, the first file is deleted and re-created again. Then the logger starts to write to the beginning of the first file.

Writer (EventLogWriter specific attribute)

winSource

Specifies the event log source for logged events.

Writer (CrashWriter specific attribute)

file

Specifies the dump file path.

On Windows, a dump file is created in bin/coredumps and Presentation Services continues to run.

Writer (CrashWriter specific attribute)

line

Dump file line number.

WriterClassGroups

None

Contains the definition for writer classes. A writer class is a group of writer class IDs.

WriterClassGroup (Contains [as child text] a comma-delimited list of class IDs.)

name

Specifies the name of the WriterClassGroup.

Filters

None

Contains filter configuration.

FilterRecord

writerClassGroup

Specifies the group of writers to which this record is applied. WriterClassGroup should be defined previously in the WriterClassGroups section.

FilterRecord

disableCentralControl

(Optional) Determines that this entry is not updated by Fusion Middleware Control. Default value is true.

FilterRecord

path

Specifies the log source path. To enable the logging of SOAP information, enter the following value:

saw.httpserver.request.soaprequest

The current filter record is applied to the software component that is identified by that path and all its subcomponents.

FilterRecord

information

Contains an integer that specifies the severity of the corresponding message type.

Only messages with a severity index less than the provided number are logged.

FilterRecord

warning

Contains an integer that specifies the severity of the corresponding message type.

Only messages with a severity index less than the provided number are logged.

FilterRecord

error

Contains an integer that specifies the severity of the corresponding message type.

Only messages with a severity index less than the provided number are logged.

FilterRecord

trace

Contains an integer that specifies the severity of the corresponding message type.

Only messages with a severity index less than the provided number are logged.

FilterRecord

incident_error

Contains an integer that specifies the severity of the corresponding message type.

Only messages with a severity index less than the provided number are logged.


8.5.3 Examples of the Formats of Logged Messages

The fmtName attribute of the Writer element formats logged messages in one of three formats: default (10g style), ODL-TEXT, and ODL-XML. The following entries are examples of these formats.

Example 8-5 shows the default format.

Example 8-5 Default Format

The default format generates messages with identifying headings, such as:

Type: Information
Severity: 30
Time: Wed Jul 26 11:22:20 2006
File: project\sawserver\sawserver.cpp
Line: 399
Properties: ThreadID-2552
Location: 
             saw.sawserver
             saw.sawserver.initializesawserver
             saw.sawserver
Oracle BI Presentation Services has started successfully.

Example 8-6 shows the ODL-TEXT format.

Example 8-6 ODL-TEXT Format

The short format generates messages in a shortened form without identifying headings, such as:

[timestamp] [component id] [messagetype:level] [message-id] [module id] ([field-name: field-value])* message-text [[
supplemental-detail
]]

[2010-05-27T10:51:20.000-07:00] [OBIPS] [NOTIFICATION:1] [] [saw.sawserver] [ecid: 1243446680218334471555761] [tid: 2552] Oracle BI Presentation Services (OBIPS) 11.1.1.2 (Build 0) are starting up.[[
File:sawserver.cpp
Line:432
Location:
   saw.sawserver
   saw.sawserver.initializesawserver
   saw.sawserver
ecid: 1243446680218334471555761 
]]

Example 8-7 shows the ODL-XML format.

Example 8-7 ODL-XML Format

The xml format generates messages in XML format, such as:

<msg time="2010-05-08T18:41:05.000+00:00" 
comp_id="OBIPS" type="NOTIFICATION" level="1" msg_id="" 
module="saw.sawserver" ecid="124180446517874242628761" tid="127c"> 
<txt> Oracle BI Presentation Services has started successfully</txt> 
<suppl_detail /> 
</msg>

8.5.4 Oracle BI Presentation Services Message Structure

Each message that is logged by Presentation Services has several components, as described in Table 8-5.

Table 8-5 Components of Presentation Services Log Message

Message ComponentDescription

Message Text

The text of the log message to the user.

Message Type

One of five types: information, warning, error, incident_error or trace.

For information, see Table 8-2.

Severity

The severity is represented as a positive integer.

The lower the value, the more important the message. A message with severity of 0 is the most important type of message, whereas a message with a severity of 32 is not important at all.

Message Properties

Properties indicate other kinds of information. The kind varies among messages and might include user name, the IP address of the client browser, the thread ID, and so on.


8.5.5 Oracle BI Presentation Services Log Filters

FilterRecords customize logging details. Use FilterRecords to specify the implementation (output type) and logging levels for categories of web logs: Incident Error, Error, Trace, Warnings, and Information.

In the following example, the first two FilterRecords contain the following string:

path="saw"

This string logs the informational events at level 1, the error messages at level 31, and so on:

<FilterRecord writerClassGroup="Console" path="saw" information="1" warning="31" error="31" trace="0" incident_error="32" />
<FilterRecord writerClassGroup="File" path="saw" information="1" warning="31" error="31" trace="0" incident_error="32" />
<FilterRecord writerClassGroup="File" path="saw.mktgsqlsubsystem.joblog" information="1" warning="2" error="31" trace="0" incident_error="32"/>

This high-level path applies to every event.

You can customize FilterRecords by adding new FilterRecords, such as the third one shown in the preceding example, with finer-grain specification of log levels for events of various types. In this example, information is being logged to a disk file from saw.mktgsqlsubsystem.log, which generates Marketing job events.

You can disable logging of job details by changing the information level from 1 to 0, as shown in the following example, or by commenting out the lines:

<FilterRecord writerClassGroup="Console" path="saw" information="1" warning="31" error="31" trace="0" incident_error="32" />
<FilterRecord writerClassGroup="File" path="saw" information="1" warning="31" error="31" trace="0" incident_error="32" />
<FilterRecord writerClassGroup="File" path="saw.mktgsqlsubsystem.joblog" information="1" warning="2" error="31" trace="0" incident_error="32"/>

8.5.6 Diagnosing Issues with Agents

If an agent fails to execute fully or if debugging is turned on in Oracle BI Scheduler, then a log file is generated for the agent.

You manually turn on debugging by setting the Debug element to True in the Oracle BI Scheduler instanceconfig.xml file. (For information, see Section 8.3.2, "What Are Diagnostic Log Configuration Files and Where Are They Located?")

The location for agent log files is specified in the instanceconfig.xml file for the Oracle BI Scheduler. (For information, see Section 19.3.3.3, "Agent Scheduler Configuration Settings.") The default location for log files is the Log directory in the Oracle Business Intelligence installation directory on the computer where the Oracle BI Scheduler is installed.

The log file name has the following format:

Agent-JobID-InstanceID.xxx

In this file name:

  • Agent is the prefix for all agent log files.

  • JobID is the Oracle BI Scheduler job identifier for the agent.

  • InstanceID is the Oracle BI Scheduler instance identifier for the agent.

  • xxx is the file extension:

    • .err for agent error log files.

    • .log for debug log files.

The agent error and debug log files are written as separate files for each agent instance that fails to execute. You can use a text editor to view the files. Entries are generally self-explanatory.

The presence of an error log does not necessarily mean that an agent failed completely. For example, suppose an agent delivers content to multiple email addresses. If some addresses are invalid or the mail server is down, then an error log is generated for the agent.

You can also view error messages and exit codes for job instances in Job Manager. For information, see "Instance Properties in Job Manager" in Oracle Fusion Middleware Scheduling Jobs Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition). Exit status shows the number of deliveries successfully completed.

8.6 Using ODBC/JDBC Procedures to Obtain Oracle BI Server Diagnostics

This section describes how to use ODBC/JDBC procedures to obtain diagnostic information for the Oracle BI Server. It contains the following topics:

8.6.1 About the Oracle BI Server ODBC/JDBC Procedures

You can use ODBC/JDBC procedures to obtain diagnostic information for the Oracle BI Server. These procedures are especially useful on non-Windows platforms where you cannot run the Administration Tool.

Use the nqcmd utility to run the procedures using ODBC. See "Using nqcmd to Test and Refine the Repository" in Oracle Fusion Middleware Metadata Repository Builder's Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition for more information about nqcmd.

You can also run the procedures using JDBC. For more information about using JDBC to connect to the Oracle BI Server, see the README.TXT file contained in the bijdbc.jar file in ORACLE_HOME/bifoundation/jdbc.

8.6.2 Obtaining a List of Available Diagnostic Categories

You can first run OBISAvailableDiagnostics() to get a list and description of the diagnostic categories that are available. For example:

call OBISAvailableDiagnostics()

The results appear similar to the following:

CategoryDescription

General

General overview of the OBIS instance you are connected to.

DBInstance:DBNAME1

All of the statistics related to the DB instance named in DBNAME1

DBInstance:DBNAMEn

All of the statistics related to the DB instance named in DBNAMEn

LDAP:Instance1

All of the statistics related to the LDAP instance named in Instance1

LDAP:Instancen

All of the statistics related to the LDAP instance named in Instancen

DBConnectionPool:Instance1

All of the statistics related to the DB connection pool named in Instance1

DBConnectionPool:Instancen

All of the statistics related to the DB connection pool named in Instancen

ThreadPool:Instance1

All of the statistics related to the Thread pool named in Instance1

ThreadPool:Instancen

All of the statistics related to the Thread pool named in Instancen

Cache:Instance1

All of the statistics related to the Cache named in Instance1

Cache:Instancen

All of the statistics related to the Cache named in Instancen


All categories, except for the General category, are Instance categories. Instance categories are statistics related to a particular instance object (like a specific physical database). If multiple instances of an object are initialized, separate categories will exist for each instance, in the format category_name:instance_name. See the preceding table for examples.

Note the following about the ODBC/JDBC categories:

  • The ThreadPool category only displays statistics from threads created and managed by the DbConnection PoolMgr.

  • The Cache category displays statistics from the Compiler Cache and the LDAP Internal Cache.

8.6.3 Running Specific Diagnostics

After you obtain the available diagnostic categories, you can call OBISDiagnostics(string) to obtain diagnostics for individual categories, where string is a category name. For example:

call OBISDiagnostics('ThreadPool:orcldb_pool')

The results appear similar to the following:

Parameter NameValue

CAPACITY

1000

THREAD COUNT

20

BUSY THREAD COUNT

15

ACCUMULATED REQUESTS

5

MAX STACK SIZE

100


The spelling of the category must be correct, or no rows are returned.

Another example might be:

call OBISDiagnostics('General')

The results appear similar to the following:

Parameter NameValue

TOTAL SESSIONS

10

QUERIES PER SEC

5

NEW LOGINS

10

ACTIVE LOGINS

7

NEW REQUESTS

30

DATA CACHE HIT PER SEC

5

NEW INIT BLOCKS

10


8.6.4 About Parameters for ODBC/JDBC Procedures

The following tables provide parameter reference information for each category type:

Table 8-6 General Category Parameters

Parameter NameDescription

TOTAL SESSIONS

The total number of sessions connecting clients to the Oracle BI Server.

QUERIES PER SEC

The number of queries completed each second by the Oracle BI Server.

NEW LOGINS

The total number of new login requests received by the Oracle BI Server.

ACTIVE LOGINS

The total number of active logins within the Oracle BI Server.

NEW REQUESTS

The number of new execute requests received by the Oracle BI Server.

DATA CACHE HIT PER SEC

The percentage of data cache hits for each second.

NEW INIT BLOCKS

The total number of new initialization block requests received by the Oracle BI Server.


Table 8-7 DBInstance Category Parameters

Parameter NameDescription

QUERIES PER SEC

The number of queries completed each second by the back-end database.

FAILED QUERIES PER SEC

The number of queries that failed each second in the back-end database.

NEW PREPARES

The number of prepares sent to the back-end database.

ROWS PER SEC

The number of rows retrieved each second from the back-end database.

KB PER SEC

The number of kilobytes retrieved each second from the back-end database.


Table 8-8 LDAP Category Parameters

Parameter NameDescription

NEW REQUESTS

The total number of new LDAP authentication requests received.

NEW IMPERSONATED REQUESTS

The total number of new impersonated LDAP authentication requests received.

ACTIVE REQUESTS

The number of LDAP authentication requests active within the Oracle BI Server.


Table 8-9 DBConnectionPool Category Parameters

Parameter NameDescription

CAPACITY

The maximum number of connections that the database connection pool allows.

CONNECTION COUNT

The current number of open connections in the thread pool.

BUSY CONNECTION COUNT

The number of connections that have been assigned to process a query, or that are currently processing a query, in the database connection pool.

AVG REQUESTS PER SEC

The average number of requests each second that have been submitted to the database connection pool.

AVG OPEN REQUESTS PER SEC

The average number of connections that are opened each second. Connections might be opened for new connections, because other connections timed out, or because of problems with a connection.


Table 8-10 ThreadPool Category Parameters

Parameter NameDescription

CAPACITY

The maximum number of threads allowed by the thread pool.

THREAD COUNT

The current number of threads in the thread pool.

BUSY THREAD COUNT

The current number of threads that have been assigned work. The thread might be blocked waiting for a resource or data, or it could be actively running on a CPU.

ACCUMULATED REQUESTS

The total number of requests that have been submitted to the thread pool.

MAX STACK SIZE

The maximum number of stack bytes consumed for all threads in the thread pool.


Table 8-11 Cache Category Parameters

Parameter NameDescription

CAPACITY

The total capacity of the specified cache object.

TOTAL REQUESTS

The total number of requests each second against the specified cache object.

AVG REQUESTS

The average number of requests each second against the specified cache object.

AVG HITS

The average number of hits each second for the specified cache object.

AVG MISS

The average number of misses each second for the specified cache object.


PK/5ҵPK\EOEBPS/configpres.htm% Configuring Presentation Setting Defaults

12 Configuring Presentation Setting Defaults

This chapter describes how to change default presentation settings in Oracle Business Intelligence that administrators commonly change using Fusion Middleware Control.

Advanced configuration settings are described in Section 18.5, "Manually Changing Presentation Settings."

12.1 Using Fusion Middleware Control to Change Presentation Setting Defaults

Before you begin this procedure, ensure that you are familiar with the information in Section 3.2, "Using Fusion Middleware Control to Update Oracle Business Intelligence Configuration Settings."

To use Fusion Middleware Control to change presentation setting defaults:

  1. Go to the Business Intelligence Overview page, as described in Section 2.2.3, "Using Fusion Middleware Control to Manage Oracle Business Intelligence System Components."

  2. Display the Presentation tab of the Deployment page.

  3. Click Lock and Edit Configuration to enable changes to be made.

  4. Complete the elements using the descriptions in the help topic for the page. Click the Help button on the page to access the page-level help for the following options:

    • Show page tabs option

    • Show section headings option

    • Allow dashboard sections to be collapsible option

    • Pivot Tables show auto-preview option

  5. Click Apply, then click Activate Changes.

  6. Return to the Business Intelligence Overview page and click Restart.

See Chapter 18, "Configuring and Managing Analyses and Dashboards" for information about advanced configuring settings for analyses and dashboards.

For information about using methods in the Oracle BI Systems Management API to change configuration settings, see Chapter 22, "Introducing the Oracle BI Systems Management API."

PKj*%PK\EOEBPS/configfileref.htm NQSConfig.INI File Configuration Settings

A NQSConfig.INI File Configuration Settings

This appendix lists the NQSConfig.INI file parameters for Oracle Business Intelligence and gives a brief description and any required syntax for each parameter. The Oracle BI Server software uses an initialization file called NQSConfig.INI to set parameters upon startup. This initialization file includes parameters to customize behavior based on the requirements of each individual installation. The parameters are generally listed in the order in which they appear in the configuration file.


Note:

The examples in this appendix assume that you are editing a Windows version of NQSConfig.INI. If you are editing this file on a UNIX system, then ensure that you use UNIX-appropriate file system paths and conventions.


This appendix includes the following sections:

A.1 About Parameters in the NQSConfig.INI File

Each instance of the Oracle BI Server has its own NQSConfig.INI file. When you update NQSConfig.INI parameters for a clustered deployment, ensure that you make the change in the NQSConfig.INI file for each instance of the Oracle BI Server.

Some parameters in NQSConfig.INI are centrally managed by Fusion Middleware Control and cannot be updated manually in NQSConfig.INI. Instead, use Fusion Middleware Control to change these parameters. Parameters that are centrally managed by Fusion Middleware Control are marked as such in this appendix, and are also identified by comments in the NQSConfig.INI file.

See Appendix C, "Mapping User Interface Labels with Configuration File Elements" for additional information.


Note:

If you attempt to manually update NQSConfig.INI parameters that are centrally managed by Fusion Middleware Control, then the manually updated values are ignored, because the value set in Fusion Middleware Control overrides the value in the file. If you must manually update these settings, then you must disable all configuration through Fusion Middleware Control (not recommended).


Note the following rules and guidelines for NQSConfig.INI file entries:

  • The Oracle BI Server reads the NQSConfig.INI file each time it is started.

  • Each parameter entry in NQSConfig.INI must be within the section to which the parameter belongs (Repository, Cache, General, and so on).

  • Each entry must be terminated with semicolon ( ; ).

  • You can add comments anywhere in the NQSConfig.INI file. Comments must begin with either of the following:

         #

         //

    Any text following these comment characters up to the end of the line is ignored when the Oracle BI Server reads the file.

  • Any syntax errors prevent the Oracle BI Server from starting. The errors are logged to the nqserver.log file, which is located in:

    ORACLE_INSTANCE/diagnostics/logs/OracleBIServerComponent/coreapplication_obisn
    

    There might also be a summary message in the system log that relates to the error.

    If you get an error, then correct the problem and start the Oracle BI Server again. Repeat this process until the server starts with no errors.

A.1.1 How to Update Parameters in NQSConfig.INI

The following procedure explains how to update parameters in NQSConfig.INI.

To update parameters in NQSConfig.INI:

  1. Open the NQSConfig.INI file in a text editor. You can find this file at:

    ORACLE_INSTANCE/config/OracleBIServerComponent/coreapplication_obisn
    

    Make a backup copy of the file before editing.

  2. Locate and update the parameter you want to change.

  3. Save and close the file.

  4. Restart the Oracle BI Server. For more information, see Section 4.1, "About Starting and Stopping Oracle Business Intelligence."

  5. If you have multiple Oracle BI Server instances, then repeat these steps in each NQSConfig.INI file for all Oracle BI Server instances.

A.2 Repository Section Parameters


Note:

The default repository is centrally managed by Fusion Middleware Control and cannot be changed by manually editing NQSConfig.INI, unless all configuration through Fusion Middleware Control has been disabled (not recommended).

The Repository tab of the Deployment page in Fusion Middleware Control controls the default repository. The logical name of the default repository is always "Star." See Section 10.2, "Using Fusion Middleware Control to Upload a Repository and Set the Oracle BI Presentation Catalog Location" for more information.

Note that you can manually add additional repository entries in NQSConfig.INI without having these entries overridden by Fusion Middleware Control. However, hosting multiple repositories on a single Oracle BI Server is not recommended for production systems.


The Repository section contains one entry for every repository that is loaded when the server starts.

Syntax: logical_name = repository_name.rpd;

Optional syntax: logical_name = repository_name.rpd, DEFAULT;

In this syntax:

  • logical_name: A logical name for the repository. Client tools use this name to configure the ODBC data sources that connect to the repository. To use a reserved keyword for the name, such as OCI7 or OCI8, enclose it in single quotation marks.

  • repository_name.rpd: The file name of the repository. The file name must have the .rpd file extension, and the file must reside in the repository subdirectory.

    The demonstration repository SampleAppLite.rpd is installed by default with Oracle Business Intelligence.

When DEFAULT is specified for a repository, connections that do not specify a logical repository name in the DSN connect to the default repository.

Example: Star = SampleAppLite.rpd, DEFAULT;

A.3 Query Result Cache Section Parameters

The parameters in the Query Result Cache Section provide configuration information for Oracle BI Server caching. The query cache is enabled by default. After deciding on a strategy for flushing outdated entries, you should configure the cache storage parameters in Fusion Middleware Control and in the NQSConfig.INI file.

Note that query caching is primarily a runtime performance improvement capability. As the system is used over a period of time, performance tends to improve due to cache hits on previously executed queries. The most effective and pervasive way to optimize query performance is to use the Aggregate Persistence wizard and aggregate navigation.

This section describes only the parameters that control query caching. For information about how to use caching in Oracle Business Intelligence, including information about how to use agents to seed the Oracle BI Server cache, see Chapter 7, "Managing Performance Tuning and Query Caching."

A.3.1 ENABLE


Note:

The ENABLE parameter is centrally managed by Fusion Middleware Control and cannot be changed by manually editing NQSConfig.INI, unless all configuration through Fusion Middleware Control has been disabled (not recommended).

The Cache enabled option on the Performance tab of the Capacity Management page in Fusion Middleware Control corresponds to the ENABLE parameter. See Section 7.5.1, "Using Fusion Middleware Control to Enable and Disable Query Caching" for more information.


Specifies whether the cache system is enabled. When set to NO, caching is disabled. When set to YES, caching is enabled. The query cache is enabled by default.

Example: ENABLE = YES;

A.3.2 DATA_STORAGE_PATHS

Specifies one or more paths for where the cached query results data is stored and are accessed when a cache hit occurs and the maximum capacity in bytes, kilobytes, megabytes, or gigabytes. The maximum capacity for each path is 4 GB. For optimal performance, the paths specified should be on high performance storage systems.

Each path listed must be an existing, writable path name, with double quotation marks ( " ) surrounding the path name. Specify mapped directories only. UNC path names and network mapped drives are allowed only if the service runs under a qualified user account.

You can specify either fully qualified paths, or relative paths. When you specify a path that does not start with "/" (on UNIX) or "<drive>:" (on Windows), the Oracle BI Server assumes that the path is relative to the local writable directory. For example, if you specify the path "cache," then at runtime, the Oracle BI Server uses the following:

ORACLE_INSTANCE/bifoundation/OracleBIServerComponent/coreapplication_obisn/cache

Note:

Multiple Oracle BI Servers across a cluster do not share cached data. Therefore, the DATA_STORAGE_PATHS entry must be unique for each clustered server. To ensure this unique entry, enter a relative path so that the cache is stored in the local writable directory for each Oracle BI Server, or enter different fully qualified paths for each server.


Specify multiple directories with a comma-delimited list. When you specify multiple directories, they should reside on different physical drives. (If you have multiple cache directory paths that all resolve to the same physical disk, then both available and used space might be double-counted.)

Syntax: DATA_STORAGE_PATHS = "path_1" sz[, "path_2" sz{, "path_n" sz}];

Example: DATA_STORAGE_PATHS = "cache" 256 MB;


Note:

Specifying multiple directories for each drive does not improve performance, because file input and output (I/O) occurs through the same I/O controller. In general, specify only one directory for each disk drive. Specifying multiple directories on different drives might improve the overall I/O throughput of the Oracle BI Server internally by distributing I/O across multiple devices.


The disk space requirement for the cached data depends on the number of queries that produce cached entries, and the size of the result sets for those queries. The query result set size is calculated as row size (or the sum of the maximum lengths of all columns in the result set) times the result set cardinality (that is, the number of rows in the result set). The expected maximum should be the guideline for the space needed.

This calculation gives the high-end estimate, not the average size of all records in the cached result set. Therefore, if the size of a result set is dominated by variable length character strings, and if the length of those strings are distributed normally, you would expect the average record size to be about half the maximum record size.


Note:

It is a best practice to use a value that is less than 4 GB. Otherwise, the value might exceed the maximum allowable value for an unsigned 32-bit integer, because values over 4 GB cannot be processed on 32-bit systems. It is also a best practice to use values less than 4 GB on 64-bit systems.

Create multiple paths if you have values in excess of 4 GB.


A.3.3 MAX_ROWS_PER_CACHE_ENTRY

Specifies the maximum number of rows in a query result set to qualify for storage in the query cache. Limiting the number of rows is a useful way to avoid consuming the cache space with runaway queries that return large numbers of rows. If the number of rows a query returns is greater than the value specified in the MAX_ROWS_PER_CACHE_ENTRY parameter, then the query is not cached.

When set to 0, there is no limit to the number of rows per cache entry.

Example: MAX_ROWS_PER_CACHE_ENTRY = 100000;

A.3.4 MAX_CACHE_ENTRY_SIZE


Note:

The MAX_CACHE_ENTRY_SIZE parameter is centrally managed by Fusion Middleware Control and cannot be changed by manually editing NQSConfig.INI, unless all configuration through Fusion Middleware Control has been disabled (not recommended).

The Maximum cache entry size option on the Performance tab of the Capacity Management page in Fusion Middleware Control corresponds to the MAX_CACHE_ENTRY_SIZE parameter. See Section 7.5.2, "Using Fusion Middleware Control to Set Query Cache Parameters" for more information.


Specifies the maximum size for a cache entry. Potential entries that exceed this size are not cached. The default size is 20 MB.

Specify GB for gigabytes, KB for kilobytes, MB for megabytes, and no units for bytes.

Example: MAX_CACHE_ENTRY_SIZE = 20 MB;

A.3.5 MAX_CACHE_ENTRIES


Note:

The MAX_CACHE_ENTRIES parameter is centrally managed by Fusion Middleware Control and cannot be changed by manually editing NQSConfig.INI, unless all configuration through Fusion Middleware Control has been disabled (not recommended).

The Maximum cache entries option on the Performance tab of the Capacity Management page in Fusion Middleware Control corresponds to the MAX_CACHE_ENTRIES parameter. See Section 7.5.2, "Using Fusion Middleware Control to Set Query Cache Parameters" for more information.


Specifies the maximum number of cache entries allowed in the query cache to help manage cache storage. The actual limit of cache entries might vary slightly depending on the number of concurrent queries. The default value is 1000.

Example: MAX_CACHE_ENTRIES = 1000;

A.3.6 POPULATE_AGGREGATE_ROLLUP_HITS

Specifies whether to aggregate data from an earlier cached query result set and create a new entry in the query cache for rollup cache hits. The default value is NO.

Typically, if a query gets a cache hit from a previously executed query, then the new query is not added to the cache. A user might have a cached result set that contains information at a particular level of detail (for example, sales revenue by ZIP code). A second query might ask for this same information, but at a higher level of detail (for example, sales revenue by state). The POPULATE_AGGREGATE_ROLLUP_HITS parameter overrides this default when the cache hit occurs by rolling up an aggregate from a previously executed query (in this example, by aggregating data from the first result set stored in the cache). That is, Oracle Business Intelligence sales revenue for all ZIP codes in a particular state can be added to obtain the sales revenue by state. This is referred to as a rollup cache hit.

Normally, a new cache entry is not created for queries that result in cache hits. You can override this behavior specifically for cache rollup hits by setting POPULATE_AGGREGATE_ROLLUP_HITS to YES. Nonrollup cache hits are not affected by this parameter. If a query result is satisfied by the cache—that is, the query gets a cache hit—then this query is not added to the cache. When this parameter is set to YES, then when a query gets an aggregate rollup hit, then the result is put into the cache. Setting this parameter to YES might result in better performance, but results in more entries being added to the cache.

Example: POPULATE_AGGREGATE_ROLLUP_HITS = NO;

A.3.7 USE_ADVANCED_HIT_DETECTION

When caching is enabled, each query is evaluated to determine whether it qualifies for a cache hit. A cache hit means that the server was able to use cache to answer the query and did not go to the database at all. The Oracle BI Server can use query cache to answer queries at the same or later level of aggregation.

The parameter USE_ADVANCED_HIT_DETECTION enables an expanded search of the cache for hits. The expanded search has a performance impact, which is not easily quantified because of variable customer requirements. Customers that rely heavily on query caching and are experiencing misses might want to test the trade-off between better query matching and overall performance for high user loads. See also the parameter "MAX_SUBEXPR_SEARCH_DEPTH" for related information.

A.3.7.1 Reasons Why a Query Is Not Added to the Cache

Customers who rely on query result caching in the Oracle BI Server to meet their performance KPIs can use caching parameters to help determine why a cache hit did not occur. Logging facilities can help diagnose common reasons for getting a cache miss, where the logical SQL query that was supposed to seed the cache did not get inserted into the cache. The following describes some situations when this might occur.

  • Noncacheable SQL element. If a SQL request contains CURRENT_TIMESTAMP, CURRENT_TIME, RAND, POPULATE, or a parameter marker, then it is not added to the cache.

  • Noncacheable table. Physical tables in the Oracle BI Server repository can be marked "noncacheable." If a query references any noncacheable table, then the query results are not added to the cache.

  • Cache hit. In general, if the query gets a cache hit on a previously cached query, then the results of the current query are not added to the cache.

    The exception is query hits that are aggregate rollup hits. These are added to the cache if the NQSConfig.INI parameter POPULATE_AGGREGATE_ROLLUP_HITS has been set to YES.

  • Result set is too big.

    This situation occurs when you exceed the size set in DATA_STORAGE_PATHS, or if you have rows in excess of the number set in MAX_ROWS_PER_CACHE_ENTRY. See Section A.3.2, "DATA_STORAGE_PATHS" and Section A.3.3, "MAX_ROWS_PER_CACHE_ENTRY" for more information.

  • Query is canceled. This can happen by explicit cancellation from Oracle BI Presentation Services or the Administration Tool, or implicitly through timeout.

  • Oracle BI Server is clustered. Queries that fall into the 'cache seeding' family are propagated throughout the cluster. Other queries continue to be stored locally. Therefore, even though a query might be put into the cache on Oracle BI Server node 1, it might not be on Oracle BI Server node 2.

Level 4 of query logging is the best tool to diagnose whether the Oracle BI Server compiler intended to add the entry into the query result cache. See Section 8.4.1, "Configuring Query Logging" for more information.

A.3.8 MAX_SUBEXPR_SEARCH_DEPTH

Lets you configure how deep the hit detector looks for an inexact match in an expression of a query. The default is 5.

For example, at level 5, a query on the expression SIN(COS(TAN(ABS(ROUND(TRUNC(profit)))))) misses on profit, which is at level 7. Changing the search depth to 7 opens up profit for a potential hit.

A.3.9 DISABLE_SUBREQUEST_CACHING

When set to YES, disables caching at the subrequest (subquery) level. The default value is NO.

Caching subrequests improves performance and the cache hit ratio, especially for queries that combine real-time and historical data. In some cases, however, you might disable subrequest caching, such as when other methods of query optimization provide better performance.

Example: DISABLE_SUBREQUEST_CACHING = NO;

A.3.10 GLOBAL_CACHE_STORAGE_PATH


Note:

The GLOBAL_CACHE_STORAGE_PATH parameter is centrally managed by Fusion Middleware Control and cannot be changed by manually editing NQSConfig.INI, unless all configuration through Fusion Middleware Control has been disabled (not recommended).

The Global cache path and Global cache size options on the Performance tab of the Capacity Management page in Fusion Middleware Control correspond to the GLOBAL_CACHE_STORAGE_PATH parameter. See Section 7.5.4, "Using Fusion Middleware Control to Set Global Cache Parameters" for more information.


In a clustered environment, Oracle BI Servers can be configured to access a shared cache that is referred to as the global cache. The global cache resides on a shared file system storage device and stores seeding and purging events and the result sets that are associated with the seeding events.

This parameter specifies the physical location for storing cache entries shared across clustering. This path must point to a network share. All clustering nodes share the same location.

You can specify the size in KB, MB, or GB, or enter a number with no suffix to specify bytes.

Syntax: GLOBAL_CACHE_STORAGE_PATH = "directory name" SIZE;

Example: GLOBAL_CACHE_STORAGE_PATH = "C:\cache" 250 MB;

A.3.11 MAX_GLOBAL_CACHE_ENTRIES

The maximum number of cache entries stored in the location that is specified by GLOBAL_CACHE_STORAGE_PATH.

Example: MAX_GLOBAL_CACHE_ENTRIES = 1000;

A.3.12 CACHE_POLL_SECONDS

The interval in seconds that each node polls from the shared location that is specified in GLOBAL_CACHE_STORAGE_PATH.

Example: CACHE_POLL_SECONDS = 300;

A.3.13 CLUSTER_AWARE_CACHE_LOGGING

Turns on logging for the cluster caching feature. Used only for troubleshooting. The default is NO.

Example: CLUSTER_AWARE_CACHE_LOGGING = NO;

A.4 General Section Parameters

The General section contains general server default parameters, including localization and internationalization, temporary space and memory allocation, and other default parameters used to determine how data is returned from the Oracle BI Server to a client.


Note:

The settings for the parameters LOCALE, SORT_ORDER_LOCALE, SORT_TYPE and CASE_SENSITIVE_CHARACTER_COMPARISON, described in the following topics, are interrelated. They help determine how the Oracle BI Server sorts data.


A.4.1 LOCALE

Specifies the locale in which data is returned from the server. This parameter also determines the localized names of days and months.

To successfully run Oracle Business Intelligence, ensure that you configure the appropriate locales on the operating system for the language in which you run the applications. (In some cases, you might install additional content on the system to support the locale.) The Oracle BI Server sets the C-runtime locale during the server startup. Some locale- and language-related settings are interrelated and help determine how the Oracle BI Server sorts data. Ensure that the settings for the following parameters work together:

  • LOCALE

  • SORT_ORDER_LOCALE

  • SORT_TYPE

  • CASE_SENSITIVE_CHARACTER_COMPARISON

Valid platform-independent values for LOCALE and SORT_ORDER_LOCALE are:

  • Arabic

  • Chinese

  • Chinese-traditional

  • Croatian

  • Czech

  • Danish

  • Dutch

  • English-USA

  • Finnish

  • French

  • German

  • Greek

  • Hebrew

  • Hungarian

  • Italian

  • Japanese

  • Korean

  • Norwegian

  • Polish

  • Portuguese

  • Portuguese-Brazilian

  • Romanian

  • Russian

  • Slovak

  • Spanish

  • Swedish

  • Thai

  • Turkish

For information about Oracle BI Catalog Manager and language extensions, see Chapter 15, "Localizing Oracle Business Intelligence."

