PK =\Eoa,mimetypeapplication/epub+zipPK=\EiTunesMetadata.pliste artistName Oracle Corporation book-info cover-image-hash 439844998 cover-image-path OEBPS/dcommon/oracle-logo.jpg package-file-hash 230684280 publisher-unique-id E10613-02 unique-id 382035455 genre Oracle Documentation itemName Oracle® WebCenter Content User's Guide for Site Studio Designer, 11g Release 1 (11.1.1) releaseDate 2011-11-01T08:34:59Z year 2011 PKnqjePK=\EMETA-INF/container.xml PKYuPK=\EOEBPS/c16_manager.htm Setting Up Manager

16 Setting Up Manager

This section covers the following topics:

16.1 About Site Studio Manager

Site Studio Manager is a web-based application that can be used to modify the site hierarchy and make changes to each section. The users (site managers) use it to add and remove sections, assign page templates, change site properties, and more.

Manager is similar to Contributor in that the user opens the application directly from the site and starts making changes. It is added to the site differently than Contributor. There are no contribution regions; the designer simply adds the Site Studio Manager fragment from the Toolbox. To customize the appearance of Manager, you modify the fragment. To customize the functionality of Manager, you edit the manager configuration settings file (see Section 16.7, "Customizing Manager Configuration Settings").


Note:

For more information about using Site Studio Manager, see the Oracle WebCenter Content Administrator and Manager's Guide for Site Studio.

16.2 Choosing Where and When to Display Manager

Choosing where and when to display Manager on the site is an important decision because it affects how site managers use the site. Unlike Contributor, there is no immediate relationship with the content using a contribution icon. Instead, Manager is used to change settings that affect the entire page or site (like assigning page templates and changing section properties).

As such, you want to create a logical location for Manager and choose the appropriate time to display it (always on or only display in contribution mode).

There are three places where Manager can display:

If you add Manager to a section, you probably want to make that section viewable only in Contributor. You might also spend time designing a page template specifically for Manager.

16.3 When Manager Opens

There are two states when Manager opens:

The default setting in Manager is to display at all times.

16.4 Adding Manager to Your Site

When you add Manager to your site, you allow a user (a site manager) to modify the site hierarchy and perform several site management tasks. You can add Manager to your site in two ways:

16.4.1 Adding Manager With Default Settings

To add Manager to your site, simply add the Site Studio Manager fragment to a page template. When you do this, you're adding Manager with the maximum amount of settings enabled for the user.

To add Manager with its default settings, perform these tasks:

  1. Open a page template from the site hierarchy and place your cursor where you want Manager to appear on the page.

  2. In the Toolbox, click Other Fragments.

  3. Click the Site Studio Manager fragment.

    The Fragment Parameter Values dialog opens (see Section A.65, "Fragment Parameter Values Dialog").

  4. Choose a theme: blue, red, or grey.

    To change the look and feel beyond what is available in these themes, edit the Site Studio Manager fragment using the Fragment Editor (see Section 13.8, "Editing Fragments").

  5. Click OK to close the Fragment Parameter Values dialog.

    The Manager application now appears on the page when viewed in a browser.

16.4.2 Adding Manager With Custom Settings

If you want to change the settings that are available to the user, then you should first create a manager configuration settings file, edit the file, and then add the Site Studio Manager fragment, but this time, reference the manager configuration settings file you created.

To add Manager with a manager configuration settings file, perform these tasks:

  1. Follow the steps to create a manager configuration settings file (see Section 16.5, "Creating a Manager Configuration Settings File").

  2. Open a page template from the site hierarchy and place your cursor where you want Manager to appear on the page.

  3. In the Toolbox, click Other Fragments.

  4. Click the Site Studio Manager fragment.

    The Fragment Parameter Values dialog opens (see Section A.65, "Fragment Parameter Values Dialog").

  5. Choose a theme: blue, red, or grey.

    To change the look and feel beyond what is available in these themes, edit the Site Studio Manager fragment using the Fragment Editor (see Section 13.8, "Editing Fragments").

  6. Place the cursor in the Name column of the settings fields, and click the icon (Figure 16-1) next to it.

    Figure 16-1 Additional Information Icon

    Additional Information Icon

    The search results page opens, showing all available manager configuration settings files on the content server.

  7. Click Select beside the manager configuration settings file you want to use.

  8. Click OK to close the Fragment Parameter Values dialog.

The Manager application now appears on your page template with the options that you enabled in the manager configuration settings file.

16.5 Creating a Manager Configuration Settings File

A manager configuration settings file is an editable XML file read by Manager to determine the number of editing options the site manager has. If you're content with the default options turned on in Manager, then you can simply add the Site Studio Manager fragment without creating a manager configuration settings file.

If, however, you want to control which options are enabled and disabled then you must create a manager configuration settings file, which you do in the Site Assets pane. There are two starting points of manager configuration settings files you can create: one with the minimal settings enabled and one with the maximum settings enabled. You can create as many manager configuration settings files as you like.

To create a manager configuration settings file, perform these tasks:

  1. Open the Site Assets pane in Designer.

  2. Click the menu at the top and choose Manager Configuration Settings.

  3. Click the New File icon (Figure 16-2).

    Figure 16-2 New File Icon

    New File Icon
  4. To create a manager configuration settings file, perform one of the following:

    Or, to create a copy of an existing manager configuration settings file:

    • Choose Copy and then Selected to copy the currently selected manager configuration settings file to a new one.

    • Choose Copy and then from Server to copy an existing file on the content server.

    • Choose Copy and then from Local to copy an existing file on your file system.

    The standard content check-in page opens.

  5. Provide the metadata for the manager configuration settings file and click Assign Info at the bottom of the page to check it into the content server. All required metadata fields are marked red.

The manager configuration settings file appears in the Site Assets pane, where you can select if for editing or reference it from a fragment. For information on customizing the settings file, see Section 16.7, "Customizing Manager Configuration Settings."

16.6 Copying a Manager Configuration Settings File

You can select a manager configuration settings file from the list to copy, select a manager configuration setting from the content server to copy, or select a manager configuration setting from your local server to copy.

Copying a manager configuration settings file from the list

  1. In the menu on the Site Assets pane, select Manager Configuration Settings.

  2. Select the manager configuration settings file you want to copy from the list.

  3. Click the Create New icon (Figure 16-3), select Copy, and then Selected:

    The Assign Info Form opens for you to check the item into the content server.

    Figure 16-3 Create New Icon

    Create New icon
  1. Enter appropriate values for the Assign Info Form.

  2. When complete, click Assign Info.

  3. The manager configuration setting is copied.

Copying a manager configuration settings file from the server

  1. In the menu on the Site Assets pane, select Manager Configuration Settings

  2. Click the Create New icon (Figure 16-3), select Copy, and then from Server.

    A search results page opens.

  3. Click the corresponding Select button of the ones you want to copy.

    The Assign Info Form opens for you to check the item into the content server.

  4. Enter appropriate values for the Assign Info Form.

  5. When complete, click Assign Info.

  6. The manager configuration settings file is copied.

Copying a manager configuration settings file from your local instance

  1. In the menu on the Site Assets pane, select Manager Configuration Settings.

  2. Click the Create New icon (Figure 16-3), select Copy, and then from Local.

    A navigation window opens.

  1. On your local instance, navigate to the manager configuration settings file you want to copy.

  2. Select the manager configuration setting and click Open.

    The Assign Info Form opens for you to check the item into the content server.

  3. Enter appropriate values for the Assign Info Form.

  4. When complete, click Assign Info.

  5. The manager configuration settings file is copied.

16.7 Customizing Manager Configuration Settings

To customize the available options in Manager, you edit the manager configuration settings file. This is an XML file read by Manager to determine the available options to the user (a site manager). When you modify this file, you can control whether users can add sections, assign page templates, modify site properties, and so on.

You edit a manager configuration settings file using the Site Assets pane:

  1. In the Site Assets pane, choose the asset type Manager Configuration Settings.

  2. Select the desired manager configuration settings file and click the Edit icon (Figure 16-4).

    Figure 16-4 Edit Icon

    Edit Icon

    The Manager Configuration Settings dialog Section A.69, "Manager Configuration Settings Dialog") opens in form view (Figure 16-5).

    Figure 16-5 Form View of Manager Configuration Settings File

    Form View of Manager Configuration Settings File

    Note:

    Many of the settings are disabled (grayed-out) if the manager configuration settings file you are editing has the hierarchy hidden.

  3. Select or clear the checkbox next to each setting enabled or disabled for the user. For more information on each setting, see Section 16.11, "Description of the Manager Configuration Settings File."

  4. Alternatively, click the Source tab to edit the XML source code of the manager configuration settings file directly:

    Figure 16-6 Editing Manager Configuration File Settings in Source View

    Manager Configuration File Settings in Source View
  5. For more information, see Section 16.11, "Description of the Manager Configuration Settings File." Also, see the Oracle WebCenter Content Technical Reference Guide for Site Studio for details on the source code, tags, attributes, and the like.

  6. Save your work and close the manager configuration settings file.

To change the appearance of Manager, including the color scheme, fonts, and other layout settings, edit the Site Studio Manager fragment in the Fragment Editor (see Section 13.8, "Editing Fragments").

16.8 Viewing the Content Information of a Manager Configuration Settings File

To view content information for a manager configuration settings file, perform these tasks:

  1. In the menu on the Site Assets pane, select Manager Configuration Settings.

  2. Select a manager configuration setting from the list.

  3. Click the Doc Info icon (Figure 16-7).

    The content information page opens.

    Figure 16-7 Doc Info icon

    Surrounding text describes Figure 16-7 .

16.9 Adding a Manager Configuration Settings File to a Site

To add a manager configuration settings file to a site, perform these tasks:

  1. In the menu on the Site Assets pane, select Manager Configuration Settings.

  2. Click the Add to Site icon (Figure 16-8).

    A search results page opens.

    Figure 16-8 Add to Site Icon

    Surrounding text describes Figure 16-8 .
  3. Select the manager configuration setting to add, click Site Studio, and then Select Marked Documents.

  4. Depending on your configuration, you may receive a caution that you are about to add existing asset(s) to your site. Click OK.

    The manager configuration setting is now associated with the web site, and you can now open it to edit.

16.10 Removing a Manager Configuration Settings File from a Site

To remove a manager configuration settings file from a site, perform these tasks:

  1. In the menu on the Site Assets pane, select Manager Configuration Settings.

  2. From the list, select the manager configuration setting to be removed and click the Remove From Site icon (Figure 16-9).

    When you remove a manager configuration setting, you are simply removing it from the site, not deleting from the content server.

    Figure 16-9 Remove from Site Icon

    Surrounding text describes Figure 16-9 .

16.11 Description of the Manager Configuration Settings File

A manager configuration settings file is read by the Manager application to determine the available editing options for the user (the site manager). The options include the ability to add and remove sections, assign page templates, and change section properties. As the designer of the site, you can enable and disable each option.

Here is a description of each setting in the manager configuration settings file when viewed in form view:

SettingDescription
Visible in Contributor Mode onlyManager opens only when viewed in contribution mode.
Automatically load ManagerManager automatically opens on the page when you view it in a browser.
HierarchyOnly these portions of the site hierarchy can be modified by the user. Choose one of three options:

Hide: Users cannot modify the site hierarchy at all.

Show All Sections: Users can modify the entire site hierarchy.

Show Current Section Only: Users can modify only the current section (the one they are viewing Manager from).

Add New SectionUsers can add a section to the site hierarchy and specify the following information when creating a section.

Set UrlDirName: The URL that represents the section in the web site address.

Set Section ID: The ID of the section used by Site Studio to call up a section of the site.

Remove SectionUsers can remove a section from the site hierarchy.
Move SectionUsers can move a section in the site hierarchy.
Set the Error Handler SectionUsers can designate the section as an error handler (for use with a custom error page).
Change the Primary Page TemplateUsers can change the primary page template associated with the section.
Change the Secondary Page TemplateUsers can change the secondary page template associated with the section.
Section IDUsers can change the ID associated with the section.

disabled: Displays the value but prevents users from changing it.

LabelUsers can change the label associated with the section.

disabled: Displays the value but prevents users from changing it.

Include in NavigationUsers can control whether this section appears in the site navigation.

disabled: Displays the value but prevents users from changing it.

Contributor OnlyUsers can control whether this section appears only when the site is viewed in contribution mode.

disabled: Displays the value but prevents users from changing it.

UrlDirNameUsers can specify the URL that represents the section in the web site address.

disabled: Displays the value but prevents users from changing it.

UrlPageNameUsers can specify the URL that represents the primary page in this section. If a name is not specified (by you or the site manager), then "index.htm" is used.

disabled: Displays the value but prevents users from changing it.

MaxAgeUsers can specify the maximum amount of time that the page can be cached, which is particularly useful when the site is using a reverse proxy cache for delivery.

disabled: Displays the value but prevents users from changing it.

CustomUsers can change any custom properties that have been created for the site.

PK%('^PK=\EOEBPS/c01_introduction.htm Introduction

1 Introduction

This section covers the following topics:

1.1 About Site Studio

Site Studio is a powerful, flexible web development application suite that offers a comprehensive approach to designing, building, and maintaining enterprise-scale web sites. It goes beyond conventional web site development solutions by offering web site creation and content management all in one. Everything associated with the web site, including all site assets (such as templates, graphics, CSS files, and the like) and all site content, is stored and managed in the content server. Site Studio dramatically improves productivity and enables organizations to maintain accurate, timely, and current web content with consistent branding and presentation across all corporate sites. With Site Studio, you can centralize control of site architecture and presentation, while distributing content development and ongoing maintenance to business units or other teams.


Note:

Site Studio 11gR1 is fully backward compatible to 10gR4. Site Studio Designer 11gR1 can also work with sites created in Site Studio releases 10gR3 and earlier. It is important to note, though, that sites creates with Site Studio versions 10gR3 and earlier continue to work in "legacy" mode; that is, they can not take advantage of the architecture and features of Site Studio 11gR1.

1.2 Designer, Manager, and Contributor

Site Studio comprises three applications, which reflect the three distinct users of Site Studio: designers, managers, and contributors.

The Site Studio Designer application provides the development environment in which a single individual (the site designer) can create, design, and distribute the site. The designer is typically a webmaster, a web developer, a site administrator, or someone in a similar position. Typically, one designer works with multiple managers and contributors.

The Site Studio Manager application provides a web-based site management console that can be used by one or more site managers to maintain the structure of the site. The manager is often the head of a division or department. See the Oracle WebCenter Content Administrator and Manager's Guide for Site Studio for more information.

The Site Studio Contributor application enables assigned individuals within an organization (the contributors) to update the content on the web site whenever they want using an inline editing environment that can be called directly from the web site. Contributors are usually non-technical users and might be members of the marketing team or sales team. See the Oracle WebCenter Content User's Guide for Site Studio Contributor for more information.

Designers of the site spend most of their time in the Designer application, using the Manager and Contributor applications mostly to preview or test the site. Managers spend most of their time in Manager and may occasionally use Contributor to make minor edits. Contributors most likely work exclusively in Contributor. Of course, the same individual can design, manage, and contribute to the web site (a more likely scenario in a smaller organization).