A.4.2 SORT_ORDER_LOCALE

Used to help determine whether the Oracle BI Server can function-ship (push down) an ORDER BY clause to a relational database. ORDER BY clauses are used in sorting.

Every database that is defined in the Physical layer in the Oracle BI Administration Tool has a features table associated with it. If you want to override the default value in the Features table for a particular type of relational database, then you must do so for all occurrences of it in the Physical layer.

In the Oracle BI Administration Tool, the Features table in the Features tab of the Database dialog specifies the features and functions that the relational database supports. The settings for SORT_ORDER_LOCALE in the Features table and in the NQSConfig.INI file should match only if the database and the Oracle BI Server sort data in the same way.

For the relational database and the Oracle BI Server to sort data the same way, they must be in agreement on the parameters that are shown in Table A-1.

Table A-1 Critical SORT_ORDER_LOCALE Parameters

Functional CategorySpecific Parameters

Base language

LOCALE

Base language

SORT_ORDER_LOCALE

The default value for SORT_ORDER_LOCALE in both the Features table and in the NQSConfig.INI file is english-usa.

If the Oracle BI Server and the database sort data differently, then the Features table entry SORT_ORDER_LOCALE for the database must be set to a different value than english-usa. Otherwise, the different data sort methods clash.

Note: The LOCALE and SORT_ORDER_LOCALE parameters accept platform-independent names only. See the list provided in Section A.4.1, "LOCALE" for details.

Case

CASE_SENSITIVE_CHARACTER_COMPARISON

Binary versus linguistic comparison

SORT_TYPE


If the SORT_ORDER_LOCALE setting in the actual data source does not match the SORT_ORDER_LOCALE setting in the Features tab of the Database dialog in the Oracle BI repository, then result sets might not be correct. If the settings do not match, then incorrect answers can result when using multi-database joins, or errors can result when using the Union, Intersect, and Except operators, which all rely on consistent sorting between the back-end data source and the Oracle BI Server.

If the SORT_ORDER_LOCALE setting in NQSConfig.INI does not match the SORT_ORDER_LOCALE setting in the Features tab of the Database dialog in the Oracle BI repository, then query performance might be negatively impacted. However, this situation does not affect the correctness of the result set.

Example: SORT_ORDER_LOCALE = "english-usa";

A.4.2.1 SORT_ORDER_LOCALE on UNIX Operating Systems

The Oracle BI Server sets the C-runtime locale during server startup. A value for the setting is specified using the SORT_ORDER_LOCALE entry in the NQSConfig.INI file. See Chapter 15, "Setting Locale Parameters on the Oracle BI Server" for more information.

A.4.3 SORT_TYPE

Specifies the type of sort to perform. The default value is BINARY. Binary sorts are faster than nonbinary sorts.

Valid values are BINARY and DEFAULT. If you specify DEFAULT, then a nonbinary sort is performed; this yields better sort results for data that contains accented characters.

Example: SORT_TYPE = "BINARY";

A.4.4 CASE_SENSITIVE_CHARACTER_COMPARISON

Specifies whether the Oracle BI Server differentiates between uppercase and lowercase characters when performing comparison operations.

Valid values are ON and OFF. When set to OFF, case is ignored. When set to ON, case is considered for comparisons. This parameter is set to ON by default. For binary sorts, case sensitivity for the server and for the relational database should be set the same way.

For information about how this parameter relates to the case setting in Oracle BI Presentation Services, see Section B.1, "Making Advanced Configuration Changes for Presentation Services."

This setting only applies to the internal comparisons of the Oracle BI Server for caching and aggregation. Case sensitivity is a function of database operations and is set at the database level. The CASE_SENSITIVE_CHARACTER_COMPARISON parameter allows the Oracle BI Server to match the functions of the back-end database. The following operators are affected:

  • Order By

  • Group By

  • Distinct

  • Join

  • comparisons (<, >, =, <=, >=, <>)

For example, consider the following three terms:

  • ACME

  • DELTA

  • acme

An ORDER BY with CASE_SENSITIVE_CHARACTER_COMPARISON set to ON results in rows in the order shown in the preceding example. An ORDER BY with a case-insensitive setting results in ACME and acme appearing next to one another in the list.

If the term is case-sensitive and you perform a duplicate remove (DISTINCT), then the result is three rows. If the term is not case-sensitive, then the DISTINCT result is two rows.

CASE_SENSITIVE_CHARACTER_COMPARISON should be set to correspond with how the back-end database deals with case. For example, if the back-end database is case-insensitive, then the Oracle BI Server should be configured to be case-insensitive. If the Oracle BI Server and the back-end database are not similarly case-sensitive, then some subtle problems can result.

For an example of CASE_SENSITIVE_CHARACTER_COMPARISON applied to aggregation, a case-sensitive database has the following tuples (or rows):

Region  Units
 WEST     1
 west     1
 West     1

With CASE_SENSITIVE_CHARACTER_COMPARISON set to ON, the data is returned to the client the with the same results shown in the preceding table.

With CASE_SENSITIVE_CHARACTER_COMPARISON set to OFF, the data is again returned to the client the with the same results shown in the preceding table. There is no change because the Oracle BI Server has not done any character comparisons.

However, if SUM_SUPPORTED is set to OFF in the features table, the Oracle BI Server is forced to do a character comparison. The results of the query in this case are as follows:

Region  Units
 WEST     3

The reason for these results is that the Oracle BI Server has case-sensitive character comparison turned off, so it now treats the three tuples as the same value and aggregates them. In this case WEST = West = west. However, if you filter on the Region column, you would still see the regions WEST, West, and west; CASE_SENSITIVE_CHARACTER_COMPARISON does not affect filtering on a back-end database. The logic shown in the aggregation example applies to caching as well.

Because CASE_SENSITIVE_CHARACTER_COMPARISON is set in the NQSConfig.INI file, the parameter applies to all back-end databases in a repository. Therefore, it should be set to match the case sensitivity of the dominant back-end database of the repository.

Example: CASE_SENSITIVE_CHARACTER_COMPARISON = ON;

A.4.5 NULL_VALUES_SORT_FIRST

Specifies if NULL values sort before other values (ON) or after (OFF). ON and OFF are the only valid values. The value of NULL_VALUES_SORT_FIRST should conform to the underlying database. If there are multiple underlying databases that sort NULL values differently, then set the value to correspond to the database that is used the most in queries.

Example: NULL_VALUES_SORT_FIRST = OFF;

A.4.6 DATE_TIME_DISPLAY_FORMAT

Specifies the format for how date/time stamps are input to and output from the Oracle BI Server. The default value is yyyy/mm/dd hh:mi:ss.

Example: DATE_TIME_DISPLAY_FORMAT = "yyyy/mm/dd hh:mi:ss";

A.4.7 DATE_DISPLAY_FORMAT

Specifies the format for how dates are input to and output from the Oracle BI Server. The default value is yyyy/mm/dd.


Note:

Specify the year as either 2-digit (yy) or 4-digit (yyyy). Separators can be any character except y, m, or d.


Example: DATE_DISPLAY_FORMAT = "yyyy/mm/dd";

A.4.8 TIME_DISPLAY_FORMAT

Specifies the format for how times are input to and output from the Oracle BI Server. The default value is hh:mi:ss.

Example: TIME_DISPLAY_FORMAT = "hh:mi:ss";

A.4.9 WORK_DIRECTORY_PATHS

Specifies one or more directories for temporary space.

Each directory listed must be an existing, writable path name, with double quotation marks ( " ) surrounding the path name. Specify mapped directories only.

You can specify either fully qualified paths, or relative paths. When you specify a path that does not start with "/" (on UNIX) or "<drive>:" (on Windows), the Oracle BI Server assumes that the path is relative to the local writable directory. For example, if you specify the path "temp," then at runtime, the Oracle BI Server uses the following:

ORACLE_INSTANCE/tmp/OracleBIServerComponent/coreapplication_obisn/temp

Specify multiple directories with a comma-delimited list. Valid values are any relative path, or fully qualified path to an existing, writable directory. UNC path names and network mapped drives are allowed only if the service runs under a qualified user account.

For optimum performance, temporary directories should reside on high-performance storage devices. If you specify multiple directories, then they should reside on different physical drives.

Syntax: WORK_DIRECTORY_PATHS = "path_1" [, "path_2"{, "path_n"}];

Example 1: WORK_DIRECTORY_PATHS = "temp" ;

Example 2: WORK_DIRECTORY_PATHS = "D:\temp", "F:\temp";


Note:

Specifying multiple directories for each drive does not improve performance because file I/O occurs through the same I/O controller. In general, specify only one directory for each disk drive. Specifying multiple directories on different drives improves the overall I/O throughput of the Oracle BI Server because internally, the processing files are allocated using a round-robin algorithm that balances the I/O load across the given disk drives.


A.4.10 VIRTUAL_TABLE_PAGE_SIZE

Several operations, such as sort, join, union, and database fetch, can require memory resources beyond those available to the Oracle BI Server. To manage this condition, the server uses a virtual table management mechanism that provides a buffering scheme for processing these operations. When the amount of data exceeds the VIRTUAL_TABLE_PAGE_SIZE, the remaining data is buffered in a temporary file and placed in the virtual table as processing continues. This mechanism supports dynamic memory sizes and ensures that any row can be obtained dynamically for processing queries.

VIRTUAL_TABLE_PAGE_SIZE specifies the size of a memory page for Oracle BI Server internal processing. A larger value reduces I/O but increases memory usage, especially in a multiuser environment.

When VIRTUAL_TABLE_PAGE_SIZE is increased, I/O operations are reduced. Complex queries might use 20 to 30 virtual tables, while simple queries might not even require virtual tables. The default size of 128 KB is a reasonable size when one considers that the size for virtual paging in Windows NT is 64 KB. This parameter can be tuned depending on the number of concurrent users and the average query complexity. In general, setting the size larger than 256 KB does not yield a corresponding increase in throughput due to the 64 KB size limit of Windows NT system buffers, as each I/O still goes through the system buffers. 128 KB is also a reasonable value on UNIX systems.

Example: VIRTUAL_TABLE_PAGE_SIZE = 128 KB;

A.4.11 USE_LONG_MONTH_NAMES

Specifies whether month names are returned as full names, such as JANUARY and FEBRUARY, or as three-letter abbreviations, such as JAN and FEB. Valid values are YES and NO. Specify YES to have month names returned as full names, or NO to have months names returned as three-letter abbreviations. The default value is NO.

Example: USE_LONG_MONTH_NAMES = NO;

A.4.12 USE_LONG_DAY_NAMES

Specifies whether day names are returned as full names, such as MONDAY and TUESDAY, or as three-letter abbreviations, such as MON and TUE. Valid values are YES and NO. Specify YES to have day names returned as full names, or NO to have day names returned as three-letter abbreviations. The default value is NO.

Example: USE_LONG_DAY_NAMES = NO;

A.4.13 UPPERCASE_USERNAME_FOR_INITBLOCK

You can use the special syntax :USER in initialization blocks to pass through user names. When this parameter is set to YES, then user names passed through initialization blocks using :USER are changed to all uppercase. Otherwise, case is maintained in the user names.

Example: UPPERCASE_USERNAME_FOR_INITBLOCK = NO;

A.5 Security Section Parameters

The security parameters specify default values for the Oracle BI Server security features. For more information about security, see Oracle Fusion Middleware Security Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition.

A.5.1 DEFAULT_PRIVILEGES

Specifies the default Oracle BI repository object privilege granted to the AuthenticatedUser application role, which is the default application role associated with any new repository object. In effect, this setting specifies the default level of object security in the Presentation layer of the repository for new objects that do not have other explicit security settings.

Note that the AuthenticatedUser application role means "any authenticated user." This role is internal to the Oracle BI repository.

Valid values are NONE and READ. The default value is READ. Note that NONE corresponds to the No Access setting in the Permissions dialog in the Administration Tool.

Example: DEFAULT_PRIVILEGES = READ;

A.5.2 PROJECT_INACCESSIBLE_COLUMN_AS_NULL

Controls how security-sensitive columns are displayed to unauthorized users. If this parameter is set to YES, then a NULL expression replaces the original column expression in the query and secured columns are hidden from unauthorized users in analyses.

If this parameter is set to NO, then when a user attempts to run a report that contains a secured column the user is not authorized to see, an unresolved column error occurs.

The default value is YES.

Example: PROJECT_INACCESSIBLE_COLUMN_AS_NULL = YES;

A.5.3 IGNORE_LDAP_PWD_EXPIRY_WARNING

Determines whether users can log in even when the LDAP server issues a password expiration warning. Valid values are YES and NO. Uncomment this parameter and specify YES to allow users to log in when the LDAP server issues a password expiration warning, or specify NO to reject user logins when the warning is issued. The default value is NO.

After user passwords have actually expired in the LDAP server, users cannot log in, regardless of the value of this parameter.

Example: IGNORE_LDAP_PWD_EXPIRY_WARNING = NO;

A.5.4 SSL

This parameter, along with the remaining parameters in this section, relate to Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) communication between Oracle Business Intelligence components.

The default setting for SSL is NO.


Note:

Most of the SSL parameters in this section are centrally managed by Fusion Middleware Control and cannot be changed by manually editing NQSConfig.INI, unless all configuration through Fusion Middleware Control has been disabled (not recommended). The centrally managed SSL parameters include:

  • SSL

  • SSL_CERTIFICATE_FILE

  • SSL_PRIVATE_KEY_FILE

  • SSL_VERIFY_PEER

  • SSL_CA_CERTIFICATE_FILE

See "SSL Configuration in Oracle Business Intelligence" in Oracle Fusion Middleware Security Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition for complete information about how to configure SSL between Oracle Business Intelligence components.


A.5.5 SSL_CERTIFICATE_FILE

Specifies the directory path to the certificate file. For components acting as SSL servers, such as Oracle BI Server and Oracle BI Scheduler, this is the Server Certificate file name. For client components, such as Oracle Business Intelligence ODBC Client Data Source, this is the Client Certificate file name.

This parameter is centrally managed.

Example (Server): SSL_CERTIFICATE_FILE = "servercert.pem";

Example (Client): SSL_CERTIFICATE_FILE = "client-cert.pem";

A.5.6 SSL_PRIVATE_KEY_FILE

Specifies the private key file. For server components, this is the Server Private Key file name. For client components, this is the Client Private Key file name.

This parameter is centrally managed.

Example (Server): SSL_PRIVATE_KEY_FILE = "serverkey.pem";

Example (Client): SSL_PRIVATE_KEY_FILE = "client-key.pem";

A.5.7 SSL_VERIFY_PEER

Specifies whether the server requires client authentication or not. When set to YES, the Oracle Business Intelligence component verifies that the other component in the connection has a valid certificate (that is, mutual authentication). The default value of NO permits a connection to any peer.

This parameter is centrally managed.

Example: SSL_VERIFY_PEER = NO;

A.5.8 SSL_CA_CERTIFICATE_FILE

Specifies the name and path of the trusted CA Certificate used to verify the server or client certificate when Verify Peer is set to YES. Takes effect only when client authentication is required.

This parameter is centrally managed.

Example: SSL_CA_CERTIFICATE_FILE = "CACertFile";

A.5.9 SSL_TRUSTED_PEER_DNS

Specifies individual named clients that are allowed to connect by Distinguished Name (DN). The DN identifies the entity that holds the private key that matches the public key of the certificate.

This parameter is not centrally managed.

Example: SSL_TRUSTED_PEER_DNS = "";

A.5.10 SSL_CERT_VERIFICATION_DEPTH

The depth of the certificate chain. A depth of one means a certificate has to be signed by a trusted CA. A depth of two means the certificate was signed by a CA that was further verified by a CA. The default value is 9.

This parameter is not centrally managed.

Example: SSL_CERT_VERIFICATION_DEPTH = 9;

A.5.11 SSL_CIPHER_LIST

A list of permitted cipher suites that the server uses. The default is empty string, which is equivalent to "ALL."

You must set this parameter only when you want to use a cipher suite other than the default choice.

This parameter is not centrally managed.

Example: SSL_CIPHER_LIST = "EXP-RC2-CBC-MD5";

A.6 Server Section Parameters

The parameters in the Server section define defaults and limits for the Oracle BI Server.

A.6.1 READ_ONLY_MODE


Note:

The READ_ONLY_MODE parameter is centrally managed by Fusion Middleware Control and cannot be changed by manually editing NQSConfig.INI, unless all configuration through Fusion Middleware Control has been disabled (not recommended).

The Disallow RPD Updates option on the Performance tab of the Capacity Management page in Fusion Middleware Control corresponds to the READ_ONLY_MODE parameter. See Section 7.3.1, "Using Fusion Middleware Control to Disallow RPD Updates" for more information.


Permits or forbids changing Oracle BI repository files when the Administration Tool is in either online or offline mode. The default is NO, meaning that repositories can be edited.

When this parameter is set to YES, it prevents the Administration Tool from making any changes to repository files. When the Administration Tool opens the repository, a message informs the user that the repository is read-only. If this parameter is set to NO, then the Administration Tool can make changes to the repository.

Note that even when READ_ONLY_MODE is set to NO, there are still situations when Administration Tool opens repositories in read-only mode. For example, if you open a repository in offline mode, but the Oracle BI Server or another Administration Tool client holds a lock on the repository, then the repository opens in read-only mode. In online mode, a repository might open as read-only if an offline Administration Tool held a lock on the repository at the time the Oracle BI Server started.

In addition, the Administration Tool also opens in read-only mode when Oracle Business Intelligence has been clustered, and the Administration Tool is connected in online mode to a slave node. This occurs because the master node holds a lock on the repository. To avoid this situation when running in a clustered environment, ensure that the Oracle BI Server ODBC DSN that is used by the Administration Tool has been configured to point to the cluster controller rather than to a particular Oracle BI Server.

A.6.2 MAX_SESSION_LIMIT

Specifies the maximum number of concurrent connections that are allowed by the server. When this number is exceeded, the server refuses the connection request.

The limit is 65,535 connections.

Example: MAX_SESSION_LIMIT = 2000;

A.6.2.1 About the MAX_SESSION_LIMIT and SERVER_THREAD_RANGE Parameters

The size of the connection pool determines the number of available Oracle BI Server connections and the number of available threads for processing physical queries. A logical query might generate multiple physical queries, each of which could go to different connections.

The Oracle BI Server creates server threads up to the specified maximum using the parameter SERVER_THREAD_RANGE. All the threads that are available at any time are used to process queries from one or more sessions as needed.

Typically, the number of sessions that is specified by MAX_SESSION_LIMIT is larger than the number of available threads that is specified by SERVER_THREAD_RANGE.

In summary:

  • MAX_SESSION_LIMIT specifies the number of sessions that can be connected to the Oracle BI Server, even if inactive. The sessions and the corresponding queries are queued to the threads for processing as they become available.

  • The size of the connection pool specifies the number of threads and connections that process physical queries.

  • SERVER_THREAD_RANGE specifies the number of threads that process the logical queries, or in other words, the number of queries that can be active in the Oracle BI Server at any time.

A.6.3 MAX_REQUEST_PER_SESSION_LIMIT

Specifies the maximum number of logical requests per session. This is how many open requests there are, per session, at the same time.

The limit is 65,535 logical requests per session.


Note:

Usually, individual users have only one open request for each session at the same time. Application programs and Oracle BI Presentation Services, however, typically have multiple requests open at the same time. In general, the default value of 500 should be sufficient for most environments, but this parameter should be tuned based on the application environment and the client tools in use.


Example: MAX_REQUEST_PER_SESSION_LIMIT = 500;

A.6.4 SERVER_THREAD_RANGE

For each Oracle BI Server request, SERVER_THREAD_RANGE specifies configuration information for thread allocation. The lower number in the range specifies the number of threads that is initially allocated, and the larger number in the range specifies the maximum number of threads to be allocated. The thread pool grows and shrinks in 5-thread increments until the upper or lower bound is reached. If there are fewer threads than sessions, then sessions share the available number of threads on a first come-first served basis.

Although setting both values to the same number maximizes the benefits of thread pooling, there is a cost associated with doing so. If you set the lower boundary and the upper boundary to the same number, then that number of threads is always allocated, which consumes stack space.

Example: SERVER_THREAD_RANGE = 10-200;

See Section A.6.2.1, "About the MAX_SESSION_LIMIT and SERVER_THREAD_RANGE Parameters" for related information.

A.6.5 SERVER_THREAD_STACK_SIZE

Specifies the memory stack size that is allocated for each server thread. A value of 0 sets the stack size as 256 KB for each server thread for 32-bit platforms, or 1 MB for 64-bit systems.

The default value is 0. If you change this value, then ensure that the value that you provide is appropriate for the memory resources that are available on the system.

Example: SERVER_THREAD_STACK_SIZE = 0;

A.6.6 DB_GATEWAY_THREAD_RANGE

Specifies the minimum and maximum number of threads in the Oracle Business Intelligence Database Gateway thread pool, according to SERVER_THREAD_RANGE.

The default value is 40-200.

Example: DB_GATEWAY_THREAD_RANGE = 40-200;

A.6.7 DB_GATEWAY_THREAD_STACK_SIZE

Specifies the memory stack size that is allocated for each Oracle Business Intelligence Database Gateway thread. A value of 0 sets the stack size as 256 KB per server thread for 32-bit platforms, or 1 MB for 64-bit systems.

The default value is 0. If you change this value, then ensure that the value that you provide is appropriate for the memory resources that are available on the system.

Example: DB_GATEWAY_THREAD_STACK_SIZE = 0;

A.6.8 HTTP_CLIENT_THREAD_RANGE

Specifies the minimum and maximum number of threads in the thread pool that the Oracle BI Server uses for reading and writing data using the HTTP client wrapper.

The default value is 0-100.

Example: HTTP_CLIENT_THREAD_RANGE = 0-100;

A.6.9 HTTP_CLIENT_THREAD_STACK_SIZE

Specifies the memory stack size that is allocated for each thread that is specified in HTTP_CLIENT_THREAD_RANGE. A value of 0 sets the stack size as 256 KB per thread for 32-bit platforms, or 1 MB for 64-bit systems.

The default value is 0. If you change this value, then ensure that the value that you provide is appropriate for the memory resources that are available on the system.

Example: HTTP_CLIENT_THREAD_STACK_SIZE = 0;

A.6.10 MAX_EXPANDED_SUBQUERY_PREDICATES

Controls the maximum number of values that can be populated by a subquery when it is expanded. The default is 8,192 values. The Oracle BI Server generates an error if this limit is exceeded.

The Oracle BI Server syntax supports various kinds of subqueries, including IN and COMPARISON subqueries. In some cases, the Oracle BI Server must execute the subquery and convert it into values (for example, when the database features IN_SUPPORTED/IN_SUBQUERY_SUPPRTED and COMPARISON_SUBQUERY are turned off in the database features table). When the Oracle BI Server converts subqueries into value lists, MAX_EXPANDED_SUBQUERY_PREDICATES is used to monitor the maximum number of values from the result set of the subquery.

Note that there is also a database feature setting called MAX_ENTRIES_PER_IN_LIST. This value is set according to how many literals can be supported by the given data source. If this limit is exceeded, then the Oracle BI Server breaks the IN list into smaller ones and ORs them together. However, if the original IN list is too long, it might exceed the SQL statement length limit for that data source, resulting in a database error or failure. The MAX_EXPANDED_SUBQUERY_PREDICATES parameter provides a second limit to ensure that this situation does not occur.

Example: MAX_EXPANDED_SUBQUERY_PREDICATES = 8192;

A.6.11 MAX_QUERY_PLAN_CACHE_ENTRIES

Controls the number of cached logical query plans. The query plan cache is an internal performance feature that increases the speed of the query compilation process by caching plans for the most recently used queries.

The default value of this parameter is 1024. Do not raise this value without consulting Oracle Support Services.

Example: MAX_QUERY_PLAN_CACHE_ENTRIES = 1024;

A.6.12 MAX_QUERY_PLAN_CACHE_ENTRY_SIZE

Specifies the heap memory usage limit that is allocated for the single logical plan cache entry. The total plan cache memory usage per Oracle BI Server can be calculated by multiplying MAX_QUERY_PLAN_CACHE_ENTRY_SIZE times MAX_QUERY_PLAN_CACHE_ENTRY_SIZE.

The default value of 0 indicates the default limit of 256KB on 32-bit platforms, or 1MB on 64-bit platforms. If you change this value, then ensure that the value that you provide is appropriate for the memory resources that are available on the system.

Example: MAX_QUERY_PLAN_CACHE_ENTRY_SIZE = 0;

A.6.13 MAX_DRILLDOWN_INFO_CACHE_ENTRIES

Controls the number of cached Action Link drilldown information entries per repository. This increases the speed of computing Action Link information by caching the Action Link information for the most recently used queries.

The default value of this parameter is 1024. Do not raise this value without consulting Oracle Support Services.

Example: MAX_DRILLDOWN_INFO_CACHE_ENTRIES = 1024;

A.6.14 MAX_DRILLDOWN_QUERY_CACHE_ENTRIES

Controls the number of cached Action Link query entries per repository. This increases the speed of drilling down by caching the Action Link drilldown results for the most recently used queries.

The default value of this parameter is 1024. Do not raise this value without consulting Oracle Support Services.

Example: MAX_DRILLDOWN_QUERY_CACHE_ENTRIES = 1024;

A.6.15 INIT_BLOCK_CACHE_ENTRIES

Controls the number of initialization block result sets that are cached with row-wise initialization. The cache key is the fully instantiated initialization block SQL.

The default value is 20. Because this parameter affects internal operations for localized versions of Oracle Business Intelligence, it is recommended that you do not change this value unless instructed to do so.

Example: INIT_BLOCK_CACHE_ENTRIES = 20;

A.6.16 CLIENT_MGMT_THREADS_MAX

Specifies the number of management threads to allocate for managing Oracle BI Server client/server communications. Each client process consumes a management thread. The client/server communication method for Oracle BI Server is TCP/IP.

Because the default value of 5 is typically sufficient for server communications with clients, do not change the value of this parameter.

Example: CLIENT_MGMT_THREADS_MAX = 5;

A.6.17 RPC_SERVICE_OR_PORT


Note:

The RPC_SERVICE_OR_PORT parameter is centrally managed by Fusion Middleware Control and cannot be changed by manually editing NQSConfig.INI, unless all configuration through Fusion Middleware Control has been disabled (not recommended).

The Port Range From and Port Range To options on the Scalability tab of the Capacity Management page in Fusion Middleware Control override the RPC_SERVICE_OR_PORT parameter. See Section 5.5, "Using Fusion Middleware Control to Scale System Components" for more information.


Specifies the IP address and port number on which the Oracle BI Server listens. You can specify an IP address and port number in the form ip_address:port, or you can specify a port number only.

When you specify an IP address and port number, the Oracle BI Server binds to the specified IP address.

When you specify a port number only, the IP address is set by default to 0.0.0.0, which causes the Oracle BI Server to listen on all IP addresses on that computer.

When you specify an IP address only, the port value defaults to 9703.

When using the Oracle Business Intelligence ODBC wizard to configure ODBC data sources for the Oracle BI Server, the port number specified in the Port field on the Enter Logon Information screen should match the port number specified here. If you change the port number in the configuration file, then ensure that you reconfigure any affected ODBC data sources to use the new port number.

Example1: RPC_SERVICE_OR_PORT = 9703;

Example2: RPC_SERVICE_OR_PORT = 127.0.0.1:9703;

A.6.18 LISTEN_ADDRESS

This parameter is reserved for a future release.

A.6.19 LISTEN_PORT

This parameter is reserved for a future release.

A.6.20 ENABLE_DB_HINTS

Enables optional hints to be passed along with a SQL statement to an Oracle Database. Database hints are discussed in Oracle Fusion Middleware Metadata Repository Builder's Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition.

The default value is YES.

Example: ENABLE_DB_HINTS = YES;

A.6.21 PREVENT_DIVIDE_BY_ZERO

Controls the behavior for when a division by zero occurs. When set to YES, then a NULL value is returned. When set to NO, then the query is terminated and an appropriate error is returned to the user.

Example: PREVENT_DIVIDE_BY_ZERO = YES;

A.6.22 CLUSTER_PARTICIPANT


Note:

The CLUSTER_PARTICIPANT parameter is centrally managed by Fusion Middleware Control and cannot be changed by manually editing NQSConfig.INI, unless all configuration through Fusion Middleware Control has been disabled (not recommended).

For each Oracle BI Server instance listed on the Scalability tab of the Capacity Management page in Fusion Middleware Control, CLUSTER_PARTICIPANT is set to YES for that server. See Section 5.5, "Using Fusion Middleware Control to Scale System Components" for more information.

All Oracle Business Intelligence deployments are designed to run the Cluster Controller, even if they are single-node deployments. Because of this, CLUSTER_PARTICIPANT should always be set to YES.


Specifies whether the Oracle BI Server that is using this configuration file is a member of an Oracle BI Server cluster.

Valid values are YES and NO. The default value is YES.

In a clustered environment, you typically designate a repository publishing directory to propagate changes made to the repository in online mode. See "REPOSITORY_PUBLISHING_DIRECTORY" and "REQUIRE_PUBLISHING_DIRECTORY" for more information about the repository publishing directory.

When CLUSTER_PARTICIPANT is set to YES, this server must have a valid, configured ClusterConfig.xml file in the following location:

ORACLE_INSTANCE/config/OracleBIApplication/coreapplication

For more information, see the information about the ClusterConfig.xml file in Chapter 6, "Deploying Oracle Business Intelligence for High Availability."

Example: CLUSTER_PARTICIPANT = YES;

A.6.23 REPOSITORY_PUBLISHING_DIRECTORY


Note:

The REPOSITORY_PUBLISHING_DIRECTORY parameter is centrally managed by Fusion Middleware Control and cannot be changed by manually editing NQSConfig.INI, unless all configuration through Fusion Middleware Control has been disabled (not recommended).

The RPD Publishing Directory option on the Repository tab of the Deployment page in Fusion Middleware Control corresponds to the REPOSITORY_PUBLISHING_DIRECTORY parameter. Note that this parameter only appears in NQSConfig.INI if the RPD Publishing Directory option has been set in Fusion Middleware Control. See Section 10.2, "Using Fusion Middleware Control to Upload a Repository and Set the Oracle BI Presentation Catalog Location" for more information.


When the parameter CLUSTER_PARTICIPANT is set to YES, REPOSITORY_PUBLISHING_DIRECTORY specifies the location of the repository publishing directory shared by all Oracle BI Servers participating in the cluster. There is no default value for this parameter.

When a repository is updated in online mode, it is published to this location. All clustered servers examine this location upon startup for any repository changes. This must be a valid location visible to all servers in the cluster, even if you anticipate that no repositories are updated in online mode.

The directory should reside on a shared file system. The directory must be a valid fully qualified directory path name, with double quotation marks ( " ) surrounding the path name. UNC path names and network mapped drives are allowed only if the service runs under a qualified user account. Do not specify a relative path name, or the Repository subdirectory (located in the Oracle Business Intelligence software installation directory) as the location of the repository publishing directory.

The Oracle BI Server designated as the master server for online repository changes (the one for which the MasterServer parameter is set to true in the ClusterConfig.xml file) must have read and write access to this directory. The Oracle BI Servers in the cluster (the other servers defined in the ClusterConfig.xml file) must also have read and write access to this directory. All entries must reference the same actual directory, although different names can be specified to accommodate differences in drive mappings.

Examples:

REPOSITORY_PUBLISHING_DIRECTORY = "z:\OracleBI\Publish";

REPOSITORY_PUBLISHING_DIRECTORY = "\\ClusterSrv\Publish";

A.6.24 REQUIRE_PUBLISHING_DIRECTORY


Note:

The REQUIRE_PUBLISHING_DIRECTORY parameter is centrally managed by Fusion Middleware Control and cannot be changed by manually editing NQSConfig.INI, unless all configuration through Fusion Middleware Control has been disabled (not recommended).

The Share Repository option on the Repository tab of the Deployment page in Fusion Middleware Control corresponds to the REQUIRE_PUBLISHING_DIRECTORY parameter. See Section 10.2, "Using Fusion Middleware Control to Upload a Repository and Set the Oracle BI Presentation Catalog Location" for more information.


When the parameter CLUSTER_PARTICIPANT is set to YES, REQUIRE_PUBLISHING_DIRECTORY specifies that the repository publishing directory (from the parameter REPOSITORY_PUBLISHING_DIRECTORY) must be available for this Oracle BI Server to start and join the cluster.

This parameter is commented out by default.

When set to YES, if the publishing directory is not available at startup or if an error is encountered while the server is reading any of the files in the directory, an error message is logged in the nqserver.log file and the server shuts down.

To allow the Oracle BI Server to start and join the cluster even if the publishing directory is not available, set this value to NO. When set to NO, the server joins the cluster and a warning message is logged in the nqserver.log file. Any online repository updates are not reflected in the server's Repository directory (located in the Oracle Business Intelligence software installation directory). This could result in request failures, wrong answers, and other problems. However, this could be useful in situations where online repository editing is done infrequently and the goal is to keep the cluster operational even if some servers have stale repositories.