Even though these applications are separate, they are tightly integrated. The tasks performed in Designer affect Manager and Contributor, and tasks performed in Manager affect Contributor. For example, setting up a Manager fragment or assigning content to pages in Designer, or modifying the editing menu available to the contributors, directly affect the appearance and behavior of Manager and Contributor.

1.3 Oracle Content Server and Site Studio

Oracle Content Server is the main repository for your web site. Oracle Content Server enables everyone in your organization to easily contribute content, efficiently manage the content with rich library services, and securely access content anywhere.

As part of Universal Content Management (UCM), Site Studio employs many of the built-in services that the content server has to offer, such as managed content, Idoc Script, security, and workflow. You can use the Site Studio Administration page on the content server to administer several tasks related to Site Studio (see Section 5.19, "Site Studio Administration Page in Oracle Content Server").

Site Studio also works in tandem with other components, like Dynamic Converter and Check Out and Open, which enable users to seamlessly incorporate native documents (Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and so forth) on their web site. Dynamic Converter is used to convert native documents into web pages that then appear on the web site. Check Out and Open is used to provide an in-context "check out" option directly from the web page where the document appears. Additionally, this option will launch the native application and open the file for editing.

You may also choose to enable Oracle Content Server's folders functionality or other capabilities to make it easier for contributors to submit content to the site. Experience with Oracle Content Server and its add-ons is helpful in creating and managing web sites with Site Studio. Please see the Oracle Content Server documentation for more information.

1.4 Reusable Assets and Content

Most web sites begin with the creation of a single HTML or scripting-based web page. The look and feel of the site is designed and site navigation is determined. Content, typically a mixture of text and graphics, is added last. As the site grows, this first page can be saved under a new name and essentially serve as a "template" for future web pages, all of which are connected.

This approach works well until you find yourself making a global change to the web site, which could require individual edits to every page on the site. To do this, many large web sites take a modular approach that uses dynamic includes and database-driven web pages. As a result, portions of content are assembled to display as a single web page when the web browser requests it. Thus, site navigation, advertisements, headers and footers, and information that changes frequently can be updated just once and take effect immediately. However, this requires a significant development effort and a lot of coordination.

Site Studio takes a similar approach, but it goes one step further by offering reusable layout and content. Some site assets, such as page templates, region templates, and placeholders, are used to provide background information ("look and feel") for a typical web page, while other assets, such as region definitions and element definitions, can modify and filter the layout and content, leaving much of the content of the page open for contributors to create and edit within the given page. Individual portions of the web page (both content and layout) can be made reusable, allowing those assets to be used and reused multiple times in the same way the page templates themselves are used and reused.

1.5 Web Sites in HCSP, JSP, and ASP

Before you create your web site in Site Studio, you should be aware that HCSP sites are the only site type that can take advantage of the architecture and features in Site Studio 11gR1. Legacy (that is, pre-10gR4) sites continue to work as they did with Site Studio 11gR1, but you are strongly encouraged to convert your old HCSP web sites to take advantage of the 11gR1 architecture and features. ASP and JSP sites are still available for legacy (that is, pre-10gR4) projects, but they do not have the 11gR1 functionality. They will function as they did with previous releases of Site Studio.

Please note the following:

1.6 What's New

Site Studio 11g Release 1 (11.1.1) has many new features and enhancements compared to previous releases:

1.6.1 Compared to Site Studio 10gR4 (10.1.4.5.0 - Build 9.0.0.546)

Site Studio 11gR1 includes these enhancements over the 10.1.4.5.0 release of Site Studio.

Section Level Replication

Site Studio now features a method of marking certain sections of a web site as not ready to move, so they would not be included in replication. This allows a section to be marked as not ready for replication while significant changes are being made to the section. When the section is ready to be replicated the property can be reset in Designer, Manager or directly from the page in contribution mode. When this feature is enabled, adding a new section or performing a switch content on a section will automatically set this value to not ready so that the new content will not automatically be replicated to another server. For more information, seeSection 12.1.11, "Viewing and Editing Web Site and Section Properties."

1.6.2 Compared to Site Studio 10gR4 (10.1.4.5.0 - Build 9.0.0.506)

Site Studio 11gR1 includes the enhancements listed in Section 1.6.1, "Compared to Site Studio 10gR4 (10.1.4.5.0 - Build 9.0.0.546)", as well as the following enhancements.

Enable Contributor Console from Administration Page

In previous versions of Site Studio, you had to manually move a file from one folder to another in order to enable the Contributor console window. Now there is a button in the Administrator pages that moves the file for you when you want to enable the console. For more information, see Section 5.19, "Site Studio Administration Page in Oracle Content Server."

Definition Bundles

Site Studio now features a method for bundling a collection of related definitions and templates to replicate to other web sites. This allows you to reuse a 'set' of (for example) definitions and templates that make up a specific method of laying out information without having to manually re-create each individual definition and template. The bundle of definitions and templates can be copied in one unit to another web site to use. For more information, see Section 9.12, "Definition Bundles."

New Contributor Appearance

Site Studio Contributor now features a new interface, which optimizes many of the editing and workflow tasks in Contributor.

Remove Region Content on Edit Menu

The Contribution Region menu in Site Studio Contributor now opens (when enabled in Site Studio Designer) a Remove Region Content option. This allows the contributor to quickly remove the content rather than going through the Switch Content Wizard.

Site Studio Component Reset

Site Studio now has an option to reset the component update numbering. This allows you to redeploy the original assets of an installation independent of the base content server installation, if you find it necessary.

Contribution Mode URL

The contribution mode in Site Studio Contributor can be opened when you add /contributor/ to the URL. This is used mainly for those creating third-party interfaces for contribution mode. A configuration flag must be set for the URL method to work.

Read-Only Mode for Blocked Assets

Site Studio Designer now alerts you on opening a site asset if it is opened elsewhere for editing, and gives you the option of opening it as read-only. Previously the asset could not be opened if someone else was editing the asset.

DAM Rendition

Site Studio now works with Digital Asset Management renditions, when the component is installed on the content server.

1.6.3 Compared to Site Studio 10gR4 (10.1.4.5.0 - Build 9.0.0.470)

Site Studio 11gR1 includes the enhancements listed in Section 1.6.2, "Compared to Site Studio 10gR4 (10.1.4.5.0 - Build 9.0.0.506)", as well as the following enhancements.

Design Mode

Site Studio now has an additional method of working with the web site as a Designer. Design Mode is a method of granting some of the tools available in Site Studio Designer through the Contributor interface. This function is especially useful to those who are using the Site Studio extension for JDeveloper.

On-Demand Editor

Site Studio now features a method of speeding the load time of Contributor when a page has a large number of elements. When on-demand editors are enabled, a preview of the data in each element opens, and you click on the element to edit the information.

Page Name Control

Site Studio now has the ability to change the default URL page name from "index.htm".

Direct Delivery

Site Studio now allows for direct delivery of native documents. Native documents can now be easily delivered to download to a local computer rather than being published through conversion to the Web page.

1.6.4 Compared to Site Studio 10gR4 (10.1.4.0.0 - Builds 9.0.0.454 and 9.0.0.410)

Site Studio 11gR1 includes the enhancements listed in Section 1.6.2, "Compared to Site Studio 10gR4 (10.1.4.5.0 - Build 9.0.0.506)," Section 1.6.3, "Compared to Site Studio 10gR4 (10.1.4.5.0 - Build 9.0.0.470)," as well as the following enhancements.

JavaScript and CSS Compression

Site Studio features a method of compressing and concatenating the CSS and JavaScript used on the web site. This method reduces both the number and the size of the JavaScript and CSS files that must be downloaded by the browser while loading Contributor.

Workflow Approve All

Site Studio now features a method of approving all items in a person's workflow that are on one Web page with one click.

1.6.5 Compared to Site Studio 10gR4 (10.1.4.0.0 - Build 9.0.0.354)

Site Studio 11gR1 includes the enhancements listed in Section 1.6.2, "Compared to Site Studio 10gR4 (10.1.4.5.0 - Build 9.0.0.506)," Section 1.6.3, "Compared to Site Studio 10gR4 (10.1.4.5.0 - Build 9.0.0.470)," and in Section 1.6.4, "Compared to Site Studio 10gR4 (10.1.4.0.0 - Builds 9.0.0.454 and 9.0.0.410)," as well as the following enhancements.

On-Demand Web Sites

Site Studio administrators can now mark web sites as served "on demand." The web sites marked as on-demand web sites are not loaded into the content server's memory until a request is received to view the site or edit the site in Designer. Using on-demand web sites prevents tying up content server resources for sites that are rarely accessed, and reduces load times when starting the content server.

The Manage Web Sites page on the content server includes an On-Demand Web Sites button, which opens a page where you can mark sites as "on-demand" sites. There will be a slight delay to serve those sites listed as on-demand when accessed by a user for the first time.

Domain and Folder-Based Addressing Changes

Site Studio can now identify web sites by a combination of folders and domains. Previous versions of Site Studio required that you use either a folder-based or a domain-based address. Administrators can now specify a domain, a folder, or both to map to a web site. For more information, see Section 7.2, "Site Addressing."

1.6.6 Compared to Site Studio 10gR3

In addition to the enhancements listed compared to 10gR4 releases, Site Studio 11g Release 1 (11.1.1) includes the following new features and enhancements, compared to 10gR3 releases.

Improved Reusability of Site Assets and Content

Site Studio has gone through a complete internal redesign to facilitate the reusability of site assets and content. The way that a web site is designed and built in Site Studio now maximizes the reusability of all parts of a web site. This includes the structure of the web site, reusing page templates, region templates, element definitions, and other structural components. It also includes being able to reuse all parts of the content and information displayed on the web site. All assets of the web site are now separately managed objects, and each part can be used and then reused to make the web site much easier to maintain.

Page templates now have more reusable parts, and more separately managed parts. Previous releases used layout pages with inline elements. Now with page templates, placeholders are used on web pages to define where the site content can be edited or replaced.

Each part of a web page can consist of a page template, placeholders, subtemplates, and region templates, each used with a corresponding definition to modify specific implementations of a particular piece.

More Separately Managed Site Assets

To improve reusability, Site Studio now includes a larger number of separately managed site assets. The following assets are new:

  • Element definitions: Files that define the editing experience for element types. Specifically, they specify what a contributor can do when editing an element.

  • Region definitions: Files that define the element definitions available in the region. This then determines what constitutes the editing environment when Contributor is opened for the page containing the region. Region definitions also specify the content creation and switching options available to contributors for contribution regions, and set default metadata for content files associated with these regions.

  • Placeholder definitions: Files that define what region definitions, region templates, and subtemplates are allowed for the associated placeholders. They also specify what contributor actions are allowed for the placeholders.

  • Page templates: Fully-formed HTML files that define the layout and high-level look-and-feel of web pages, including the placement of contribution regions (that is, editable areas on the page), navigation aids (in the form of fragments) and site-wide images (banners and the like). Page templates are the highest-level site design object.

  • Region templates: Partial HTML files (that is, without head and body sections) that define the layout and look-and-feel of the data in contribution regions within web pages.

  • Subtemplates: Partial HTML files (that is, without head and body sections) that can be inserted into placeholders on page templates to divide them into further smaller, reusable areas with their own placeholders and contribution regions.

  • Custom configuration scripts: JavaScript files that override the default Contributor editor configuration to provide contributors with a customized editing experience.

The new site assets are in addition to the following site assets which existed in previous Site Studio releases:

  • Contributor data files: Content files in XML format that are generated by Site Studio. Contributor data files are edited using the Site Studio Contributor application.

  • Native documents: Content files created using familiar third-party applications such as Microsoft Word. Native documents are converted to HTML format using Dynamic Converter, and they are edited using their associated application.

  • Images: Graphic files (JPG, GIF, PNG) that are included in content files or page templates (for example, corporate banners or product images).

  • Scripts: JavaScript files that provide a series of executable commands. Scripts are often used to provide additional functionality to web pages.

  • Cascading style sheets (CSS): Files that provide control over how page content is displayed (more specifically, how different HTML elements, such as headers and links, appear on the page). Links to CSS files are often embedded in page templates, so their formatting rules apply to all web pages based on these templates.

  • Custom element forms: Custom elements are customizable HTML files that define custom forms for use in elements (for example, selection forms for specific file types). Site Studio comes with several predefined custom element forms (in [CS-Dir]\custom\SiteStudio\support). These allow the creation of a fully customized editing experience, which is then placed in the Contributor form as if it were a normal Site Studio element. Custom element forms are also checked into the content server when the Site Studio component is installed.

  • Validation scripts: JavaScript files that define the validation rules for element data to determine that the data meets the requirements (for example, it does not exceed a certain maximum length or contain some illegal characters).

  • Fragment libraries: Collections of chunks of code (fragments) that enhance the functionality of a Site Studio web site (for example, by providing dynamic navigation aids or a standard page footer).

  • Manager configuration settings: Files that define the functionality that is available in Site Studio Manager. Manager is a web-based tool that enables designated users (site managers) to modify the structure of a web site.

  • Conversion definitions: Files that specify the conversion rules for native documents on a web site.

  • Other media: Any other media files that could be used on a web site, such as Flash animations, video files, audio files, and so on.

For more information, see Chapter 3, "Understanding Site Studio Web Sites," Chapter 8, "Working With Templates," Chapter 9, "Working With Definitions," Chapter 10, "Working With Content Files,"and Chapter 11, "Working With Scripts and Forms."

New Default Contributor Editor

Site Studio Contributor now uses FCKeditor as the default editor.

See the Oracle WebCenter Content User's Guide for Site Studio Contributor for more information on the Contributor application.

Static and Dynamic Lists as Elements

Static lists and dynamic lists are now elements, and can be more easily implemented and modified using element definitions. In previous versions of Site Studio, '>lists were fragments.

More Custom Elements

This release of Site Studio includes more types of custom elements. Many data-driven web sites can contain values (boolean, integer, and so on) that control the content. With more custom elements, the designer and contributor are able to use more forms of data control. Site Studio Designer comes with several predefined custom element forms (in [CS-Dir]\custom\SiteStudio\support). These forms are also checked into the content server when the Site Studio component is installed.

Custom Configuration Scripts

Site Studio now uses custom configuration scripts to customize the editor. The designer can modify the contributor interface to suit specific business needs.

For more information, see Chapter 11, "Working With Scripts and Forms."

Switch Content Wizard

Changing the content is now handled through a wizard. The wizard makes it easier to use and reuse site assets on the site. You can use the wizard to switch to another contributor data file, native document, or a subtemplate.

For more infomation, see Section 12.3, "Assigning Content With The Switch Content Wizard."

Link Wizard

The link wizard has been redesigned for ease of use. It is now easier and faster to create links through the wizard, allowing you different choices of link formats and link targets.

For more information, see Section 12.4, "Working With Links."

Dialogs More Tightly Integrated in Design Environment

The site asset definition and configuration dialogs are now more tightly integrated in the site design environment. These dialogs can be viewed as tabs in the design area.

For more infomation, see Section 5.6.1, "Dialogs vs. Tabs."

1.7 Accessibility Features

Site Studio complies with Oracle's accessibility guidelines. Accessibility features are provided in a number of areas:

1.7.1 Context Menus

Site Studio Designer provides context menus to provide options that are relevant to the current context of the application. For example, with a contribution folder selected, it shows options that are applicable to that folder in that particular context. To show a context menu, right-click in a toolbox or workspace in Designer, or press the menu key on your keyboard.