Example: REQUIRE_PUBLISHING_DIRECTORY = YES;

A.6.25 DISCONNECTED

This parameter has been deprecated and is no longer used.

A.6.26 AUTOMATIC_RESTART

Specifies whether the Oracle BI Server should be automatically restarted after a failure. Automatic restart applies only to an Oracle BI Server platform; it does not apply to a clustered Oracle BI Server environment. The default value is YES.

Example: AUTOMATIC_RESTART = YES;

A.6.27 VARIABLE_VALUE_LIMIT

Specifies the maximum length of returned session variable values when client tools call the NQSGetSessionValues() function.

Example: VARIABLE_VALUE LIMIT= 10;

For example, suppose VARIABLE_VALUE_LIMIT is set to 10 and the NQSGetSessionValues() function is called on a variable whose value is "1234567890ABCDE." The value is truncated to "1234567890".

A.6.28 EVALUATE_SUPPORT_LEVEL

Specifies whether the database functions EVALUATE, EVALUATE_ANALYTIC, EVALUATE_AGGR, and EVALUATE_PREDICATE can be issued by users. See "Database Functions" in Oracle Fusion Middleware Metadata Repository Builder's Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition for more information about the EVALUATE* functions.

By default, this parameter is set to 0, which means that all support for the EVALUATE family of functions is disabled. Set this parameter to 1 to enable users with the oracle.bi.server.manageRepositories permission to issue EVALUATE functions. Set this parameter to 2 to enable all users to issue EVALUATE functions.

Example: EVALUATE_SUPPORT_LEVEL = 1;

A.6.29 FMW_SECURITY_SERVICE_URL


Note:

The FMW_SECURITY_SERVICE_URL parameter is centrally managed by Fusion Middleware Control and cannot be changed by manually editing NQSConfig.INI, unless all configuration through Fusion Middleware Control has been disabled (not recommended).


Specifies the location where Oracle WebLogic Server is running so that the Oracle BI Server can locate the Oracle Fusion Middleware security service.

Example: FMW_SECURITY_SERVICE_URL = "http://localhost:9704";

A.6.30 FMW_SECURITY_SERVICE_MAX_NUMBER_OF_CONNECTIONS

Limits the number of connections from the Oracle BI Server to the Oracle Fusion Middleware security service to avoid overloading the Oracle WebLogic Server with too many connections. Do not change.

Example: FMW_SECURITY_SERVICE_MAX_NUMBER_OF_CONNECTIONS = 2000;

A.6.31 FMW_SECURITY_SERVICE_MAX_NUMBER_OF_RETRIES

Specifies the maximum number of times to attempt to connect to the Oracle Fusion Middleware security service.

Example: FMW_SECURITY_SERVICE_MAX_NUMBER_OF_RETRIES = 0;

A.6.32 FMW_UPDATE_ROLE_AND_USER_REF_GUIDS

Users are identified by their global unique identifiers (GUIDs), not by their names. Because of this identification, if you migrate from test to production or change from one identity store to another, then user-based data access security that you configure in the Oracle BI repository might no longer work.

To avoid this situation, you can temporarily set this parameter to YES to refresh the GUIDs for users in the repository with the GUIDs for users in the identity store. The default value for this parameter is NO.

You do not normally refresh GUIDs in the identity store between test and production environments, because the GUIDs should be identical in both environments. You should refresh GUIDs only if they differ between test and production environments.

Ensure that you set this parameter back to NO after refreshing the GUIDs to avoid compromising the security of the system.

See "Managing Security Using the Default Security Configuration" in Oracle Fusion Middleware Security Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition for complete information about the process of refreshing GUIDs. Note that a similar parameter is also needed to refresh GUIDs for Presentation Services.

Example: FMW_UPDATE_ROLE_AND_USER_REF_GUIDS = NO;

A.6.33 MONITOR_PORT


Note:

The MONITOR_PORT parameter is centrally managed by Fusion Middleware Control and cannot be changed by manually editing NQSConfig.INI, unless all configuration through Fusion Middleware Control has been disabled (not recommended).


Specifies the port that the BI Server listens on when the Cluster Controller must connect to it.

Example: MONITOR_PORT = 9701;

A.6.34 ORACLEHARDWAREACCELERATION


Note:

The ORACLEHARDWAREACCELERATION parameter is centrally managed by Fusion Middleware Control and cannot be changed by manually editing NQSConfig.INI, unless all configuration through Fusion Middleware Control has been disabled (not recommended).


This setting is for internal use only. Do not modify it.

Example: ORACLEHARDWAREACCELERATION = NO;

A.7 High Availability Parameters

The parameters in the High Availability section define defaults and limits use in a highly available configuration.

A.7.1 HA_DB_PING_PERIOD_MILLISECS

Specifies the number of milliseconds between two consecutive polls of every TimesTen database performed by the BI Server to ensure high availability. Through this polling, the BI Server determines which TimesTen schemas are inactive, so that the BI Server can select which TimesTen aggregate tables to use for a query.

Example: HA_DB_PING_PERIOD_MILLISECS = 60000;

A.8 Dynamic Library Section Parameters

This section contains one entry for each dynamic link library (DLL) or set of shared objects that is used to make connections to the Oracle BI Server, for both Windows and UNIX systems.

Syntax: logical_name = dynamic_library;

In this syntax:

  • logical_name: A logical name for the dynamic link library. These logical names also appear in the Connection Pool dialog.

  • dynamic_library: The name of the associated dynamic library. These libraries are located in:

    ORACLE_HOME/bifoundation/server/bin


Caution:

Do not make any changes to this section unless instructed to do so by Oracle Support Services.


The following are the dynamic link libraries that are shipped with this release:

  • ODBC200 = nqsdbgatewayodbc;

  • ODBC350 = nqsdbgatewayodbc35;

  • OCI8 = nqsdbgatewayoci8;

  • OCI8i = nqsdbgatewayoci8i;

  • OCI10g  = nqsdbgatewayoci10g;

  • DB2CLI = nqsdbgatewaydb2cli;

  • DB2CLI35 = nqsdbgatewaydb2cli35;

  • NQSXML = nqsdbgatewayxml;

  • XMLA = nqsdbgatewayxmla;

  • BAPI = nqsdbgatewaysapbapi;

  • ESSBASE = nqsdbgatewayessbasecapi;

  • OracleADF = nqsdbgatewayoracleadf;

  • OracleADF_HTTP = nqsdbgatewayoracleadf;

  • HyperionADM = nqsdbgatewayadm;

  • OracleWS = nqsdbgatewayoraclews;

  • hadoop = nqsdbgatewayhadoop;

  • timesten = nqsdbgatewaytimesten;

  • timesten35 = nqsdbgatewaytimesten35;

A.9 Usage Tracking Section Parameters

The usage tracking parameters define default values for the collection of usage tracking statistics on each logical query submitted to the Oracle BI Server.

Table A-2 shows the names and descriptions of columns that are added to the usage tracking table and to the standalone usage tracking repository.

Table A-2 Names and Descriptions of Columns Added to Usage Tracking Table

NameData TypeDescriptionNotes

SAW_DASHBOARD_PG

Varchar(150)

Page within Oracle BI Presentation Services dashboard

Null if not a dashboard request.

PRESENTATION_NAME

Varchar(128)

Name of the Presentation Catalog in Oracle BI Presentation Services

NA

ERROR_TEXT

Varchar(250)

Error flag and reason text for queries that do not generate a cache entry, from back-end databases

Only applicable if SUCCESS_FLG is nonzero. Concatenates multiple messages; the application must parse the column contents.

RUNAS_USER_NAME

Varchar(128)

Impersonated User (the Proxy User that executed the query)

Null if the request is not run as an impersonated user.


For more information about usage tracking, see Chapter 9, "Managing Usage Tracking."

A.9.1 ENABLE


Note:

For new (non-upgraded) installations, the ENABLE parameter in the [USAGE_TRACKING] section is centrally managed by Fusion Middleware Control and cannot be changed by manually editing NQSConfig.INI, unless the UsageTrackingCentrallyManaged attribute of the BIDomain.BIInstance.ServerConfiguration MBean has been set to false.

The UsageTrackingEnabled attribute of the BIDomain.BIInstance.ServerConfiguration MBean corresponds to the ENABLED parameter. See "Managing Usage Tracking" for more information.


Enables or disables the collection of usage tracking statistics.

Valid values are YES and NO. The default value is NO. When set to NO, statistics are not accumulated. When set to YES, statistics are accumulated for each logical query.

Example: ENABLE = NO ;

A.9.2 DIRECT_INSERT


Note:

For new (non-upgraded) installations, the DIRECT_INSERT parameter is centrally managed by Fusion Middleware Control and cannot be changed by manually editing NQSConfig.INI, unless the UsageTrackingCentrallyManaged attribute of the BIDomain.BIInstance.ServerConfiguration MBean has been set to false.

The UsageTrackingDirectInsert attribute of the BIDomain.BIInstance.ServerConfiguration MBean corresponds to the DIRECT_INSERT parameter. See "Managing Usage Tracking" for more information.


Specifies whether statistics are inserted directly into a database table or written to a local file.

  • When DIRECT_INSERT is set to NO, data is written to a flat file.

  • When DIRECT_INSERT is set to YES, data is inserted into a table.


    Note:

    This parameter is operative only if the usage tracking parameter ENABLE is set to YES.


Because direct insertion into a database table is recommended, the default value is YES.

Certain other parameters become valid, depending whether DIRECT_INSERT is set to YES or to NO. These parameters are summarized in Table A-3 and described in the following sections.

Table A-3 Valid Parameters for DIRECT_INSERT Settings

DIRECT_INSERT SettingParameters UsedParameter Setting

NO

STORAGE_DIRECTORY

"full_directory_path"

NO

CHECKPOINT_INTERVAL_MINUTES

5

NO

FILE_ROLLOVER_INTERVAL_MINUTES

30

NO

CODE_PAGE

"ANSI"

YES

PHYSICAL_TABLE_NAME

"Database"."Catalog"."Schema"."Table" or "Database"."Schema"."Table"

YES

CONNECTION_POOL

"Database"."Connection_Pool"

YES

BUFFER_SIZE

10 MB

YES

BUFFER_TIME_LIMIT_SECONDS

5

YES

NUM_INSERT_THREADS

5

YES

MAX_INSERTS_PER_TRANSACTION

1


A.9.3 STORAGE_DIRECTORY

Specifies the full path to the directory that is used to store usage tracking log files. The directory listed must be a valid fully qualified, writable directory path name, with double quotation marks ( " ) surrounding the path name. Specify mapped directories only.

Valid values are any fully qualified path name to an existing, writable directory.

The parameter STORAGE_DIRECTORY is valid only if the parameter DIRECT_INSERT is set to NO. When usage tracking is enabled, but no storage directory is specified, the files are written to the following location:

ORACLE_INSTANCE\diagnostics\logs\OracleBIServerComponent\coreapplication_obisn

Example: STORAGE_DIRECTORY = "C:\Temp\UsageTracking";

A.9.4 CHECKPOINT_INTERVAL_MINUTES

Specifies how often the usage tracking data is flushed to disk. Setting this interval ti a larger number increases the amount of data that might be lost if the server shuts down abnormally. Setting this interval lower incurs additional overhead.

The default is 5 minutes.


Note:

When the interval is set to 0, the Oracle BI Server attempts to write usage tracking data to disk with minimal time between attempts. This can negatively affect server performance and is strongly discouraged.


Example: CHECKPOINT_INTERVAL_MINUTES = 5;

A.9.5 FILE_ROLLOVER_INTERVAL_MINUTES

Specifies the time, in minutes, before the current usage tracking log file is closed and a new file is created. For example, if this entry is set to 60 minutes, then 24 usage tracking log files are created each day.

The default is 30 minutes.

When the checkpoint interval equals or exceeds the rollover interval, only the rollover occurs explicitly; the checkpoint occurs implicitly only when the old usage tracking log file is closed.


Note:

When the checkpoint interval is set to 0, the Oracle BI Server attempts to close current usage tracking log files and open new log files with minimal time between attempts. This can negatively affect server performance and result in a large number of usage tracking log files in the storage directory. Setting this interval to 0 is strongly discouraged.


Example: FILE_ROLLOVER_INTERVAL_MINUTES = 240;

A.9.6 CODE_PAGE

For multilingual repositories, this specifies the type of output code page to use when writing statistics to disk. Valid values include any valid code page number (such as 1252), and other globally recognized output code page types.

The default value is ANSI. The type depends upon the database loader being used. For example, to support multilingual repositories for database loaders that are used by Oracle Database and DB2, specify UTF8. Enclose the value in double quotation marks. USC-2 is currently not supported.

Example: CODE_PAGE = "ANSI";

A.9.7 PHYSICAL_TABLE_NAME


Note:

For new (non-upgraded) installations, the PHYSICAL_TABLE_NAME parameter is centrally managed by Fusion Middleware Control and cannot be changed by manually editing NQSConfig.INI, unless the UsageTrackingCentrallyManaged attribute of the BIDomain.BIInstance.ServerConfiguration MBean has been set to false.

The UsageTrackingPhysicalTableName attribute of the BIDomain.BIInstance.ServerConfiguration MBean corresponds to the PHYSICAL_TABLE_NAME parameter. See "Managing Usage Tracking" for more information.


Specifies the table in which to insert records that correspond to the query statistics. The table name is the fully qualified name as it appears in the Physical layer of the Administration Tool.

The general structure of this parameter depends on the type of database being used:

  • For SQL Server, use the following general structure:

    PHYSICAL_TABLE_NAME = "Database"."Catalog"."Schema"."Table";

    Example:

    PHYSICAL_TABLE_NAME = "OracleBI Usage"."Catalog"."dbo"."S_NQ_ACCT";

    In the preceding example, the structure is as follows:

    • "Oracle BI Usage" represents the database component

    • "Catalog" represents the catalog component

    • "dbo" represents the schema component

    • "S_NQ_ACCT" represents the table name

  • For Oracle Database, use the following general structure:

    PHYSICAL_TABLE_NAME = "Database"."Schema"."Table";

    Examples:

    PHYSICAL_TABLE_NAME = "OracleBI Usage"."DEV_BIPLATFORM"."S_NQ_ACCT";

    In the preceding example, the structure is as follows:

    • "Oracle BI Usage" represents the database component

    • "DEV_BIPLATFORM" represents the schema component

    • "S_NQ_ACCT" represents the table name

A.9.8 CONNECTION_POOL


Note:

For new (non-upgraded) installations, the CONNECTION_POOL parameter is centrally managed by Fusion Middleware Control and cannot be changed by manually editing NQSConfig.INI, unless the UsageTrackingCentrallyManaged attribute of the BIDomain.BIInstance.ServerConfiguration MBean has been set to false.

The UsageTrackingConnectionPool attribute of the BIDomain.BIInstance.ServerConfiguration MBean corresponds to the CONNECTION_POOL parameter. See "Managing Usage Tracking" for more information.


Specifies the connection pool to use for inserting records into the usage tracking table. This is the fully qualified name as it appears in the Physical layer of the Administration Tool.

Example: CONNECTION_POOL = "OracleBI Usage"."Connection Pool";

A.9.9 BUFFER_SIZE

Specifies the amount of memory that is used to temporarily store insert statements. The buffer allows the insert statements to be issued to the usage tracking table independently of the query that produced the statistics to be inserted. When the buffer fills up, then the statistics of subsequent queries are discarded until the insert threads service the buffer entries.

You can specify the size in KB or MB, or enter a number with no suffix to specify bytes.

Example: BUFFER_SIZE = 10 MB;

A.9.10 BUFFER_TIME_LIMIT_SECONDS

Specifies the maximum amount of time that an insert statement remains in the buffer before it is issued to the usage tracking table. This time limit ensures that the Oracle BI Server issues the insert statements quickly even during periods of extended quiescence.

Example: BUFFER_TIME_LIMIT_SECONDS = 5;

A.9.11 NUM_INSERT_THREADS

Specifies the number of threads that remove insert statements from the buffer and issue them to the usage tracking table. The number of threads should not exceed the total number of threads that are assigned to the connection pool.

Example: NUM_INSERT_THREADS = 5;

A.9.12 MAX_INSERTS_PER_TRANSACTION

Specifies the number of records to group as a single transaction when inserting into the usage tracking table. Increasing the number might slightly increase performance, but also inc9reases the possibility of inserts being rejected due to deadlocks in the database.

Example: MAX_INSERTS_PER_TRANSACTION = 1;

A.9.13 SUMMARY_STATISTICS_LOGGING


Note:

For new (non-upgraded) installations, the SUMMARY_STATISTICS_LOGGING parameter is centrally managed by Fusion Middleware Control and cannot be changed by manually editing NQSConfig.INI, unless the UsageTrackingCentrallyManaged attribute of the BIDomain.BIInstance.ServerConfiguration MBean has been set to false.

The SummaryStatisticsLogging attribute of the BIDomain.BIInstance.ServerConfiguration MBean corresponds to the SUMMARY_STATISTICS_LOGGING parameter. See "Turning On Summary Advisor Logging" in Oracle Fusion Middleware Metadata Repository Builder's Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition for more information.


Enables or disables the collection of Oracle BI Summary Advisor logging statistics, as follows:

  • Set this parameter to YES to enable Summary Advisor logging.

  • Set this parameter to LOG_OUTER_JOINT_QUERIES_ONLY to enable Summary Advisor logging only for logical queries that contain outer joins. Consider using this option when the minor performance impact of enabling full Summary Advisor logging is a concern.

  • Set this parameter to NO (the default) to disable Summary Advisor logging.

The Oracle BI Summary Advisor feature is only available when you are running Oracle Business Intelligence on the Oracle Exalytics Machine.

See "Using Oracle BI Summary Advisor to Identify Query Candidates for Aggregation" in Oracle Fusion Middleware Metadata Repository Builder's Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition for more information about the Summary Advisor feature.

Example: SUMMARY_STATISTICS_LOGGING = YES;

A.9.14 SUMMARY_ADVISOR_TABLE_NAME


Note:

For new (non-upgraded) installations, the SUMMARY_ADVISOR_TABLE_NAME parameter is centrally managed by Fusion Middleware Control and cannot be changed by manually editing NQSConfig.INI, unless the UsageTrackingCentrallyManaged attribute of the BIDomain.BIInstance.ServerConfiguration MBean has been set to false.

The SummaryAdvisorTableName attribute of the BIDomain.BIInstance.ServerConfiguration MBean corresponds to the SUMMARY_ADVISOR_TABLE_NAME parameter. See "Turning On Summary Advisor Logging" in Oracle Fusion Middleware Metadata Repository Builder's Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition for more information.


Specifies the table in which to insert records that correspond to the Oracle BI Summary Advisor logging statistics. The table name is the fully qualified name as it appears in the Physical layer of the Administration Tool.

Example: SUMMARY_ADVISOR_TABLE_NAME = "Orcl"."DEV_BIPLATFORM".

"S_NQ_SUMMARY_ADVISOR"

A.10 Query Optimization Flags Section Parameters

There is one parameter in the Query Optimization Flags section. It is a special parameter to override the behavior of the Oracle BI Server in certain situations.

A.10.1 STRONG_DATETIME_TYPE_CHECKING

Use this parameter to relax strong type checking to prevent some date/time data type incompatibilities in queries from being rejected. For example, a query of the form "date/time op string-literal" technically contains a date/time data type incompatibility and would normally be rejected by the Oracle BI Server.

Valid values are ON and OFF. The default value is ON, which means that strong type checking is enabled and queries containing date/time data type incompatibilities are rejected. This is the recommended setting.

To relax the strong type checking, set the value to NO. Note that invalid queries or queries with severe date/time incompatibilities are still rejected. Note also that the query could still fail, for example, if the relational database implements a similar strong type checking.

Example: STRONG_DATETIME_TYPE_CHECKING = ON;

A.11 MDX Member Name Cache Section Parameters

The parameters in this section are for a cache subsystem that maps between a unique name and the captions of members of all SAP/BW cubes in the repository.

A.11.1 ENABLE

This parameter indicates if the feature is enabled or not.

The default value is NO because this only applies to SAP/BW cubes.

A.11.2 DATA_STORAGE_PATH

The path to the location where the cache is persisted. This applies only to a single location.

The number at the end of the entry indicates the storage capacity. When the feature is enabled, the string <full directory path> must be replaced with a valid path.

Example: DATA_STORAGE_PATH = "C:\OracleBI\server\Data\Temp\Cache" 500 MB;

A.11.3 MAX_SIZE_PER_USER

The maximum disk space that is allowed for each user for cache entries.

Example: MAX_SIZE_PER_USER = 100 MB;

A.11.4 MAX_MEMBER_PER_LEVEL

The maximum number of members in a level that can be persisted to disk.

Example: MAX_MEMBER_PER_LEVEL = 1000;

A.11.5 MAX_CACHE_SIZE

The maximum size for each individual cache entry size.

Example: MAX_CACHE_SIZE = 100 MB;

A.12 Aggregate Persistence Section Parameters

Oracle Business Intelligence provides an aggregate persistence feature that automates the creation and loading of the aggregate tables and their corresponding Oracle Business Intelligence metadata mappings. The parameters in this section relate to configuring and using the aggregate persistence feature.

A.12.1 AGGREGATE_PREFIX

Specifies the Domain Server Name for aggregate persistence. The prefix must be between 1 and 8 characters long and should not have any special characters ('_' is allowed).

Example: AGGREGATE_PREFIX = "SA_";

A.12.2 AGGREGATE_THREAD_POOL_SIZE

Specifies the number of threads to be started for aggregate persistence. Within each phase, relational loads are executed in separate threads to improve the load performance. The default value is 5.

Example: AGGREGATE_THREAD_POOL_SIZE = 5;

A.12.3 AGGREGATE_AW_NAME

Specifies the name of the Analytic Workspace object that is created in the target Oracle Database. The aggregate AW cubes and dimensions are created under this container.

Example: AGGREGATE_AW_NAME = "OBI_AW";

A.12.4 PREAGGREGATE_AW_CUBE

Specifies whether the system-generated AW cube for aggregate persistence must be fully solved. The default value is YES. Note that a YES value significantly increases storage space usage.

Example: PREAGGREGATE_AW_CUBE = YES;

A.13 JavaHost Section Parameters

There is only one parameter in this section. It provides information about the computers where the JavaHost process is running.

A.13.1 JAVAHOST_HOSTNAME_OR_IP_ADDRESSES


Note:

The JAVAHOST_HOSTNAME_OR_IP_ADDRESS parameter is centrally managed by Fusion Middleware Control and cannot be changed by manually editing NQSConfig.INI, unless all configuration through Fusion Middleware Control has been disabled (not recommended).

The host information and Port Range From and Port Range To options on the Scalability tab of the Capacity Management page in Fusion Middleware Control override the JAVAHOST_HOSTNAME_OR_IP_ADDRESS parameter. See Section 5.5, "Using Fusion Middleware Control to Scale System Components" for more information.


This parameter provides information about JavaHost connectivity. The default port value is 9810.

Syntax: JAVAHOST_HOSTNAME_OR_IP_ADDRESS = "host_name1:port1",host_name2:port2;

Example: JAVAHOST_HOSTNAME_OR_IP_ADDRESS = "MYHOST:9810";

A.14 Datamart Automation Section Parameters

The parameters in this section are reserved for a future release.

A.14.1 ESSBASE_STUDIO_URL

This parameter is reserved for a future release.

A.14.2 ESSBASE_SERVER

This parameter is reserved for a future release.

A.14.3 DMA_DATABASE

This parameter is reserved for a future release.

PKӖ# :9PK\EOEBPS/index.htm Index

Index

A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Z 

A

action framework, 11.2
adapters, relational data source, 1.7
Admin MBeans, 1.3.4
Administration Server
confirming whether running, 4.6
defined, 1.3.4
starting and stopping, 4.2, 4.7
Administration Tool
using to manage clustered system components, 6.4
using to purge cache, 7.7.4.2
agents
antivirus software, 19.2.1
configuring email settings for, 11.1.1
definition of, 19.1
delivery options for, 19.3.4
e-mail Scheduler configuration settings, 19.3.3.2
general Scheduler configuration settings, 19.3.3.1
KeepErrorLogFiles configuration element, 19.3.3.3
log directory, viewing entries, 8.5.6, 8.5.6
log file location, 19.3.3.3
Log_Dir configuration element, 19.3.3.3
LogPurgeDays configuration element, 19.3.3.3
managing device types, 19.4
manually configuring settings, 19.3.1
MaxDeliverySleepSecs configuration element, 19.3.3.3
MaxGlobalSleepSecs configuration element, 19.3.3.3
MaxRequestSleepSecs configuration element, 19.3.3.3
MaxRowsTimesColumns configuration element, 19.3.3.3
MinDeliverySleepSecs configuration element, 19.3.3.3
MinGlobalSleepSecs configuration element, 19.3.3.3
MinRequestSleepSecs configuration element, 19.3.3.3
number connection attempts, 19.3.3.3
number delivery attempts, 19.3.3.3
NumDeliveryRetries configuration element, 19.3.3.3
NumGlobalReTries configuration element, 19.3.3.3
NumRequestRetries configuration element, 19.3.3.3
permission settings, 19.2.2
Scheduler configuration settings, 19.3.3.3, 19.3.3.3
seeding server cache, 7.7.3
sleep time, 19.3.3.3, 19.3.3.3
using to seed cache, 7.7.3
viewing information about active sessions, 19.5
aggregate tables, using, 7.2
AllowedLanguages configuration element, 15.2.1.4
AllowedLocales configuration element, 15.2.1.4
AllowRememberPassword configuration element, B.1
alternating bars, changing color, 18.3.3
alternative methods for starting and stopping system components, 4.5
AlwaysKeepSessionAffiliation configuration parameter, 6.3.3
ampersand in time zone values, 14.4.1
analyses
blocking, 18.6, 18.6
default currency, 16.1
default header and footer, 18.7.2.1
general configuration tasks, 18.2
navigation and drill down, 18.2.2
unattended time, B.1
view defaults, 18.7, 18.7
API, Oracle BI Systems Management, 22.3.3
application, sample, 1.5
archiving
catalog folders, 17.10
objects, 17.2.3
Presentation Catalog, 17.10
attack on web pages, B.1.1
attribute files, 17.1.1.2

B

backup and recovery, 25
bars, changing color for alternating bars, 18.3.3
BI domain, definition of, 1.3.1.1
BI Publisher, configuring toolbar, 18.5.4
biee_domain.xml, disabling Fusion Middleware Control from managing configuration settings, D.1
blocking analyses, 18.6, 18.6
briefing books, table of contents, 18.5.5
BulkFetchBufferSize (bytes) configuration element, 19.3.3.1

C

CACertificateDir configuration element, 19.3.3.1
CACertificateFile configuration element, 19.3.3.1
cache
about hits, 7.7.1
administering, 7.9
attributes for physical tables, 7.6.1.2
configuring event polling tables, 7.6.1.3
displaying global cache information, 7.7.4.1
effects of repository changes on, 7.6.3
enabling and disabling, 7.5.1
in a clustered environment, 7.4.6
managing settings, 7.9
monitoring and managing, 7.6
persistence time setting, 7.6.1.2
purging using Administration Tool, 7.7.4.2
purging using ODBC procedures, 7.6.2
purging when switching between repositories, 7.6.3.3
reasons for disabling, 7.6.1.1
seeding with a suite of queries, 7.7.2
seeding with agents, 7.7.3
setting max entry size, 7.5.2
setting max number of entries, 7.5.2
strategies, 7.7
using event polling tables, 7.8
using the Cache Manager, 7.7.4
using with row-level database security, 7.7.1.1
viewing information in Cluster Manager, 6.4.1.2
Cache Manager
about and opening, 7.7.4
displaying global cache information, 7.7.4.1
purging cache, 7.7.4.2
using, 7.7.4
capacity, managing, 5
captions, localizing for Presentation Catalog, 17.9
catalog folders
archiving, 17.10
unarchiving, 17.10
Catalog Manager
about, 17.3
archiving a Presentation Catalog, 17.10
components of, 17.5.2
copying and pasting items between Presentation Catalogs, 17.6.2
creating reports to display Presentation Catalog data, 17.9
localizing Presentation Catalog captions, 17.9
localizing Presentation Catalog text strings, 15.2.2
opening a Presentation Catalog, 17.4.6
previewing objects, 17.6.6
recommendations for working with, 17.3.2
renaming items, 17.6.3
searching for and replacing Presentation Catalog text, 17.8
searching for Presentation Catalog items, 17.6.1
setting permissions of items, 17.6.5
starting, 17.4
unarchiving a Presentation Catalog, 17.10
viewing and editing objects in XML, 17.7
working with item properties, 17.6.4
workspace, 17.5
catalogs
file system guidelines, 17.1.3
validating, 17.2.5
centrally managing
Java components using WebLogic Server administration console, 2.3
Oracle Business Intelligence using Fusion Middleware Control, 2.2
CertificateFileName configuration element, 19.3.3.1
CertificateVerifyDepth configuration element, 19.3.3.1
certification information, 1.8
CertPrivateKeyFileName configuration element, 19.3.3.1
change/delete permission, 19.2.2
checkpoints for usage tracking, 9.3.4
CipherList configuration element, 19.3.3.1
clickjacking, B.1.1
client sessions, expiration time, 7.3.2
cluster
about components in, 6.1
configuring for, 6.3
managing with Fusion Middleware Control, 6.2.1
shared files and directories, 5.4
shared Oracle BI Presentation Catalog, 5.4.2
shared repository publishing directory, 5.4.1
troubleshooting, 6.5
viewing and managing using Cluster Manager, 6.4.1
Cluster Controller, configuring primary and secondary, 6.1.2
Cluster Manager
See also Cluster Server
about, 6.4
accessing when components are stopped, 6.4
activating Oracle BI Scheduler instances, 6.4
managing clustered servers, 6.4.1.3
viewing and managing cluster information, 6.4.1
viewing cache information, 6.4.1.2
viewing session information, 6.4.1.3
Cluster Server
See also Cluster Manager
viewing cache information, 6.4.1.2
ColocatedOracleMapViewerContextPath configuration element, 20.2
colors, changing alternating bar color, 18.3.3
comments and status overrides, configuring, 1.7
components
Catalog Manager, 17.5.2
Java and system, 1.3.3
Compound Layout default views, 18.7.2.3
concurrent connections, maximum number, 19.3.3.1
configuration
alternate BI Publisher toolbar, 18.5.4
cache, accessing, 7.9
changes for Presentation Services, B.1
default language, specifying for login screen, 15.2.1.3
file location, 3.6
general tasks for analyses, 18.2
graphs and gauges, 18.3.2
instanceconfig.xml file, B.1
JavaHost service, B.2
map views, 20
marketing content server, 11.4, 11.4.2
tables and pivot tables, 7.3.3, 12.1
time zones, 14.5
URL generation and resource file location, 21
configuration settings
disabling Fusion Middleware Control from managing, D.1
methods for updating, 3.1
updating using a text editor, 3.4
updating using Fusion Middleware Control, 3.2
updating using Java program with Oracle BI Systems Management API, 22.3.3.2
updating using MBean Browser, 3.5
updating using Oracle BI Systems Management API, 3.3, 22.3.3
updating using WLST with Oracle BI Systems Management API, 22.3.3.1
ControllerPollSeconds configuration parameter, 6.3.1
CookieDomain configuration element, B.1
CookiePath configuration element, B.1
cookies, B.1
copying and pasting content between catalogs, 17.6.2
copyright text on maps, 20.3
creating
device types, 19.4
reports to display Presentation Catalog data, 17.9
CubeMaxPopulatedCells configuration element, 18.3.1.1
CubeMaxRecords configuration element, 18.3.1.1
currency
customized subject areas, 16.1
default for analyses, 16.1
user-preferred options, 16.2

D

dashboards
headers and footers, 18.7.2.5
links to page, 18.5.3
managing, 18.1
page defaults, 18.7.2.5
section defaults, 18.7.2.4, 18.7.2.4
view defaults, 18.7, 18.7
data sources, setting up, 1.7
DATA_STORAGE_PATHS configuration parameter, 7.5.3
database, back-end
bulk fetch buffer size, 19.3.3.1
job script path, 19.3.3.1
maximum concurrent connections field, 19.3.3.1
purging, 19.3.3.1
timeout specification, 19.3.3.1
tuning and indexing, 7.2
databases supported, 1.8
DDL, Dynamic Library section parameters, A.8
default RPD, viewing, 10.2
DefaultName configuration element, 18.5.1
DefaultRowsDisplayed configuration element, 18.3.1.2
DefaultScriptPath configuration element, 5.4.4, 19.3.3.1
deleting device types, 19.4
delivery devices, 19.3.4
delivery profiles, 19.3.4
descriptions for repository objects, externalizing for localization, 15.5
diagnostics
introduction, 8
log configuration file format example for BI Server, 8.3.2
log configuration file format example for JavaHost Server, 8.3.2
log configuration file settings, 8.3.2
log configuration files location, 8.3.2
log files, 8.2.1
log files location, 8.3.1
dictionary, metadata, 18.2.1, 18.2.1
disabling Fusion Middleware Control from managing configuration settings, D.1
display names for repository objects, externalizing for localization, 15.5
double column support, associating a descriptor ID column and descriptor column, 15.6.3
drill down, adding support for, 18.2.2
DSN, Presentation Services, B.1
Dynamic Library section (NQSConfig.INI file)
parameters, about, A.8