1.7.2 Standard Windows Keyboard Shortcuts

Site Studio supports most standard Windows keyboard shortcuts, for example:

  • Ctrl + C: copy

  • Ctrl + X: cut

  • Ctrl + V: paste

  • Delete: delete

  • F2: rename

  • Tab: move to next item

  • Space: select or clear a checkbox.

  • Alt + F: opens the File section of the Menu toolbar.

This is just a short list; the set of keyboard commands used in Windows navigation are used in Site Studio Designer, except where they would not work as expected, as listed in Section 1.7.3, "Site Studio Designer-Specific Keyboard Shortcuts."

1.7.3 Site Studio Designer-Specific Keyboard Shortcuts

The following shortcuts are used to work with the different areas of Site Studio Designer:

  • Workspace screens:

    • Ctrl + Tab: moves through the open documents.

    • Ctrl + PgUp, Ctrl + PgDn: moves through the Source, Design, and Preview tabs on a specific document.

    • 1: When you are in a site asset that has a columned entry in a form (for example, the WYSIWYG Element) pressing 1 selects the first column.

    • 2: When you are in a site asset that has a columned entry in a form (for example, the WYSIWYG Element) pressing 2 selects the second column.

    The Tab key will respond differently when you are working with source code than with other entries. When working with source code, Tab will insert a tab, for aligning text. When working with other entry forms, Tab will move to the next selection.

  • Designer panes:

    • Ctrl + Tab: moves between sections in a pane (for example, in the Section Properties pane).

    • Ctrl + Shift + Tab: sorts items either alphabetically or in groups, where available (for example, in the Properties Pane).

    • Enter: When you are in the Section Properties, press Enter to move focus to the text entry. Press Shift + Enter to exit from text entry and return focus to the property name.

    • Shift + Enter: When the focus is on a section property, but not for text entry in the specific property, then press Shift + Enter to click the Additional Information button.

  • Dialogs:

    • Esc: In dialogs that have form entry, such as the Fragment Editor, press Esc to enter the form to modify the information.

    • Shift + Esc: In dialogs that have form entry, such as the Fragment Editor, press Shift + Esc to leave the form and move focus outside the text-entry.

    Additionally, dialogs that have list controls, the context menu allows you to add, delete, or move within the list.

  • Link Wizard:

    The Link Wizard behaves as a Web page would. The arrow keys will not move in the hierarchy, rather you press Tab to move to the selected item and Enter to select. Additionally, you press Tab to move into a radio button group, and Enter to select the button.

1.7.4 Fragments and Accessibility

Fragments in Designer have two methods of interaction. There is a Fragment Toolbox, which is a pane in Designer. This toolbox, however, is only accessible through using the mouse.

For complete accessibility, fragments are accessible through a dialog, the Select Fragment dialog (see Section A.81, "Select Fragment Dialog"). This dialog can be opened from the Menu just as any other dialog, and is navigable using the keyboard.

1.8 System Requirements

The system requirements for the Site Studio Designer application are as follows:

PKfV˧PK=\EOEBPS/c05_getting_started.htm Getting Started With Designer

5 Getting Started With Designer

As the designer of the site, you spend most of your time using the Site Studio Designer application. It is recommended that you install Site Studio Designer locally on your computer.

In Designer, you build the site hierarchy and create the overall look-and-feel of the site. You make decisions about page layout, site navigation, and the use of fragments and contribution regions (that is, the editable areas of web pages).

This section covers the following topics:

5.1 Installing Designer

For specific information on the system requirements for installing and running Designer, see Section 1.8, "System Requirements."

To install the Site Studio Designer application, perform these tasks:


Note:

You need administrative rights to the computer to install Site Studio Designer. If you want to install Site Studio Designer on a system running Windows Vista or Windows 7 with User Account Control (UAC) turned off, make sure that you install the application as a user with administrator privileges.

  1. Contact your system administrator for instructions on where to obtain the client software installer for Site Studio Designer.

    If you have access to an Oracle Content Server 11gR1 instance, you can find the Site Studio Designer installation on the My Downloads page in the Oracle Content Server web interface (under My Content).

  2. After obtaining the client software, run the installer executable.

    The installation wizard is launched.

  3. Follow the instructions on screen to install the Site Studio Designer software.


    Note:

    If you install Site Studio Designer 11gR1 on a computer that already has an earlier Designer version on it, the Designer 11gR1 application installs alongside the earlier version. (The previous version is not removed.)

5.2 Starting Designer

To start Site Studio Designer, open the Start menu, select Programs, then Oracle Universal Content Management, then select Site Studio 11gR1, and then Site Studio Designer.

The first time the Designer application is launched, it opens an empty site hierarchy and workspace, and it prompts you to create a web site. Thereafter, Designer opens the last web site you worked on. You can prevent Designer from automatically reconnecting to the last site on the Customize dialog (Miscellaneous tab), which is called up by opening the Tools menu and then choosing Customize.


Note:

Site Studio 11gR1 is fully backward compatible. This means that you can use Site Studio Designer 11gR1 to work with sites created in earlier Site Studio releases. It is important to note, though, that these sites continue to work in "legacy" mode; that is, they use the pre-10gR4 architecture and they do not take advantage of the architecture and features introduced in Site Studio 10gR4.

5.3 Main Designer Window

The Designer interface provides an environment where you can set up and manage all aspects of your site, including the site structure, page layout, navigation, and contribution. When you first open Designer, you see the site hierarchy and asset properties on the left, the workspace in the center, the site assets below that, and the toolbox on the right.

Figure 5-1 Main Site Studio Designer Window

Description of Figure 5-1 follows

The main Designer window consists of various elements:

The display and arrangement of these objects is a default. You can rearrange them and customize the interface if you like. For more information, see Chapter 6, "Customizing Designer."

5.4 Site Hierarchy

The site hierarchy shows the fundamental structure of your web site, and it ultimately governs many other aspects of your site (such as how you organize content and how Site Studio controls its presentation). You can show or hide the site hierarchy from the View menu.

Figure 5-2 Site Hierarchy Pane

Description of Figure 5-2 follows

After you specify a name and location for a web site in Site Connection Manager (see Section 5.12, "Site Connection Manager"), you are ready to start building the site structure. You do this by creating a home page, then individual sections (like Products, Services, and About Us) in the site hierarchy.

After you add the sections, you are ready to add page templates to each section. Page templates come in two flavors:

Whether you are adding a primary or secondary page to a section, you have three options: create a page template from scratch, reuse an existing page template, or create a page template based on an existing page template. For more information, see Section 12.1, "Working With the Site Hierarchy." You can also use the Manager application to modify the site hierarchy and assign page templates (see Section 5.17, "Site Studio Manager.").

5.5 Properties Pane

The properties pane displays useful information about the currently selected object in the site hierarchy, workspace, site assets pane, or toolbox. You can show or hide the properties pane from the View menu.

The information displayed in the properties pane is divided into categories, depending on the current object. Figure 5-3 shows the property categories for a node in the site hierarchy called Careers. They are web site, Section, and Custom section properties. Other selected objects have different property categories. You can use the plus and minus symbols to expand or collapse the property categories to show or hide the properties and their values.

Figure 5-3 Property Categories

Description of Figure 5-3 follows

The properties shown differ for each property category. For example, for the site hierarchy, it displays the site ID and label, Cgi URL, home page, default placeholder definition, and so on (Figure 5-4). For page templates, it displays information about the site assets, HTML tags, scripting tags, and fragments on the page. The site asset properties are shown as you work in design view so that you can see what is happening behind the scenes and make precise edits to specific tags.

Figure 5-4 Properties and Their Values

Properties of the HTML table> tag

You can use the properties pane to view and edit various settings on your web site, including the site hierarchy, primary pages and secondary pages, and the contents of site templates (HTML, scripts, fragments, and so forth) while working in design view. The properties pane is extremely useful to edit the contents of site templates (page templates, subtemplates, and region templates), especially when those changes cannot be performed directly in design view. Examples of this include background color, page margins, and table width.

You can use the icons at the top of the properties pane to show all properties in alphabetical order (by name) or categorized into groups of related properties. The values of some properties may be edited. These are shown in black. If a property cannot be edited, it is grayed out.

If you click a different area of a page template, region template, or subtemplate (while in design view), or a separate site asset, a different tag with different attributes displays instead. You can view the attributes of a parent tag by selecting it from the drop-down list at the top of the properties pane.

You can also use the Manager application to modify properties that relate to the site hierarchy. For more information, see Section 5.17, "Site Studio Manager."

5.6 Workspace

The workspace is where you generally do the most work. This is where you edit site templates (page templates, region templates, and subtemplates) and also define and configure other site assets such as region definitions, element definitions, and cascading style sheets.

When you open a site asset in the workspace, its associated file on the content server is checked out. After you are done editing and you save the changes (by clicking the Save icon on the toolbar or pressing Ctrl+S), the file is checked back into the content server.

You cannot open an asset to edit when it is currently opened by another user to edit. In that case, you will be alerted, and the asset will be opened in read-only mode.

The workspace in Designer provides the following features:

5.6.1 Dialogs vs. Tabs

The workspace can display site assets in two ways: as dialogs or as tabs.

Asset Dialogs

Site assets can display in the workspace as familiar Windows dialogs, with a title bar, minimize and maximize icons, and a close icon (Figure 5-5).

Figure 5-5 Two Assets Displaying As Dialogs

Description of Figure 5-5 follows

You can freely drag and drop dialog windows to any position within the workspace. This may be especially useful if you have a large screen, with lots of "real estate" to work with, so you can arrange the open windows to maximize viewing efficiency. You can also use the Window menu in Designer to change how the windows are arranged in the workspace (cascading, tiled).

If an asset has any unsaved changes, this is indicated by an asterisk (*) next to the asset name in the window title bar. When you close a window that has any unsaved changes, you are first prompted to save or discard these changes.

Asset Tabs

Site assets may also display in the workspace as tabs covering the entire workspace area (Figure 5-6).

Figure 5-6 Two Assets Displaying As Tabs

Description of Figure 5-6 follows

You cannot move the tabs to a different position in the workspace as they already cover the entire workspace. You can use the left and right arrows in the top-right corner of the workspace to cycle between all open asset tabs, and the 'X' icon to close the current tab.

If an asset has any unsaved changes, this is indicated by an asterisk (*) next to the asset name on the tab. When you close a tab that has any unsaved changes, you are first prompted to save or discard these changes.

Switching Between Dialog and Tab Views

You can switch between dialog view and tab view at any time. If you want to see all open assets in tabs rather than dialogs, click the Maximize icon of an asset window (Figure 5-7). Please note that after you maximize one dialog, all assets are displayed in tabs.

Figure 5-7 Maximize Icon

Maximize icon

If you want to see all assets in dialogs rather than tabs, click the Restore Down icon in the top-right corner of the Designer application window (Figure 5-8), just below the application title bar icons. Please note that after you restore one tab, all assets are displayed in dialogs.

Figure 5-8 Restore Down Icon

Restore Down icon

5.6.2 Views

A site asset may be viewed in various ways, depending on the type of asset:

  • Source view displays the code that is in the content file associated with the site asset: HTML, XML, JavaScript, Idoc Script, Site Studio tags, and so on. For more information, see Section 5.6.3, "Source View."

  • Design view displays all objects as they are arranged on a site template, both static (for example, a fixed banner graphic) and dynamic (placeholders and fragments). For more information, see Section 5.6.4, "Design View."

  • Preview provides an actual view of a site template with all assets in place, as it appears to site consumers in a web browser. For more information, see Section 5.6.5, "Preview."

  • Form view provides a dialog in which you can set the properties of a site asset. For more information, see Section 5.6.6, "Form View."

Figure 5-9 View Tabs in Workspace

Description of Figure 5-9 follows

You can use the arrows in the bottom-left corner of the workspace to move between the views of the current site asset. By default, site templates open in design view, while definition assets open in form view. Most other assets (for example, contributor data files and CSS files) open in source view. Native documents open in their associated third-party application.

5.6.3 Source View

Source view displays the code that is in the content file associated with a site asset: HTML, XML, JavaScript, Idoc Script, Site Studio tags, and so on.

Figure 5-10 Source View (Page Template)

Description of Figure 5-10 follows

The information in source view appears as color-coded text:

  • Black is used for XML code, HTML tag attributes, and text that appears on the web page.

  • Purple is used for HTML tags.

  • Blue is used for HTML tag attribute values.

  • Green is used for Idoc Script, HTML comments, and code inserted by Site Studio.

You can change many of these settings, including the typeface, indentation levels, and line wrapping. For more information, see Section 6.9, "Formatting the Code in Source View."

Source view offers complete control over the site template. If you do not like the way things look in design view, you can always switch to source view to control the exact behavior of the web page. In fact, you may find yourself starting off in design view (see Section 5.6.4, "Design View") to create the page and then switching to source view to customize the appearance and behavior of the page.

Most of the sections in this guide assume you are working in design view. Source view instructions are included where appropriate.

You can edit the text in source view using common editing keystrokes (for example, Ctrl+C and Ctrl+V to copy and paste), the application toolbars (see Section 5.10, "Toolbars"), and right-click menus (see Section 5.6.7, "Right-Click Menus"). You can, for example, add site assets, images, tables, and line breaks as you work in source view.

5.6.4 Design View

Design view displays all objects as they are arranged on a site template, both static (for example, a fixed banner graphic) and dynamic (for example, placeholders and fragments). Depending on how the template was set up and what positioning methods are used, this view may approximate what the page layout is when viewed in a web browser. You see text, images, colors, hyperlinks, and tables as they appear on the actual web site, but dynamic content (from fragments and scripts) is represented as tags rather than the actual content. This is because most fragments and scripts require server-side scripting and dynamically rendered content. This content can only be seen on the Preview tab (see Section 5.6.5, "Preview").

Figure 5-11 Design View (Page Template)

Description of Figure 5-11 follows

When you open a site template (page template, region template, or subtemplate) in Designer, it opens in the workspace in design mode, where you can edit the template as needed. The workspace then functions as an editor that offers many common editing features. You can edit the text and objects using common editing keystrokes (for example, Ctrl+C and Ctrl+V to copy and paste), the application toolbars (see Section 5.10, "Toolbars"), and right-click menus (see Section 5.6.7, "Right-Click Menus"). You can, for example, add site assets, images, tables, and line breaks as you work in design view. To select an object, simply click it, so it displays selection handles (Figure 5-12).

Figure 5-12 Selected Object in Design View

Selected object in design view

For edits that cannot be performed using this interface, you can use the properties pane (see Section 5.5, "Properties Pane"). The properties pane enables you to fine-tune specific areas of a site template, like background color, page margins, and table width. If you cannot make a specific edit here, you can always edit the actual code in source view (see Section 5.6.3, "Source View").

To help you identify where site assets (for example, placeholders and fragments) are located on a site template, Designer inserts asset tags with their names. (You can modify this text for fragments in the Fragment Editor as discussed in Section 13.12.4, "Adding, Editing, and Deleting Fragment Snippets".)

Designer can also highlight the location of HTML tags in design view. To turn this feature on, click the Show/Hide HTML Tags icon (Figure 5-13) in the formatting toolbar. You can click the down arrow next to the icon to show or hide specific HTML tags.

Figure 5-13 Show/Hide HTML Tags

Show/Hide HTML Tags icon

5.6.5 Preview

Preview provides an actual view of a web page with all assets in place, as it appears in a web browser for consumers. This is useful for previewing site templates and checking how fragments and placeholders are positioned on a template (which may be hard to see in design mode, especially if the page layout is controlled by CSS).

Figure 5-14 Preview (Page Template)

Preview of layout page


Note:

Site Studio requires Internet Explorer 7 or higher to provide previewing capabilities.

5.6.6 Form View

Form view provides a dialog in which you can set the properties of some site assets; for example, element definitions, region definitions, placeholder definitions, and conversion definitions. Figure 5-15 shows an example of a region definition in form view. Most form views have a Help button that you can click to see context-sensitive help information for the current form.

Figure 5-15 Form View (Region Definition)

Description of Figure 5-15 follows

5.6.7 Right-Click Menus

When you are working in the workspace in source view or design view, you can right-click at any time to see a menu of relevant options (Figure 5-16). The available options depend on where you are in the workspace, the type of asset you are working on, and what you are doing. In addition to providing several common editing functions (cut, copy, paste, select all, and the like), the right-click menus also typically allow you to insert assets (appropriate to the specific context), or edit or delete a selected asset.

Figure 5-16 Right-Click Menu in Design View

Description of Figure 5-16 follows

5.7 Site Assets Pane

The site assets pane is used to manage files that are associated with your site. You can use this pane to quickly and easily open, edit, and organize these files. You can show or hide the site assets pane from the View menu.

Figure 5-17 Site Assets Pane

Description of Figure 5-17 follows

Site Asset List

The site asset list shows all types of assets. This list can be modified as desired; the entries can be arranged and grouped in any way you want by clicking the icon next to the menu. This opens the Site Asset Categories dialog (see Section A.14, "Site Asset Categories Dialog"), where you can change the way the items in the site assets pane are ordered and grouped.

Toolbar

The site assets pane has a toolbar that provides easy access to several functions:

IconDefinition
Question Mark project status icon
Opens the Site Asset Categories dialog, where you can customize and even add categories to the site assets pane in Designer. For more information, see Section A.14, "Site Asset Categories Dialog."
Question Mark project status icon
Enables you to edit the selected asset.
Question Mark project status icon
Opens content information for the selected asset.
Question Mark project status icon
Enables you to create assets and copy existing assets.
Question Mark project status icon
Adds the selected asset to the site.
Question Mark project status icon
Removes the selected asset from the site.
Question Mark project status icon
Refreshes the list of items for the current asset category.
Question Mark project status icon
Opens the previous asset category in the list of site assets.
Question Mark project status icon
Opens the next asset category in the list of site assets.

The list of asset categories is stored in the project file of a site, so to maintain the same asset list structure in the menu for each web site, you must edit the list for each site.

Content ID List

After you select a site asset type in the menu, all assets of that type are listed. The content ID is the name of each site asset (as given when the asset was created). When a good naming convention is used, the content ID of the asset can tell you at a glance what the asset is used for. You can sort the list of assets by content ID by clicking the column header.

Title List

Each site asset, when checked into the content server, has its own content ID and a title used for identification. The title is an additional way to help identify the site assets in the site asset pane. You can sort the list of assets by title by clicking the column header.

5.8 Toolbox

The toolbox contains fragments that you can add to page templates, region templates, and subtemplates. Fragments are containers for text, graphics, scripts, and anything else that adds functionality to a web page. You can show or hide the toolbox from the View menu.

Figure 5-18 Toolbox

Toolbox in Designer

Site Studio Designer comes with several predefined fragments. There are four categories of fragments: navigation fragments, dynamic list fragments, static list fragments, and other fragments. Each category contains a variety of fragments in multiple scripting languages. You can use any fragment as-is or copy and edit the fragment to suit your needs. You can also create fragments from scratch. For details on the fragments provided with Designer, seeAppendix C, "Sample Fragments."

Adding a fragment to a template is easy. You simply place your cursor in the template where you want the fragment to appear and then click the desired fragment in the toolbox. Many fragments contain additional options (called parameters) that allow you to customize the appearance of the fragment before adding it to the template.

For more information on fragments, see Chapter 13, "Working With Fragments."

5.9 Menu Bar

This section contains the following topics:

5.9.1 File Menu

The File menu has multiple parts. Many of the items here are ones you would expect to find, such as Close, Save, Print, or Exit. However, there are three additional submenus which have many options for working with the structure of the web site, as well as other advanced options.

Many of the items on the File menu are available on the Standard toolbar and Site toolbar. For more information on the Standard toolbar, see Section 5.10.1, "Standard Toolbar." For more information on the Site toolbar, see Section 5.10.2, "Site Toolbar."

The File menu contains the following items:

  • Close: Choose this option to close the active site asset.

  • Save: Choose this option to save the changes made to the active site asset.

  • Print: Choose to print the current site asset. This menu item is available only when the active asset is a template. For more information, see Section 8.2, "Managing Templates as Site Assets."

  • Print Preview: Choose to view the site asset as it will appear on the printed page. This item is active only when the site asset is in source view. For more information, see Section 5.6.3, "Source View."

  • Print Setup: Choose to edit your printer options for this session.

  • Site: This opens a submenu with administration options that affect the entire web site. For more information, see Section 5.9.1.1, "Site Submenu."

  • Fragments: This opens a submenu with options for working with the fragment libraries. For more information, see Section 5.9.1.2, "Fragments Submenu."

  • Definitions: This opens a submenu with options for uploading and downloading definition bundles.

  • Exit: Choose to close Site Studio Designer.

5.9.1.1 Site Submenu

The Site submenu has the following options:

  • Connection Manager: Opens the Site Connection Manager dialog (see Section 5.12, "Site Connection Manager"), where you can create, edit, and delete connections to web sites on the content server.

  • Connect: Establishes a connection with the current web site.

  • Disconnect: Disconnects from the current web site.

  • Refresh Hierarchy and Fragments: Refreshes the entire site, which reloads the site hierarchy and fragments for the web site.

  • Recent Sites: A list of the most recent sites opened in Site Studio Designer.

  • Advanced: This opens an additional submenu of advanced items for working with Site Studio:

    • Edit Site Addresses: Opens the Site Addresses dialog. This allows you to specify one or more domain-based or folder-based addresses that point to your web site. For more information, see Section A.5, "Site Addresses Dialog."

    • Set Default Link Format: Opens the Choose Default Link Format dialog. Here you can specify the default link format, starting with choosing between path-based or ID-based, or if changing the format is available in the link wizard. For more information, see Section A.6, "Choose Default Link Format Dialog," and Section 5.13, "Link Wizard."

    • Define Environment Properties: Opens the Define Environment Properties dialog. This allows you to determine what properties of the web site are maintained during site replication, and what properties are not replicated. For more information, see Section A.7, "Define Environment Properties Dialog."

    • Show Contributor Accessibility Menus: Toggles the menu bar to a style that works better with screen-reading tools.

    • Enable Publish Now: Toggles to include or remove the Publish Now option in the Site Studio Contributor toolbar. For more information, see Section 5.20.2, "Publish Now."

    • Enable Section Level Replication: Toggles the Ready to Publish field in the Section Properties for all sections of the web site.

    • Commit Project Changes: Saves all project changes to the content server.

    • Update Project Info: Updates the project information in Designer from the content server.

    • View Project DOC_INFO: Opens a browser window displaying the DOC_INFO information of the project file.

    • View Web Site Objects Report: Opens a browser window and opens the the Web Site Objects Report. For more information on the Web Site Objects Report, see Section 14.5, "Viewing a Web Site Objects Report."

  • View: This opens an additional submenu of items for working with the web site on the Oracle Content Server as well as viewing the web site.

    • Content Server Portal: Opens a browser displaying the Oracle Content Server.

    • Content Server Admin: Opens a browser window displaying the Oracle Content Administration Server.

    • Content Server Applets: Opens a browser window displaying the Administration section on the Oracle Content Server.

    • Content Server Search: Opens a browser window displaying a search page on the Oracle Content Server.

    • Content Tracker Report: Opens a Content Tracker Report for the web site, which shows how many times the assets on the site were accessed. For more information, see Section 14.4, "Content Tracker Report."

    • Site Studio Admin: Opens a browser window displaying the Site Studio Administration page on the Oracle Content Server

    • Site Studio Manage Web Sites: Opens a browser window displaying the Manage Web Sites section in Site Studio Administration on the Oracle Content Server.

    • Site Home Page: Opens a browser window displaying the home page of the current web site

    • Selected Page: Opens the page highlighted in the hierarchy pane in a browser.

    • Source: Opens the active asset in the Source tab. For more information, see Section 8.11.2, "Source View," and Section 9.11.2, "Source View."

    • Design: Opens the active asset in the Design tab. For more information, see Section 8.11.1, "Design View."

    • Preview: Opens the active asset in the Preview tab. For more information, see Section 8.11.3, "Preview."

    • Form: Opens the active asset in the Form tab. For more information, see Section 9.11.1, "Form View."

5.9.1.2 Fragments Submenu

The Fragments submenu has items to manage fragment libraries. You can also create a new fragment. For more information on fragments, see Section 13, "Working With Fragments."

5.9.1.3 Definitions Submenu

The Definitions submenu has items to work with uploading and downloading definition bundles. For more information on definition bundles, seeSection 9.12, "Definition Bundles."

  • Upload Definition Bundle: Opens a dialog to select a stored definition bundle on your local computer. For more information, see Section 9.12.3, "Uploading Bundles."

  • Download: Opens another submenu to download a definition bundle based on the type of definition to download. For more on downloading the different definition bundles, see Section 9.12.2, "Downloading Bundles."

    • Placeholder Definition Bundle...: Opens a browser window listing the placeholder definitions on the content server. Select one to continue downloading the bundle.

    • Region Definition Bundle...: Opens a browser window listing the region definitions on the content server. Select one to continue downloading the bundle.

    • Element Definition Bundle...: Opens a browser window listing the element definitions on the content server. Select one to continue downloading the bundle.

5.9.2 Edit Menu

The Edit menu contains items that are used in editing and transforming the text in a document. Many of these functions, such as Undo, Redo, Cut, Copy, Find, and Replace are also used with objects in a document.

Many of the items in this menu are available in the Standard toolbar. For more information, see Section 5.10.1, "Standard Toolbar."

All items in the Edit menu are unavailable (grayed out) when the active document is in Preview mode. For mor einformatino, see Section 5.6.5, "Preview."

The Edit menu has the following items:

  • Undo: Reverses the most recent action, undoing it.

  • Redo: Does the most current action undone by the 'Undo' command.

  • Cut: Cuts the selected text or object and puts it in the clipboard.

  • Copy: Copies the selected text or object and puts it on the clipboard.

  • Paste: Pastes the text or object from the clipboard.

  • Select All: Selects all text and objects if

  • Find: Opens a dialog to find an entered text string.

  • Replace: Opens a dialog to find an entered text string, and replace it with another string.

5.9.3 Formatting Menu

The Formatting menu selection of the menu bar contains items that are similar to other software programs. Functions that have to do with formatting text, such as Bold, Italic, Numbered List, Itemized List, Align Center, and so forth are here.

All items in the Edit menu are unavailable (grayed out) when the active document is in Preview mode. For more information, see Section 5.6.5, "Preview."

All of the items in this menu are available in the Formatting toolbar. For more information, see Section 5.10.3, "Formatting Toolbar."

The Formatting menu has the following items:

  • Bold: Makes the selected text bold.

  • Italic: Makes the selected text italic.

  • Underline: Makes the selected text underlined.

  • Remove Formatting: Removes all bold, italic, and underline formatting in the selected text.

  • Numbered List: Starts a numbered list of items, starting with 1.

  • Bulleted List: Starts a bulleted list of items.

  • Increase Indent: Moves the left-most margin to the right.

  • Decrease Indent: Moves the left-most margin to the left.

  • Align Left: Aligns the text to the left margin.

  • Align Center: Aligns the text to the center of the page.

  • Align Right: Aligns the text to the right margin.

  • Font Size: Opens a menu to select a text size from xx-small to xx-large.

  • Font Face: Opens a menu to select a font to use on the page.

  • Style: Opens a menu to select a font style to use.

  • Text Color: Opens a color picker to select the text color.

  • Background: Opens a color picker to select the background color (also called "highlighting").

5.9.4 View Menu

The items in the View menu are mostly toggles to display windows in the Designer workspace, and toggles to display the workspace toolbars.

The first section of items are used to toggle view (checked) or hide (unchecked) the windows in the workspace. The middle section toggles the workspace toolbars. For more information on the workspace windows, see Section 5.6, "Workspace." For more information on the different toolbars, see Section 5.10, "Toolbars."

The final two sections each have a single item:

5.9.5 Tools Menu

The items in the Tools menu are used to work with the site currently open in Designer. This section also can contain custom menu items created through the Customize item. For more information, see Section A.1.3, "Customize Dialog: Tools Tab."

The Tools menu has the following items:

  • Update Navigation: Regenerates the site navigation structures. This will cause menus generated from these structures to also update on the website.

  • Define Custom Section Properties: Opens the Custom Section Properties dialog, where you can assign custom properties to site sections (in addition to the web site properties such as section ID, label, and default placeholder definition). For more information, see Section A.9, "Custom Section Properties Dialog."

  • Define Placeholder Definition Mappings: Opens the Define Placeholder Definition Mappings dialog, where you provide a mapping from a placeholder name to a placeholder definition. For more information on the Define Placeholder Definition Mappings dialog, see Section A.74, "Define Placeholder Definition Mapping Dialog." For more information on placeholder mappings, see Section 9.8, "Working With Placeholder Definitions."

  • Compare Changes: Opens the Compare Changes Feature. For more information, see Section 12.5.2, "Using the Compare Changes Feature."

  • Create Hyperlink: Opens the Link wizard. For more information, see Section 12.4, "Working With Links."

  • Remove Hyperlink: Removes the selected hyperlink.

  • Show/Hide HTML Tags: Toggles to show the HTML tags in Design View.

  • Highlight Borderless Elements: Toggles to show in Design view a thin outline of the elements with content to be shown fully in the final web page, such as placeholders and fragments.

  • HTML Tidy Source: Applies the HTML Tidy library to the code in Source view. HTMYL Tidy is a library that is used to clean up HTML source code and have it conform to specified .dtd files.

  • Language: Selects a language to operate Designer in.

  • Customize: Opens the Customize dialog to the Tools tab. Here you can add additional custom menu options. For more information, see Section A.1.3, "Customize Dialog: Tools Tab."

5.9.6 Window Menu

The items in the Window menu are similar to those found in other software packages. Here you can select to maximize a window, close it, or select which window among the open workspace windows is the active window.

5.9.7 Help Menu

The items in the Help menu are similar to those found in other software packages. Here you can open the help files, or learn more about the version of the Site Studio Designer program you are currently using.