E

ECID, viewing log information, 8.2.1
editing device types, 19.4
embedded fonts, 18.3.2.1.1
embedded maps in pages, 20.4
EmbedFonts configuration element, 18.3.2
EnableBookmarkURL configuration element, 18.5.3
EnablePromptedURL configuration element, 18.5.3
event polling tables
about, 7.6.1.3, 7.8
column names, 7.8.1
configuring, 7.6.1.3
making active, 7.8.2
populating, 7.8.3
setting up, 7.8.1
troubleshooting, 7.8.4
exchanging metadata, 1.7
exporting Presentation Catalog text strings, 15.2.2.2
exposing Presentation Catalog text strings, 15.2.2.5
Externalize Strings utility, using, 15.5

F

failover, configuring for, 6.3
FlashCLSID configuration element, 18.3.2
FlashCodeBase configuration element, 18.3.2
folders, archiving and unarchiving, 17.10
fonts, embedded, 18.3.2.1.1
footer for analyses, 18.7.2.1
frame busting, B.1.1
framework, actions, 11.2
Fusion Middleware Control
MBean Browser, 2.4.2
navigation tree, 2.2.5
starting and stopping system and Java components, 4.3
starting to centrally manage Oracle Business Intelligence, 2.2.2
tool to monitor and configure system components, 1.4.1
user interface labels mapped to configuration file elements, C
using to centrally manage Oracle Business Intelligence, 2.2
using to configure the connection to the marketing content server, 11.4.1
using to update configuration settings, 3.2
WebLogic Server, 2.1

G

gauge views, configuring, 18.3.2
General section parameters (NQSConfig.INI file)
about, A.4
AGGREGATE_PREFIX, A.12.1
CASE_SENSITIVE_CHARACTER_COMPARISON, A.4.4
DATE_DISPLAY_FORMAT, A.4.7
DATE_TIME_DISPLAY_FORMAT, A.4.6
LOCALE, A.4.1
NULL_VALUES_SORT_FIRST, A.4.5
SORT_ORDER_LOCALE, A.4.2
SORT_ORDER_LOCALE on UNIX, A.4.2.1
SORT_TYPE, A.4.3
TIME_DISPLAY_FORMAT, A.4.8
UPPERCASE_USERNAME_FOR_INITBLOCK, A.4.13
VIRTUAL_TABLE_PAGE_SIZE, A.4.10
WORK_DIRECTORY_PATHS, A.4.9
global cache
about, 7.4.6
configuring, 7.5.4, 7.5.5
displaying information in Cache Manager, 7.7.4.1
setting up a network share for, 5.4.3
graph views
common settings, 18.3.1.2
configuring, 18.3.2
cube settings, 18.3.1.1
fonts, 18.3.2.1.1
green bar styling, 18.3.3
guidelines
for Catalog Manager, 17.3.2
for catalogs, 17.1.3
for object names, 17.1.1.1

H

header for analyses, 18.7.2.1
high availability
deploying Oracle Business Intelligence for, 6
deployment diagram, 6.1
eliminating single points of failure, 6.1.2
managing using Fusion Middleware Control, 6.2.1
horizontal scaling
about, 5.1
performing steps for, 5.3

I

i1012980
Sect1
Understanding the User Log, 8.4
i1013009
Sect3
Choosing a Logging Level, 8.4.1.1
InIFrameRenderingMode configuration element, B.1.1
inline frames, B.1.1
installing and upgrading, 1.7
instanceconfig.xml file
for Oracle BI Scheduler, 5.4.4
for Presentation Services, B.1

J

Java components
definition of, 1.3.1.1, 1.3.3.1
in a clustered environment, 6.1
listed, 1.3.3
managing using WebLogic server administration console, 1.4.2
monitoring and starting and stopping using Fusion Middleware Control, 2.2.4
Java program, using with Oracle BI Systems Management API to update configuration settings, 22.3.3.2
JavaHost
diagnostic log configuration file format example, 8.3.2
service, B.2
JavaHostProxy configuration parameter, 6.3.2
JavaHostReadLimitInKB configuration element, 18.3.1.2
JavaScript files, 18.6.1
JMX MBeans
container, 1.3.4
using the MBean Browser to manage, 2.4
Job Manager Configuration dialog box
accessing, 19.3.2
agents tab fields, 19.3.3.3
role of, 19.3.2
Scheduler Tab fields, 19.3.3.1
job scripts path, 19.3.3.1

K

KeepErrorLogFiles configuration element, 19.3.3.3

L

languages, default language, specifying for login screen, 15.2.1.3
links to dashboard pages, 18.5.3
listen address, setting, 5.5
localization
of repository metadata, 15.5
setting the Japanese locale on AIX systems, 15.4.5.2
SORT_ORDER_LOCALE settings on UNIX systems, 15.4
location
BI configuration files, 3.6
Presentation Catalog, 17.1
lock files, 17.1.1.3
locking mechanism for multiple concurrent administrators, 2.1
log files
See also query log, administering
agent log directory, viewing entries, 8.5.6
configuration file location, 8.3.2
levels, 8.3.3
manually configuring rotation policy, 8.2.2.2
message categories, 8.3.3
messages in, 8.5.4
Presentation Services, 8.5
rotation, 8.2.2.1, 8.3.4
viewing in Fusion Middleware Control, 8.2.1
log viewer utility
about, 8.4.2
interpreting log records, 8.4.2.2
running, 8.4.2.1
Log_Dir configuration element, 19.3.3.3
LogAllSqlStmts configuration element, 19.3.3.1
logging levels
configuring using Fusion Middleware Control, 8.2.2.1
described, 8.4.1.1
enabling for individual users, 8.4.1.1
log viewer utility, 8.4.2, 8.4.2.2
manually configuring, 8.2.2.2
overriding with session variable, 8.4.1.1
user logging levels, 8.4.1.2, 8.4.1.2
logical architecture for Oracle Business Intelligence, 1.3
login screen, specifying default language, 15.2.1.3
LogPurgeDays configuration element, 19.3.3.3
lookup
creating logical lookup columns, 15.6.5.4
creating logical lookup tables, 15.6.5.1
designating a logical table as a lookup table, 15.6.5.2
designing translation lookup tables in a mls schema, 15.6.4
function syntax, 15.6.5.3

M

Managed Server, 1.3.4
confirming whether running, 4.8.1
definition of, 1.3.1.1
guidelines for scaling, 5.1.2
in a clustered environment, 6.1
scaling horizontally, 5.3
starting and stopping on Windows and UNIX, 4.8
manually starting the Oracle Business Intelligence system, 4.2
map views
configuring, 20
configuring manually, 20.2
configuring MapViewer, 20.1
embedded in pages, 20.4
hardware requirements, 13.2
inserting text, 20.3
system requirements, 13.1
translating layers, 13.3.4
mapping configuration file elements with corresponding Fusion Middleware Control user interface labels, C
MapViewer configuration, 20.1
marketing content server
configuring the connection to, 11.4, 11.4.2
using Fusion Middleware Control to configure the connection to, 11.4.1
Master BI Server, viewing in Cluster Manager, 6.4.1.1
MAX_ROWS_PER_CACHE_ENTRY configuration parameter, 7.5.3
MaxAgeMinutes configuration element, 18.5.3
MaxCells configuration element, 18.3.1.2
MaxDeliverySleepSecs configuration element, 19.3.3.3
MaxDropDownValues configuration element, 18.5.1
MaxEntries configuration element, 7.9
MaxExecThreads configuration element, 19.3.3.1
MaxExpireMinutes configuration element, 7.9
MaxFollowLinks configuration element, 18.5.1
MaxGlobalSleepSecs configuration element, 19.3.3.3
MaxRecords configuration element, 20.2
MaxRequestSleepSecs configuration element, 19.3.3.3
MaxRowsTimesColumns configuration element, 19.3.3.3
MaxVisibleColumns configuration element, 18.3.1.2
MaxVisiblePages configuration element, 18.3.1.2
MaxVisibleRows configuration element, 18.3.1.2
MaxVisibleSections configuration element, 18.3.1.2
MBean Browser
updating configuration settings, 3.5
using to manage Oracle Business Intelligence, 2.4
MDX Member Name Cache section parameters (NQSConfig.INI file)
DATA_STORAGE_PATH, A.11.2
ENABLE, A.11.1
MAX_MEMBER_PER_LEVEL, A.11.4
MAX_SIZE_PER_USER, A.11.3
memory requirements, 1.8
messages in log files, 8.5.4
metadata
exchanging, 1.7
importing into IBM DB2 or Oracle Database, 1.7
metadata dictionary, 18.2.1, 18.2.1
metrics, viewing, 7.1.1
migrating to a new environment, 24
migration, whole server, 24
MinDeliverySleepSecs configuration element, 19.3.3.3
MinExecThreads configuration element, 19.3.3.1
MinExpireMinutes configuration element, 7.9
MinGlobalSleepSecs configuration element, 19.3.3.3
minimum disk space, 1.8
MinRequestSleepSecs configuration element, 19.3.3.3
MinUserExpireMinutes configuration element, 7.9
modes for opening catalogs, 17.4.4
monitoring system metrics, 7.1
multilingual data support, 15.6.1
multilingual support, lookup, 15.6.2
multiple host logical architecture, 1.3.2

N

navigation tree in Fusion Middleware Control, 2.2.5
navigation, adding support for in analyses, 18.2.2
node manager
daemon process, 1.3.1.1
starting on Windows and UNIX, 4.2.2
nQLogViewer utility, interpreting log records, 8.4.2.2
NQSConfig.INI file
comments, adding, A.1
configuration file parameter entries, rules for, A.1
configuring parameters for clustering, load balancing, and failover, 7.5.5
Dynamic Library section parameters, A.8
General section, about, A.4
Optimization Flags section parameters, A.10
parameters and syntax, about, A
parsing rules, A.1
Query Result Cache section, parameters, A.3
Repository section parameters, A.2
security section parameters, A.5
Server section parameters, A.6
Usage Tracking section parameters, A.9
NumDBConnections configuration element, 19.3.3.1
NumDeliveryRetries configuration element, 19.3.3.3
NumGlobalReTries configuration element, 19.3.3.3
NumRequestRetries configuration element, 19.3.3.3

O

object names, guidelines for, 17.1.1.1
objects
attribute files for, 17.1.1.2
committing to production, 17.2.3
guidelines for names, 17.1.1.1
lockfiles for, 17.1.1.3
previewing in Catalog Manager, 17.6.6
searching for, 17.6.1
viewing and editing in XML, 17.7
working with properties, 17.6.4
ODBC procedures
about syntax for, 7.6.2.1
for Presentation Services shared request key, 7.6.2.2
for purging cache, 7.6.2
for purging SAP/BW data sources, 7.6.2.4
offline mode for opening catalogs, 17.4.4
online mode for opening catalogs, 17.4.4
opening catalogs, 17.4.4
operating systems, supported, 1.8
OPMN
about, 1.4.3
definition of, 1.3.1.1
using opmnctl command line to start and stop System components, 4.5.1
Optimization Flags section parameters (NQSConfig.INI file)
parameters, about, A.10
STRONG_DATETIME_TYPE_CHECKING, A.10.1
options, delivery for agents, 19.3.4
Oracle BI Catalog Manager
See Catalog Manager
Oracle BI Dashboards
See dashboards
Oracle BI Presentation Services Plug-in, configuring for high availability, 6.3.3
Oracle BI repository
disallowing updates, 7.3.1
localizing repository metadata, 15.5
metadata dictionary, 18.2.1
repository publishing directory, 5.4.1
restarting Oracle BI processes, 4.1
sharing, 10.2
specifying password for, 10.2
understanding version numbers, 10.1.2
uploading using Fusion Middleware Control, 10.2
uploading using System MBeans, 10.3
Oracle BI Server
diagnostic log configuration file format example, 8.3.2
loading repository, 10.2
viewing sessions in Cluster Manager, 6.4.1.3
Windows, starting or restarting, 4.5.2
Oracle BI Systems Management API
accessing API methods, 22.2
JMX Admin MBeans and Methods, 22.4
purpose of, 22.1
using to manage and configure Oracle Business Intelligence, 22.3
using to programmatically start and stop Oracle Business Intelligence, 4.5.3
using to scale out for high availability and performance, 22.3.4
using to start and stop Oracle Business Intelligence, 22.3.2
using to update configuration settings, 3.3, 22.3.3, 22.3.3
Oracle Business Intelligence
deploying for high availability, 6
logical architecture explained, 1.3
scaling, 5
Oracle Scorecard and Strategy Management, configuring comments and status overrides for, 1.7
Oracle WebLogic Server Admin Console, starting and stopping Java components, 4.4

P

PassphraseFileName configuration element, 19.3.3.1
password
remembering, B.1
specifying for repository upon upload, 10.2
pasting items between Presentation Catalogs, 17.6.2
patching
about, 23
components, 23.1
determining current patch levels, 23.4
platform patches, 23.2
rolling back a patch, 23.3
PauseOnStartup configuration element, 19.3.3.1
PERF_PREFER_IN_LISTS database feature, 7.8.1
performance
about managing, 7.2
disallowing repository updates, 7.3.1
for web client, 7.10
setting up static file caching, 7.10
tuning and indexing data sources, 7.2
using aggregate tables, 7.2
viewing metrics, 7.1.1
permissions
setting for items, 17.6.5
setting in Catalog Manager, 17.6.5
settings for agents, 19.2.2
pivot table views
common settings, 18.3.1.2
configuration, 7.3.3, 12.1
cube settings, 18.3.1.1
platforms, supported, 1.8
PoolTimeout (minutes) configuration element, 19.3.3.1
POPULATE_AGGREGATE_ROLLUP_HITS configuration parameter, 7.5.3
ports
specifying, 5.5
viewing, 5.6.1
precedence order for time zones, 14.3
Presentation Catalog
about, 17.1
administering, 17.3, 17.6.4
archiving, 17.10
Catalog Manager workspace, about, 17.5
Catalog Manager, setting permissions through, 17.6.5
Catalog Manager, starting, 17.4
committing an object to production, 17.2.3
configuring for a full text search, 17.11
copying and pasting objects between, 17.6.2
creating new, 17.2.2
creating reports to display data, 17.9
exporting text strings for, 15.2.2.2
exposing text strings for, 15.2.2.5
localizing captions for, 17.9
location of, 17.1
maintaining manually, 17.2
maintaining using Fusion Middleware Control, 17.2
manually changing additional configuration settings for, 17.2.1
manually creating a new one, 17.2.2
modes for opening in Catalog Manager, 17.4.4
opening, 17.4.4
recommendations for working with, 17.3.2
rename items, about using Catalog Manager to, 17.6.3
replicating, 17.12
searching for and replacing text, 17.8
setting object permissions, 17.6.5
setting permissions of objects, 17.6.5
setting up a network share for, 5.4.2
specifying shared location for, 10.2
unarchiving, 17.10
viewing and editing objects in XML, 17.7
Presentation Services
cache, 7.9
configuring for high availability, 6.3.2
log message structure, 8.5.4
logging in, 8.5
query cache, 7.6.2.2
Replication Agent, 17.12.4
specifying default language, for login screen, 15.2.1.3
previewing objects from Catalog Manager, 17.6.6
production, committing objects to, 17.2.3
programmatically starting and stopping Oracle Business Intelligence using the Oracle BI Systems Management API, 4.5.3
properties of catalog objects, 17.6.4
publish agents for Subscription privilege, 19.2.2
PurgeInstDays configuration element, 19.3.3.1
PurgeIntervalMinutes configuration element, 19.3.3.1
purging cache
for SAP/BW data sources, 7.6.2.4
result records, 7.6.2.3
using Administration Tool, 7.7.4.2
using ODBC procedures, 7.6.2
when switching between repositories, 7.6.3.3

Q

query caching
about hits, 7.7.1
advantages of, 7.4.2
attributes for physical tables, 7.6.1.2
cache strategies, 7.7
configuring event polling tables, 7.6.1.3
cost of caching, about, 7.4.3
displaying global cache information, 7.7.4.1
effects of repository changes on, 7.6.3
enabling and disabling, 7.5.1
monitoring and managing, 7.6
Presentation Services query cache, 7.6.2.2
purging using Administration Tool, 7.7.4.2
purging using ODBC procedures, 7.6.2
purging when switching between repositories, 7.6.3.3
reasons for disabling, 7.6.1.1
refresh interval, setting for XML data sources, 7.4.5
seeding with a suite of queries, 7.7.2
seeding with agents, 7.7.3
setting max entry size, 7.5.2
setting max number of entries, 7.5.2
using event polling tables, 7.8
using the Cache Manager, 7.7.4
using with row-level database security, 7.7.1.1
query environment, administering
query logs, administering, 8.4
usage tracking, administering, 9.1
query logs
administering, 8.4
configuring, 8.4.1
disabling user logging levels, 8.4.1.2
interpreting the log records, 8.4.2.2
log viewer utility, 8.4.2
logging levels, 8.4.1.1
setting logging levels, 8.4.1.1
setting user logging levels, 8.4.1.2
Query Result Cache section parameters (NQSConfig.INI file), A.3
CACHE_POLL_SECONDS, A.3.12
CLUSTER_AWARE_CACHE_LOGGING, A.3.13
DATA_STORAGE_PATHS, A.3.2
ENABLE, A.3.1
GLOBAL_CACHE_STORAGE_PATH, A.3.10
MAX_CACHE_ENTRIES, A.3.5
MAX_CACHE_ENTRY_SIZE, A.3.4
MAX_GLOBAL_CACHE_ENTRIES, A.3.11
MAX_ROWS_PER_CACHE_ENTRY, A.3.3
MAX_SUBEXPR_SEARCH_DEPTH, A.3.8
POPULATE_AGGREGATE_ROLLUP_HITS, A.3.6
USE_ADVANCED_HIT_DETECTION, A.3.7

R

recovery and backup, 25
refresh interval, setting for XML data sources, 7.4.5
relational data source adapters, 1.7
RemoteOracleMapViewerAbsoluteURL configuration element, 20.2
renaming items
about, 17.6.3
with reference updates, 17.6.3
without reference updates, 17.6.3
replacing Presentation Catalog text, 17.8
replication
catalogs, 17.12
Oracle BI Presentation Services Replication Agent, 17.12.4
resuming, 17.12.7
sawrepaj utility, 17.12.4
repository file, disallowing updates, 7.3.1
repository publishing directory, setting up a network share for, 5.4.1
Repository section parameters (NQSConfig.INI file), A.2
repository variables, cache purging considerations, 7.6.3.4
requirements, system, 1.8
resource files, location, 21
result records, for purging cache, 7.6.2.3
resuming replication, 17.12.7
rollover, described, 9.3.4
row-level database security, ensuring correct cache results with, 7.7.1.1

S

SA System subject area, delivery options, 19.3.4
sample application, 1.5
sawrepaj utility, 17.12.4
scaling your system
about, 5.1
performing steps for, 5.3
recommendations, 5.1.2
using Fusion Middleware Control, 5.5
using the Oracle BI Systems Management API, 22.3.4
Scheduler
activating inactive instances of, 6.4
computer running, 19.3.1
configuration options, 19.3.2
configuration tasks for, 1.7
configuring for high availability, 5.4.4
configuring primary and secondary, 6.1.2
configuring Scheduler Tab options, 19.3.3.1
DefaultScriptPath configuration element, 5.4.4
execution threads, 19.3.3.1, 19.3.3.1
SchedulerScriptPath configuration element, 5.4.4
schema tables, 19.3.3.1
scripts, setting up a network share for, 5.4.4
SchedulerScriptPath configuration element, 5.4.4, 19.3.3.1
ScriptRPCPort configuration element, 19.3.3.1
searching for
and replacing catalog text, 17.8
catalog objects, 17.6.1
SectionSliderDefault configuration element, 18.3.2
SectionSliderLimit configuration element, 18.3.2
Security section parameters (NQSConfig.INI file)
DEFAULT_PRIVILEGES, A.5.1
parameters, about, A.5
PROJECT_INACCESSIBLE_COLUMN_AS_NULL, A.5.2
SSL, A.5.4, A.5.4
SSL_CA_CERTIFICATE_FILE, A.5.8
SSL_CERT_VERIFICATION_DEPTH, A.5.10
SSL_CERTIFICATE_FILE, A.5.5
SSL_CIPHER_LIST, A.5.11
SSL_PK_VERIFY_PEER, A.5.7
SSL_PRIVATE_KEY_FILE, A.5.6
SSL_TRUSTED_PEER_DNS, A.5.9
Security Sensitive option, for session variables, 7.7.1.1
Server section parameters (NQSConfig.INI file)
AUTOMATIC_RESTART, A.6.26
CLIENT_MGMT_THREADS_MAX, A.6.16
CLUSTER_PARTICIPANT, A.6.22
DB_GATEWAY_THREAD_RANGE, A.6.6
DB_GATEWAY_THREAD_STACK_SIZE, A.6.7
ENABLE_DB_HINTS, A.6.20
HTTP_CLIENT_THREAD_RANGE, A.6.8
HTTP_CLIENT_THREAD_STACK_SIZE, A.6.9
INIT_BLOCK_CACHE_ENTRIES, A.6.15
LISTEN_ADDRESS, A.6.18
LISTEN_PORT, A.6.19
MAX_DRILLDOWN_INFO_CACHE_ENTRIES, A.6.13
MAX_DRILLDOWN_QUERY_CACHE_ENTRIES, A.6.14
MAX_EXPANDED_SUBQUERY_PREDICATES, A.6.10
MAX_QUERY_PLAN_CACHE_ENTRIES, A.6.11
MAX_QUERY_PLAN_CACHE_ENTRY_SIZE, A.6.12
MAX_REQUEST_PER_SESSION_LIMIT, A.6.3
MAX_SESSION_LIMIT, A.6.2
parameters, about, A.6
PREVENT_DIVIDE_BY_ZERO, A.6.21
REPOSITORY_PUBLISHING_DIRECTORY, A.6.23
REQUIRE_PUBLISHING_DIRECTORY, A.6.24
RPC_SERVICE_OR_PORT, A.6.17
SERVER_THREAD_RANGE, A.6.4
SERVER_THREAD_STACK_SIZE, A.6.5
ServerPollSeconds configuration parameter, 6.3.1
ServerPortNumber configuration element, 19.3.3.1
service levels, monitoring, 7.1
session variables
for time zones, 14.5
Security Sensitive option, 7.7.1.1
using to translate strings, 15.5
sessions
expiration time, 7.3.2
viewing information about active agent, 19.5
settings for time zones, 14.5
shared files and directories, clustering requirements, 5.4
Shared Location option
for catalogs, 10.2
for Oracle BI repository, 10.2
single points of failure, eliminating, 6.1.2
SIZE parameters (NQSConfig.INI file)
USE_LONG_DAY_NAMES, A.4.12
USE_LONG_MONTH_NAMES, A.4.11
specifications for time zones, 14.4
SSL information, 1.7
SSL Trusted Peer DNs configuration field, 19.3.3.1
starting and stopping
Administration Server, 4.7
Catalog Manager, 17.4
Fusion Middleware Control, 2.2.2
Java components, 4.4
Managed Server, 4.8
Oracle BI components, 4.1
Oracle Business Intelligence system manually, 4.2
Oracle Business Intelligence using the Oracle BI Systems Management API, 22.3.2
system and Java components, 4.3
system components, 4.5
system components with a Windows service, 4.5.2
system components with opmnctl command line, 4.5.1
static file caching, setting up, 7.10
status
displaying using the Oracle BI Systems Administration API, 22.3.1
viewing for components, in Fusion Middleware Control, 2.2.3
STORAGE_DIRECTORY parameter
user tracking log files, selecting an output location for, 9.3.1
strings
externalizing for localization, 15.5
translating using session variables, 15.5
subject area, SA System, 19.3.4
supported installation types, 1.8
SyndicatedOracleMapViewerContextPath configuration element, 20.2
system administration
introduction and overview, 1
links to typical tasks, 1.2
tasks, 1.1
tools for managing Oracle Business Intelligence, 1.4
system components
definition of, 1.3.1.1, 1.3.3.2
displaying names, 4.5.1
in a clustered environment, 6.1
listed, 1.3.3
managing using Fusion Middleware Control, 2.2.3
scaling, 5.1.2
scaling vertically and horizontally, 5.5
specifying ports for, 5.5
starting and stopping, 5.6.1
viewing host, instance, and port information for, 5.6.1
viewing status for, 5.6.1
system metrics, viewing, 7.1.1
system requirements, 1.8
system startup, troubleshooting, 4.9

T

table of contents for briefing books, 18.5.5
table views
common settings, 18.3.1.2
configuration, 7.3.3, 12.1
configuring maximum number of rows, 7.3.4
templates
write back, 18.8.2, 18.8.3
write back example, 18.8.3.3
temporary files, location of, 19.3.3.1
TemporaryFilePath configuration element, 19.3.3.1
text editor to manually update configuration settings, 3.4
text strings
exporting for Presentation Catalog, 15.2.2.2
exposing for Presentation Catalog, 15.2.2.5
localizing for Presentation Catalog, 15.2.2, 17.9
third-party tools, 1.7
time zones
precedence order, 14.3
session variables, 14.5
setting, 14.2
setting for users, 14.1
settings, 14.5
specifications, 14.4
specifying values, 14.4.1
usage, 14.1
user-preferred, 14.3.1
toolbar for BI Publisher, 18.5.4
topics of interest in other guides, 1.7
troubleshooting
clustered environments, 6.5
event polling tables, 7.8.4
system startup, 4.9

U

UI hints, propagating for ADF data sources, 1.7
UnaccessedRunningTimeoutMinutes configuration element, B.1
unarchiving
catalog folders, 17.10
catalogs, 17.10
objects, 17.2.3
UNIX
Japanese locale on AIX, 15.4.5.2
SORT_ORDER_LOCALE parameter, 15.4.1, A.4.2.1
updating configuration settings using Oracle BI Systems Management API, 22.3.3
URLs, generation and resource file location, 21
usage tracking
administering, 9.1
error accessing usage tracking output file, 9.3.1
file naming conventions, about and example, 9.3.2
output file, 9.3.3
output file column behavior, 9.3.3
output file format, 9.3.3
output location, selecting, 9.3.1
performance considerations, 9.3.4
usage tracking log files, usage tracking data (table), 9.4
Usage Tracking section parameters (NQSConfig.INI file)
BUFFER_SIZE, A.9.9
BUFFER_TIME_LIMIT_SECONDS, A.9.10
CHECKPOINT_INTERVAL_MINUTES, A.9.4
CODE_PAGE, A.9.6
CONNECTION_POOL, A.9.8
DIRECT_INSERT, A.9.2
ENABLE, A.9.1
FILE_ROLLOVER_INTERVAL_MINUTES, A.9.5
MAX_INSERTS_PER_TRANSACTION, A.9.12
NUM_INSERT_THREADS, A.9.11
parameters, about, A.9
PHYSICAL_TABLE_NAME, A.9.7
STORAGE_DIRECTORY, A.9.3
user interface, setting the default language, 15.2.1.3
users
preferred time zone, 14.3.1
session log-off period, 7.3.2
time zones, 14.1
utilities
log viewer utility, 8.4.2, 8.4.2.2
sawrepaj, 17.12.4

V

validating catalogs, 17.2.5
validation helper functions, 18.6.4, 18.6.4
version numbers, for Oracle BI repository, 10.1.2
vertical scaling
about, 5.1
using Fusion Middleware Control, 5.5
view defaults, 18.7
viewing device types, 19.4
views, default in Compound Layout, 18.7.2.3

W

web client, improving performance for, 7.10
WebLogic scripting tool for managing domains, 1.4.4
WebLogic server administration console
centrally managing Java components, 2.3
tool to manage Java components, 1.4.2
whole server migration, 24
Windows, service for starting and stopping system components, 4.5.2
WLST
tool to manage WebLogic server domains, 1.4.4
using with Oracle BI Systems Management API to update configuration settings, 22.3.3.1
workspace, Catalog Manager, 17.3.2, 17.5, 17.5.3
write back
limitations, 18.8.1
table, 18.8.2
template, 18.8.2, 18.8.3
template example, 18.8.3.3

X

XML data sources, setting refresh interval, 7.4.5
XML message files, 18.7.1
XML message files, view defaults, 18.7.1

Z

zones, time, 14.1
PK)f~}PK\EOEBPS/migrate.htm Moving Between Environments

24 Moving Between Environments

This chapter describes how to move Oracle Business Intelligence between environments. You can move Oracle Business Intelligence to a new environment or from a test to a production environment, as described in the following list:

  • You can move (or migrate) Oracle Business Intelligence to a new environment by re-creating an existing Oracle BI system in a different location to the one in which it was originally installed. The objective is to re-create an identical deployment on different hardware.

    You might want to move to a new environment for the following reasons:

    • To move the system as a whole onto more powerful hardware.

    • To move to a different operating system.

    • To move into a different physical location.

    Moving is sometimes performed after a system has been upgraded. Upgrade is not covered in this guide. For complete information, see Oracle Fusion Middleware Upgrade Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence.

  • Moving from a test environment to a production environment involves developing and testing applications in a test environment, and then rolling out the test applications (and optionally test data), in the production environment on the same operating system. This can also include moving from a single- to a multiple-computer environment.

    See also "Managing the Repository Lifecycle in a Multiuser Development Environment" in Oracle Fusion Middleware Metadata Repository Builder's Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition for information about moving repositories from test to production environments.

For information, see "Moving Oracle Business Intelligence to a Target Environment" in Oracle Fusion Middleware Administrator's Guide.

In addition, Oracle Business Intelligence supports whole server migration, in which a WebLogic Server instance is migrated to a different physical computer upon failure, either manually or automatically. For complete information, see the chapter on "Whole Server Migration" in Oracle Fusion Middleware Using Clusters for Oracle WebLogic Server and see "Configuring Server Migration for an Enterprise Deployment" in Oracle Fusion Middleware Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence.

PKӟPK\EOEBPS/em_wls_config.htmZo Managing Oracle Business Intelligence

2 Managing Oracle Business Intelligence

This chapter introduces management and configuration of Oracle Business Intelligence using Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control, Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console, and the Fusion Middleware Control MBean Browser.

This chapter includes the following sections:

2.1 Why Use Fusion Middleware Control and WebLogic Server Administration Console?

You use Fusion Middleware Control and WebLogic Server Control Administration Console to centrally manage the Oracle Business Intelligence system. These Web-based tools support the most common system administration tasks for Oracle Business Intelligence. For more information, see Section 1.2, "Getting Started with Managing Oracle Business Intelligence."

Fusion Middleware Control enables you to manage system components by performing tasks such as monitoring status, starting and stopping processes, scaling out, resolving issues, and configuring components. You can also manage some aspects of Java components. For example, you can monitor their status and start and stop them.

WebLogic Server Administration Console enables you to monitor status and configure security for Java components. For information, see Chapter 1, "Introduction to Oracle Business Intelligence System Administration."

Locking Mechanism Enables Multiple Concurrent Administrators

With large deployments, you might have multiple administrators accessing the system concurrently to view the state of the system while other administrators might want to make configuration changes. Fusion Middleware Control and Oracle WebLogic Server prevent concurrent updates of the same configuration settings by multiple administrators by using a locking mechanism that allows only one administrator to make changes at any one time.


Note:

Multiple administrators using the same administrator account could unknowingly make concurrent updates of the same configuration settings. It is therefore recommended that multiple administrator users do not share the same administrator account.


2.2 Centrally Managing Oracle Business Intelligence Components Using Fusion Middleware Control

You can use Fusion Middleware Control to centrally manage, monitor, and configure Oracle Business Intelligence system components (for example, the Oracle BI Server, Oracle BI Presentation Services, and Oracle BI Scheduler). You can also use Fusion Middleware Control to manage the Administration Server and Managed Servers.

This section contains the following topics:

2.2.1 Tips for Using Fusion Middleware Control with Oracle Business Intelligence

Keep the following tips in mind as you use Fusion Middleware Control to manage Oracle Business Intelligence:

  • For complete information about Fusion Middleware Control and how to use it, see Oracle Fusion Middleware Administrator's Guide.

  • You might want to have a user who can view information about Oracle Business Intelligence within Fusion Middleware Control but not make any changes. You can configure such a user by making him a member of the Monitors group. See Oracle Fusion Middleware Securing Resources Using Roles and Policies for Oracle WebLogic Server for information on the Monitors group.

  • You might encounter display problems when using Internet Explorer 8 with Fusion Middleware Control. For example, scroll bars might be missing on the Log Messages tab of the Diagnostics page, even when the bars are required to see all the text.

    To work around this issue, ensure that Compatibility View mode is turned off for the browser. To do so:

    1. From the Tools menu, select Internet Options. On the Advanced tab in the Browsing section, ensure that Automatically recover from page layout errors with Compatibility View is not checked.

    2. From the Tools menu, select Compatibility View Settings. Ensure that Display intranet sites in Compatibility View and Display all websites in Compatibility View are not checked.

2.2.2 Logging into Fusion Middleware Control to Manage Oracle Business Intelligence

To log in to Fusion Middleware Control, open a web browser and enter the Fusion Middleware Control URL, in the following format:

http://hostname.domain:port/em

The port number is the number of the Administration Server, and the default port number is 7001.