5.10 Toolbars

Site Studio Designer has several toolbars that provide easy access to many design functions:

You can show or hide any of these toolbars from the View menu. In addition, you can drag and drop the toolbar to any position. If you drag a toolbar to a position outside the toolbar area, it becomes a separate dialog that you can customize by clicking the down arrow in the title bar.

5.10.1 Standard Toolbar

The standard toolbar provides access to several common editing functions such as copying, pasting, and printing.

Figure 5-19 Standard Toolbar

Surrounding text describes Figure 5-19 .
OptionDescription
Save icon
Saves the open assets.
Cut icon
Cuts the selected text.
Copy icon
Copies the selected text.
Paste icon
Pastes the selected text.
Undo icon
Cancels the operation that was last performed.
Redo icon
Does the operation that was last undone by the 'Undo' command.
Print icon
Prints the current contents of the active window in the workspace.
Surrounding text describes icon_help.gif.
Opens the online help of the Designer application.

5.10.2 Site Toolbar

The site toolbar provides access to several site-related functions such as site connections, content assignment, and navigation.

Figure 5-20 Site Toolbar

Surrounding text describes Figure 5-20 .
OptionDescription
Site list menu
Lists all defined site connections.
Site Connect icon
Establishes a connection with the current web site (shown in the list next to this icon).
Site Disconnect icon
Breaks the connection with the current web site (shown in the list next to this icon).
Assign Content icon
Opens the Assign Content dialog (see Section A.54, "Assign Content Dialog"), where you can assign content (contributor data file, native document, or subtemplate) to a contribution region on a page.
Define Custom Section Properties icon
Opens the Custom Section Properties dialog (see Section A.9, "Custom Section Properties Dialog"), where you can assign custom properties to site sections (in addition to the web site properties such as section ID, label, and default placeholder definition).
Update Navigation icon
Regenerates the site navigation structures. This will cause menus generated from these structures to also update on the website.
Refresh All icon
Refreshes the entire site, which reloads the site hierarchy and fragments for the web site.
Site Connection Manager icon
Opens the Site Connection Manager dialog (see Section 5.12, "Site Connection Manager"), where you can create, edit, and delete connections to web sites on the content server.
View Pages in Browser icon
Launches a browser with the currently selected section from the site hierarchy window.

Please note that nothing happens if you click this icon with nothing selected in the site hierarchy.

Compare Changes icon
Compares the current web page with the latest one on the content server, and shows the differences in color-coded text in a new browser window.
Expand All Sections icon
Expands all sections in the site hierarchy to show all assigned primary and secondary pages.
Collapse All Sections icon
Collapses all sections in the site hierarchy to hide all assigned primary and secondary pages.

5.10.3 Formatting Toolbar

The formatting toolbar provides access to several text formatting functions such as font size and color, text alignment, lists, and the like.

Figure 5-21 Formatting Toolbar

Surrounding text describes Figure 5-21 .
OptionDescription
Font Face icon
Applies the selected font to the text.
Font Size icon
Applies the selected font size to the text.
Text Color icon
Applies the selected color to the text. You can use the down arrow next to the icon to select a text color.
Background Color icon
Applies the selected background (that is, highlight) color to the text. You can use the down arrow next to the icon to select a background color.
Bold icon
Makes the selected text bold.
Italic icon
Makes the selected text italic.
Underline icon
Makes the selected text underlined.
Remove Formatting icon
Removes all formatting from the selected text.
Numbered List icon
Inserts a numbered (ordered) list.
Bulleted List icon
Inserts a bulleted (unordered) list
Indent icon
Increases the indentation level of the selected text by one level.
Outdent icon
Reduces the indentation level of the selected text by one level.
Left Align icon
Left-aligns the selected text.
Center icon
Centers the selected text.
Right Align icon
Right-aligns the selected text.
Create Hyperlink icon
Launches the Link wizard (see Section A.18, "Link Wizard"), which enables you to create a hyperlink for the selected text, or edit an existing hyperlink.
Remove Hyperlink icon
Removes an existing hyperlink from the selected text.
Show/Hide HTML Tags icon
Shows or hides HTML tags in the workspace. You can use the down arrow next to the icon to show or hide specific HTML tags.
Highlight Borderless Elements icon
Shows or hides borders around elements that normally do not have borders.
HTML Tidy Source icon
Cleans up and reformats the HTML source code, making sure that it complies with the chosen DOCTYPE.

5.10.4 HTML Toolbar

The HTML toolbar provides access to several HTML-related functions such as CSS classes, images, and horizontal lines.

Figure 5-22 HTML Toolbar

Surrounding text describes Figure 5-22 .
OptionDescription
CSS Class menu
Applies the selected HTML style to the text.
Image icon
Inserts an image on the web page at the current cursor position. You are prompted to select an image from the content server.
Horizontal Line icon
Inserts a horizontal line (<hr>).
Line Break icon
Inserts a line break (<br>).
Nonbreaking Space icon
Inserts a non-breaking space (&nbsp;).

5.10.5 Table Toolbar

The table toolbar provides access to several table-related functions such as adding a table, adding rows and columns, merging and splitting cells, and the like.

Figure 5-23 Table Toolbar

Surrounding text describes Figure 5-23 .
OptionDescription
Insert Table icon
Inserts a table on the web page at the current cursor position. Click the down arrow next to the icon to choose from a list of predefined tables.
Delete Table icon
Deletes the current table.
Insert Row icon
Inserts a row to the table above the row the cursor is in.
Insert Column icon
Adds a column to the table to the left of the column the cursor is in.
Split Cell icon
Splits the table cell where your cursor is located into columns or rows. You are prompted to choose whether the cells should split into columns (that is, vertically) or rows (that is, horizontally).
Merge Cell Left icon
Merges the table cell where your cursor is located with the cell to the left.
Surrounding text describes icon_merge_cell_up.gif.
Merges the table cell where your cursor is located with the cell above it.
Surrounding text describes icon_merge_cell_right.gif.
Merges the table cell where your cursor is located with the cell to the right.
Merge Cell Down icon
Merges the table cell where your cursor is located with the cell below it.

5.10.6 Contribution Toolbar

The contribution toolbar provides access to several contribution functions such as adding a region and various types of elements. This toolbar is primary used for legacy sites (that is, sites created in Site Studio Designer releases before 10gR4).

Figure 5-24 Contribution Toolbar

Surrounding text describes Figure 5-24 .
OptionDescription
Insert Region icon
Inserts a legacy contribution region on the web page at the current cursor position.
Insert WYSIWYG Element icon
Inserts a legacy WYSIWYG element on the web page at the current cursor position.
Insert Plain Text Element icon
Inserts a legacy plain-text element on the web page at the current cursor position.
Insert Image Element icon
Inserts a legacy image element on the web page at the current cursor position.
Edit Object Properties icon
Opens the properties dialog for the selected element, where you can edit its properties.
Delete Selected Object icon
Removes the selected item from the web page.

5.10.7 Placeholder Toolbar

The placeholder toolbar provides access to several placeholder-related functions such as adding a placeholder and various types of elements to templates.

Figure 5-25 Placeholder Toolbar

Surrounding text describes Figure 5-25 .
OptionDescription
Insert Placeholder icon
Inserts a placeholder on the web page at the current cursor position.
Insert WYSIWYG Element icon
Inserts an element on the web page at the current cursor position.
Dynamic Conversion icon
Inserts a dynamic conversion on the web page at the current cursor position.
Edit Object Properties icon
Opens a dialog where you can assign an element.
Delete Selected Object icon
Removes the selected item from the web page.

5.11 Log File

The log file shows status, warning, and error messages that are generated while you are using the Designer application. This may be useful for troubleshooting purposes. You can see the log file at any time by opening the View menu and then choosing Log File.

The log shows the source of the messages, their type, date, and time, and the actual message texts. You can click any message for a more detailed view. In addition, you can save the current log to a text file by clicking File, and then Save.

Figure 5-26 Log File

Description of Figure 5-26 follows

5.12 Site Connection Manager

The Site Connection Manager is used to control the connections to Site Studio web sites on the content server. You can add, edit, and delete site connections. When you connect to a web site, you essentially connect to its project file on the content server. This project file holds all relevant information that enables you to work with the site in Designer. For example, it contains references to all files that comprise the web site and their relationships.

You can open the Site Connection Manager in two ways:

Figure 5-27 Site Connection Manager Icon

Site Connection Manager icon

Figure 5-28 Site Connection Manager

Description of Figure 5-28 follows

When you create a site connection, you specify the Cgi URL address of the content server that stores the web site, the site identifier, and a connection name. Site Studio Designer then creates a project file for the web site and checks it into the content server with the default metadata for new project files (see Section 7.3.1, "Specifying the Metadata That is Assigned to a Project File"). When you have created a site connection, you can quickly open your site in Designer using the menu on the site toolbar (Figure 5-29) or by selecting File, then Site, and then Recent Sites.

Figure 5-29 List of Web Sites in Designer

List of available web sites in Designer.

web sites also appear in the "Web Sites" menu on the content server (Figure 5-30).

Figure 5-30 List of Web Sites in Oracle Content Server (in Default Tray Layout)

List of available web sites in Content Server.

For more information on working with site connections, see Section 7.1, "Site Connections," and Section A.2, "Site Connection Manager Dialog."

5.13 Link Wizard

The Link wizard is used to add a hyperlink to text or other page element in page templates, region templates, or subtemplates. You can link to a variety of targets, including web site sections, contributor data files, native documents, and URLs. You can link to items on the current web site, but also to items on other Site Studio sites on the content server, or to external web sites. Contributors use this same wizard to create hyperlinks in the Contributor application. You, as the site designer, control the options available to them when you set up an element definition (under 'Link Settings'). For example, you decide what kinds of content can be linked to: a new contributor data file or native document, an existing file on the content server, and/or an existing file on your local computer. You may also limit the file formats of native documents that can be linked to (for example, only Microsoft Word documents).

In Designer, with a template open in design view and some text or other page element selected, you open the wizard by clicking the Create Hyperlink icon on the formatting toolbar (Figure 5-31).

Figure 5-31 Create Hyperlink Icon

Create Hyperlink icon

Figure 5-32 Link Wizard

Description of Figure 5-32 follows

The Link wizard consists of multiple steps, depending on the choices you make during the process.


Note:

You can step through the wizard faster by clicking the blue arrow to the left of the option you want to use. This automatically selects the option and moves the wizard to the next step.

The first step is to specify the type of hyperlink to create:

You can click Options to specify whether the link target should open in a new browser window. After you select the desired link type, the wizard proceeds and presents some additional screens depending on the choices you make.

Link to a Section

If you choose to link to a section, you are asked to specify the site section that the hyperlink points to. You can link to a section on the current web site or a different Site Studio site on the content server. You select the target section from the site hierarchy.

In addition, you may be asked to select the URL format (path-based or ID-based), depending on whether this was enabled in the wizard (see Section 12.4.8, "Choosing a Default Link Format"). For more information, see "URL Formats".

The final step is to confirm the link before it is actually created (or modified).

Link to a File

If you choose to link to a file, you are first asked to select the type of file that the hyperlink points to. The site designer decides which file type(s) you can link to:

Link to the following URL

If you choose to link to a URL (web address), you can specify that URL in the field next to this option. You cannot proceed in the wizard until you provide a URL. This is often an external URL, such as a web site on the Internet, but may also useful to link to a file on the content server that is not used for contribution, such as a PDF file, media file, or zip file.

The final step is to confirm the link before it is actually created (or modified).

Target Sections

One of the wizard steps enables you to specify the web site section in which you want the selected data file to appear (the "target section"). This enables you to control where a particular file appears on the web site regardless of where it is actually stored on the site. For example, if you have a product description stored in the "Products" section of the site, you can create a link to it from the "Support" section and then specify that the document actually appears in the "Support" section when the hyperlink is clicked. You can choose from the following options:

URL Formats

You may be prompted to choose the URL format of the link, depending on whether contributors are allowed to make this decision. (You can set this option in Designer by selecting File, then Site, then Advanced, and then Set Default Link Format.) The following URL formats are available:

5.14 Switch Content Wizard

The Switch Content wizard is used to change the content assigned to a contribution region on a web page (or assign content if none was assigned yet). Contributors use this same wizard to assign or switch content in the Contributor application. You, as the site designer, control the options available to them when you set up a region definition. For example, you decide what kinds of content can be assigned: a new contributor data file or native document, an existing file on the content server, and/or an existing file on your local computer. You may also limit the file formats of native documents that can be assigned (for example, only Microsoft Word documents). In addition, you may allow the association of content with a contribution region to be removed altogether.

In Designer, you open the Switch Content wizard from a web page that opens in the Assign Content dialog (see Section A.54, "Assign Content Dialog"), which, in turn, is launched by right-clicking an assigned primary or secondary page of a section in the site hierarchy and choosing Assign Content. The page is essentially displayed in contribution mode, and you can right-click the menu in a contribution graphic to switch the content of the associated placeholder (or assign it if no content has yet been assigned).

Figure 5-33 Switch Content Wizard

Description of Figure 5-33 follows

The Switch Content wizard consists of multiple steps, depending on the properties of the current contribution region and the choices you make during the process.


Note:

You can step through the wizard faster by clicking the blue arrow to the left of the option you want to use. This automatically selects the option and moves the wizard to the next step.

Selecting a Region Definition or Subtemplate

Depending on how contribution region was set up, you may first be prompted to select the region definition or subtemplate that the region content should be based on.

If you select a region definition, you associate the contribution region directly with a contributor data file or native document (to be selected later in the wizard). Its contents open in the contribution region in accordance with the selected region definition and its associated region template. You, as the site designer, control what region definitions are available for the contribution region (in the placeholder definition).

If you select a subtemplate, you associate the contribution region with a subtemplate that defines what the region looks like and typically divides it into smaller contribution regions (each of which needs separate content assigned to it). You, as the site designer, control what subtemplates are available for the contribution region (in the placeholder definition).

Selecting the Content

Depending on your wizard choices, you may be prompted to select the type of content file that is associated with the contribution region. The available content file types depend on what was made available in the region definition. Select an option:

5.15 Fragment Editor

The fragment editor is used to create and edit fragments. To edit a fragment, simply right-click the fragment in the toolbox (see Section 5.8, "Toolbox") and choose Edit or Copy and Edit (for read-only fragments). This opens the fragment in the fragment editor. (You may first see a fragment properties dialog, where you must provide some information before you can edit the fragment.) To create a fragment, select File. then select Fragments, and then New.

The fragment editor may display as a dialog or a tab. For more information, see Section 5.6.1, "Dialogs vs. Tabs."

Figure 5-34 Fragment Editor

Description of Figure 5-34 follows

Fragments can exist in many forms, from a simple copyright statement to a complex series of scripting functions. You can turn just about any piece of code into a fragment. The Fragment Editor helps you manage this code and the individual parts that comprise a fragment, including the following:

For more information on the fragment editor, see Section 13.12, "Using the Fragment Editor."

5.16 Contributor Data Files and Native Documents

Contributor data files and native documents are used to store content submitted to the site by a contributor. Both files can be assigned directly to a contribution region on a primary page or added as the target of a hyperlink or dynamic list, where they appear on a secondary page.