Fusion Middleware Control is available only if the Administration Server is running, as described in Section 4.2, "Starting the Oracle Business Intelligence System."

To log in to Fusion Middleware Control:

  1. Enter the URL in a web browser. For example:

    http://host1.example.com:7001/em
    

    The Fusion Middleware Control login page is displayed, as shown in Figure 2-1.

    Figure 2-1 Sign-In Page for Fusion Middle ware Control

    Fusion Middleware Control Login page.

  2. Enter the system administrator user name and password and click Login.

    This systemwide administration user name and password was specified during the installation process, and you can use it to log in to WebLogic Server Administration Console, Fusion Middleware Control, and Oracle Business Intelligence.

    Alternatively, enter any other user name and password that has been granted the Oracle BI Administrator application role.

    Fusion Middleware Control opens, as shown in Figure 2-2.

    Figure 2-2 Main Page in Fusion Middleware Control

    Fusion Middleware Control bifoundation_domain page


Note:

If you have the browser configured to send HTTP requests to a proxy server, then you might have to configure the browser to not send Administration Server HTTP requests to the proxy server. If the Administration Server is on the same computer as the browser, then ensure that requests that are sent to localhost or 127.0.0.1 are not sent to the proxy server.


2.2.3 Using Fusion Middleware Control to Manage Oracle Business Intelligence System Components

Use this topic to display Oracle Business Intelligence pages that enable you to manage the Oracle Business Intelligence system components:

To manage Oracle Business Intelligence system components using Fusion Middleware Control:

  1. Log in to Fusion Middleware Control.

    For more information, see Section 2.2.2, "Logging into Fusion Middleware Control to Manage Oracle Business Intelligence."

  2. Expand the Business Intelligence folder and select the coreapplication node.

    Fusion Middleware Control displays the Overview page, as shown in Figure 2-3.

    Figure 2-3 Overview Page in Fusion Middleware Control

    Business Intelligence Overview page


    Note:

    If the Business Intelligence folder is not visible or there is no coreapplication node under it, then Oracle Business Intelligence system components have not been installed. For information, see Oracle Fusion Middleware Installation Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence.


    The Overview page displays the current status of the system, by providing information about current availability, performance, and issues identified within the BI domain. (For more information, see Section 1.3, "What Is the Oracle Business Intelligence System Logical Architecture?") The Overview page also enables you to start and stop Oracle Business Intelligence.

  3. From the Overview page, select an appropriate tab to perform Oracle Business Intelligence management tasks.

    See Section 3.2, "Using Fusion Middleware Control to Update Oracle Business Intelligence Configuration Settings" for information about performing tasks on these tabs.

2.2.4 Using Fusion Middleware Control to Monitor Status and Start and Stop Oracle Business Intelligence Java Components

Use this topic to display the WebLogic Domain page, where you can monitor status and start and stop Oracle Business Intelligence Java components (Administration Server and Managed Servers).

You can also display the WebLogic Server Administration Console (using a link on the bifoundation_domain Summary page), where you can manage Oracle Business Intelligence Java components.

To manage Oracle Business Intelligence Java components using Fusion Middleware Control:

  1. Log in to Fusion Middleware Control.

    For more information, see Section 2.2.2, "Logging into Fusion Middleware Control to Manage Oracle Business Intelligence."

  2. Expand the WebLogic Domain folder and select the bifoundation_domain node.

    Fusion Middleware Control displays the bifoundation_domain page, as shown in Figure 2-4.

    Figure 2-4 Home Page for bifoundation_domain

    Fusion Middleware Control BI Domain Home page

    The bifoundation_domain page is the starting point for monitoring status and for starting and stopping Oracle Business Intelligence Java components using Fusion Middleware Control. You can also click a link to display the WebLogic Server Administration Console, where you can manage and configure Oracle Business Intelligence Java components. For more information, see Section 2.3, "Centrally Managing Oracle Business Intelligence Java Components Using the Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console."

  3. Using the bifoundation_domain page, you can perform the following Oracle Business Intelligence management tasks:

2.2.5 About the Navigation Tree in Fusion Middleware Control

The navigation tree enables you to navigate within the BI domain that can be managed by Fusion Middleware Control.

Depending on the choices made during installation for which install type and components to configure, the following domain components can be displayed as nodes in the navigation tree:

  • Application Deployments

    The Application Deployments node shows all the applications that are deployed into the BI domain (for example, analytics, Oracle Business Intelligence for Microsoft Office, Oracle BI Publisher, and Oracle Real-Time Decisions).

  • WebLogic Domain

    These nodes display summary information for the WebLogic server. Select a node and click the Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console link to display the WebLogic Server Administration Console, where you can administer Oracle WebLogic Server.

    • bifoundation_domain

      This node represents the WebLogic server domain for Oracle Business Intelligence with an AdminServer node that contains the Administration Server and a bi_cluster node that contains Managed Servers (a single node cluster by default). For information, see Section 1.3.4, "What Is the Administration Server?"

      • AdminServer

      • bi_cluster

  • Business Intelligence

    • coreapplication

      This node represents the Oracle Business Intelligence system components that can be managed using Fusion Middleware Control.

      Select this node to display the Overview page and manage the system components.

  • Metadata Repositories

    This node represents the Metadata Services (MDS) schema repositories that can be managed using Fusion Middleware Control.

2.3 Centrally Managing Oracle Business Intelligence Java Components Using the Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console

You use the Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console to centrally manage Oracle Business Intelligence Java components.

You display Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console, using the following methods:

  • Clicking a link on the Overview page in Fusion Middleware Control

  • Entering a URL into a web browser window

The Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console is available only if the Administration Server for WebLogic Server is running. For information, see Section 4.1, "About Starting and Stopping Oracle Business Intelligence."

To display Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console:

  1. If the Administration Server for WebLogic Server is not running, start it.

    For information, see Section 4.7, "Starting and Stopping the Administration Server and All Oracle Business Intelligence Java Components on Windows and UNIX."

  2. Display the Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console using the following methods:

    Clicking a link on the Overview page in Fusion Middleware Control:

    1. Display Fusion Middleware Control. For information, see Section 2.2.3, "Using Fusion Middleware Control to Manage Oracle Business Intelligence System Components."

    2. Expand the WebLogic Domain node and select the bifoundation_domain.

    3. Click the Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console link in the Summary region.

      The Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console login page is displayed.

    Using a URL in a web browser window:

    1. Start a web browser.

    2. Enter the following URL into the browser:

      http://<host>:<port>/console/

      For example, http://mycomputer:7001/console/

      where host is the DNS name or IP address of the Administration Server and port is the listen port on which the Administration Server is listening for requests (port 7001 by default). If you have configured a domain-wide Administration port, then use that port number. If you configured the Administration Server to use Secure Sockets Layer (SSL), then you must add the letter 's' after http as follows:

      https://<host>:7001/console/

      The preceding URL example uses SSL.

      The Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console login page is displayed.

  3. Enter the system administrator user name and password and click Login.

    This systemwide administration user name and password was specified during the installation process, and you can use it to log in to WebLogic Server Administration Console, Fusion Middleware Control, and Oracle Business Intelligence. Alternatively, enter a user name that belongs to one of the following security groups:

    • Administrators

    • Operators

    • Deployers

    • Monitors

    These groups provide various levels of access to system administration functions in the Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console.

    Using the security system, you can add to or delete users fro, one of these groups to provide controlled access to the Console.

    If you have the browser configured to send HTTP requests to a proxy server, then you might have to configure the browser to not send Administration Server HTTP requests to the proxy. If the Administration Server is on the same computer as the browser, then ensure that requests sent to localhost or 127.0.0.1 are not sent to the proxy.

    In Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console you select the bifoundation_domain page, as shown in Figure 2-5.

    Figure 2-5 bifoundation_domain Page in Administration Console

    WebLogic Server BI Domain page

    You can monitor and manage Oracle Business Intelligence Java components from this page.


Note:

For more information on using the the Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console, see the Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console Help system. That Help system describes how to use the console to override the context root for a deployed web application. Changing any context root for Oracle Business Intelligence is not supported, because many context roots are used for internal links and end-user end points.


2.4 Managing Oracle Business Intelligence JMX MBeans Using the Fusion Middleware Control MBean Browser

This section introduces the Fusion Middleware Control MBean Browser and explains how to display it.

2.4.1 What Is the Fusion Middleware Control MBean Browser?

The Fusion Middleware Control MBean Browser is an Oracle web application (based on JMX MBean containers), that can be used instead of Fusion Middleware Control to perform centralized and local management of Oracle Business Intelligence system components.

2.4.2 Displaying the Fusion Middleware Control MBean Browser

This section describes how to display the Fusion Middleware Control MBean Browser.

Although you can use the Fusion Middleware Control MBean Browser to update Oracle Business Intelligence configuration settings, most settings are more conveniently accessible using the Oracle Business Intelligence pages in Fusion Middleware Control. You display these pages by selecting the coreapplication node in the Business Intelligence folder as described in Section 3.2, "Using Fusion Middleware Control to Update Oracle Business Intelligence Configuration Settings."

To display the Fusion Middleware Control MBean Browser:

  1. Display Fusion Middleware Control.

    For information, see Section 2.2.3, "Using Fusion Middleware Control to Manage Oracle Business Intelligence System Components."

  2. In the Navigator window, expand the WebLogic Domain folder and the bifoundation_domain node, and select the AdminServer node.

    For information, see Section 1.3.4, "What Is the Administration Server?"

  3. Display the WebLogic Server menu and select System MBean Browser from the menu to display the Fusion Middleware Control System MBean Browser.

    For information about how to access Oracle Business Intelligence MBeans, see Section 3.5, "Using the Fusion Middleware Control MBean Browser to Update Configuration Settings."

  4. Make and save your changes.

PK* _oZoPK\EOEBPS/whatsnew.htm: New Features for Oracle Business Intelligence System Administrators

New Features for Oracle Business Intelligence System Administrators

This preface describes changes to system administration features for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition 11g Release 1 (11.1.1). If you are upgrading to Oracle BI EE from a previous release, then read the following information carefully, because there are significant differences in features, tools, and procedures.

This preface contains the following topics:

New Features for Oracle BI EE 11g Release 1 (11.1.1.6)

This section describes new features for Oracle BI EE 11g Release 1 (11.1.1.6). It contains the following topics:

New Features for 11.1.1.6.2

New system administration features in Oracle BI EE 11g Release 1 (11.1.1.6.2) include:

ODBC/JDBC Procedures to Obtain Oracle BI Server Diagnostics

ODBC/JDBC procedures are now available to obtain diagnostic information for the Oracle BI Server. See Section 8.6, "Using ODBC/JDBC Procedures to Obtain Oracle BI Server Diagnostics" for more information.

New Features for 11.1.1.6.0

New system administration features in Oracle BI EE 11g Release 1 (11.1.1.6.0) include:

New Configuration Elements for Prompts and Custom Links

You can use new configuration elements to affect the following:

Changes in the Interface for Fusion Middleware Control

Various changes were made in the user interface for Fusion Middleware Control, as described in the following sections:

Language for the User Interface of the Administration Tool

See Section 15.4.4, "Modifying the Language of the User Interface for the Administration Tool" for details on changing the language for the Oracle BI Administration Tool.

Enhancements for Oracle BI Presentation Catalog

See the following sections that describe enhancements to working with objects in the Oracle BI Presentation Catalog:

Enhancements to Full-Text Search

The way that you configure for users to perform a full-text search has been enhanced, as described in Section 17.11, "Configuring for Full-Text Catalog Search."

Configuration Settings for Analyses and Dashboards

New configuration settings are available for working with analyses and dashboards, as described in Section 18.5.1, "Manually Changing Presentation Setting Defaults."

Configuration Settings in NQSConfig.INI

The NQSConfig.INI file for the Oracle BI Server now includes the settings that are described in the following sections. Some of these sections have enhanced documentation from the previous release:

New Features for Oracle BI EE 11g Release 1 (11.1.1.5)

New system administration features in Oracle BI EE 11g Release 1 (11.1.1.5) include:

Changes to the Simple Install Type

The Simple Install type has been changed. In this release, only an Administration server is configured as part of this type. The Managed Server and the Node Manager are not installed, which affects the way that certain administration tasks are performed. See "Installation Types" in Oracle Fusion Middleware Installation Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence for more information.

Enhancements to Exporting Captions

The process of exporting captions from the catalog for translation has been enhanced to address duplicate captions. For information, see Section 15.2.2.4, "Step 4: Handling Duplicate Exported Text Strings."

Provisioning Tenants

You can use Catalog Manager to provision tenants. For information, see Section 17.6.7, "Working with Tenants."

New Features for Oracle BI EE 11g Release 1 (11.1.1.3)

New system administration features in Oracle BI EE 11g Release 1 (11.1.1.3) include:

Integrated Management Experience

This release introduces a fully integrated management experience for the administration of Java and non-Java components using Fusion Middleware Control and Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console. Because of this new integrated management experience, you no longer must manually change configuration files for most administration tasks.

Centralized System Administration

In this release, you can now perform most system administration tasks using centralized management capabilities, including the following:

For information, see Chapter 2, "Managing Oracle Business Intelligence."

Programmatic and Scripting Capabilities for Administrative Operations

This release enables the automation of configuration and system management. The new BI Systems Management API Java programming interface includes a rich set of standards-based JMX MBeans to enable developers to automate administrative operations using Java and scripting technologies such as WLST (WebLogic Scripting Tool) and JPython. For information, see Chapter 22, "Introducing the Oracle BI Systems Management API."

New Configuration Settings for Views

This release provides new configuration settings for table, pivot table, graph, and gauge views. The release also introduces a new type called map view. For information about configuring these views, see Chapter 18, "Configuring and Managing Analyses and Dashboards."

Validation of the Catalog

This release provides functionality that enables you to validate the catalog to address inconsistencies that have developed over time., For information, see Section 17.2.5.4, "Performing a Basic Validation of the Catalog."

Management of Users and Groups

This release introduces several enhancements and changes in how users and groups are managed. This release also uses application roles for organizing users. The Presentation Services groups from the previous release are now known as Catalog groups. For information, see "Working with Catalog Groups" in Oracle Fusion Middleware Security Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition

Enhancements for Localization

This release introduces several enhancements for localizing your system, including lookup tables and alias tables. For information, see Chapter 15, "Localizing Oracle Business Intelligence."

PK l;:PK\EOEBPS/configsettings.htm\i Configuring the Oracle Business Intelligence System

3 Configuring the Oracle Business Intelligence System

This chapter describes how to configure the Oracle Business Intelligence system using Fusion Middleware Control and manually. This chapter provides information about the location of configuration files.

This chapter includes the following sections:

3.1 Configuring Oracle Business Intelligence

Oracle recommends using Fusion Middleware Control to configure Oracle Business Intelligence. However, if configuration settings cannot be changed using this method, then you can use the Oracle BI Systems Management API or the Fusion Middleware Control MBean Browser. You can also manually edit configuration files if you take the appropriate precautions.

Table 3-1 describes the methods that you can use for configuring Oracle Business Intelligence. All the methods result in changes being made in one or more configuration files.

Table 3-1 Methods for Configuring Oracle Business Intelligence

What to you want to do?What tools can you use?How are updates made?

Centrally manage configuration settings

Automatically, through Oracle BI Systems Management API methods.

For information, see Chapter 22, "Introducing the Oracle BI Systems Management API."

Programmatically change configuration settings

  • WLST (WebLogic Scripting Tool)

  • Java Program

For information, see Section 3.3, "Using the Oracle BI Systems Management API to Update Configuration Settings."

Using scripts or programs to programmatically access Oracle BI Systems Management API methods.

Manually change configuration settings

Caution: Settings managed by Fusion Middleware Control are commented as such in configuration files. You must not be manually update these settings.

You must make changes correctly in configuration files in all nodes in a cluster to avoid damage to the system.

Manually, using a text editor to enter changes in configuration files.


3.2 Using Fusion Middleware Control to Update Oracle Business Intelligence Configuration Settings

Using Fusion Middleware Control to update Oracle Business Intelligence configuration settings is the recommended method, because it manages the distribution of changes across the system, and across all computers if the system is clustered.

To update Oracle Business Intelligence configuration settings using Fusion Middleware Control:

  1. Go to the Business Intelligence Overview page, as described in Section 2.2.3, "Using Fusion Middleware Control to Manage Oracle Business Intelligence System Components."

  2. Select the appropriate page and tabs to display the settings to change.

  3. Click Lock and Edit Configuration to enable changes to be made.


    Note:

    Multiple administrators should not share the same administrator account, as they could unknowingly make concurrent updates to the same configuration settings.


  4. Make the appropriate changes on each page.

  5. Click Apply on each page after you have made your changes.

  6. When you have finished making your changes, do one of the following:

    • Click Activate Changes to execute your changes and release the lock to enable another system administrator to make changes.

    • Click Release Configuration to undo all changes you made since clicking Lock and Edit Configuration and release the lock to enable another system administrator to make changes.

  7. After you have activated your changes, go to the Overview page and click Restart.

3.3 Using the Oracle BI Systems Management API to Update Configuration Settings

You can use the Oracle BI Systems Management API to update Oracle Business Intelligence configuration settings that are normally managed by Fusion Middleware Control. For information, see Section 22.3.3, "Updating Configuration Settings Using the Oracle BI Systems Management API."

3.4 Using a Text Editor to Update Configuration Settings

You can manually update configuration settings that are not normally managed by Fusion Middleware Control using a text editor.


Caution:

If you manually update configuration settings that are not normally managed by Fusion Middleware Control, then you must likely make identical changes in multiple copies of configuration files on multiple computers. If you fail to make changes in all of the necessary configuration files, then the system might be damaged.


You can use a text editor to manually update Oracle Business Intelligence configuration settings that are not normally managed by Fusion Middleware Control, as described in the following procedure.

To manually update Oracle Business Intelligence configuration settings that are not normally managed by Fusion Middleware Control:

  1. Make a backup copy of the files that you plan to edit.

  2. Open the configuration file in a text editor.


    Note:

    If Oracle Business Intelligence is installed on multiple computers or in multiple locations, then a copy of the configuration file exists for each installation, and each file contains duplicate settings. Therefore, you must locate and make the same changes in each copy of a configuration file.


    For information, see Section 3.6, "Where Are Configuration Files Located?"

  3. In each configuration file to change, locate the element or create the new element if you must add a setting to the file.

  4. Enter the appropriate changes.

  5. Save your changes and close the configuration file.

  6. Restart Oracle Business Intelligence.

    For information, see Section 4.1, "About Starting and Stopping Oracle Business Intelligence."

It is possible to manually update configuration settings that are normally managed by Fusion Middleware Control. However, you should never attempt such updates unless you are specifically instructed to do so by Oracle Support Services. For information, see Appendix D, "Manually Updating Fusion Middleware Control Settings."

3.5 Using the Fusion Middleware Control MBean Browser to Update Configuration Settings

Use Fusion Middleware Control to update configuration settings, unless specifically directed to use the MBean Browser. For information, see Section 3.2, "Using Fusion Middleware Control to Update Oracle Business Intelligence Configuration Settings."

To update configuration settings using the Fusion Middleware Control MBean Browser:

  1. Display the Fusion Middleware Control MBean Browser.

    For information, see Section 2.4.2, "Displaying the Fusion Middleware Control MBean Browser."

  2. Lock the domain.

    Before you change any Oracle Business Intelligence-related configuration attribute settings using the Fusion Middleware Control MBean Browser, you must lock the domain as follows:

    1. Navigate to the following MBean (the first BIDomain MBean): oracle.biee.admin, Domain:bifoundation_domain, BIDomain, BIDomain.

    2. Display the Operations tab.

    3. Click the Lock operation link.

      When you have locked the domain, you can start to update settings.

  3. Expand a folder to display the details for a group of configuration file attributes.

    For example, to configure Oracle Business Intelligence email settings, expand the BIDomain.BIInstance.EmailConfiguration folder, and select the underlying node of the same name.

    To configure a different group of Oracle Business Intelligence configuration settings, expand the required folder, and select it's underlying node.

  4. Create or update a value in the following ways:

    • Entering directly into a field in the Attributes tab:

      • Enter a new value into the Value field for the appropriate row.

      • Click Apply to save the changes, or Revert to undo the changes.

    • Entering into a new page that you display from the Attributes tab:

      • Click the link in the Name column to display a new page.

      • Enter a new value in the Value field.

      • Click Apply to save the changes, or Revert to undo the changes.

      • Click Return to close the page.

  5. Click Revert to undo your changes.

  6. Repeat the previous steps to create or change other settings.

  7. Release the lock on the domain.

    After you have made changes you must release the lock on the domain by committing, or rolling back your changes as follows:

    1. Navigate to the following MBean: oracle.biee.admin, Domain:bifoundation_domain, BIDomain, BIDomain.

    2. Display the Operations tab.

    3. (Optional) Click the commit operation link to save your changes and release the lock on the domain.

      Use this option when you are satisfied with the changes and you want to release the lock on the domain.

    4. (Optional) Click the rollback operation link to undo your changes and release the lock on the domain.

      Use this option when you do not want to commit your changes and want to release the lock on the domain.

  8. Go to the Oracle Business Intelligence Overview page and click Restart.

3.6 Where Are Configuration Files Located?

Oracle Business Intelligence configuration files, used to configure the behavior of the system, are found in various locations within the Middleware home.

Each host has its own set of configuration files for the components that are deployed on that host.

Oracle Business Intelligence system component configuration files can be found under:

MW_HOME\ORACLE_INSTANCE\instancen\config\COMPONENT\bi_component_name\

For example, the configuration file for the Oracle BI Server might be located in:

D:\mw_home\instances\instance1\config\OracleBIServerComponent\ coreapplication_obis1

Table 3-2 lists the names and locations of configuration files for each Oracle Business Intelligence system component. You are advised to use Fusion Middleware Control to update Oracle Business Intelligence configuration settings and ensure that changes are correctly propagated. For information, see Section 3.2, "Using Fusion Middleware Control to Update Oracle Business Intelligence Configuration Settings."

For information about diagnostic log configuration files, see Section 8.3.2, "What Are Diagnostic Log Configuration Files and Where Are They Located?"

Table 3-2 Oracle Business Intelligence System Component Configuration File Locations

BI ComponentConfiguration FileFile Location

Oracle BI Server


NQSConfig.INI

logconfig.xml

ORACLE_INSTANCE\config\OracleBIServerComponent\coreapplication_obisn

For example:

\instances\instance1\config\OracleBIServerComponent\coreapplication_obis1

Note: Although DBFeatures.ini is also located in this directory, do not edit this file directly. See Oracle Fusion Middleware Metadata Repository Builder's Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition for information about how to edit features for a database.

Oracle BI Presentation Services


instanceconfig.xml

ORACLE_INSTANCE\config\OracleBIPresentationServicesComponent\coreapplication_obipsn

For example:

\instances\instance1\config\OracleBIPresentationServicesComponent\coreapplication_obips1

Note: Do not add elements to the instanceconfig.xml file unless you are overriding the stated default values. Override only those settings that are necessary for configuring the system to meet the needs of your organization.

Cluster Controller


ClusterConfig.xml

ccslogging.xml

ORACLE_INSTANCE\config\OracleBIApplication\coreapplication

For example:

\instances\instance1\config\OracleBIApplication\coreapplication

Oracle BI Scheduler


instanceconfig.xml

ccslogging.xml
(for Cluster Controller)

ORACLE_INSTANCE\config\OracleBISchedulerComponent\coreapplication_obischn

For example:

\instances\instance1\config\OracleBISchedulerComponent\coreapplication_obisch1

JavaHost

config.xml

logging_config.xml

ORACLE_INSTANCE\config\OracleBIJavaHostComponent\coreapplication_obijhn

For example:

\instances\instance1\config\OracleBIJavaHostComponent\coreapplication_obijh1

Oracle BI Presentation Services Plug-in


bridgeconfig.properties

MW_HOME\user_projects\domains\domain_name\config\fmwconfig\biinstances\coreapplication

For example:

mw_home\user_projects\domains\bifoundation_domain\config\fmwconfig\biinstances\coreapplication


For more information about Oracle Business Intelligence installations, see Oracle Fusion Middleware Installation Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence

PKW+7\\PK\EOEBPS/part7.htmJ Automating Management of Oracle Business Intelligence

Part VII

Automating Management of Oracle Business Intelligence

This part explains how to use the Oracle BI Systems Management API. It includes the following chapter:

PK&tOJPK\EOEBPS/glossary.htm Glossary

Glossary

This glossary defines terms for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition. See also the Oracle Fusion Middleware Master Glossary for additional terms and definitions.

action

Provides functionality to navigate to related content or to invoke operations, functions or processes in external systems. You can include actions in analyses, dashboard pages, agents, scorecard objectives, scorecard initiatives, and KPIs.

See also action link.

Action Framework

The Action Framework is a component of the Oracle BI EE architecture and includes a J2EE application called the Action Execution Service (AES) and actions-specific JavaScript functionality deployed as part of Oracle BI EE. The action framework also includes client-side functionality for creating actions and invoking certain action types directly from the browser.

action link

A link to an action that you have embedded in an analysis, dashboard page, scorecard objective, scorecard initiative, or KPI that, when clicked, runs an associated action.

See also action.

ADF Business Intelligence Component

Provides the developer the ability to include Oracle BI Presentation Catalog objects in ADF Applications. This component uses a SOAP connection to access the catalog.

Administration Server

Part of the WebLogic server domain and runs the processes that manage Oracle Business Intelligence components. The Administration Server includes the Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console, Oracle Fusion Middleware Control, and JMX MBeans. For a Simple Install type, the Administration Server also includes Java components for Oracle Business Intelligence such as Oracle BI Publisher and Oracle Real-Time Decisions.

See also Fusion Middleware Control, Java components and Managed Server.

Administration Tool

See Oracle BI Administration Tool.

agent

Enables you to automate your business processes. You can use agents to provide event-driven alerting, scheduled content publishing, and conditional event-driven action execution.

Agents can dynamically detect information-based problems and opportunities, determine the appropriate individuals to notify, and deliver information to them through a wide range of devices (email, phones, and so on).

aggregate persistence

A feature that automates the creation and loading of aggregate tables and their corresponding Oracle Business Intelligence metadata mappings to enable aggregate navigation.

aggregate table

A table that stores precomputed results from measures that have been aggregated over a set of dimensional attributes. Each aggregate table column contains data at a given set of levels. For example, a monthly sales table might contain a precomputed sum of the revenue for each product in each store during each month. Using aggregate tables optimizes performance.

aggregation rule

In an Oracle BI repository, a rule applied to a logical column or physical cube column that specifies a particular aggregation function to be applied to the column data, such as SUM.

In Presentation Services, users can see the rules that have been applied in the repository. Users can also change the default aggregation rules for measure columns.

alias table

A physical table that references a different physical table as its source. You can use alias tables to set up multiple tables, each with different keys, names, or joins, when a single physical table must serve in different roles. Because alias table names are included in physical SQL queries, you can also use alias tables to provide meaningful table names, making the SQL statements easier to read.

analysis

A query that a user creates on the Criteria tab in Presentation Services. An analysis can optionally contain one or more filters or selection steps to restrict the results.

See also filter and selection step.

analysis criteria

Consists of the columns, filters, and selection steps that you specify for an analysis.

See also analysis.

analysis prompt

A prompt that is added to an analysis. When the user selects a prompt value, that value then determines the content that displays in the analysis that contains the prompt, only.

See dashboard prompt and prompt.

attribute

The details of a dimension in an Oracle BI repository. Attributes usually appear as columns of a dimension table.

attribute column

In Presentation Services, a column that holds a flat list of values that are also known as members. No hierarchical relationship exists between these members, as is the case for members of a hierarchical column. Examples include ProductID or City.

See hierarchical column.

BI Composer

BI Composer is a simple-to-use wizard that enables you to quickly and easily create, edit, or view analyses without the complexities of the Analysis editor.

BI domain

Contains configurable system components (the coreapplication) and Java components (the WebLogic server domain), and includes the Web-based management tools and applications that use resources.

A BI domain can be a set of middleware homes spread across one or more physical servers.

See also BI instance.

BI instance

Refers to the system components (coreapplication) of a BI domain

See also BI domain.

BI object

A piece of business intelligence content that is created with Presentation Services and saved to the Oracle BI Presentation Catalog. Examples of BI objects include analyses, dashboards, dashboard pages, scorecards, and KPIs.

BI Search

A search tool that resides outside of Presentation Services. BI Search is available from the Home Page after the administrator adds a link to the BI Search URL. BI Search provides a mechanism for searching for objects in the Oracle BI Presentation Catalog that is similar to a full-text search engine.

bookmark link

Captures the path to a dashboard page and all aspects of the page state.

See prompted link.

bridge table

A table that enables you to resolve many-to-many relationships between two other tables.

briefing book

See Oracle BI Briefing Books.

business model

An object in the Oracle BI repository that contains the business model definitions and the mappings from logical to physical tables. Business models are always dimensional, unlike objects in the Physical layer, which reflect the organization of the data sources. Each business model contains logical tables, columns, and joins.

Business Model and Mapping layer

A layer of the Oracle BI repository that defines the business, or logical, model of the data and specifies the mapping between the business model and the Physical layer schemas. This layer can contain one or more business models.

The Business Model and Mapping layer determines the analytic behavior that is seen by users, and defines the superset of objects available to users. It also hides the complexity of the source data models.

business owner

The person responsible for managing and improving the business value and performance of a KPI or scorecard object, such as an objective, cause & effect map, and so on.

cause & effect map

A component of a scorecard that lets you illustrate the cause and effect relationships of an objective or KPI.

See also Oracle Scorecard and Strategy Management.

chronological key

A column in a time dimension that identifies the chronological order of the members within a dimension level. The key must be unique at its level.

Cluster Controller

A process that serves as the first point of contact for new requests from Presentation Services and other clients. The Cluster Controller determines which Oracle BI Server in the cluster to direct the request to based on Oracle BI Server availability and load. It monitors the operation of servers in the cluster, including the Oracle BI Scheduler instances. The Cluster Controller is deployed in active-passive configuration.

column

In an Oracle BI repository, columns can be physical columns, logical columns, or presentation columns.

In Presentation Services, indicates the pieces of data that an analysis returns. Together with filters and selection steps, columns determine what analyses contain. Columns also have names that indicate the types of information that they contain, such as Account and Contact.

See also analysis, attribute column, hierarchical column, and measure column.

column filter

See filter.

column prompt

A type of filter that enables you to build specific value prompts on a data column to either exist alone on the dashboard or analysis or to expand or refine existing dashboard and analysis filters.

See also prompt.

complex join

A join in the Physical layer of an Oracle BI repository that uses an expression other than equals.

condition

Objects that return a single Boolean value based on the evaluation of an analysis or of a key performance indicator (KPI). You use conditions to determine whether agents deliver their content and execute their actions, whether actions links are displayed in dashboard pages, or whether sections and their content are displayed in dashboard pages.

See also action, action link, agent and key performance indicator (KPI).

connection pool

An object in the Physical layer of an Oracle BI repository that contains the connection information for a data source.

See also Physical layer.

content designer

The user who creates business intelligence objects such as analyses, dashboards, and scorecards.

contextual event action

A predelivered action that uses the Action Framework to pass content from the business intelligence object to another region on an ADF page.

See also action, Action Framework, and action link.

criteria

See analysis criteria.

cube

An OLAP (online analytical processing) data structure that lets data be analyzed more quickly and with greater flexibility than structures in relational databases. Cubes are made up of measures and organized by dimensions. Cubes in multidimensional data sources roughly correspond to star schemas in relational database models.

currency prompt

A prompt that enables the user to change the currency type that displays in the currency columns on an analysis or dashboard.

See also prompt.

custom view

A component of a scorecard that lets you show a customized view of your business and strategy data.

See also Oracle Scorecard and Strategy Management.

dashboard

An object that provides personalized views of corporate and external information. A dashboard consists of one or more pages. Pages can display anything that you can access or open with a web browser, such as results of analyses, images, alerts from agents, and so on.

dashboard prompt

A prompt that is added to the dashboard. When the user selects a prompt value, that value then determines the content that displays in all analyses that are included on the dashboard.

See analysis prompt and prompt.

Dashboard URL

Used for incorporating or referencing the content of a specific dashboard in external portals or applications. It has several forms and optional arguments that you can use to control its behavior.

data source name (DSN)

A data structure that contains the information about a specific database, typically used by an ODBC driver to connect to the database. The DSN contains information such as the name, directory, and driver of the database.

Connection pool objects in the Physical layer of the Oracle BI repository contain DSN information for individual data sources.

database hint

Instructions placed within a SQL statement that tell the database query optimizer the most efficient way to execute the statement. Hints override the optimizer's execution plan, so you can use hints to improve performance by forcing the optimizer to use a more efficient plan. Hints are supported only for Oracle Database data sources.

dimension

A hierarchical organization of logical columns (attributes). One or more logical dimension tables might be associated with at most one dimension.

A dimension might contain one or more (unnamed) hierarchies. There are two types of logical dimensions: dimensions with level-based hierarchies (structure hierarchies), and dimensions with parent-child hierarchies (value hierarchies).

A particular type of level-based dimension, called a time dimension, provides special functionality for modeling time series data.

See also hierarchy.

dimension table

A logical table that contains columns used by a particular dimension. A dimension table cannot be a fact table.

See also fact table.

driving table

A mechanism used to optimize the manner in which the Oracle BI Server processes multi-database joins when one table is very small (the driving table) and the other table is very large.

event polling table

Event polling tables (also called event tables) provide information to the Oracle BI Server about which physical tables have been updated. They are used to keep the query cache up-to-date. The Oracle BI Server cache system polls the event table, extracts the physical table information from the rows, and purges stale cache entries that reference those physical tables.

Essbase

A multidimensional database management system available from Oracle that provides a multidimensional database platform upon which to build business intelligence applications. Also referred to as Oracle's Hyperion Essbase.

fact table

In an Oracle BI repository, a logical table in the Business Model and Mapping layer that contains measures and has complex join relationships with dimension tables.

See also dimension table.

filter

Criteria that are applied to attribute and measure columns to limit the results that are displayed when an analysis is run. For measure columns, filters are applied before the query is aggregated and affect the query and thus the resulting values.

See also prompt and selection step.

foreign key

A column or a set of columns in one table that references the primary key columns in another table.

fragmentation content

The portion, or fragment, of the set of data specified in a logical table source when the logical table source does not contain the entire set of data at a given level. Fragmentation content is defined by the logical columns that are entered in the Fragmentation content box in the Content tab of the Logical Table Source dialog box.

Fusion Middleware Control

Provides Web-based management tools that enable you to monitor and configure Fusion Middleware components.

global header

An object in the user interface for Oracle BI Presentation Services that contains links and options that enable the user to quickly begin a task or locate a specific object within the Oracle BI Presentation Catalog. The global header always displays in the Presentation Services user interface, thus enabling users to quickly access links and search the catalog without having to navigate to the Home Page or Catalog page.

Go URL

Used to incorporate specific business intelligence results into external portals or applications. The Go URL is used when you add a result to your favorites or add a link to a request to a dashboard or external website. It has several forms and optional arguments that you can use to control its behavior.

hierarchical column

In Presentation Services, a column that holds data values that are organized using both named levels and parent-child relationships. This column is displayed using a tree-like structure. Individual members are shown in an outline manner, with lower-level members rolling into higher-level members. For example, a specific day belongs to a particular month, which in turn is within a particular year. Examples include Time or Geography.

See also attribute column.

hierarchy

In an Oracle BI repository, a system of levels in a logical dimension that are related to each other by one-to-many relationships. All hierarchies must have a common leaf level and a common root (all) level.

Hierarchies are not modeled as separate objects in the metadata. Instead, they are an implicit part of dimension objects.

See also dimension, logical level, and presentation hierarchy.

hierarchy level

In Presentation Services, an object within a hierarchical column that either rolls up or is rolled up from other levels. Corresponds to a presentation level in an Oracle BI repository.

See also presentation level.

home page

Provides an intuitive, task-based entry way into the functionality of Presentation Services. The Home page is divided into sections that enable you to quickly begin specific tasks, locate an object, or access technical documentation.

image prompt

A prompt that provides an image with different areas mapped to specific values. The user clicks an image area to select the prompt value that populates the analysis or dashboard.

See also prompt.

initialization block

Used to initialize dynamic repository variables, system session variables, and nonsystem session variables. An initialization block contains the SQL statements that are executed to initialize or refresh the variables that are associated with that block.

initiative

Used in a scorecard, an initiative is a time-specific task or project that is necessary to achieve objectives. As such, you can use initiatives that support objectives as milestones as they reflect progress toward strategy targets.

See also objective and Oracle Scorecard and Strategy Management.

Java components

Fusion Middleware Control components that are deployed as one or more Java EE applications (and a set of resources) and are managed by Node Manager.

See also Node Manager.

key performance indicator (KPI)

A measurement that defines and tracks specific business goals and strategic objectives. KPIs often times roll up into larger organizational strategies that require monitoring, improvement, and evaluation. KPIs have measurable values that usually vary with time, have targets to determine a score and performance status, include dimensions to allow for more precise analysis, and can be compared over time for trending purposes and to identify performance patterns.

See also Oracle Scorecard and Strategy Management.

KPI watchlist

A method of distributing KPIs to end users. A watchlist is a collection of KPIs that are built by adding the KPIs that are stored in the Oracle BI Presentation Catalog. After a KPI watchlist is built and saved, it is stored as a catalog object and can be added to dashboards and scorecards.

See also key performance indicator (KPI).

level

See hierarchy level.

logical display folder

Folders used to organize objects in the Business Model and Mapping layer of an Oracle BI repository. They have no metadata meaning.

logical join

Joins that express relationships between logical tables. Logical joins are conceptual, rather than physical, joins. In other words, they do not join to particular keys or columns. A single logical join can correspond to many possible physical joins.

logical level

In an Oracle BI repository, a component of a level-based hierarchy that either rolls up or is rolled up from other levels.

Parent-child hierarchies have implicit, inter-member levels between ancestors and descendants that are not exposed as logical level objects in the metadata. Although parent-child hierarchies also contain logical level objects, these levels are system generated and exist to enable aggregation across all members only.

See also dimension and hierarchy.

Logical SQL

The SQL statements that are understood by the Oracle BI Server. The Oracle BI Server Logical SQL includes standard SQL, plus special functions (SQL extensions) like AGO, TODATE, EVALUATE, and others.

Clients like Presentation Services send Logical SQL to the Oracle BI Server when a user makes a request. In addition, Logical SQL is used in the Business Model and Mapping layer to enable heterogeneous database access and portability. The Oracle BI Server transforms Logical SQL into physical SQL that can be understood by source databases.

logical table

A table object in the Business Model and Mapping layer of an Oracle BI repository. A single logical table can map to one or more physical tables. Logical tables can be either fact tables or dimension tables.

See also dimension table and fact table.

logical table source

Objects in the Business Model and Mapping layer of an Oracle BI repository that define the mappings from a single logical table to one or more physical tables. The physical to logical mapping can also be used to specify transformations that occur between the Physical layer and the Business Model and Mapping layer, and to enable aggregate navigation and fragmentation.

Managed Server

An individual J2EE application container (JMX MBean container). It provides local management functions on individual hosts for Java components and system components contained within the local middleware home, and refers to the Administration Server for all of its configuration and deployment information.

See also Administration Server and Fusion Middleware Control.

MDS

Oracle Metadata Services. A core technology of the Application Development Framework. MDS provides a unified architecture for defining and using metadata in an extensible and customizable manner.

See also MDS XML.

MDS XML

An XML format that is compatible with Oracle Metadata Services. MDS XML is a supported format for the Oracle BI repository. It enables integration with third-party source control management systems for offline repository development.

MDS XML format is different from the XML format generated by the Oracle BI Server XML API.

See also MDS, Oracle BI repository, and Oracle BI Server XML API.

measure column

A column that can change for each record and can be added up or aggregated. Typical measures are sales dollars and quantity ordered. Measures are calculated from data sources at query time.

Measure columns are displayed in the Oracle BI repository, usually in fact tables, or in Presentation Services.

metadata

Data about data. Metadata objects include the descriptions of schemas (such as tables, columns, data types, primary keys, foreign keys, and so on) and logical constructs (like fact tables, dimensions, and logical table source mappings).

The Oracle BI repository is made up of the metadata used by the Oracle BI Server to process queries.

metadata dictionary

A static set of XML documents that describe metadata objects, such as a column, including its properties and relationships with other metadata objects. A metadata dictionary can help users obtain more information about metrics or attributes for repository objects.

mission statement

A statement in a scorecard that specifies the key business goals and priorities that are required to achieve your vision.

See also Oracle Scorecard and Strategy Management and vision statement.

multi-database join

A join between two tables in an Oracle BI repository, where each table resides in a different database.

Node Manager

A daemon process that provides remote server start, stop, and restart capabilities when Java processes become unresponsive or terminate unexpectedly.

See also Java components.

object properties

Information about an object and attributes that the owner can assign to an object. Examples of properties include name, description, date stamps, read-only access, and do not index flag.

See also permissions.

objective

A required or desired outcome in a scorecard that forms your corporate strategy.

See also initiative and Oracle Scorecard and Strategy Management.

offline mode

In the Oracle BI Administration Tool, a mode where a repository builder can edit a repository that is not loaded into the Oracle BI Server.

online mode

In the Oracle BI Administration Tool, a mode where a repository builder can edit a repository while it is available for query operations. Online mode also allows user session monitoring for users connected to the subject areas in the repository.

opaque view

A Physical layer table that consists of a SELECT statement. In the Oracle BI repository, opaque views appear as view tables in the physical databases, but the view does not actually exist.

Open Database Connectivity (ODBC)

A standard interface used to access data in both relational and nonrelational databases. Database applications can use ODBC to access data stored in different types of database management systems, even if each database uses a different data storage format and programming interface.

Oracle BI Administration Tool

A Windows application that is used to create and edit Oracle BI repositories. The Administration Tool provides a graphical representation of the three parts of a repository: the Physical layer, the Business Model and Mapping layer, and the Presentation layer.

Oracle BI Briefing Books

A collection of static or updatable snapshots of dashboard pages, individual analyses, and BI Publisher reports. You can download briefing books in PDF or MHTML format for printing and viewing. You also can update, schedule, and deliver briefing books using agents.

Oracle BI JavaHost

A service that gives Presentation Services the ability to use functionality that is provided in Java libraries to support components such as graphs. The services are provided based on a request-response model.

Oracle BI Logical SQL View Object

Provides the developer the ability to create a Logical SQL statement to access the Oracle BI Server and fetch business intelligence data and bind it to native ADF components for inclusion on an ADF page. This view object uses a BI JDBC connection to the Oracle BI Server.

Oracle BI Presentation Catalog

Stores business intelligence objects, such as analyses and dashboards, and provides an interface where users create, access, and manage objects, and perform specific object-based tasks (for example, export, print, and edit). The catalog is organized into folders that are either shared or personal.

Oracle BI Presentation Services

Provides the framework and interface for the presentation of business intelligence data to web clients. It maintains a Presentation Catalog service on the file system for the customization of this presentation framework. It is a standalone process and communicates with the Oracle BI Server using ODBC over TCP/IP. It consists of components that are known as Answers, Delivers, and Interactive Dashboards.

See also ODBC; Oracle BI Server; Oracle BI Presentation Catalog; Oracle BI Presentation Services server.

Oracle BI Presentation Services server

The Oracle BI web server that exchanges information and data with the Oracle BI Server.

Oracle BI Publisher

A J2EE application that provides enterprise-wide publishing services in Oracle Business Intelligence. It generates highly formatted, pixel-perfect reports.

See also report.

Oracle BI Publisher report

See report.

Oracle BI repository

The set of Oracle Business Intelligence metadata that defines logical schemas, physical schemas, physical-to-logical mappings, aggregate table navigation, and other constructs. Oracle BI repositories can be in binary (RPD) format, in which repository metadata is contained in a single file with an extension of .rpd, or in a set of MDS XML documents. MDS XML format repositories are used for offline development only and cannot be loaded into the Oracle BI Server. Oracle BI repositories in both formats can be edited using the Oracle BI Administration Tool.

See also metadata and Oracle BI Administration Tool.

Oracle BI Scheduler

An extensible scheduling application for scheduling results to be delivered to users at specified times. It is the engine behind the Oracle BI Delivers feature.

See also results.

Oracle BI Server

A standalone process that maintains the logical data model that it provides to Presentation Services and other clients through ODBC. Metadata is maintained for the data model in a local proprietary file called the repository file. The Oracle BI Server processes user requests and queries underlying data sources.

Oracle BI Server XML API

Provides utilities to create a generic, XML-based representation of the Oracle BI repository metadata. You can use this XML file version of the repository to programmatically modify the metadata. The Oracle BI Server XML API objects correspond to metadata repository objects in an RPD file. These objects differ from XML objects in the Oracle BI Presentation Catalog.

Oracle Business Intelligence Mobile

Oracle Business Intelligence Mobile allows you to view Oracle BI EE content on supported mobile devices such as the Apple iPhone and Apple iPad.

Using Oracle Business Intelligence Mobile, you can view and analyze BI content such as analyses and dashboards, BI Publisher content, scorecard content, and content delivered by agents.

Oracle Business Intelligence Session-Based Web Services

An API that implements SOAP. These web services are designed for programmatic use, where a developer uses one web service to invoke many different business intelligence objects. These web services provide functionality on a wide range of Presentation Services operations. These web services enable the developer to extract results from Oracle BI Presentation Services and deliver them to external applications, perform Presentation Services management functions, and execute Oracle Business Intelligence alerts (known as Intelligent Agents).

See also Oracle Business Intelligence Web Services for SOA.

Oracle Business Intelligence Web Services for SOA

Contains three web services, ExecuteAgent, ExecuteAnalysis, and ExecuteCondition, which are hosted by the bimiddleware J2EE application. These web services are designed to enable developers to use third-party web services clients (for example, Oracle SOA Suite) to browse for and include business intelligence objects in service oriented architecture components.

See also Oracle Business Intelligence Session-Based Web Services.

Oracle Call Interface (OCI)

A connection interface that the Oracle BI Server can use to connect to Oracle Database data sources. You should always use OCI when importing metadata from or connecting to an Oracle Database.

Oracle OLAP

Oracle Database has an OLAP Option that provides an embedded, full-featured online analytical processing server.

Oracle Business Intelligence supports Oracle OLAP as a data source. When you import metadata from an Oracle OLAP source, the Oracle OLAP objects appear in the Physical layer of the Administration Tool. Oracle OLAP objects include Analytic Workspaces, which are containers for storing related cubes.

Oracle Process Manager and Notification Server (OPMN)

A process management tool that manages all system components (server processes), and supports both local and distributed process management, automatic process recycling and the communication of process state (up, down, starting, stopping). OPMN detects process unavailability and automatically restarts processes).

See also system components.

Oracle Scorecard and Strategy Management

A performance management tool that lets you describe and communicate your business strategy. You can drive and assess your corporate strategy and performance from the top of your organization down, or from the bottom up.

Oracle Technology Network (OTN)

A repository of technical information about Oracle's products where you can search for articles, participate in discussions, ask the user community technical questions, and search for and download Oracle products and documentation.

parent-child hierarchy

A hierarchy of members that all have the same type. All the dimension members of a parent-child hierarchy occur in a single data source. In a parent-child hierarchy, the inter-member relationships are parent-child relationships between dimension members.

See also dimension.

parent-child relationship table

A table with values that explicitly define the inter-member relationships in a parent-child hierarchy. Also called a closure table.

pass-through calculation

A calculation that is not computed by the Oracle BI Server but instead is passed to another data source. Enables advanced users to leverage data source features and functions without the need to modify the Oracle BI repository.

permissions

Specify which users can access an object, and limit how users can interact with an object. Examples of permissions include write, delete, and change permissions.

See object properties.

perspective

A category in your organization with which to associate initiatives, objectives, and KPIs in a scorecard. A perspective can represent a key stakeholder (such as a customer, employee, or shareholder/financial) or a key competency area (such as time, cost, or quality).

See also initiative, key performance indicator (KPI), objective, and Oracle Scorecard and Strategy Management.

physical catalog

An object in the Physical layer of an Oracle BI repository that groups different schemas. A catalog contains all the schemas (metadata) for a database object.

physical display folder

Folders that organize objects in the Physical layer of an Oracle BI repository. They have no metadata meaning.

physical join

Joins between tables in the Physical layer of an Oracle BI repository.

Physical layer

A layer of the Oracle BI repository that contains objects that represent physical data constructs from back-end data sources. The Physical layer defines the objects and relationships available for writing physical queries. This layer encapsulates source dependencies to enable portability and federation.

physical schema

An object in the Physical layer of an Oracle BI repository that represents a schema from a back-end database.

physical table

An object in the Physical layer of an Oracle BI repository, usually corresponding to a table that exists in a physical database.

See also Physical layer.

presentation hierarchy

An object in the Presentation layer of an Oracle BI repository that provides an explicit way to expose the multidimensional model in Presentation Services and other clients. Presentation hierarchies expose analytic functionality such as member selection, custom member groups, and asymmetric queries. Users can create hierarchy-based queries using presentation hierarchies.

In Presentation Services, presentation hierarchies are displayed as hierarchical columns.

See also hierarchical column and presentation level.

Presentation layer

Provides a way to present customized, secure, role-based views of a business model to users. It adds a level of abstraction over the Business Model and Mapping layer in the Oracle BI repository. The Presentation layer provides the view of the data seen by users who build analyses in Presentation Services and other client tools and applications.

See also Business Model and Mapping layer.

presentation level

In the Oracle BI repository, a component of a presentation hierarchy that either rolls up or is rolled up from other levels. Presentation levels are displayed as levels within hierarchical columns in Presentation Services.

See also hierarchy level and presentation hierarchy.

Presentation Services

See Oracle BI Presentation Services.

Presentation Services server

See Oracle BI Presentation Services server.

presentation table

An object in the Presentation layer of an Oracle BI repository that is used to organize columns into categories that make sense to the user community. A presentation table can contain columns from one or more logical tables. The names and object properties of the presentation tables are independent of the logical table properties.

primary key

A column (or set of columns) where each value is unique and identifies a single row of a table.

process instance

A unique process on an individual workstation3R that is associated with a BI instance.

See also BI instance.

prompt

A type of filter that enables the content designer to build and specify data values or the end user to choose specific data values to provide a result sets for an individual analysis or multiple analyses included on a dashboard or dashboard page. A prompt expands or refines existing dashboard and analysis filters.

The types of prompts are column prompts, currency prompts, image prompts, and variable prompts.

See also column prompt, currency prompt, filter, image prompt, and variable prompt.

prompted link

Captures the path to a dashboard page and a simplified presentation of the dashboard prompt.

See bookmark link.

query

Contains the underlying SQL statements that are issued to the Oracle BI Server. You do not have to know a query language to use Oracle Business Intelligence.

query cache

A facility to store query results for use by other queries.

ragged hierarchy

See unbalanced hierarchy.

report

The response returned to the user from the execution of a query created using Oracle BI Publisher. Reports can be formatted, presented on a dashboard page, saved in the Oracle BI Presentation Catalog, and shared with other users.

See also analysis.

repository

See Oracle BI repository.

repository variable

See variable.

results

The output returned from the Oracle BI Server for an analysis.

See also analysis.

selection step

A choice of values that is applied after the query is aggregated that affects only the members displayed, not the resulting aggregate values. Along with filters, selection steps restrict the results for an analysis.

See also analysis and filter.

session variable

See variable.

skip-level hierarchy

A hierarchy where some members do not have a value for a particular ancestor level. For example, in the United States, the city of Washington in the District of Columbia does not belong to a state. The expectation is that users can still navigate from the country level (United States) to Washington and below without the need for a state.

See also hierarchy.

snowflake schema

A dimensional schema where one or more of the dimensions are partially or completely normalized.

star schema

A relational schema that allows dimensional analysis of historical information. Star schemas have one-to-many relationships between the logical dimension tables and the logical fact table. Each star consists of a single fact table joined to a set of denormalized dimension tables.

strategy map

A component of a scorecard that shows how the objectives that have been defined for a scorecard and the KPIs that measure their progress are aligned by perspectives. It also shows cause and effect relationships.

See also Oracle Scorecard and Strategy Management.

strategy tree

A component of a scorecard that shows an objective and its supporting child objectives and KPIs hierarchically in a tree diagram.

See also Oracle Scorecard and Strategy Management.

structured query language (SQL)

A standard programming language for querying and modifying data. Oracle Business Intelligence supports standard SQL-92 with several value-added proprietary extensions.

See also Logical SQL.

subject area

In an Oracle BI repository, an object in the Presentation layer that organizes and presents data about a business model. It is the highest-level object in the Presentation layer and represents the view of the data that users see in Presentation Services. Oracle BI repository subject areas contain presentation tables, presentation columns, and presentation hierarchies.

In Presentation Services, subject areas contain folders, measure columns, attribute columns, hierarchical columns, and levels.

system components

Server processes (not Java applications) that are managed by the Oracle Process Manager and Notification server (OPMN).

See also Oracle Process Manager and Notification Server (OPMN).

transformation

Work that is performed on data when moving from a database to another location (sometimes another database). Some transformations are typically performed on data when it is moved from a transaction system to a data warehouse system.

unbalanced hierarchy

A hierarchy where the leaves do not have the same depth. For example, an organization might choose to have data for the current month at the day level, data for the previous at the month level, and data for the previous five years at the quarter level.

See also hierarchy.

value hierarchy

See parent-child hierarchy.

variable

Objects in an Oracle BI repository that are used to streamline administrative tasks and dynamically modify metadata content to adjust to a changing data environment.

Variables are of the following types:

  • Repository variables have a single value at any point in time. There are two types of repository variables: static and dynamic.

  • Session variables are created and assigned a value when each user logs on. There are two types of session variables: system and nonsystem.

variable prompt

Enables the user to select a value specified in the variable prompt to display on the dashboard. A variable prompt is not dependent upon column data, but enables you to manipulate, for example add or multiply, the column data on an analysis.

See also prompt.

virtual physical table

A physical table that is made from a stored procedure or a SELECT statement. Creating virtual tables can provide the Oracle BI Server and the underlying databases with the proper metadata to perform some advanced query requests.

vision statement

A short statement in a scorecard that describes what your organization wants to become sometime in the future. For example, it might be to become the most successful business in the South America Polypropylene Market.

See also mission statement and Oracle Scorecard and Strategy Management.

WebLogic server domain

Contains Java components that are configured to participate in the servicing of SOAP, HTTP, and other forms of requests.

WebLogic Scripting Tool (WLST)

A command-line scripting interface that enables you to configure, manage, and persist changes to WebLogic Server instances and domains and to monitor and manage server runtime events.

PKx33PK\EOEBPS/patching.htm4T˫ Patching Oracle Business Intelligence Systems

23 Patching Oracle Business Intelligence Systems

This chapter describes how to patch Oracle Business Intelligence. Patching involves copying a small collection of files over an existing installation. A patch is normally associated with a particular version of an Oracle product and involves updating from one minor version of the product to a newer minor version of the same product (for example, from version 11.1.1.2.0 to version 11.1.1.3.0). A patch set is a single patch that contains a collection of patches that are designed to be applied at the same time.

For more information, see Oracle Fusion Middleware Patching Guide.

This chapter includes the following sections:

23.1 What Is Patched for the Oracle Business Intelligence Platform?

Oracle Business Intelligence platform patching applies patches for binary files with extensions such as DLL, JAR, and EXE.

Oracle Business Intelligence platform patching does not patch the following:

  • Configuration Files

    If configuration updates are required as part of a patch, then these are detailed in the accompanying README.txt file, and you must manually apply them. No automated mechanism is available for merging customer configuration and patched configuration files.

  • Schema-based Metadata

    Nondesign-time metadata that is stored in database schemas (including schemas for the Scheduler, usage statistics, event polling, repository files, and the Oracle BI Presentation Catalog) is not patched.

    Other platform metadata (such as repository files and Oracle BI Presentation Catalog files) that are delivered in the context of an application are patched, but as part of an applications patch and not as part of a platform patch.

23.2 Patching the Platform

Typically you apply a patch that contains one or more bug fixes to an existing production Oracle BI EE system that is distributed across one or more computers. Bug fixes might affect the system components and Java components that are deployed inside the Oracle WebLogic Server. The patch might include new server executables and updated and new Java class files.

You use the Oracle OPatch utility to apply (and to roll back) Oracle BI EE platform patches. You download patches from Oracle Support Services, as described in Section 23.2.2, "Applying a Patch to the Platform."

For more information about patching in Oracle Fusion Middleware, see Oracle Fusion Middleware Patching Guide.

This section contains the following topics:

23.2.1 What Conditions Apply when Patching the Platform?

The following conditions apply when patching the Oracle BI EE platform:

  • Oracle BI EE 11g Release 1 (11.1.1) must be installed, and previous versions must have been upgraded to this 11g release.

  • Oracle Business Intelligence must be stopped before the patch is applied and restarted after all the components are successfully patched.

  • If a patch affects existing Java components or includes new Java components, then you must re-deploy the components after applying the patch.

23.2.2 Applying a Patch to the Platform

You must apply a patch to all the related Oracle homes for a given Oracle Business Intelligence system, distributed across multiple computers. Oracle BI EE components must be patched to the same version. You must check the patch version of each Oracle home, one at a time. For information, see Section 23.4, "Determining Current Patch Levels."

Complete the tasks that are described in the following sections to apply a patch:

  1. Section 23.2.2.1, "Step 1: Download the Patch"

  2. Section 23.2.2.2, "Step 2: Stop System Component Processes for Oracle BI EE"

  3. Section 23.2.2.3, "Step 3: Apply the Patch to Each Oracle Home"

  4. Section 23.2.2.4, "Step 4: Start System Component Processes for Oracle BI EE"

  5. Section 23.2.2.5, "Step 5: Redeploy Patched J2EE Applications"

23.2.2.1 Step 1: Download the Patch

To download patch:

  1. Locate the patch (OPatch package) on the Oracle Support Services website at the following URL:

    http://support.oracle.com

    The patch ID corresponds to a bug or service request number, which is provided by Oracle Support Services.

  2. Download the patch to your local network.

For more information, see Oracle Fusion Middleware Patching Guide.

23.2.2.2 Step 2: Stop System Component Processes for Oracle BI EE

For details, see Section 4.1, "About Starting and Stopping Oracle Business Intelligence."

23.2.2.3 Step 3: Apply the Patch to Each Oracle Home

To apply the patch to each Oracle home:

  1. Display a command window and navigate to the location of the OPatch executable.

    The OPatch utility is located in the ORACLE_HOME/ORACLE_INSTANCE/OPatch directory (on UNIX operating systems) or ORACLE_HOME\ORACLE_INSTANCE\OPatch directory (on Windows operating systems).

    For example, the directory on Windows might be:

    D:\OBI11g\Oracle_BI1\OPatch

  2. Run the OPatch utility using the following command syntax:

    opatch apply -id <patch_id> -oh <oracle_home>

    For example, you might use the following command:

    opatch apply -id 123456 -oh D:\OBI11g

    For complete information about OPatch command options, see Oracle Fusion Middleware Patching Guide.

    OPatch performs the following tasks:

    • Displays the patch number, creation date, bugs fixed, and details of what is updated when the patch is applied.

    • Makes a backup copy of the binary files that are being replaced.

    • Copies new binary files to the correct locations in the Oracle home.

    • Reports that the patch has been successfully applied to the Oracle home.

  3. To run the OPatch utility for other Oracle homes, repeat the previous steps.

For more information about applying patches, OPatch requirements, prerequisite checks, and the options for running the utility, see:

23.2.2.4 Step 4: Start System Component Processes for Oracle BI EE

For details, see Section 4.1, "About Starting and Stopping Oracle Business Intelligence."

23.2.2.5 Step 5: Redeploy Patched J2EE Applications

If the patch includes any J2EE applications, then you must redeploy them to the Oracle WebLogic Server instances that they were running on before the patch was applied.

To redeploy patched J2EE applications:

  1. Display the Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console.

    For information, see Section 2.3, "Centrally Managing Oracle Business Intelligence Java Components Using the Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console."

  2. In the Change Center of the Administration Console, click Lock & Edit to enable you to redeploy J2EE applications.

  3. In the left pane of the Administration Console, select Deployments.

  4. In the right pane, select the boxes next to the patched J2EE applications to redeploy.

    This information is included with the patch itself. OPatch lists the JAR files that are affected. The README.txt file details the post-patch steps that are required, which include this manual redeployment step.

  5. Click Update.

  6. In the Update Application Assistant, click Finish.

  7. To activate these changes, in the Change Center of the Administration Console, click Activate Changes.

    Not all changes take effect immediately; some require a restart of the system.

    For more information, see Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console Help system.

On completion of the patching tasks (and following any necessary restarts), the following conditions apply:

  • System component servers have been patched and restarted and are fully operational.

  • Backup versions of changed items have been stored in the Oracle home directory and are ready for potential rollback.

  • Patch history, archives, and logs have been updated.

23.2.3 What Happens If a Patching Conflict Occurs?

If a patching conflict occurs, then the process stops and you should contact Oracle Support Services.

23.3 Rolling Back a Platform Patch

OPatch maintains metadata for each patch that is applied to each Oracle home and keeps copies of what it replaces during a patch. Therefore, you can roll back a complete patch.


Note:

To confirm that an Oracle BI EE platform patch is no longer applied after a rollback, you must establish the patch levels before applying the rollback, then repeat the task after rollback. For information, see Section 23.4, "Determining Current Patch Levels."


Complete the tasks that are described in the following sections to apply a patch:

23.3.1 Step 1: Stop System Component Processes for Oracle BI EE

For details, see Section 4.1, "About Starting and Stopping Oracle Business Intelligence."

23.3.2 Step 2: Invoke OPatch with "-rollback" Option

You must invoke OPatch with the "-rollback" option for each Oracle home while specifying the ID of the patch to be undone.

To invoke OPatch with the "-rollback" option:

  1. Display a command window and navigate to the location of the OPatch executable.

    The OPatch utility is located in the ORACLE_HOME/ORACLE_INSTANCE/OPatch directory (on UNIX operating systems) or ORACLE_HOME\ORACLE_INSTANCE\OPatch directory (on Windows operating systems).

    For example, the directory on Windows might be:

    D:\OBI11g\Oracle_BI1\OPatch

  2. Run the OPatch utility with the -rollback option using the following command syntax:

    opatch rollback -id <patch_id> -oh <oracle_home>

    For example, you might use the following command:

    opatch rollback -id 123456 -oh D:\OBI11g\Oracle_BI1\OPatch

For more information about rolling back patches, OPatch requirements, and the options for running the utility, see:

23.3.3 Step 3: Start System Component Processes for Oracle BI EE

For details, see Section 4.1, "About Starting and Stopping Oracle Business Intelligence."

23.3.4 Step 4: Redeploy J2EE Applications

If the patch included any J2EE applications, then you must redeploy them to the Oracle WebLogic Server instances that they were running on before the patch was rolled back.

To redeploy patched J2EE applications:

  1. Display the Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console.

    For information, see Section 2.3, "Centrally Managing Oracle Business Intelligence Java Components Using the Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console."

  2. In the Change Center of the Administration Console, click Lock & Edit to enable you to redeploy J2EE applications.

  3. In the left pane of the Administration Console, select Deployments.

  4. In the right pane, select the boxes next to the J2EE applications to redeploy.

  5. Click Update.

  6. In the Update Application Assistant, click Finish.

  7. To activate these changes, in the Change Center of the Administration Console, click Activate Changes.

    Not all changes take effect immediately; some require a system restart.

    For more information, see Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console Help system.

Following completion of the rollback, the binary and JAR files that were updated by the application of the previous patch are now returned to their original state.

23.4 Determining Current Patch Levels

Each Oracle home must be patched to the same version as OPatch to ensure that Oracle BI EE functions properly. Use the OPatch lsinventory utility to determine the current patch version for any given Oracle home in the system. You can also use the utility to retrieve a full list of patches, with their corresponding IDs, for a given Oracle home.

To determine the current patch levels:

  1. Display a command window and navigate to the location of the OPatch executable:

    ORACLE_HOME\ORACLE_INSTANCE\OPatch

    For example:

    D:\OBI11g\Oracle_BI1\OPatch

  2. Run the lsinventory utility using the following command syntax:

    <Path_to_OPatch>/opatch lsinventory [-all] [-detail] [-patch] [-oh (Oracle home location)]

    For example:

    opatch lsinventory -patch -detail

    For information about the lsinventory options, see the user guides in the ORACLE_HOME\ORACLE_INSTANCE\OPatch\docs directory.

  3. To run the lsinventory utility against other Oracle homes, repeat the previous steps for each Oracle home.

For more information, see Oracle Fusion Middleware Patching Guide.

PKϋ9T4TPK\EOEBPS/admin_api.htm Introducing the Oracle BI Systems Management API

22 Introducing the Oracle BI Systems Management API

This chapter describes the Oracle BI Systems Management Application Programming Interface (API).

This chapter includes the following sections:

22.1 What Is the Oracle BI Systems Management API?

The Oracle BI Systems Management API is a programming interface that provides access to Oracle Business Intelligence JMX Admin MBeans, enabling a developer to programmatically perform system administration tasks for Oracle Business Intelligence. The system administration tasks that can be performed using the Oracle BI Systems Management API are also available using Fusion Middleware Control.

The Oracle BI Systems Management API centralizes the management of system configuration by automatically propagating changes to all of the files that require updates in multiple locations.

Alternative methods for modifying system configuration settings for Oracle Business Intelligence are available. For information, see Section 3.1, "Configuring Oracle Business Intelligence."

The Oracle BI Systems Management API and its Java methods are described in a JavaDoc file that is located in the following directory:

ORACLE_HOME/doc/javadoc/bifoundation/jmxapi/index.html


Note:

You cannot display the Log Viewer or Performance Metrics using the Oracle BI Systems Management API.


22.2 Accessing Oracle BI Systems Management API Methods

This section describes the following ways to access Oracle BI Systems Management API methods:

  • Using an Oracle WebLogic Server Scripting Tool (WLST) command (interactive mode)

    You can use the command line to enter a command and view the response at a command-line prompt. This method is useful for learning the tool, prototyping command syntax, and verifying configuration options before building a script. Using WLST interactively is particularly useful for getting immediate feedback after making a critical configuration change. The WLST scripting shell maintains a persistent connection with an instance of WebLogic Server.

  • Using a WLST command in a script (Script mode)

    You can use a script to invoke a sequence of WLST commands without requiring your input, much like a shell script. Scripts contain WLST commands in a text file with a .py file extension, such as filename.py. You use script files with the Jython commands for running scripts. The Jython scripting language is used because it is freely available and compatible with the Java platform.