The two files are different, however, in how you open and edit them:

To use these files on your site, you must create an editable area (a 'contribution region') on a page template and then assign the data file or native document to the placeholder. If you are using data files, you also must add one or more elements to each region definition. Each element appears as a field in Contributor where a user can add and edit content. You, as the site designer, control the editing options available to the contributor within each element (in its element definition).

After you have set up the contribution region, you assign one of these files to the region using the Assign Content dialog (see Section A.54, "Assign Content Dialog"). This is available at any time by clicking the Assign Content icon (Figure 5-35).

Figure 5-35 Assign Content icon

Assign Content icon

When you first open the Assign Content dialog, you see the site hierarchy on the left and the fully rendered page template with one or more contribution regions on the right. Each contribution region has its own contribution graphic, which shows the name of the contribution region, a Status/Edit icon, and a Menu icon (Figure 5-36).

Figure 5-36 Contribution Graphic

Description of Figure 5-36 follows

If you hover your mouse cursor over a contribution graphic, its associated contribution region is marked in a yellow box. This is the content that can be edited using the selected contribution graphic. In addition, a tooltip appears that provides useful site design information for the contribution region (such as the associated placeholder name and definition, the content ID of the associated content file, and the associated region definition and template) (Figure 5-37).

Figure 5-37 Contribution Region Marked on Web Page With Tooltip

Description of Figure 5-37 follows

If not all contribution regions on a page in a site section have content assigned to them, the folder icon of that section in the site hierarchy shows a red 'x' (Figure 5-38).

Figure 5-38 Red X Icon

Red X Icon

You can specify a new data file or native document or reuse an existing one for each region. You should specify a new file if you want new and unique content to display on that page on the web site and reuse an existing file if you want the same content to display on multiple pages on the web site (similar to the decision that goes into reusing other site assets, such as page templates).


Note:

Contributor data files and native documents are stored in the content server like any other content item. As such, you can choose different metadata or security for each file and consequently, limit what a contributor sees based on his or her login credentials.

Allowing Contributors to Create Files

In addition to assigning contributor data files or native documents to a region, you can allow contributors to create their own data files and native documents on the web site.

This adds a whole new dimension to your site, allowing the site to grow without your having to create sections and page templates every time a piece of content is created. To do this, you must allow contributors to add files to the site (an allowed action in an element definition) and then set up areas on the site where those files can appear (a replaceable region on a secondary page).

5.17 Site Studio Manager

When a web site has been created and deployed using Site Studio Designer, the site management responsibilities can be handed over to users who manage the site. They do this using Site Studio Manager, which is a web-based application.

Figure 5-39 Site Studio Manager Application

Site Studio Manager Application

To use Manager, you browse to a web page that has the manager feature enabled (see Chapter 16, "Setting Up Manager"). Depending on how it is implemented, Manager may display at all times or it may only display in contribution mode. You can open Manager from each page or from a designated section of the site.

In Manager, you can modify the site hierarchy, change the page template associated with a section, modify the properties of a section, and so on. The manager of the site may choose to work exclusively in Manager or both Manager and Contributor to effectively manage the site.

When you add Manager and Contributor to your site, you must consider how the two applications are used and how they might be used together by managers and contributors. You should educate them regarding their roles and responsibilities.

For more information on using Manager, see the Oracle WebCenter Content Administrator and Manager's Guide for Site Studio.

5.18 Site Studio Contributor

After a web site has been created and deployed in Site Studio Designer, it can be handed over to the users who add and update content on the site. These users are called contributors, and they update the site using the Contributor application.

The designer of the site can also use Contributor, and may frequently do so to test the site contribution, to populate the site with sample pages, or to fix pages that have become broken.

To start Contributor, you visit a web page that contains an editable contribution region (which was set up in Designer) and then change the page view to contribution mode (you may be prompted to log onto the web site). You can then click any contribution graphic on the page and start editing that page in Contributor.

The following topics provide a brief introduction to Contributor:

5.18.1 Launching Contributor

To open the Contributor application, browse to the web page containing a contribution region and enable contribution mode using a combination of keystrokes on the keyboard (the default is Ctrl+Shift+F5). You are then prompted to enter your login credentials.

You can tell that you are in contribution mode by a thin Contribution Mode banner along the top of the screen. You also see one or more contribution graphics (Figure 5-40) on the page, one for each placeholder.

Figure 5-40 Contribution Graphic

Contribution Graphic

Each contribution graphic marks an editable area on the web page that can be opened and edited with Contributor or a third-party application (if a native document is used). The name of the placeholder is listed first, followed by the Edit icon then the menu icon. To edit, click the Edit icon or click the Menu icon and choose Edit.

Please note the following:

  • The number of contribution graphics may vary, depending on the number of editable areas on a page and the contributor's login credentials (if the designer set up different security for each file on the site).

  • Different icons may appear within the contribution graphic, meaning different things. If content has not been assigned to the placeholder, then the graphic has a small green '+' symbol (Figure 5-41).

    Figure 5-41 Contribution Graphic Showing That Content Has not Been Assigned

    Graphic showing no content has been added

    If the contributor has access to switch the region content, then the graphic displays a small yellow arrow (Figure 5-42).

    Figure 5-42 Contribution Graphic Showing That Content Can Be Switched

    Graphic showing content to switch

    If the content is in workflow, this is represented by a green gear icon on the left side of the contribution graphic (Figure 5-43).

    Figure 5-43 Contribution Graphic Showing Workflow

    Contribution graphic showing workflow
  • For information on how to change the default keystroke combination (Ctrl + Shift + F5), see the Oracle WebCenter Content Administrator and Manager's Guide for Site Studio.

  • To know which web pages contain contribution regions and of those, which ones should be edited, the designer must notify the contributor, perhaps by forwarding the URL of the web page or using Workflow.

5.18.2 Contributor Editor

After you choose to edit a contribution region on a web page, the Contributor editor launches in a browser popup window (Figure 5-44), and you can start editing the content in the current contribution region. Please note that this browser popup window may be suppressed by popup-blocking software, so you must configure that software to allow pop-ups on your site. Also, when the Contributor editor opens, the web browser displaying the original web page becomes temporarily unavailable. You can return to the web browser when you close the Contributor editor.

Figure 5-44 Contributor Editor

Contributor Interface

The Contributor interface is very similar to the interface of a word processing program. You can add, remove, and edit text, images, hyperlinks, and more. There is even a list option that enables you to manage simple or complex lists. The appearance and behavior of Contributor varies depending on how each contribution region and element is set up in Designer. As the designer of the site, you can set up and modify contribution regions so that the Contributor interface is plain and simple or advanced and powerful.

The main editor window contains various elements:

  • Page header: includes the name of the contribution region being edited.

  • Data file: shows the content ID of the data file associated with the editable contribution region on the content server.

  • Elements tab: provides the editing environment for all elements in the contribution region. Please note that all elements in the associated data file are shown, even if only some of them are actually displayed in the contribution region being edited. (The other information may be used elsewhere on the web site, so editing that information may affect other pages on the site.)

  • Metadata tab: shows the content information (metadata) for the data file associated with the editable contribution region (only if the site designer opted to make the metadata available for the contribution region).

  • Contribution toolbar: provides a set of functions that apply to the contribution region as a whole. You can save or preview the data changes, refresh the current view, open a usage report for the data file, and view the changes made to the web page.

  • Editing areas: one for each element in the contributor data file associated with the contribution region on the web page. These editing areas are where you type in your text and format your document.

  • Element toolbars: provide editing functionality relevant to the type of content you are editing. The site designer controls what editing options are available for each element type.

5.18.3 Contributor and Workflows

In addition to contributing content to the site, a contributor may also be responsible for reviewing and approving content. This could also be the sole responsibility of a reviewer in your organization. The process of reviewing and approving content is called workflow.

You create a workflow in Site Studio using the existing workflow functionality in the content server. If you are familiar with this, you should be able to quickly adopt the workflow process on your site. Workflow can be enabled for the content assigned to a contribution region on a web page. When a contributor adds a new data file or native document to that web page, the content automatically enters a workflow (preventing the page from going "live" without going through an approval process).

To participate in a workflow, reviewers click a link in a workflow e-mail message that takes them to the web page that must be reviewed (the page is in contribution mode). They can open the menu in the contribution graphic that has the workflow icon (Figure 5-45) and choose Approve Document, Reject Document, or Edit.

Figure 5-45 Contribution in Workflow Icon

Contribution in Workflow icon

If the reviewer chooses Approve Document, the next reviewer in the workflow is notified with a similar e-mail message. If the reviewer is the last reviewer in the workflow, clicking Approve Document makes the content appear on the actual, "live," web site.

If the reviewer chooses Reject Document, the Oracle Content Server rejection page opens, where the review must supply details on why it was rejected. Additionally, an e-mail is sent to the previous reviewer in the workflow. Clicking Edit opens Contributor so that the content can be edited. For more information, see Section 15.3, "Workflow Experience for Contributors," and the Oracle WebCenter Content User's Guide for Site Studio Contributor.

The complete workflow process depends on how you set up workflow on the content server. For more information, see Chapter 15, "Using Workflows," and the Oracle Content Server documentation.

5.19 Site Studio Administration Page in Oracle Content Server

The Site Studio Administration page is created when you install the Site Studio component on the content server, and it is accessible from the Oracle Content Server Administration page.

You use this page to perform several administrative tasks for all of your web sites (some of which you can also do in Designer). Using the Site Studio Administration page, you can view information about your web sites, start and stop web sites, replicate web sites, upgrade web sites, and much more.

This page has the following options:

For more information on each of these options, see the Oracle WebCenter Content Administrator and Manager's Guide for Site Studio.

In addition to going through the Oracle Content Server user interface, you can also conveniently open the Site Studio Administration page by clicking the down arrow next to the View Pages icon on the site toolbar in Designer and choosing Site Studio Admin (Figure 5-46). This opens the Site Studio Administration page on the content server hosting the site that you are currently connected to in Designer.

Figure 5-46 Site Studio Admin Option in View Menu

Description of Figure 5-46 follows

5.20 Site Studio Publisher

Site Studio Publisher is a component installed on the Oracle Content Server (just as the Site Studio component is installed) that is used to crawl a Site Studio web site and transfer it from an Oracle Content Server environment to a pure web server environment that is not running an Oracle Content Server instance. This process is referred to as publishing.

Site Studio Publisher creates a static snapshot of a dynamic site by traversing all the links in a web site (visiting all of the linked pages) and downloading a copy of each page and all of the resources (images, flash movies, and so on) on each page. Your entire web site, including the content of queries, layout pages, fragments, contributor data files, and native documents, are then copied and published to the new server.

This section contains the following topics:

5.20.1 Site Studio Publisher in Oracle Content Server

Site Studio Publisher is run from the Oracle Content Server. Once installed, you can create any tasks you need to crawl any sites created with Site Studio. It is not necessary that Publisher is located on the content server storing the web site that you want to publish.

Figure 5-47 Main Site Studio Publisher Screen

screenshot of Site Studio Publisher on Content Server

The main Publisher interface is a type of dashboard, listing all of the publishing tasks, their status including when they are scheduled to run and most recently ran, and an actions menu to modify individual tasks, or even run them immediately ("on demand.")

This window contains the information on available publishing tasks:

  • The top of the screen lists the status of Publisher, if it is running or paused.

  • Pause Publishing suspends all tasks from running according to schedule. If Publisher is paused, then the button becomes Resume Publishing.

  • Add New Task is used to add a new publishing task.

  • Refresh redisplays all task statuses.

  • Description is the name you have given the task.

  • Priority shows if the task runs at a high or a normal priority.

  • Status displays if the task is Waiting, Pending, Running, Finished, or Expired.

  • Next Run is the scheduled date and time the task will run.

  • Last Run is the date and time of the completion or failure of the most recent task.

  • Progress displays the current progress of the task.

  • Click Actions to open a menu and select one of the following actions for the task:

    • Edit opens a screen to edit the task parameters.

    • Run puts the task in the queue to run according to the schedule set for the task.

    • Stop appears when a task is running. Select to stop a task.

    • Delete deletes the task.

    • View Info opens a screen to view the information about previous times the task has run. This will not appear on tasks that have never run.

    • View Logs opens the screen to view the log file for the task.

See the Oracle WebCenter Content User's Guide for Site Studio Publisher for more information on using Publisher.

5.20.2 Publish Now

Publishing is the term used to describe Site Studio Publisher crawling a web site and creating a static web site to a pure web server environment. Depending on the size of the web site, publishing may take quite a while, and this is why the full site is often published only periodically. In these cases, some time may pass before a changed web page is reflected on the "live" site.

You may not want to wait until the next publication cycle for a changed web page to appear on the site, especially if you corrected errors on a page. To accommodate for this, Site Studio Publisher has a Publish Now feature, which enables it to search for files on the content server that are marked for immediate publication and then publish only those files. This is a much quicker process, since it does not involve deploying the entire site, but only a limited number of files.

The Publish Now selection is in the Site Studio Contributor toolbar. When a contributor changes a page and wants it published quickly, they click the Publish Now selection in the Contributor toolbar. For more information on Publish Now in Site Studio Contributor, see the Oracle WebCenter Content User's Guide for Site Studio Contributor.

Contributor can be controlled regarding whether or not the Publish Now feature is available, by setting the feature in Designer. This is easily handled in the menu bar, first selecting File, then Site, then Advanced, and finally Enable Publish Now (for more information, see Section 5.9.1.1, "Site Submenu"). If Enable Publish Now is checked, it is enabled, and contributors working on the web site can mark the individual pages with Publish Now.

PKOttPK=\EOEBPS/c13_fragments.htm Working With Fragments

13 Working With Fragments

This section covers the following topics:

13.1 About Fragments

When you first design a page template, you generally start with the basic look and feel of the site, using background colors, graphics, text, and a table layout. This kind of information opens in the same way on every page of the web site, or a section of the web site. You can, therefore, add this information directly to the page template, subtemplate, or region template in source or design view.

A fragment can be a single line of text (such as a copyright notice), or it can be a complex collection of scripts performing client-side and server-side actions (such as a JavaScript-based menu).

Just about anything that you add to a page template, subtemplate, or region template can be added as a fragment. How often you use fragments depends on your preference and the requirements of your web site.

13.2 Adding and Editing Fragments

Fragments can be added and edited using the Toolbox in Designer. Site Studio includes numerous sample fragments in the Toolbox that you can use or customize for your own (see Section 13.4, "Fragments in the Toolbox"). To use a fragment, simply place your cursor on the template where you would like the fragment to appear and then click the desired fragment in the Toolbox.

You can customize the way a fragment appears on a template by changing its parameters in the Fragment Parameter Values dialog, which you see when you add the fragment to a template.

The fragments contain parameters so that you can customize the fragment each time you use it on a template. If there's a setting that you're unable to change in a parameter, you can always open the fragment in the Fragment Editor and customize it there; even add your own custom parameter if you like.

13.3 Fragment Handling in Templates

Page templates, being complete HTML documents, have a <HEAD> and <BODY> in their code. Subtemplates and region templates, however, do not have a <HEAD> section. You must be aware of this distinction when placing a fragment, and also when creating and editing fragments.

The snippets inside of a fragment have a designated location of head, drop-point, top-of-body, or bottom-of-body. These designations are made when creating or editing fragments in the Fragment Editor dialog (see Section A.57, "Fragment Editor Dialog"). Those snippets designated with a head location must be placed on a template with a <HEAD>; that is, they must be placed on a page template because they require the header to work. If you place a fragment that has a snippet with a head location on a region template or a subtemplate, then the fragment cannot work.

When you put a fragment on a page template, this includes information in the XML data island, specifically in the <SSINFO> tag. When you put a fragment on a subtemplate or a region template, then a wcmFragment tag is placed in the HTML. In both cases this can be seen in source view.

It is recommended that, whenever possible, you create fragments with a single body snippet. The fragment can then be used in any situation, whether it is on a page template, a subtemplate, or a region template.

13.4 Fragments in the Toolbox

Site Studio includes numerous out-of-the-box fragments that you can begin using right away without knowing how to create or edit a fragment. Using the sample fragments is a great way to add instant functionality to your web site while learning about the practical use and potential of a fragment.

Figure 13-1 Sample Fragments in the Toolbox

Sample Fragments in Toolbar

The sample fragments are available in the Toolbox and are divided into four categories:

13.5 Filtering Fragments in the Toolbox

The Toolbox in Designer displays all of the fragments that are available to you as you build your web site. As you and other designers introduce fragments to the site (or sites), however, the total number of fragments in the Toolbox can quickly become unmanageable.

You can control which fragments display in the Toolbox by filtering them based on their scripting language, whether they belong to your site or not, and whether you've introduced them or they came with Site Studio.

To filter fragments in the Toolbox, perform these tasks:

  1. From the View menu, select Customize.

  2. Click the Miscellaneous tab.

  3. To display only the fragments written in the same language as your site (HCSP/JSP or ASP), check Filter fragments in other languages.

  4. To display only the fragments that belong to your site (and not other sites), check Filter libraries from other sites.

    Fragments in fragment libraries not identified as part of your site no longer appear in the Toolbox. To make a fragment part of your site, add it as a site asset to the "Fragment Libraries" category.

  5. To display only the fragments that you created (and not the default ones that ship with Site Studio), check Filter default libraries.

  6. Click Close to close the Customize dialog.

One reason you may want to show all of the available fragments on the server is to copy one of those fragment and make it part of your site.

13.6 Adding Fragments to a Template

You can use the Toolbox to add fragments directly to a template while working in design or source view.

To add a fragment, perform these tasks:

  1. Place your cursor in the template where you want the fragment to appear.

    If you're adding a list fragment, It may be necessary to first create a contribution region and then place the fragment in that region.

  2. In the Toolbox, click a fragment category: Navigation Fragments, Dynamic List Fragments, Static List Fragments, or Other Fragments.

  3. Click the desired fragment (for a description of each fragment, see Appendix C, "Sample Fragments").

  4. If the fragment contains parameters, you are prompted for additional information in the Fragment Parameter Values dialog (see Section A.65, "Fragment Parameter Values Dialog").

  5. Enter the appropriate values in the fields provided and then click OK to add the fragment.

The fragment displays on your template where your cursor was last located.

Many of the sample fragments insert a small text or a graphic as a visual aid so that you know where a fragment is located on a template. This small marker is known as the design view code. The design view code is used because many of the fragments contain dynamic content and server-side scripts that must be viewed in a web browser on the web site to be seen properly.

The placeholder does not necessarily represent how the fragment appears on your web site. You can change the placeholder in the Fragment Editor, if you like (see Step 5 in Section 13.12.4, "Adding, Editing, and Deleting Fragment Snippets").

13.7 Previewing Fragments

Previewing a fragment can be useful to determine what the fragment looks like and how it works before making it a part of your template. You can preview fragments using the Preview option in the right-click menu of the Toolbox, or using the Preview button in the Fragment Editor (see Section 13.12, "Using the Fragment Editor").

This section covers the following topics:

13.7.1 Previewing a Fragment

To preview a fragment, perform these tasks:

  1. In the Toolbox, click a fragment category: Navigation Fragments, Dynamic List Fragments, Static List Fragments, or Other Fragments.

  2. Right-click the desired fragment and choose Preview.

  3. If the fragment contains parameters, you are taken to the Fragment Parameter Values dialog (see Section A.65, "Fragment Parameter Values Dialog").

    Enter the appropriate values in the fields provided and click OK.

  4. The Fragment Preview dialog opens (see Section A.66, "Fragment Preview Dialog"), where you can see what your fragment looks like.

  5. Click a section in the site hierarchy pane to see how the fragment appears in different sections of the web site.

If a section in the site hierarchy is not included in your site navigation, has no primary page associated with it, or is pointing to an external URL, then you cannot select it and preview it in this dialog.

  1. To see what the fragment looks like with different parameter values selected, click Change Parameter Values, enter the appropriate values in the fields provided, and then click OK to return to the Fragment Preview dialog.

  2. Click Finished when you're done previewing the fragment.

For a description of all the sample fragments and their parameters in the Toolbox, see Appendix C, "Sample Fragments."

You cannot preview a static list fragment in the Fragment Preview dialog because the list requires a contributor data file with content in it to be viewed properly.

13.7.2 Choosing Different Parameters for a Fragment

You can customize the way a fragment appears by changing its parameters in the Fragment Parameter Values dialog when you preview a fragment or add it to a page template, subtemplate, or region template. You can also change those values after you've added the fragment.

13.7.3 Choosing Different Parameters When Adding a Fragment

To choose different parameters when adding a fragment, perform these tasks:

  1. Place your cursor in the template where you want the fragment to appear.

  2. In the Toolbox, click a fragment category: Navigation Fragments, Dynamic List Fragments, Static List Fragments, or Other Fragments. Then click the desired fragment.

  3. In the Fragment Parameter Values dialog (see Section A.65, "Fragment Parameter Values Dialog"), enter the appropriate values in the fields provided, and click OK.

    or

    If you're adding a list fragment to a contribution region, enter the appropriate values in the Element dialog and then click Parameters to change its parameters.

    Click OK twice to close the Fragment Parameter Values and the Element dialog.

13.7.4 Changing the Parameters of a Fragment

After you've added a fragment to a template, you can still change its parameters and thus its appearance on a web page.

To change the parameters of a fragment, perform these tasks:

  1. In design view, double-click the fragment.

    or

    In source view, right-click the fragment and choose Edit Fragment Instance.

  2. Change the desired parameter values in the Fragment Parameter Values dialog (see Section A.65, "Fragment Parameter Values Dialog").

  3. Click OK.

You cannot change the parameter values of a fragment that has been added to a page template if that fragment contains snippets included as type "simple" (see Section 13.12.4, "Adding, Editing, and Deleting Fragment Snippets").

For a description of each parameter included in the sample fragments, see Appendix C, "Sample Fragments." Please note, however, that some fragments may not contain parameters.

To add parameters to a fragment or to further customize the fragment, you can edit the fragment in the Fragment Editor (see Section 13.8, "Editing Fragments").


Note:

The options you choose in the Fragment Parameter Values dialog apply only to this one instance where you added the fragment to a template. You can choose different values each time you add a fragment to a template without affecting the appearance of the same fragment used elsewhere on your site.

13.8 Editing Fragments

There are two ways to change the appearance of a fragment on your web site: change its parameters (see Section 13.7.2, "Choosing Different Parameters for a Fragment") or change the fragment.

By editing a fragment, you can completely change its appearance and functionality to meet your needs. You can even create your own parameters so that you can ensure editing decisions later, when you actually add the fragment to a template.

There are two ways to edit a fragment:

13.8.1 Editing a Copy of a Fragment

Editing a copy of a fragment can be useful when you want to edit a fragment without altering the original. You also must edit a copy of a fragment when the fragment library it belongs to is checked out by another user or labeled as read-only (see Section 13.13.3, "Making a Fragment Library Read-Only").


Note:

The fragments that come with Site Studio are read-only, so to edit them, you must choose this option.

To edit a copy of a fragment, perform these tasks:

  1. In the Toolbox, click a fragment category: Navigation Fragments, Dynamic List Fragments, Static List Fragments, or Other Fragments.

  2. Right-click the desired fragment and choose Copy and Edit.

  3. The Properties for Fragment dialog (see Section A.58, "Properties for Fragment Dialog") opens, where you can specify individual properties for the fragment.

  4. Click OK to close the fragment properties dialog.

  5. The fragment opens in the Fragment Editor, where you can start making changes to the fragment (see Section 13.12, "Using the Fragment Editor").

    Figure 13-2 Fragment Editor with Fragment

    Fragment Editor
  6. When finished making changes, click the Save icon (Figure 13-3) in the toolbar (or click File then Save) and follow the steps outlined in Section 13.13.2, "Saving a Fragment in a Fragment Library."

    Figure 13-3 Save Icon

    Save Icon

The fragment displays in the Toolbox with the other fragments, and it is available to every site in the content server.

13.8.2 Editing a Fragment

After you (or another designer) adds a fragment to the Toolbox, you can start editing it right away.


Note:

You cannot edit the fragments that come with Site Studio directly because they are read-only.

To edit a fragment, perform these tasks:

  1. In the Toolbox, click a fragment category: Navigation Fragments, Dynamic List Fragments, Static List Fragments, or Other Fragments.

  2. Right-click the desired fragment and choose Edit.

  3. The fragment opens in the Fragment Editor, where you can start making changes to the fragment (see Section 13.12, "Using the Fragment Editor").

  4. When finished, click the Save icon (Figure 13-4) in the toolbar (or click File, then select Save).

    Figure 13-4 Save Icon

    Save Icon
  5. On the Assign Info Form in the content server, enter the appropriate metadata for the library and then click Assign Info.


    Note:

    When you edit a fragment in the Fragment Editor, the fragment library (that the fragment is stored in) is checked out of the content server, and it is checked back in when you close the Fragment Editor. (It is also checked out and checked in each time you save the fragment.) This prevents designers (assuming your organization has more than one) from encountering sharing violations or overriding each other's work.

It may occasionally be necessary to click the Refresh icon (Figure 13-5) in Designer to see the most current list of fragments in the Toolbox (which reads them from the content server).

Figure 13-5 Refresh Icon

Refresh Icon

In Site Studio, it is good practice to create a copy of a fragment and then edit that fragment instead of editing the original. There are several reasons for this:

  • You can quickly and easily revert to the original fragment if needed (in case anything goes wrong with the fragment you're editing).

  • You can quickly get started with your own fragment without re-creating everything in an existing fragment (much like creating a page template based on an existing page template).

  • You reduce the chances of overwriting another designer's work and consequently, creating unpredictable results on a web site. The reason for this is that the fragments you create and edit in Designer are stored in one place in the content server. They appear in every instance of Designer that is connected to the same content server, and therefore, multiple designers can end up using the same fragment on different web sites.

13.9 Creating a New Fragment

In addition to editing fragments and creating fragments from existing ones (see Section 13.8, "Editing Fragments"), you can create a fragment from scratch and add your own content to it. This is a good choice to introduce functionality or use existing content from another web site (that wasn't created with Site Studio).

To create a fragment, perform these tasks:

  1. From the File menu, select Fragment, then select New.

  2. In the New Fragment dialog, enter property values for the fragment (see Section A.58, "Properties for Fragment Dialog").

  3. Click OK to close the fragment properties dialog, which opens the Fragment Editor.

  4. In the Fragment Editor, add the desired snippets, assets, parameters, and elements (if it's a static list) to the fragment. For more information, see Section 13.12, "Using the Fragment Editor"

  5. When finished making changes, click the Save icon (Figure 13-6) in the toolbar (or click File then Save) and follow the steps outlined in Section 13.13.2, "Saving a Fragment in a Fragment Library."

    Figure 13-6 Save Icon

    Save Icon

The fragment displays in the Toolbox with the other fragments and is available to every site on the content server.

13.10 Deleting a Fragment

You can delete a fragment from a template in the same way that you delete tables, graphics, and other objects.

To delete a fragment, perform these tasks:

  1. Select the fragment, and press the Delete key on your keyboard.

    or

    In source view, right-click the fragment code and choose Delete Fragment Instance.

  2. Click Yes to confirm the deletion.

The fragment instance is removed. The fragment itself remains in the Toolbox, and you can continue using it on other templates.

13.11 Deleting a Fragment in the Toolbox

You can delete a fragment in the Toolbox, which also deletes it from the content server.


Note:

Fragments in Site Studio are stored in Oracle Content Server and are available to every web site on the server. If you delete a fragment for one web site, other web sites using that same fragment is affected. You should, therefore, first verify that the fragment is not being used elsewhere before you delete it.

To delete a fragment in the Toolbox, perform these tasks:

  1. In the Toolbox, right-click the desired fragment.

  2. Choose Delete.

  3. Click Yes to confirm the deletion.

The fragment is no longer included in the Toolbox.

13.12 Using the Fragment Editor

A fragment is a container for code ( HTML, XML, JavaScript, Idoc Script), files referenced by that code (graphics, CSS, additional scripts, and so on), and parameters that govern how that code is added to a template.

The file that stores this information is written in XML and is stored in the content server with the fragment assets. The XML file and the fragment assets collectively are called a fragment library.

You can view and edit fragments and the files referenced by that fragment using the Fragment Editor.

Figure 13-7 Fragment in the Fragment Editor

Vertical Menu Bar Fragment Editor

Using the Fragment Editor, you can modify existing fragments and create your own fragments. You can turn just about any piece of code or functionality into a fragment that can be added to a template and still managed separately from the template.

The following are some tasks you'll perform in the Fragment Editor:

The Preview button in the Fragment Editor performs the same action as using the Preview option in the right-click menu of the Toolbox (see Section 13.7, "Previewing Fragments").

13.12.1 Opening the Fragment Editor

The Fragment Editor can be opened within the Designer application, where it used to view and edit fragments. The Fragment Editor displays in the workspace in the same way that templates display there. In fact, some options in the Designer toolbar also apply to fragments (Cut, Copy, Paste, Save, window controls, and so on).

There are two ways to open the Fragment Editor:

13.12.2 Specifying Fragment Properties

Each time you create a fragment in Designer, you are prompted to confirm or create individual properties for the fragment. You can also view and change existing properties from within the Fragment Editor by clicking the Additional Information (Figure 13-8) icon:

Figure 13-8 Additional Information icon

Additional Information Icon

To specify properties for a fragment, perform these tasks:

  1. Open the Properties for Fragments dialog (see Section A.58, "Properties for Fragment Dialog").

    Figure 13-9 Properties for Fragment Dialog

    Properties for Fragment dialog box
  2. Enter a name for the fragment in the Name field. The name displays in the Toolbox.

  3. Enter an identification in the ID field. This identifies the fragment and its many parts (snippets, fragment assets, parameters, and so on). The ID also serves as an XML attribute and the base name for the fragment's classes, files, and directories. You cannot change the ID after you assign one to a fragment.


    Note:

    The ID should be concise and should not contain spaces or non-ASCII characters.

  4. Choose a language for the fragment in the Language field. The language is used for server-side scripting and must correlate with the web site type.

    • Select idoc or jsp for "hcsp/jsp" sites.

    • Select asp for "asp" sites.

  5. Choose a fragment type in the Type field. The type determines where the fragment appears in the Toolbox (see Section 13.4, "Fragments in the Toolbox") and certain editing options available in the Fragment Editor. You have four choices:

    • navigation: A navigation fragment provides site navigation for your web site, such as a navigation bar, breadcrumbs, and a search box.