  • Using a Java program

    You can use a Java program to contact the JMX server directly.

For information about the Oracle BI Systems Management API methods, see Section 22.4, "Descriptions of JMX Admin MBeans and Methods for the Oracle BI Systems Management API."

22.3 Using the Oracle BI Systems Management API to Manage and Configure Oracle Business Intelligence

This section describes using the Oracle BI Systems Management API to manage and configure Oracle Business Intelligence, and contains the following topics:

22.3.1 Displaying Oracle Business Intelligence Status Using the Oracle BI Systems Management API

You can use the Oracle BI Systems Management API to display the status of Oracle Business Intelligence using either WLST commands or a Java program as described in the following sections:

22.3.1.1 Example: Using WLST Commands in a Script to Display the Status of Oracle Business Intelligence

This example connects a user to Oracle Business Intelligence and displays the service status.

To use WLST commands in a script to display the status of Oracle Business Intelligence:

  1. Open a text editor and create a WLST script similar to the following example:

    # Example to demonstrate connecting to a BIEE domain using WLST
    #
    # This scripts expects the following arguments:
    #
    # 1. wls.host  (localhost)
    # 2. wls.port  (7001)
    # 3. wls.user  (user1)
    # 4. wls.password  (password1)
    # ===================================================================
     
    import sys
    import os
     
    # Check the arguments to this script are as expected.
    # argv[0] is script name.
    argLen = len(sys.argv)
    if argLen -1 != 4:
          print "ERROR: got ", argLen -1, " args."
          print "USAGE: wlst.cmd wls_connect.py WLS_HOST WLS_PORT WLS_USER WLS_PASSWORD"
       print " eg: wlst.cmd wls_connect.py localhost 7001 user1 password1" 
          exit()
     
    WLS_HOST = sys.argv[1]
    WLS_PORT = sys.argv[2]
    WLS_USER = sys.argv[3]
    WLS_PW = sys.argv[4]
     
    print 'Connecting to '+ WLS_HOST+ ':' + WLS_PORT + ' as user: ' + WLS_USER + ' ...'
     
    # Connect to WLS
    connect(WLS_USER, WLS_PW, WLS_HOST+ ':' + WLS_PORT);
     
    print 'Connecting to Domain ...'
    domainCustom()
    cd ('oracle.biee.admin')
    print 'Connecting to BIDomain MBean ...'
    cd ('oracle.biee.admin:type=BIDomain,group=Service')
     
    biinstances = get('BIInstances')
    biinstance = biinstances[0]
     
    print 'Connecting to BIInstance MBean ...'
    cd ('..')
    cd (biinstance.toString())
     
    servicestatus=get('ServiceStatus')
    print 'BIInstance MBean; ServiceStatus: ' + servicestatus
     
    exit()
    
  2. Save the script.

  3. Navigate to the folder \MW_HOME\wlserver_10.3\common\bin and run the script, entering any arguments required.

    For example, you might enter the following at the command line:

    ./wlst.sh wlst_connect.py localhost 7001 user1 password1 (UNIX)

    wlst wlst_connect.cmd localhost 7001 user1 password1 (Windows)

    The command window (and log file), displays prompts and messages, for example:

    Initializing WebLogic Scripting Tool (WLST) ...
    
    Welcome to WebLogic Server Administration Scripting Shell
     
    Type help() for help on available commands
     
    Connecting to localhost:7001 as user: user1 ...
    Connecting to t3://localhost:7001 with userid password1 ...
    Successfully connected to Administration Server 'AdminServer' that belongs to 
    domain 'bifoundation_domain'.
     
    Warning: An insecure protocol was used to connect to the 
    server. To ensure on-the-wire security, use the SSL port or 
    Admin port instead.
     
    Connecting to Domain ...
    Location changed to domain custom tree. 
    This is a writable tree with No root.
    For more help, use help(domainCustom)
     
    Connecting to BIDomain MBean ...
    Connecting to BIInstance MBean ...
    BIInstance MBean; ServiceStatus: FULLY_STARTED
     
     
    Exiting WebLogic Scripting Tool.
    

For more information about using WLST commands, see Oracle Fusion Middleware WebLogic Scripting Tool Command Reference.

22.3.1.2 Example: Using a Java Program to Display the Status of Oracle Business Intelligence

This example connects to Oracle Business Intelligence and displays the current status. The Java program in this example also contains additional methods (commented out) which you can use to start and stop Oracle Business Intelligence. For more information, see Section 22.3.2.2, "Example: Using a Java Program to Stop and Start Oracle Business Intelligence."

To use a Java program with the Systems management API to display the status of Oracle Business Intelligence:

  1. Open a Java editor and compile a Java program similar to the following example:

    package com.oracle.bi.example;
    import java.util.Hashtable;
    import javax.management.MBeanServerConnection;
    import javax.management.ObjectName;
    import javax.management.remote.JMXConnector;
    import javax.management.remote.JMXConnectorFactory;
    import javax.management.remote.JMXServiceURL;
    import javax.naming.Context;
    
    /**
     * Example class showing how to connect to the Oracle BIEE AdminMBeans JMX Interface.
     * <br/>
     * This example is intentionally succinct for clarity, so for example,
     * it does not do any exception handling.
     * Any production code should include robust error handling.
     * Note that you need <code>wljmxclient.jar</code> and <code>wlclient.jar</code> on the classpath.
     */
    public class MBeanAPIExample1 {
          private String host;
          private int port;
          private String username;
          private String password;
          private MBeanServerConnection mbs = null;
          private ObjectName biDomainMBeanName;
          private ObjectName biInstanceMBeanName;
       private MBeanAPIExample1(String[] args) {
             if (args.length < 4) {
                System.out.println("Usage: MBeanAPIExample1 host port
    username password"); throw new IllegalArgumentException("Not enough arguments"); } host = args[0]; port = Integer.parseInt(args[1]); username = args[2]; password = args[3]; } private void connect() throws Exception { String jmxUrl = "service:jmx:t3://" + host + ":" + port +
    "/jndi/weblogic.management.mbeanservers.domainruntime"; System.out.println("Connecting using URL: " + jmxUrl + " ..."); Hashtable<String,String> h = new Hashtable<String,String>(); h.put(Context.SECURITY_PRINCIPAL, username); h.put(Context.SECURITY_CREDENTIALS, password); h.put(JMXConnectorFactory.PROTOCOL_PROVIDER_PACKAGES,
    "weblogic.management.remote"); JMXConnector jmxConnector = JMXConnectorFactory.connect(new
    JMXServiceURL(jmxUrl), h); mbs = jmxConnector.getMBeanServerConnection(); System.out.println("Connected OK"); biDomainMBeanName = new
    ObjectName("oracle.biee.admin:type=BIDomain,group=Service"); ObjectName[]biInstanceMBeanNames=(ObjectName[])mbs.getAttribute
    (biDomainMBeanName, "BIInstances"); biInstanceMBeanName = biInstanceMBeanNames[0];
    // there should only be one System.out.println("Found BI Instance MBean: " +
    biInstanceMBeanName); } private void displayStatus() throws Exception { String status = (String)mbs.getAttribute(biInstanceMBeanName,
    "ServiceStatus"); System.out.println("Status is: " + status); } private void stopAll() throws Exception { System.out.println("Stopping instance ..."); Object[] args = new Object[]{}; String[] sig = new String[]{}; mbs.invoke(biInstanceMBeanName, "stop", args, sig); System.out.println("Stopped instance OK"); } private void startAll() throws Exception { System.out.println("Starting instance ..."); Object[] args = new Object[]{}; String[] sig = new String[]{}; mbs.invoke(biInstanceMBeanName, "start", args, sig); System.out.println("Started instance OK"); } /** * @param args */ public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception { MBeanAPIExample1 example = new MBeanAPIExample1(args); example.connect(); example.displayStatus(); // example.stopAll(); // example.startAll(); } }
  2. Navigate to the \<wlserver>\server\lib folder and run the Java program, providing the class path, class name and any arguments required.

    java -classpath <JavaClassName> <host> <port> <username> <password>

    For example:

    java -classpath <MW_HOME>wls_10.3/server/lib/wjmxclient.jar com.oracle.bi.example.MBeanAPIExample1 localhost 7001 user1 password1

    The command window (and log file) displays prompts and messages, for example:

    Connecting using URL: service:jmx:t3://localhost:7001/jndi/weblogic.management.mbeanservers.domainruntime
    ...
    Connected OK
    Found BI Instance MBean:
    oracle.biee.admin:type=BIDomain.BIInstance,biInstance=coreapplication,group=Service
    
    Status is: FULLY_STARTED
    

22.3.2 Starting and Stopping Oracle Business Intelligence Using the Oracle BI Systems Management API

You can use the Oracle BI Systems Management API start and stop Oracle Business Intelligence using either WLST commands or a Java program as described in the following sections:

22.3.2.1 Example: Using WLST Commands to Stop and Start Oracle Business Intelligence

This example stops and starts the Oracle Business Intelligence instance, and displays the status during each stage of the process.

To use WLST commands to stop and start Oracle Business Intelligence:

  1. Open a text editor and create a WLST script similar to the following:

    # Example to demonstrate connecting to a BIEE domain using WLST and stopping and restarting the instance
    #
    # This scripts expects the following arguments:
    #
    # 1. wls.host (localhost)
    # 2. wls.port (7001)
    # 3. wls.user  (user1)
    # 4. wls.password  (password1)
    # ===================================================================
    import sys
    import os
    # Check the arguments to this script are as expected.
    # argv[0] is script name.
    argLen = len(sys.argv)
    if argLen -1 != 4:
        print "ERROR: got ", argLen -1, " args."
        print "USAGE: wlst_stop_start.cmd wls_stop_start_obi.py WLS_HOST WLS_PORT WLS_USER WLS_PASSWORD"
        print "   eg: wlst_stop_start.cmd wls_stop_start_obi.py localhost 7001 user1 password1" 
        exit()
    WLS_HOST = sys.argv[1]
    WLS_PORT = sys.argv[2]
    WLS_USER = sys.argv[3]
    WLS_PW = sys.argv[4]
    print 'Connecting to '+ WLS_HOST+ ':' + WLS_PORT + ' as user: ' + WLS_USER + ' ...'
    # Connect to WLS
    connect(WLS_USER, WLS_PW, WLS_HOST+ ':' + WLS_PORT);
    print 'Connecting to Domain ...'
    domainCustom()
    cd ('oracle.biee.admin')
    print 'Connecting to BIDomain MBean ...'
    cd ('oracle.biee.admin:type=BIDomain,group=Service')
    biinstances = get('BIInstances')
    biinstance = biinstances[0]
    print 'Connecting to BIInstance MBean ...'
    cd ('..')
    cd (biinstance.toString())
    servicestatus=get('ServiceStatus')
    print 'BIInstance MBean; ServiceStatus: ' + servicestatus
    print 'Calling stop ...'
    objs = jarray.array([], java.lang.Object)
    strs = jarray.array([], java.lang.String)
    invoke('stop', objs, strs)
    servicestatus=get('ServiceStatus')
    print 'BIInstance MBean; ServiceStatus: ' + servicestatus
    print 'Calling start ...'
    objs = jarray.array([], java.lang.Object)
    strs = jarray.array([], java.lang.String)
    invoke('start', objs, strs)
    servicestatus=get('ServiceStatus')
    print 'BIInstance MBean; ServiceStatus: ' + servicestatus
    exit()
    
  2. Save the script.

  3. Navigate to the folder \MW_HOME\wlserver_10.3\common\bin and run the script, entering any arguments required.

    For example, you might enter the following at the command line:

    ./wlst.sh wlst_stop_start_obi.py localhost 7001 user1 password1 (UNIX)

    wlst wlst_wlst_stop_start_obi.cmd localhost 7001 user1 password1 (Windows)

    The command window (and log file), displays prompts and messages, for example:

    Initializing WebLogic Scripting Tool (WLST) ...
    
    Welcome to WebLogic Server Administration Scripting Shell
     
    Type help() for help on available commands
     
    Connecting to localhost:7001 as user: user1 ...
    Connecting to t3://localhost:7001 with userid password1 ...
    Successfully connected to Administration Server 'AdminServer' that belongs to 
    domain 'bifoundation_domain'.
     
    Warning: An insecure protocol was used to connect to the 
    server. To ensure on-the-wire security, use the SSL port or 
    Admin port instead.
     
    Connecting to Domain ...
    Location changed to domain custom tree. 
    This is a writable tree with No root.
    For more help, use help(domainCustom)
     
    Connecting to BIDomain MBean ...
    Connecting to BIInstance MBean ...
    BIInstance MBean; ServiceStatus: FULLY_STARTED
    Calling stop ...
    BIInstance MBean; ServiceStatus: STOPPED
    Calling start ...
    BIInstance MBean; ServiceStatus: FULLY_STARTED 
    
    Exiting WebLogic Scripting Tool.
    

22.3.2.2 Example: Using a Java Program to Stop and Start Oracle Business Intelligence

Refer to the example in Section 22.3.1.2, "Example: Using a Java Program to Display the Status of Oracle Business Intelligence," remove the comments (/) before whichever method you want to run (example.stopAll(); or example.startAll();), as shown in the following main method:

       /**
        * @param args
        */
       public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
            MBeanAPIExample1 example = new MBeanAPIExample1(args);
            example.connect();
            example.displayStatus();
/**         example.stopAll();
*/
/**         example.startAll();
*/
       }

22.3.3 Updating Configuration Settings Using the Oracle BI Systems Management API

You can use the Oracle BI Systems Management API to change Oracle Business Intelligence configuration settings using WLST commands or a Java program as follows:

You can copy the examples in this section, replacing MBean details with details of other MBeans to update different Oracle Business Intelligence configuration settings (for example, log file settings, security settings). For more information, see Section 22.4, "Descriptions of JMX Admin MBeans and Methods for the Oracle BI Systems Management API."

22.3.3.1 Example: Using WLST to Edit the Email Sender Display Name Configuration Setting

This example connects to Oracle Business Intelligence, invokes the system lock, updates the value of the Email Sender Display Name configuration setting, and releases the system lock.

To use WLST to update the Email Sender Display Name configuration setting:

  1. Open a text editor and enter WLST commands similar to the following:

    # Example to demonstrate connecting to a BIEE domain using WLST,
    # and changing a simple configuration setting
    #
    # This script expects the following arguments:
    #
    # 1. wls.host (localhost)
    # 2. wls.port (7001)
    # 3. wls.user  (user1)
    # 4. wls.password  (password1)
    # 5. new email displayname
    # ===================================================================
     
    import sys
    import os
     
    # Check the arguments to this script are as expected.
    # argv[0] is script name.
    argLen = len(sys.argv)
    if argLen -1 != 5:
        print "ERROR: got ", argLen -1, " args."
        print "USAGE: wlst.cmd wls_connect.py WLS_HOST WLS_PORT WLS_USER WLS_PASSWORD EmailDisplayName"
        print "   eg: wlst.cmd wls_connect.py localhost 7001 user1 password1 FredBloggs" 
        exit()
     
    WLS_HOST = sys.argv[1]
    WLS_PORT = sys.argv[2]
    WLS_USER = sys.argv[3]
    WLS_PW = sys.argv[4]
    newDisplayName = sys.argv[5]
     
    print 'Connecting to '+ WLS_HOST+ ':' + WLS_PORT + ' as user: ' + WLS_USER + ' ...'
     
    # Connect to WLS
    connect(WLS_USER, WLS_PW, WLS_HOST+ ':' + WLS_PORT);
     
    print 'Connecting to Domain ...'
    domainCustom()
    cd ('oracle.biee.admin')
    print 'Connecting to BIDomain MBean ...'
    cd ('oracle.biee.admin:type=BIDomain,group=Service')
    #bidomain=cmo
     
    print 'Calling lock ...'
    objs = jarray.array([], java.lang.Object)
    strs = jarray.array([], java.lang.String)
    invoke('lock', objs, strs)
     
    biinstances = get('BIInstances')
    biinstance = biinstances[0]
     
    print 'Connecting to BIInstance MBean ...'
    cd ('..')
    cd (biinstance.toString())
     
    servicestatus=get('ServiceStatus')
    print 'BIInstance MBean; ServiceStatus: ' + servicestatus
     
    biemailbean = get('EmailConfiguration')
    print 'Connecting to BIInstance Email MBean ...'
    cd ('..')
    cd (biemailbean.toString())
     
    oldDisplayName=get('SenderDisplayName')
    print 'Existing email displayname is: ' + oldDisplayName
    print 'Changing email displayname to: ' + newDisplayName + ' ...'
    set('SenderDisplayName', newDisplayName)
     
    print 'Calling commit ...'
    cd ('..')
    cd ('oracle.biee.admin:type=BIDomain,group=Service')
    objs = jarray.array([], java.lang.Object)
    strs = jarray.array([], java.lang.String)
    invoke('commit', objs, strs)
     
    print 'Committed OK'
     
    exit()
    
  2. Save the script.

  3. Navigate to the folder \MW_HOME\wlserver_10.3\common\bin and run the script, entering any arguments required.

    For example, you might enter the following at the command line:

    ./wlst.sh wlst_email_disp_name_obi.py localhost 7001 user1 password1 (UNIX)

    wlst wlst_wlst_email_disp_name_obi.cmd localhost 7001 user1 password1 (Windows)

    The command window (and log file) displays prompts and messages, for example:

    Initializing WebLogic Scripting Tool (WLST) ...
    
    Welcome to WebLogic Server Administration Scripting Shell
     
    Type help() for help on available commands
     
    Connecting to localhost:7001 as user: user1 ...
    Connecting to t3://localhost:7001 with userid password1 ...
    Successfully connected to Administration Server 'AdminServer' that belongs to 
    domain 'bifoundation_domain'.
     
    Warning: An insecure protocol was used to connect to the 
    server. To ensure on-the-wire security, use the SSL port or 
    Admin port instead.
     
    Connecting to Domain ...
    Location changed to domain custom tree. 
    This is a writable tree with No root.
    For more help, use help(domainCustom)
     
    Connecting to BIDomain MBean ...
    Connecting to BIInstance MBean ...
    BIInstance MBean; ServiceStatus: FULLY_STARTED
    Connecting to BIInstance Email MBean ...
    Existing email displayname is: Oracle Business Intelligence
    Changing email displayname to: FredBloggs ...
    Calling commit ...
    Committed OK
    
    Exiting WebLogic Scripting Tool.
    

22.3.3.2 Example: Using a Java Program to Edit the Email Sender Display Name Configuration Setting

To use a Java program to Edit the Email Sender Display Name Configuration Setting:

  1. Open a Java editor and compile a Java program similar to the following example:

    package com.oracle.bi.example;
    import java.util.Hashtable;
    import javax.management.Attribute;
    import javax.management.MBeanServerConnection;
    import javax.management.ObjectName;
    import javax.management.remote.JMXConnector;
    import javax.management.remote.JMXConnectorFactory;
    import javax.management.remote.JMXServiceURL;
    import javax.naming.Context;
    
    /**
     * Example class showing how to connect to the Oracle BIEE AdminMBeans JMX Interface and change a simple configuration setting..
     * <br/>
     * This example is intentionally succinct for clarity, so for example,
     * it does not do any exception handling.
     * Any production code should include robust error handling.
     *
     * Note that you need <code>wljmxclient.jar</code> and <code>wlclient.jar</code> on the classpath.
     */
    public class MBeanAPIExample3Edit {
           private String host;
           private int port;
           private String username;
           private String password;
           private String newDisplayName;
           private MBeanServerConnection mbs = null;
           private ObjectName biDomainMBeanName;
           private ObjectName biInstanceMBeanName;
           private ObjectName biEmailMBeanName;
           private MBeanAPIExample3Edit(String[] args) {
                   if (args.length < 5) {
                     System.out.println("Usage: MBeanAPIExample3Edit host port username password newDisplayName");
                    throw new IllegalArgumentException("Not enough arguments");
                 }
                 host = args[0];
                 port = Integer.parseInt(args[1]);
                 username = args[2];
                 password = args[3];
                 newDisplayName = args[4];
           }
           private void connect() throws Exception {
                 String jmxUrl = "service:jmx:t3://" + host + ":" + port +
    "/jndi/weblogic.management.mbeanservers.domainruntime"; System.out.println("Connecting using URL: " + jmxUrl + " ..."); Hashtable<String,String> h = new Hashtable<String,String>(); h.put(Context.SECURITY_PRINCIPAL, username); h.put(Context.SECURITY_CREDENTIALS, password); h.put(JMXConnectorFactory.PROTOCOL_PROVIDER_PACKAGES,
    "weblogic.management.remote"); JMXConnector jmxConnector = JMXConnectorFactory.connect(new
    JMXServiceURL(jmxUrl), h); mbs = jmxConnector.getMBeanServerConnection(); System.out.println("Connected OK"); biDomainMBeanName = new
    ObjectName("oracle.biee.admin:type=BIDomain,group=Service"); ObjectName[]biInstanceMBeanNames=(ObjectName[])mbs.getAttribute
    (biDomainMBeanName, "BIInstances"); biInstanceMBeanName = biInstanceMBeanNames[0];
    // there should only be one System.out.println("Found BI Instance MBean: " +
    biInstanceMBeanName); } private void lock() throws Exception{ System.out.println("Locking domain ..."); Object[] args = new Object[]{}; String[] sig = new String[]{}; mbs.invoke(biDomainMBeanName, "lock", args, sig); System.out.println("Locked domain OK"); } private void commit() throws Exception{ System.out.println("Committing changes ..."); Object[] args = new Object[]{}; String[] sig = new String[]{}; mbs.invoke(biDomainMBeanName, "commit", args, sig); System.out.println("Committed changes OK"); } private void getEmailBean() throws Exception{ System.out.println("Getting Email MBean ..."); biEmailMBeanName = (ObjectName)mbs.getAttribute(biInstanceMBeanName, "EmailConfiguration"); System.out.println("Found BI Email MBean: " + biEmailMBeanName); } private void updateEmailDisplayName() throws Exception { String oldDisplayName = (String)mbs.getAttribute(biEmailMBeanName, "SenderDisplayName"); System.out.println("Existing email displayname is: " + oldDisplayName); System.out.println("Changing email displayname to: " + newDisplayName); mbs.setAttribute(biEmailMBeanName, new Attribute("SenderDisplayName", newDisplayName)); } /** * @param args */ public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception { MBeanAPIExample3Edit example = new MBeanAPIExample3Edit(args); example.connect(); example.getEmailBean(); example.lock(); example.updateEmailDisplayName(); example.commit(); } }
  2. Navigate to the \<wlserver>\server\lib folder and run the Java program giving the class path, class name and any arguments required.

    java -classpath <JavaClassName> <host> <port> <username> <password> <SenderDisplayName>

    For example:

    java -classpath <MW_HOME>wls_10.3/server/lib/wjmxclient.jar com.oracle.bi.example.MBeanAPIExample3Edit localhost 7001 user1 password1 FredBloggs

    Use quotation marks to include spaces, for example "Fred Bloggs".

    The command window (and log file), displays prompts and messages, for example:

    Connecting using URL: service:jmx:t3://localhost:7001/jndi/weblogic.management.mbeanservers.domainruntime ...
    Connected OK
    Found BI Instance MBean:
    oracle.biee.admin:type=BIDomain.BIInstance,biInstance=coreapplication,group=Service
    Getting Email MBean ...
    Found BI Email MBean: oracle.biee.admin:type=BIDomain.BIInstance.EmailConfiguration,biInstance=coreapplication,group=Service
    Locking domain ...
    Locked domain OK
    Existing email displayname is: Oracle Business Intelligence
    Changing email displayname to: FredBloggs
    Committing changes ...
    Committed changes OK
    
    

22.3.4 Scaling Out for High Availability and Performance Using the Oracle BI Systems Management API

You can use the Oracle BI Systems Management API to scale out to additional host computers for high availability and performance. Use the Enterprise Install to install Oracle Business Intelligence onto a new host computer, and then scale out using steps similar to those described in the following examples:

22.3.4.1 Example: Using WLST to Scale Out to Servers

This example connects a user to Oracle Business Intelligence and scales out to a server.

To use WLST commands in a script to scale out to servers:

  1. Open a text editor and create a WLST script similar to the following example:

    # Example to demonstrate connecting to a BIEE domain using WLST
    #  and do some scale-out operations.
    #
    # This scripts expects the following arguments:
    #
    # 1. wls.host (localhost)
    # 2. wls.port (7001)
    # 3. wls.user  (user1)
    # 4. wls.password  (password1)
    # 5. oracle instance name# 6. new count of bi servers
    # ===================================================================
     
    import sys
    import os
     
    # Check the arguments to this script are as expected.
    # argv[0] is script name.
    argLen = len(sys.argv)
    if argLen -1 != 6:
        print "ERROR: got ", argLen -1, " args."
        print "USAGE: wlst.cmd wls_connect.py WLS_HOST WLS_PORT WLS_USER WLS_PASSWORD"  OracleInstance numBIServers
        print "   eg: wlst.cmd wls_connect.py localhost 7001 user1 password1  instance2 2" 
        exit()
     
    WLS_HOST = sys.argv[1]
    WLS_PORT = sys.argv[2]
    WLS_USER = sys.argv[3]
    WLS_PW = sys.argv[4]
    oracleInstanceName = sys.argv[5]
    # convert string to int which is needed later
    newNumBIServers = int(sys.argv[6])
    
    
    print 'Connecting to '+ WLS_HOST+ ':' + WLS_PORT + ' as user: ' + WLS_USER + ' ...'
     
    # Connect to WLS
    connect(WLS_USER, WLS_PW, WLS_HOST+ ':' + WLS_PORT);
     
    print 'Connecting to Domain ...'
    domainCustom()
    cd ('oracle.biee.admin')
    print 'Connecting to BIDomain MBean ...'
    cd ('oracle.biee.admin:type=BIDomain,group=Service')
     
    biinstances = get('BIInstances')
    biinstance = biinstances[0]
    
    oracleinstances = get('OracleInstances')
     
    print 'Connecting to BIInstance MBean ...'
    cd ('..')
    print 'About to cd to: ' + biinstance.toString()
    cd (biinstance.toString())
     
    servicestatus=get('ServiceStatus')
    print 'BIInstance MBean; ServiceStatus: ' + servicestatus
    
    print 'Looping through OracleInstances looking for: ' + oracleInstanceName
    matching = false
    for oi in oracleinstances:
        cd('..')
        print 'About to cd to: ' + oi.toString()    
        cd ( oi.toString() )
        id = get('Id')
        print 'Found instance with id: ' + id
        if id == oracleInstanceName:
            matching = oi
            break
            
    if matching :
        print 'Found matching OracleInstance...'
    else :
        print 'Failed to find target OracleInstance with name: ' + oracleInstanceName
        exit()
        
    deployments = get('BIInstanceDeployments')
    # Should only ever be one of these
    deployment = deployments[0]
    print 'Acquired BIInstanceDeployment : ' + deployment.toString()
    cd('..')
    cd ('oracle.biee.admin:type=BIDomain,group=Service')
    
    print 'Calling lock ...'
    objs = jarray.array([], java.lang.Object)
    strs = jarray.array([], java.lang.String)
    invoke('lock', objs, strs)
    
    cd('..')
    cd(deployment.toString())
    numBIServers = get('numBIServers')
    print 'Current number of BI Servers is:', numBIServers
    print 'About to set number of BI Servers to:', newNumBIServers
    set('numBIServers', newNumBIServers )
    
    print 'Successfully set number of BI Servers to', newNumBIServers
    print 'Calling commit ...'
    cd ('..')
    cd ('oracle.biee.admin:type=BIDomain,group=Service')
    objs = jarray.array([], java.lang.Object)
    strs = jarray.array([], java.lang.String)
    invoke('commit', objs, strs)
    
    print 'Committed OK'
    
    print 'Connecting to BIInstance MBean ...'
    cd ('..')
    cd (biinstance.toString())
    
    servicestatus=get('ServiceStatus')
    print 'BIInstance MBean; ServiceStatus: ' + servicestatus
    
    print 'Calling stop ...'
    objs = jarray.array([], java.lang.Object)
    strs = jarray.array([], java.lang.String)
    invoke('stop', objs, strs)
    
    servicestatus=get('ServiceStatus')
    print 'BIInstance MBean; ServiceStatus: ' + servicestatus
    
    print 'Calling start ...'
    objs = jarray.array([], java.lang.Object)
    strs = jarray.array([], java.lang.String)
    invoke('start', objs, strs)
    
    servicestatus=get('ServiceStatus')
    print 'BIInstance MBean; ServiceStatus: ' + servicestatus
    
    
    exit()
    
  2. Save the script.

  3. Navigate to the folder \MW_HOME\wlserver_10.3\common\bin and run the script, entering any arguments required.

    For example, you might enter the following at the command line:

    ./wlst.sh wlst_scaleout_obi.py localhost 7001 user1 password1 (UNIX)

    wlst wlst_wlst_scaleout_obi.cmd localhost 7001 user1 password1 (Windows)

    The command window (and log file), displays prompts and messages, for example:

    Initializing WebLogic Scripting Tool (WLST) ...
    
    Welcome to WebLogic Server Administration Scripting Shell
     
    Type help() for help on available commands
     
    Connecting to localhost:7001 as user: user1 ...
    Connecting to t3://localhost:7001 with userid password1 ...
    Successfully connected to Administration Server 'AdminServer' that belongs to 
    domain 'bifoundation_domain'.
     
    Warning: An insecure protocol was used to connect to the 
    server. To ensure on-the-wire security, use the SSL port or 
    Admin port instead.
     
    Connecting to Domain ...
    Location changed to domain custom tree. 
    This is a writable tree with No root.
    For more help, use help(domainCustom)
     
    Connecting to BIDomain MBean ...
    Connecting to BIInstance MBean ...
    About to cd to: oracle.biee.admin:type=BIDomain.BIInstance,biInstance=coreapplication,group=Service
    BIInstance MBean; ServiceStatus: FULLY_STARTED
    Looping through OracleInstances looking for: instance1
    About to cd to: oracle.biee.admin:oracleInstance=instance1,type=BIDomain.OracleInstance,group=Service
    Found instance with id: instance1
    Found matching OracleInstance...
    Acquired BIInstanceDeployment : oracle.biee.admin:oracleInstance=instance1,type=BIDomain.OracleInstance.BIInstanceDeployment,biInstance=coreapplication,group=Service
    Calling lock ...
    Current number of BI Servers is: 1
    About to set number of BI Servers to: 6
    Successfully set number of BI Servers to 6
    Calling commit ...
    Committed OK
    Connecting to BIInstance MBean ...
    BIInstance MBean; ServiceStatus: PARTIALLY_STARTED
    Calling stop ...
    BIInstance MBean; ServiceStatus: PARTIALLY_STARTED
    Calling start ...
    BIInstance MBean; ServiceStatus: FULLY_STARTED
    
    Exiting WebLogic Scripting Tool.
    

For more information about using WLST commands, see Oracle Fusion Middleware WebLogic Scripting Tool Command Reference.

22.3.4.2 Example: Using a Java Program to Scale Out to Servers

To use a Java program to scale out to servers:

  1. Open a Java editor and compile a Java program similar to the following example:

    package com.oracle.bi.example;
     
    import java.util.Hashtable;
     
    import javax.management.Attribute;
    import javax.management.MBeanServerConnection;
    import javax.management.ObjectName;
    import javax.management.remote.JMXConnector;
    import javax.management.remote.JMXConnectorFactory;
    import javax.management.remote.JMXServiceURL;
    import javax.naming.Context;
     
    /**
     * Example class showing how to connect to the Oracle BIEE AdminMBeans JMX Interface,
     * and do some scale-out operations.
     * <br/>
     * This example is intentionally succinct for clarity, so for example,
     * it does not do any exception handling.
     * Any production code should include robust error handling.
     * <br/>
     * Note that you need <code>wljmxclient.jar</code> and <code>wlclient.jar</code> on the classpath.
     */
    public class MBeanAPIExample4ScaleOut {
           private String host;
           private int port;
           private String username;
           private String password;
           private String oracleInstanceName;
           private int newNumBIServers;
    
          private MBeanServerConnection mbs = null;
          private ObjectName biDomainMBeanName;
          private ObjectName biInstanceMBeanName;
          private ObjectName[] oracleInstanceMBeanNames; 
          private MBeanAPIExample4ScaleOut(String[] args) {
                 if (args.length < 6) {
                   System.out.println("Usage: MBeanAPIExample1Connect host port username password oracleInstanceName NumBIServers");
                   throw new IllegalArgumentException("Not enough arguments");
                       }
                       host = args[0];
                       port = Integer.parseInt(args[1]);
                       username = args[2];
                       password = args[3];
                       oracleInstanceName = args[4];
                       newNumBIServers = Integer.parseInt(args[5]);
           }
         private void connect() throws Exception {
                  String jmxUrl = "service:jmx:t3://" + host + ":" + port + "/jndi/weblogic.management.mbeanservers.domainruntime";
                  System.out.println("Connecting using URL: " + jmxUrl + " ...");
                  Hashtable<String,String> h = new Hashtable<String,String>();
                  h.put(Context.SECURITY_PRINCIPAL,   username);
                  h.put(Context.SECURITY_CREDENTIALS, password);
                  h.put(JMXConnectorFactory.PROTOCOL_PROVIDER_PACKAGES, "weblogic.management.remote");
                  JMXConnector jmxConnector = JMXConnectorFactory.connect(new JMXServiceURL(jmxUrl), h);
                  mbs = jmxConnector.getMBeanServerConnection();
                  System.out.println("Connected OK");
     
                  biDomainMBeanName = new ObjectName("oracle.biee.admin:type=BIDomain,group=Service");
                  ObjectName[] biInstanceMBeanNames = (ObjectName[])mbs.getAttribute(biDomainMBeanName, "BIInstances");
                  biInstanceMBeanName = biInstanceMBeanNames[0]; // there should only be one
                  System.out.println("Found BI Instance MBean: " + biInstanceMBeanName);
    oracleInstanceMBeanNames = (ObjectName[])mbs.getAttribute(biDomainMBeanName, "OracleInstances");
    for (ObjectName oracleInstanceMBeanName : oracleInstanceMBeanNames) {
          System.out.println("Found Oracle Instance MBean: " + oracleInstanceMBeanName);
      }
             }
    private void displayStatus() throws Exception {
       String status = (String)mbs.getAttribute(biInstanceMBeanName, "ServiceStatus");
       System.out.println("Status is: " + status);
    }
    private void lock() throws Exception {
       System.out.println("Locking domain ...");
       Object[] args = new Object[]{};
       String[] sig  = new String[]{};
       mbs.invoke(biDomainMBeanName, "lock", args, sig);
       System.out.println("Locked domain OK");
    }
    private void commit() throws Exception {
       System.out.println("Committing changes ...");
       Object[] args = new Object[]{};
       String[] sig  = new String[]{};
       mbs.invoke(biDomainMBeanName, "commit", args, sig);
       System.out.println("Committed changes OK");
    }
        
    private ObjectName findMatchingOracleInstanceMBean() throws Exception {
       for (ObjectName oracleInstanceMBeanName : oracleInstanceMBeanNames) {
         String oracleInstanceId =  (String)mbs.getAttribute(oracleInstanceMBeanName, "Id");
         if (oracleInstanceId.equals(oracleInstanceName)) {
             return oracleInstanceMBeanName;
         }
    }
    throw new RuntimeException("Cannot find oracle instance: " + oracleInstanceName);
    }
    
    private void scaleOut(ObjectName oracleInstanceMBeanName) throws Exception {
       ObjectName[] biInstanceDeploymentMBeanNames = (ObjectName[])mbs.getAttribute(oracleInstanceMBeanName, "BIInstanceDeployments");
       ObjectName biInstanceDeploymentMBeanName = biInstanceDeploymentMBeanNames[0]; // there should only be one
       System.out.println("Found BI Instance Deployment MBean: " + biInstanceDeploymentMBeanName);
            
       int numBIServers = (Integer)mbs.getAttribute(biInstanceDeploymentMBeanName, "NumBIServers");
       System.out.println("Found Num BI Servers: " + numBIServers);
       System.out.println("Setting Num BI Servers to: " + newNumBIServers);
       mbs.setAttribute(biInstanceDeploymentMBeanName, new Attribute("NumBIServers", newNumBIServers));
     }
        
    private void stopAll() throws Exception {
       System.out.println("Stopping instance ...");
       Object[] args = new Object[]{};
       String[] sig  = new String[]{};
       mbs.invoke(biInstanceMBeanName, "stop", args, sig);
       System.out.println("Stopped instance OK");
    }
     
    private void startAll() throws Exception {
       System.out.println("Starting instance ...");
       Object[] args = new Object[]{};
       String[] sig  = new String[]{};
       mbs.invoke(biInstanceMBeanName, "start", args, sig);
       System.out.println("Started instance OK");
    }
     
          public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
                     MBeanAPIExample4ScaleOut example = new    MBeanAPIExample4ScaleOut(args);
                     example.connect();
                     example.displayStatus();
                     ObjectName oiMBeanName = example.findMatchingOracleInstanceMBean();
                     example.lock();
                     example.scaleOut(oiMBeanName);
                     example.commit();
                     example.stopAll();
                     example.startAll();
                     example.displayStatus();
          }
    }
    
  2. Navigate to the \<wlserver>\server\lib folder and run the Java program, providing the class name and any arguments required.

    For example:

    java <JavaClassName> <host> <port> <username> <password> <oracleInstanceName> <newNumBIServers>

  3. Navigate to the \<wlserver>\server\lib folder and run the Java program, providing the class path, class name, and any arguments required.

    java -classpath <JavaClassName> <host> <port> <username> <password> <oracleInstanceName> <newNumBIServers>

    For example:

    java -classpath <MW_HOME>wls_10.3/server/lib/wjmxclient.jar com.oracle.bi.example.MBeanAPIExample4ScaleOut localhost 7001 user1 password1 instance1 3

    The command window (and log file) displays prompts and messages, for example:

    Connecting using URL: service:jmx:t3://localhost:7001/jndi/weblogic.management.mbeanservers.domainruntime ...
    Connected OK
    Found BI Instance MBean:
    oracle.biee.admin:type=BIDomain.BIInstance,biInstance=coreapplication,group=Service
    Found Oracle Instance MBean: oracle.biee.admin:oracleInstance=instance1,type=BIDomain.OracleInstance,group=Service
    Status is: PARTIALLY_STARTED
    Locking domain ...
    Locked domain OK
    Found BI Instance Deployment MBean: oracle.biee.admin:oracleInstance=instance1,type=BIDomain.OracleInstance.BIInstanceDeployment,biInstance=coreapplication,group=Service
    Found Num BI Servers: 1
    Setting Num BI Servers to: 3
    Committing changes ...
    Committed changes OK
    Stopping instance ...
    Stopped instance OK
    Starting instance ...
    Started instance OK
    Status is: FULLY_STARTED
    

22.3.5 Capturing Metrics Using the Oracle BI Systems Management API

In addition to the Metrics Browser in Fusion Middleware Control, you can view metrics for Oracle Business Intelligence using the Dynamic Monitoring Service (DMS) and WLST commands. This section describes how to use these methods.

22.3.5.1 Using the Dynamic Monitoring Service for Metrics

You can use the Dynamic Monitoring Service (DMS) to view metrics for Oracle Business Intelligence. Access the service using the following URL:

http://<host>:7001/dms

Using the Metrics Tables list in the left pane, select Non-J2EE Metrics to view the list of metrics for Oracle Business Intelligence. This is the same list that you see in the Metrics Browser of Fusion Middleware Control.

You can use the Dynamic Monitoring Service to quickly obtain a snapshot of metrics. You can use the URL for a given metric as the source for a web query in a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet that you combine with a macro that automatically copies values to an archive sheet and refreshes the query on a loop for a given period.

Suppose that you want to use the Dynamic Monitoring Service to see the details of the metric table called "Oracle_BI_General". When you click the Oracle_BI_General link in the Metrics Tables list, the table is displayed on the right side. This metric table consists of several monitored values, such as Active_Execute_Requests and Total_Sessions. You can use the information from the tables that are displayed in this Metrics Browser as part of WLST commands.

For information on accessing DMS metrics using WLST commands, see the chapter on DMS custom WLST commands in Oracle Fusion Middleware WebLogic Scripting Tool Command Reference.

22.3.5.2 Using WLTS Commands for Metrics

You can use WLST commands to capture metrics for Oracle Business Intelligence.

To use WLST commands for metrics:

  1. Navigate to the MW_HOME/ORACLE_HOME/common/bin directory.

  2. Run the WLST utility.

  3. Connect to the Oracle BI system using the connect command, as shown in the following example:

    connect('user','password','t3://<host>:7001')

  4. Verify that you are in "online mode" by viewing the following prompt:

    wls:/bifoundation_domain/serverConfig>

You can now interactively use the DMS custom WLST commands. For example, to list all the metric tables that start with "Oracle_BI", enter the following command:

wls:/bifoundation_domain/serverConfig> displayMetricTables('Oracle_BI*')

This command generates a long list of data for each of the Oracle BI metric tables. So it is more useful to focus on a given metric table, such as "Oracle_BI_General". The following command displays output such as that shown in this sample.

wls:/bifoundation_domain/serverConfig> displayMetricTables('Oracle_BI_General')

-----------------
Oracle_BI_General
-----------------
Active_Execute_Requests.value:  0
Active_Fetch_Requests.value:    0
Active_File_Handles.value:      1
Active_Initblock_Executions.value:      0
Active_Logins.value:    0
Active_Prepare_Requests.value:  0
Avg._Failed_Logins_Elapsed_Time.value:  0
Avg._Initblock_Executions_Elapsed_Time.value:   0
Avg._Succeeded_Logins_Elapsed_Time.value:       0
Avg._query_elapsed_time.value:  0
Busy_File_Handles.value:        0
File_Handle_Waiters.value:      0
Free_File_Handles.value:        502
Host:   oracle-bc5ac6af
Max._Initblock_Execution_Elapsed_Time.value:    0
Max_File_Handles.value: 503
Name:   Oracle BI General
New_Execute_Requests.value:     19
New_Fetch_Requests.value:       32
New_Initblock_Executions.value: 0
New_Logins.value:       7
New_Prepare_Requests.value:     19
New_Requests.value:     187
OBPERF_***.value:       7
Oracle_BI_Applications: Oracle BI Server
Parent: /Oracle BI Server
Process:        Oracle BI Server:4004:/instance1/coreapplication_obis1
Queries/sec.value:      0
ServerName:     /instance1/coreapplication_obis1
Succeeded_Initblock_Execution_Ratio_as_%.value: 0
Succeeded_Logins_Ratio_as_%.value:      7
Total_sessions.value:   0

Using the scripting capability of WLST, you can embed DMS commands into a Jython script to store the required metric values in a file. The following is an example of such a script.

# Script to dump timestamp (in milliseconds) for a single Oracle BI metric 
# to a file
#
from java.util import Date
from java.text import SimpleDateFormat
#
# Modify to connect to your server 
connect('biadmin','welcome1','t3://localhost:7001')
#
# This is the number of times to sample the metric
sample_length = 100
#
# This is where you define what metric table and metric to dump to file
metric_table = "Oracle_BI_General"
metric_of_interest = "Avg._query_elapsed_time.value"
#
# Some metrics have non-text characters in the name. Provide a reference here 
# so it dumps to file without error in file name
output_file_metric_ref = "Avg_Qry_Elapse"
#
# This section defines the output file name with unique time 
start_time = str(SimpleDateFormat("dd-MMM-yyyy_HH-mm-ss").format(Date()))
output_filename = start_time + "_" + output_file_metric_ref + "_dump.txt"
#
# Open the file and write summary of metric to be dumped
file = open(output_filename,'w')
print >>file, "Start Metric Dump of: " + str(metric_table) + " : " + str(metric_of_interest) + " at " + str(SimpleDateFormat("dd-MMM-yyyy HH-mm-ss").format(Date()))
#
#
# The following section forms a loop according to the sample length defined
# earlier. The 'displayMetricTables()' command returns the metric table in the 
# form of a JMX composite data array. The code following this command access 
# the metric data from this array. In this case, a particular metric of
# interest is tested for and only the value of that metric is output to file.
#
counter = 0
while counter <= sample_length:
    results = displayMetricTables(metric_table)
    for table in results:
        name = table.get('Table')
        rows = table.get('Rows')
    rowCollection = rows.values()
    iter = rowCollection.iterator()
    while iter.hasNext():
        row = iter.next()
    rowType = row.getCompositeType()
    keys = rowType.keySet()
    keyIter = keys.iterator()
    while keyIter.hasNext():
        columnName = keyIter.next()
        value = row.get(columnName)
        if columnName == metric_of_interest:
            print >>file, str(SimpleDateFormat("dd-MMM-yyyy HH-mm-ss-SSS").format(Date())) + "," + str(value)
    counter = counter + 1
file.close()
disconnect()

Certain Oracle BI metric tables, such as "Oracle_BI_Thread_Pool", are in effect two-dimensional. With the "Oracle_BI_Thread_Pool" table, you can query the metric values for various "Names", such as "Server" or "Usage_Tracking". To export the required metric value to a file in this case, you must modify the logic that was used in looping in the previous example script to handle the two dimensions. The following example script provides one way to handle this case.

# Script to dump timestamp (in milliseconds) and a 
#single Oracle BI metric to a file for metrics with multiple sections
#
from java.util import Date
from java.text import SimpleDateFormat
#
# Modify to connect to your server
connect('biadmin','welcome1','t3://localhost:7001')
#
# This is the number of times to sample the metric
sample_length = 100
#
# This is where you define what metric table, category, and metric to 
# dump to file
metric_table = "Oracle_BI_Thread_Pool"
category_of_interest = "Server"
metric_of_interest = "Avg._Request/sec.value"
#
# Some metrics have non-text characters - provide a reference here 
# so it dumps to file without error
output_file_metric_ref = "Avg_Req_Sec"
#
# This section defines the output file name with unique time 
start_time = str(SimpleDateFormat("dd-MMM-yyyy_HH-mm-ss").format(Date()))
output_filename = start_time + "_" + output_file_metric_ref + "_dump.txt"
#
# Open the file and write summary of metric to be dumped
file = open(output_filename,'w')
print >>file, "Start Metric Dump of: " + str(metric_table) + " : " + str(metric_of_interest) + " for Category: " + str(category_of_interest) + " at " + str(SimpleDateFormat("dd-MMM-yyyy HH-mm-ss").format(Date()))
#
#
counter = 0
while counter <= sample_length:
    results = displayMetricTables(metric_table)
    for table in results:
        name = table.get('Table')
        rows = table.get('Rows')
    rowCollection = rows.values()
    iter = rowCollection.iterator()
    while iter.hasNext():
        row = iter.next()
        if row.containsValue(category_of_interest):
            rowType = row.getCompositeType()
            keys = rowType.keySet()
            keyIter = keys.iterator()
            while keyIter.hasNext():
                columnName = keyIter.next()
                value = row.get(columnName)
                if columnName == metric_of_interest:
                    print >>file, str(SimpleDateFormat("dd-MMM-yyyy HH-mm-ss-SSS").format(Date())) + "," + str(value)
    counter = counter + 1
file.close()
disconnect()

22.4 Descriptions of JMX Admin MBeans and Methods for the Oracle BI Systems Management API

This section lists the JMX Admin MBeans of the Oracle BI Systems Management API that you use to perform system administration tasks (using WLST scripts and Java programs). Your code must reference Admin MBeans and their attributes and methods. This section lists the Admin MBeans. The JavaDoc pages describe the attributes and methods that are available for each Admin MBean.

For example, display the JavaDoc files in a web browser and click the Admin MBean EmailConfigurationMBean. You see all related attributes and methods, and you can then use the correct attribute and method names in WLST scripts or Java programs.

See the JavaDoc file that is located in the following directory:

ORACLE_HOME/doc/javadoc/bifoundation/jmxapi/index.html

Table 22-1 lists the JMX Admin MBeans for the Oracle BI Systems Management API.

Table 22-1 Oracle BI Systems Management API JMX Admin MBeans

Admin MBeanDescription

AvailabilityConfigurationMBean

Provides an MBean interface for configuring several options that affect process availability for Oracle Business Intelligence.

BIComponentMBean

Defines an MBean interface for a component of a BI domain.

BIDomainMBean

Defines an MBean interface for managing a BI domain.

BIInstanceDeploymentMBean

Defines an MBean interface to describe the deployment (provisioning) of system components to an Oracle instance.

BIInstanceMBean

Defines an MBean interface for managing system components.

BILogConfigurationMBean

Defines an MBean interface for managing Oracle Business Intelligence log file settings and levels.

BISizeAgeLogConfigurationMBean

Defines an MBean interface for managing query log file settings.

EmailConfigurationMBean

Defines an MBean interface for managing the email configuration of system components.

MarketingConfigurationMBean

Defines an MBean interface for managing the marketing configuration of system components.

OracleInstanceMBean

Defines an MBean interface for managing an Oracle instance.

PerformanceConfigurationMBean

Defines an MBean interface for managing the performance configuration of system components.

PresentationConfigurationMBean

Defines an MBean interface for managing the presentation configuration of system components.

PresentationServerConfigurationMBean

Defines an MBean interface for managing the configuration of Presentation Services.

ScaleOutSupportMBean

Provides operations to support scaling out a domain.

SchedulerDatabaseMBean

Defines an MBean interface for managing Scheduler database connection settings.

SecurityConfigurationMBean

Defines an MBean interface for managing the centralized security configuration of system components.

ServerConfigurationMBean

Defines an MBean interface for managing settings related to the Oracle BI Server.


You can also use the MBean Browser to access Admin MBeans. For information, see Section 2.4, "Managing Oracle Business Intelligence JMX MBeans Using the Fusion Middleware Control MBean Browser."

PK32tPK\EOEBPS/querycaching.htm Managing Performance Tuning and Query Caching

7 Managing Performance Tuning and Query Caching

This chapter describes ways to improve Oracle Business Intelligence query performance, including a performance tuning overview and information about monitoring system metrics. It also describes the how to manage and use the query cache, a feature that enables the Oracle BI Server to save the results of a query in cache files and then reuse those results later when a similar query is requested. Using cache, the cost of database processing must be paid only once for a query, not every time the query is run.

See also the following Oracle Fusion Middleware resources on performance tuning for your system:

Oracle Fusion Middleware Performance and Tuning Guide

Oracle Fusion Middleware Performance and Tuning for Oracle WebLogic Server

This chapter includes the following sections:

7.1 Monitoring Service Levels

Understanding service levels typically involves monitoring process state and viewing system metrics.

Oracle Business Intelligence automatically and continuously measures runtime performance in real time. The performance metrics are automatically enabled; you do not need to set options or perform any extra configuration to collect them.

System metrics are available in Fusion Middleware Control for system components within a given Oracle Business Intelligence installation. If you encounter a problem, such as an application that is running slowly or is hanging, then you can view more detailed performance information to learn more information about the problem.

You can use WSLT commands to periodically save metric information to a file so that you have a record of past metric values. See "DMS Custom WLST Commands" in Oracle Fusion Middleware WebLogic Scripting Tool Command Reference for more information.

You can also view metrics for Java components using the Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console.

This section contains the following topics:

7.1.1 Using Fusion Middleware Control to View Common Performance Metrics

You can access the most commonly viewed performance metrics from the Metrics tab of the Capacity Management page.

To use Fusion Middleware Control to view common performance metrics:

  1. Go to the Business Intelligence Overview page, as described in Section 2.2.3, "Using Fusion Middleware Control to Manage Oracle Business Intelligence System Components."

  2. Display the Metrics tab of the Capacity Management page.

  3. On the Metrics tab, you can view metrics that are related to responsiveness, load, and reliability. Click the Help button on the page to access the page-level help for the following metrics:

    • Request Processing Time (ms)

    • SOA Request Processing Time (ms)

    • Average Query Time (seconds)

    • Active Sessions

    • Requests (per minute)

    • SOA Requests (per minute)

    • Presentation Services Requests (per second)

    • Server Queries (per second)

    • Failed Queries

    • Errors Reported (in the last hour)

    The metrics that are displayed on this tab enable you to determine the current responsiveness, load, and reliability for Oracle Business Intelligence components across the entire cluster.

7.1.2 Using Fusion Middleware Control to View All Oracle Business Intelligence Metrics

You can view and graph all the available Oracle Business Intelligence metrics from the Performance Summary page in Fusion Middleware Control. The data is logged transiently (that is, logging starts when you go to the page and select a particular metric for display).

To use Fusion Middleware Control to view all performance metrics for Oracle Business Intelligence:

  1. In the tree navigator, expand the Business Intelligence folder and right-click the coreapplication node.

  2. Select Monitoring, then select Performance. The Performance Summary page appears, displaying a selection of metrics for this Oracle Business Intelligence installation.


    Note:

    Alternatively, to view the Performance Summary page, you can go to the Metrics page of the Capacity Management tab and click View the full set of system metrics.


  3. To customize the metrics that are displayed on the Performance Summary page, click Show Metric Palette. Then, expand the appropriate metric category and select or deselect individual metrics. The metrics that you select are displayed on the Performance Summary page.

    For information about a particular metric, right-click the metric and select Help.

7.1.3 Using the Administration Console to View Metrics for Java Components

Use the Administration Console to view metrics for Java components. You can view metrics on the Monitoring tab for the selected Managed Server, or you can use the Metric Browser. If your deployment is based on the Simple Install type, use the Monitoring tab for the Administration Server.

To view metrics for Oracle Business Intelligence in the Monitoring tab:

  1. Log in to the Administration Console.

  2. Expand the Environment node in the Domain Structure window.

  3. Click Servers. The Summary of Servers page is displayed.

  4. Click the server name (for example, oracle_bi1 or AdminServer(admin)).

  5. Click the Monitoring tab.

    Click Help for more information about the metrics displayed on this tab.

To access the Administration Console Metric Browser:

  1. Log in to the Administration Console.

  2. Click Monitoring Dashboard under Charts and Graphs.

  3. Click the Metric Browser tab.

    Click Help for more information about using the Metric Browser.

7.2 About Query Performance Tuning

This section describes some important considerations for improving query performance with the Oracle BI Server.

The following list summarizes methods that you can use to improve query performance:

  • Tuning and indexing underlying databases: For Oracle BI Server database queries to return quickly, the underlying databases must be configured, tuned, and indexed correctly. Note that different database products have different tuning considerations.

    If there are queries that return slowly from the underlying databases, then you can capture the SQL statements for the queries in the query log and provide them to the database administrator (DBA) for analysis. See Section 8.4, "Managing the Query Log" for more information about configuring query logging on the system.

  • Aggregate tables: It is extremely important to use aggregate tables to improve query performance. Aggregate tables contain precalculated summarizations of data. It is much faster to retrieve an answer from an aggregate table than to recompute the answer from thousands of rows of detail.

    The Oracle BI Server uses aggregate tables automatically, if they have been properly specified in the repository. See Oracle Fusion Middleware Metadata Repository Builder's Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition for examples of setting up aggregate navigation.

  • Query caching: The Oracle BI Server can store query results for reuse by subsequent queries. Query caching can dramatically improve the apparent performance of the system for users, particularly for commonly used dashboards, but it does not improve performance for most ad-hoc analysis.

    See Section 7.4, "About the Oracle BI Server Query Cache" for more information about query caching concepts and setup.

  • Setting parameters in Fusion Middleware Control: You can set various performance configuration parameters using Fusion Middleware Control to improve system performance. See Section 7.3, "Setting Performance Parameters in Fusion Middleware Control" for more information.

  • Setting parameters in NQSConfig.INI: The NQSConfig.INI file contains additional configuration and tuning parameters for the Oracle BI Server, including parameters to configure disk space for temporary storage, set virtual table page sizes, and several other advanced configuration settings. See Appendix A, "NQSConfig.INI File Configuration Settings" for more information.

You can also improve the overall performance of the system by increasing throughput by scaling out system components. See Chapter 5, "Scaling Your Deployment" for more information.

7.3 Setting Performance Parameters in Fusion Middleware Control

This section describes performance options that you can set in Fusion Middleware Control.

This section contains the following topics:

7.3.1 Using Fusion Middleware Control to Disallow RPD Updates

You can use Fusion Middleware Control to allow or disallow updates to the default repository file. Setting this parameter affects whether you can update the repository when the Administration Tool connects in both online and offline mode. It also affects whether you can perform other repository update operations using other utilities, such as biserverxmlcli. Note that the aggregate persistence feature is not available when repository updates are disallowed.

Disallowing repository updates can improve Oracle BI Server performance, because in this mode, the Oracle BI Server does not need to handle lock control.

If you choose to disallow repository updates, then when the Administration Tool opens a repository in either online or offline mode, a message informs the user that the repository is read-only.

Before you begin this procedure, ensure that you are familiar with the information in Section 3.2, "Using Fusion Middleware Control to Update Oracle Business Intelligence Configuration Settings."

To use Fusion Middleware Control to disallow repository updates:

  1. Go to the Business Intelligence Overview page, as described in Section 2.2.3, "Using Fusion Middleware Control to Manage Oracle Business Intelligence System Components."

  2. Display the Performance tab of the Capacity Management page.

  3. Click Lock and Edit Configuration to allow changes to be made.

  4. Select Disallow RPD Updates to disallow updates to the repository file.

    Click the Help button on the page to access the page-level help.

  5. Click Apply, then click Activate Changes.

  6. Return to the Business Intelligence Overview page and click Restart.

For information about using methods in the Oracle BI Systems Management API to change configuration settings, see Chapter 22, "Introducing the Oracle BI Systems Management API."

7.3.2 Using Fusion Middleware Control to Set the User Session Log-Off Period

You can override the time to elapse, in minutes, before a user is automatically logged off. Before you begin this procedure, ensure that you are familiar with the information in Section 3.2, "Using Fusion Middleware Control to Update Oracle Business Intelligence Configuration Settings."

To use Fusion Middleware Control to set the client session log-off period:

  1. Go to the Business Intelligence Overview page, as described in Section 2.2.3, "Using Fusion Middleware Control to Manage Oracle Business Intelligence System Components."

  2. Display the Performance tab of the Capacity Management page.

  3. Click Lock and Edit Configuration to enable changes to be made.

  4. Complete the User Session Expiry option using the description in the help topic for the page.

    Click the Help button on the page to access the page-level help for the box.

  5. Click Apply, then click Activate Changes to execute your changes and release the lock to enable another system administrator to make changes.

  6. Return to the Business Intelligence Overview page and click Restart.

For information about using methods in the Oracle BI Systems Management API to change settings, see Chapter 22, "Introducing the Oracle BI Systems Management API."

7.3.3 Using Fusion Middleware Control to Set Configuration Options for Data in Tables and Pivot Tables

Advanced configuration settings are described in Section 18.3, "Configuring for Displaying and Processing Data in Views."

Before you begin this procedure, ensure that you are familiar with the information in Section 3.2, "Using Fusion Middleware Control to Update Oracle Business Intelligence Configuration Settings."

To use Fusion Middleware Control to set configuration options for views:

  1. Go to the Business Intelligence Overview page, as described in Section 2.2.3, "Using Fusion Middleware Control to Manage Oracle Business Intelligence System Components."

  2. Display the Performance tab of the Capacity Management page.

  3. Click Lock and Edit Configuration to enable changes to be made.

  4. Complete the elements using the descriptions in the help topic for the page. Click the Help button on the page to access the page-level help for the following options:

    • Maximum Number of Rows to Download option

    • Maximum Number of Rows Per Page to Include option

    The value of these options cannot exceed the value that is specified for the MaxVisibleRows element, as described in Table 18-1.

  5. Click Apply, then click Activate Changes.

  6. Return to the Business Intelligence Overview page and click Restart.

For information about using methods in the Oracle BI Systems Management API to change configuration settings, see Chapter 22, "Introducing the Oracle BI Systems Management API."

7.3.4 Using Fusion Middleware Control to Set the Maximum Number of Rows Processed to Render a Table

You can override the maximum number of rows that can be fetched and processed from the Oracle BI Server for rendering a table. Reducing the number of rows in a table can significantly improve performance by reducing the system resources that can be consumed by a given user session.

Advanced configuration settings are described in Section 18.3, "Configuring for Displaying and Processing Data in Views."

Note the following when setting this value:

  • This specification applies to tables, not to pivot tables.

  • The default value is 65000. The minimum value is 50. If the user exceeds the maximum value, then the server returns an error message when the table view is rendered. The maximum value is at least 16 bits, which varies by platform. The system is likely to consume all its memory before approaching a number larger than this value.

Before you begin this procedure, ensure that you are familiar with the information in Section 3.2, "Using Fusion Middleware Control to Update Oracle Business Intelligence Configuration Settings."

To use Fusion Middleware Control to set the maximum number of rows that are processed to render a table:

  1. Go to the Business Intelligence Overview page, as described in Section 2.2.3, "Using Fusion Middleware Control to Manage Oracle Business Intelligence System Components."

  2. Display the Performance tab of the Capacity Management page.

  3. Click Lock and Edit Configuration to enable changes to be made.

  4. Complete the Maximum Number of Rows Processed to Render A Table View option using the description in the help topic for the page. Enter an integer value greater than 50.

    Click the Help button on the page to access the page-level help for the box.

  5. Click Apply, then click Activate Changes.

  6. Return to the Business Intelligence Overview page and click Restart.

For information about using methods in the Oracle BI Systems Management API to change configuration settings, see Chapter 22, "Introducing the Oracle BI Systems Management API."

7.4 About the Oracle BI Server Query Cache

You can configure the Oracle BI Server to maintain a local, disk-based cache of query result sets (query cache). The query cache allows the Oracle BI Server to satisfy many subsequent query requests without having to access back-end data sources (such as Oracle or DB2). This reduction in communication costs can dramatically decrease query response time.

As updates occur on the back-end databases, the query cache entries can become stale. Therefore, you must periodically remove entries from the query cache using one of the following methods:

  • Manually. In the Oracle BI Administration Tool, in the Manage menu, select Cache to open the Cache Manager. The Cache Manager provides the most flexibility in choosing which cache entries to purge and when to purge them, but it requires manual intervention. See Section 7.7.4, "Using the Cache Manager" for more information.

  • Automatically. In the Administration Tool, you can disable cache for the system, set caching attributes for a specific physical table, and use Oracle Business Intelligence event tables to purge cache automatically. See Section 7.6, "Monitoring and Managing the Cache" for additional information.

  • Programmatically. The Oracle BI Server provides ODBC-extension functions for purging cache entries programmatically. These functions give you the choice and the timing flexibility of the Cache Manager with the automation of event tables. You can write your own scripts to call these functions at times that fit your needs. See Section 7.6.2, "Purging and Maintaining Cache Using ODBC Procedures" for more information.

The parameters that control query caching are located in Fusion Middleware Control and in the NQSConfig.INI file, described in Appendix A, "NQSConfig.INI File Configuration Settings." See also Section 7.7.3, "Using Agents to Seed the Oracle BI Server Cache" for additional information.

This section contains the following topics:

7.4.1 Query Cache Architecture

The query cache consists of cache storage space, cache metadata, and cache detection in query compilation.

The process of the Oracle BI Server accessing the cache metadata is very fast. If the metadata shows a cache hit, then the bulk of the query processing is eliminated, and the results are immediately returned to the user. The process of adding the new results to the cache is independent of the results being returned to the user; the only effect on the running query is the resources that are consumed in the process of writing the cached results.

Query cache entries are portable across different operating systems, such as Windows or UNIX, and across 32-bit and 64-bit architectures. Incompatible cache entries are automatically removed. For example, you do not have to manually remove cache files when switching between 32-bit and 64-bit systems.

Note that query cache entries are not portable across different releases of Oracle Business Intelligence, such as between Version 10.1.3.2 and 11g Release 1 (11.1.1).

Caching occurs by default at the subrequest level, which results in multiple cache entries for some SQL statements. Caching subrequests improves performance and the cache hit ratio, especially for queries that combine real-time and historical data. To disable subrequest caching, set the NQSConfig.INI file parameter DISABLE_SUBREQUEST_CACHING to YES. See Appendix A, "NQSConfig.INI File Configuration Settings" for more information.

7.4.2 Advantages of Caching

The fastest way to process a query is to skip the bulk of the processing and use a precomputed answer. With query caching, the Oracle BI Server stores the precomputed results of queries in a local cache. If another query can use those results, then all database processing for that query is eliminated. This can result in dramatic improvements in the average query response time.

In addition to improving performance, being able to answer a query from a local cache conserves network resources and processing time on the database server. Network resources are conserved because the intermediate results do not have to come over the network to the Oracle BI Server. Not running the query on the database frees the database server to do other work. If the database uses a charge back system, then it could save money in the budget as well.

Another benefit of using the cache to answer a query is savings in processing time on the Oracle BI Server, especially if the query results are retrieved from multiple databases. Depending on the query, there might be considerable join and sort processing in the server. If the query is already calculated, then this processing is avoided, freeing server resources for other tasks.

To summarize, query caching has the following advantages:

  • Dramatic improvement of query performance

  • Less network traffic

  • Reduction in database processing

  • Reduction in Oracle BI Server processing overhead

7.4.3 Costs of Caching

Query caching has many obvious benefits, but also certain costs:

  • Disk space for the cache

  • Administrative costs of managing the cache

  • Potential for cached results being stale

  • CPU and disk I/O on server computer

With cache management, the benefits typically far outweigh the costs.

The following sections discuss the costs of caching.

7.4.3.1 Disk Space

The query cache requires dedicated disk space. How much space depends on the query volume, the size of the query result sets, and how much disk space that you choose to allocate to the cache. For performance purposes, a disk should be used exclusively for caching, and it should be a high performance, high reliability type of disk system.

7.4.3.2 Administrative Tasks

There are a few administrative tasks that are associated with caching. You must set the cache persistence time for each physical table appropriately, knowing how often data in that table is updated. When the frequency of the update varies, you must keep track of when changes occur and purge the cache manually when necessary. You can also create a cache event polling table and modify applications to update the polling table when changes to the databases occur, making the system event-driven.

The Oracle BI Server also provides ODBC-extension functions for purging cache entries programmatically. You can write your own scripts to call these functions at the appropriate times.

7.4.3.3 Keeping the Cache Up To Date

If the cache entries are not purged when the data in the underlying databases changes, then queries can potentially return results that are out of date. You must evaluate whether this is acceptable. It might be acceptable to allow the cache to contain some stale data. You must decide what level of stale data is acceptable and then configure (and follow) a set of rules to reflect those levels.

For example, supp