    • dynamiclist: A dynamic list fragment provides advanced contribution features by displaying a list of data files or native documents that a contributor can edit.

    • staticlist: A static list fragment provides advanced contribution features by displaying a structured layout of elements, whereby a contributor can add, edit, and delete rows and columns of information.

    • other: This category of fragments is intended for all other, possibly miscellaneous fragments, such as a copyright, an embedded Flash presentation, and a dynamically converted document.

  6. Click OK to close the Properties dialog and return to the Fragment Editor.

The Library Name in the Properties dialog denotes the fragment library where the fragment is stored. You choose this location when you save the fragment for the first time (see Section 13.13.2, "Saving a Fragment in a Fragment Library").


Note:

Only ASCII characters should be used for fragment IDs and the names of asset files and folders. This is because the folder within the zip file, which is created automatically for the assets, is named after the fragment ID, and the zip format does not support extended characters. This is true also for the names of any folders used for the assets and for the names of the asset files themselves.

13.12.3 Changing the Icon Associated with a Fragment

Each fragment in the Toolbox has an icon associated with it that can be used to differentiate it from other fragments. You can change this icon to something different, perhaps something that more closely resembles the purpose of the fragment.

To change the icon associated with a fragment, perform these tasks:

  1. With the fragment open in the Fragment Editor, click the Change icon (Figure 13-10) in the upper left. (This icon changes with each fragment you select. The icon shown here is the one you see for a new fragment.)

    Figure 13-10 Change Icon

    Change Icon
  2. Click the desired icon in the menu.

The icon displays inside this button in the Fragment Editor, and it displays in the Toolbox when you save the fragment.

13.12.4 Adding, Editing, and Deleting Fragment Snippets

A snippet is the actual text or code that a fragment adds to a template. A fragment must have at least one snippet, which is defined by its insertion point (head of page, body, drop-point, and so on) in the template.

For example, if the fragment adds text to one place on the page, then you can create just one snippet for the fragment. But if the fragment inserts text or code in multiple locations on the page (such as a script that must be placed in the head and the body), then you must create two snippets for the fragment (one for the head and one for the body).

You can add, edit, and remove fragment snippets using the Fragment Editor.

To add or edit a snippet, perform these tasks:

  1. With the fragment open in the Fragment Editor, click Add to create a snippet, or highlight an existing snippet and click Properties.

    This opens the Snippet Properties dialog (see Section A.64, "Snippet Properties Dialog").

  2. Enter a name for the snippet in the Name field. (The name may contain spaces and special characters, if you like.)

  3. Beside Location, choose an available option:

    • drop-point: Inserts the snippet where the cursor is located on the template.

    • head: Inserts the snippet in the head (specifically the end of the <HEAD> tag) of the page template.

    • top-of-body: Inserts the snippet at the beginning of the body (immediately following the <BODY> tag) in the page template.

    • bottom-of-body: Inserts the snippet at the end of the body (immediately preceding the </BODY> tag) in the page template.

  4. Beside Include, choose an available option:

    • simple: Adds the entire contents of the snippet to the template. If parameters are present, their values are added directly to the template, making them a permanent part of the page. The fragment, consequently, is no longer recognized as a fragment and its parameters cannot be modified (see Section 13.7.2, "Choosing Different Parameters for a Fragment").

    • inline: Adds the entire contents of the snippet to the template. As an inline snippet, however, the fragment and its parameters are still recognized as a fragment. You can still move the fragment, delete it, and modify its parameters.

    • reference: Adds a reference to the snippet in the template. As a referenced snippet, not only is it still recognized and managed as a fragment, but you can still edit the fragment in the Fragment Editor and immediately see your changes on the template (or templates if used more than once). This behavior is similar to that of an include file (HTML, CSS, script, and so on) on other web sites.

  5. Beside Design View Code, enter the text you would like to appear as a placeholder for the fragment in the design view of a template. (This feature is intended for snippets that are inserted at the drop-point or the body of a page template and not the head.)

    To open the text editor, click the Additional Information icon (Figure 13-11), enter your text, and then click OK to close the text editor.

    Figure 13-11 Additional Information icon

    Additional Information icon
  6. Click OK to close the snippet properties and return to the Fragment Editor.

  7. With the snippet selected, you can add and edit the content of the snippet in the Snippet code text box.

    Figure 13-12 Snippet Code Text Box

    Snippet Code Text Box

Repeat these steps for every snippet that you would like to add or edit in this fragment. You can add as many snippets as you like.

To delete a snippet, simply highlight that snippet and click Delete.

Fragment snippets can be written in HTML, XML, JavaScript, Idoc Script, JavaServer Pages (JSP), and Active Server Pages (ASP). For ASP and JSP, however, you must place your code in a fragment asset (see Section 13.12.5, "Adding, Editing, and Deleting Fragment Assets") and then reference that code from an inline fragment snippet.

You should avoid the word "BODY" in an inline head snippet because that name conflicts with code used by Site Studio to manage the head and body portions of a page template. If you must use this word in your snippet, then you should either (a) change the include method of the snippet from inline to reference, (b) put the code in a fragment asset (see Section 13.12.5, "Adding, Editing, and Deleting Fragment Assets"), and then include it in your fragment that way, or (c) change the code so that the word "BODY" is split into two parts (two concatenated strings).

If you use the same fragment containing a referenced snippet on multiple web sites on the content server, then any changes you make to that fragment immediately affect all web sites where it is used. If this is not your intention, then you should create different fragments for each site (see Section 13.8.1, "Editing a Copy of a Fragment").


Note:

With ASP fragments, you can only include a snippet using the "simple" or "inline" method. Including by "reference" is not available because of the way ASP code handles includes.

13.12.5 Adding, Editing, and Deleting Fragment Assets

Assets are the files that are referenced from within a fragment, specifically from within a snippet in the fragment. A graphic, a cascading style sheet, and a standalone JavaScript file (see first note below for implementing ASP or JSP) are all frequently used assets. When you add an asset to a fragment, it becomes a part of the fragment and is managed in a fragment library in the content server. If you move or make a copy of a fragment, all of its assets are included.

You can add, edit, and remove fragment assets in the Fragment Assets dialog in the Fragment Editor.

13.12.5.1 Adding an Asset

To add an asset, perform these tasks:

  1. With the fragment open in the Fragment Editor, click Assets.

    This opens the Fragment Assets dialog (see Section A.59, "Fragment Assets Dialog").

    Figure 13-13 Fragment Assets Dialog

    Fragment Assets Dialog
  2. To create a subfolder for the asset (this is optional), click Add Folder, type a name for the folder, and then press Enter on your keyboard.

    By default, Site Studio creates an asset folder based on the fragment's ID (see Section 13.12.2, "Specifying Fragment Properties"). The folder name uses all lowercase letters to ensure that the fragment works on all platforms (specifically, UNIX). If you create any subfolders, you should use all lowercase letters as well. In addition, you should use only ASCII characters (see note below).

  3. Highlight the folder that you would like to add the asset to and then click Add Asset (the root, or top-level folder, is the default location for assets).

  4. Browse to the file on your file system and then click Open in the Windows dialog.

  5. Click OK to close the Fragment Assets dialog and return to the Fragment Editor.

When you save your fragment, the asset is packaged with the fragment and stored in the fragment library on the content server. You can now refer to the asset from each snippet in the fragment.

13.12.5.2 Editing an Asset

To edit an asset, perform these tasks:

  1. With the fragment open in the Fragment Editor, click Assets.

  2. In the Fragment Assets dialog, select the asset and then click Edit to open the two edit options.

    Figure 13-14 Edit Options in Fragment Assets Dialog

    Edit Options in Fragment Assets Dialog
    • Click Edit to open the asset in the default application associated with that file type (for example, a cascading style sheet may open in Notepad).

    • Click Edit with to open the Edit With dialog where you can use a different application to edit the file.

  3. Make your changes to the asset and then close the application used to edit the asset.

  4. Click OK to close the Fragment Assets dialog and return to the Fragment Editor.

13.12.5.3 Deleting an Asset

To delete an asset, perform these tasks:

  1. With the fragment open in the Fragment Editor, click Assets.

  2. In the Fragment Assets dialog, select the asset and then click Delete.

  3. Click OK to close the Fragment Assets dialog and return to the Fragment Editor.

Only ASCII characters should be used for fragment IDs and the names of asset files and folders. This is because the folder within the zip file, which is created automatically for the assets, is named after the fragment ID, and the zip format does not support extended characters. This is true also for the names of any folders used for the assets and for the names of the asset files themselves.

Rather than edit a cascading style sheet (CSS) asset that is included in a fragment, you can just as well change the CSS declarations in the fragment snippet to reference your own cascading style sheet.

We recommend that you use the same name for your text-based assets (cascading style sheets, JavaScript files, and so on) as you are using for the fragment ID (see Section 13.12.2, "Specifying Fragment Properties"). For example, if the fragment ID is "myfragment," then you should use the names "myfragment.css," "myfragment.js," and so on. Not only does this help you easily identify the files associated with a fragment, but if you ever create a fragment based on this one (using the "Copy and Edit" feature), all of the assets and code within them are updated to reflect the fragment name. As such, the assets seamlessly work with the fragment.


Note:

If you plan to write your fragments in JSP or ASP, you should place your code in a fragment asset and then reference that code from an inline fragment snippet.

13.12.6 Adding, Editing, and Deleting Fragment Parameters

Parameters are a set of attributes that govern the appearance and behavior of a fragment when it is added to a template. When a fragment contains parameters, you are prompted to enter information in the Fragment Parameter Values dialog before adding the fragment to a template. Parameters can be used to add such things as text, color, size, or a query in the content server. And you can change the value of the parameters each time you add the fragment to a template.

While parameters are optional when building a fragment, they are very useful to make a fragment customizable and reusable. You can add most of a fragment's functionality to the source of the fragment, or you can add it as a parameter that can be changed when the fragment is actually used.

When parameters are used, you can have several renditions of the same fragment on the same template, where different parameters are used in each instance. Moreover, parameters can be useful for developers who have written code for the web site and would like to hand off that code as a packaged feature (a customizable fragment) to a site designer. (This scenario assumes there are multiple users in Designer.)

13.12.6.1 Editing the Parameter in a Fragment

To edit the parameter in a fragment, perform these tasks:

  1. With the fragment open in the Fragment Editor, click Parameters.

  2. In the Fragment Parameters dialog (see Section A.58, "Properties for Fragment Dialog"), select a parameter in the Name list.

    Figure 13-15 Parameter Selection in Fragment Parameters Dialog

    Parameter Selection in Fragment Parameters dialog box
  3. Make the appropriate changes to the Type, Description, Default Value, Query Text, and Option List (Query Text and Option List do not apply to all parameter types). For more information, see Section A.58, "Properties for Fragment Dialog."

  4. Click the Parameter Up icon (Figure 13-16) or the Parameter Down icon (Figure 13-17) to move the parameter up or down in the list (this also affects its location in the Fragment Parameter Values dialog).

    Figure 13-16 Parameter Up icon

    Parameter Up

    Figure 13-17 Parameter Down icon

    Parameter Down
  5. Click OK to close the Fragment Parameters dialog.

To see a description of the parameters in the sample fragments, see Appendix C, "Sample Fragments."

13.12.6.2 Adding a New Parameter to a Fragment

To add a parameter to a fragment, perform these tasks:

  1. With the fragment open in the Fragment Editor, click Parameters.

  2. In the Fragment Parameters dialog (see Section A.58, "Properties for Fragment Dialog"), click the New Parameter icon (Figure 13-18) and type a name for the parameter in the text box provided.

    Figure 13-18 New Parameter Icon

    New Parameter Icon

    Figure 13-19 Parameter Name Entry in Fragment Parameters Dialog

    Parameter Name Entry in the Fragment Parameters dialog box
  3. Choose a type from the Type menu (for a description of each type, see Section A.61, "Fragment Parameters Dialog").

  4. Enter a description in the Description field.

    The description displays at the bottom of the Fragment Parameter Values dialog when you use the fragment.

  5. Enter a value for the Default Value.

    This value is used if you do not choose a parameter value (in the Fragment Parameter Values dialog) when adding the fragment to a template.

  6. Enter a value for Query Text and Option List (this applies only to parameters of type "text," "manageddoc," and "managedurl").

  7. Click the Parameter Up icon (Figure 13-20) or the Parameter Down icon (Figure 13-21) to move the parameter up or down in the list (this also affects its location in the Fragment Parameter Values dialog).

    Figure 13-20 Parameter Up icon

    Parameter Up

    Figure 13-21 Parameter Down icon

    Parameter Down
  8. Click OK to close the Fragment Parameters dialog.

13.12.6.3 Inserting Parameters and Parameter Declarations in a Snippet

After you create one or more parameteRSrs in the Fragment Parameters dialog, you can insert those parameters into the individual snippets in the fragment (for more information on snippets, see Section 13.12.4, "Adding, Editing, and Deleting Fragment Snippets").

The Fragment Editor includes a convenient option to insert parameters and parameter declarations directly into your snippet code. To insert them, simply place your cursor in the code where you would like to add the parameter or parameter declaration, right-click, and then choose the appropriate action.

Figure 13-22 Menu for Inserting a Parameter Declaration

Inserting Parameter Declaration Menu

Figure 13-23 Menu for Inserting a Parameter

Inserting Parameter Menu

A good way to learn how to create and use parameters is to open a sample fragment from the Toolbox and see how its parameters are used. For a description of these fragments and their parameters, see Appendix C, "Sample Fragments."

13.12.7 Adding, Editing, and Deleting Fragment Elements

Elements are areas in a contribution region that can be edited using the Contributor application. These elements appear as fields in Contributor, where users (contributors) can edit text, graphics, and other content.

The most common use of an element is to first create a contribution region on a page template, and then add one or more elements (WYSIWYG, plain text, image, or custom) to that region. Contributors can then open the web page containing the region and add and edit the text or graphics in each field.

A more advanced use of an element is to include it in a fragment to create a static list. A static list bundles multiple elements in a table-like layout that allows contributors to add, edit, delete, and even rearrange rows and columns of elements (see Section C.3, "Static List Fragments").

13.12.7.1 Adding an Element to a Fragment

To add an element to a fragment, perform these tasks:

  1. With the fragment open in the Fragment Editor, click Elements.

    This opens the Fragments Elements dialog (see Section A.60, "Fragment Elements Dialog").

    Figure 13-24 Fragment Elements Dialog

    Fragment Elements Dialog
  2. Click the type of element to add to the fragment: WYSIWYG, plain text, image, or custom.

    Figure 13-25 WYSIWYG Element Icon

    WYSIWYG Element Icon

    Figure 13-26 Plain Text Element Icon

    Plain Text Element Icon

    Figure 13-27 Image Element Icon

    Image Element Icon

    Figure 13-28 CustomElement Icon

    Custom Element Icon
  3. In the Element dialog, follow the same steps as if you were adding the element to a contribution region.

  4. Click OK to close the Element dialog and then OK again to close the Fragment Elements dialog.

13.12.7.2 Editing an Element in a Fragment

To edit an element in a fragment, perform these tasks:

  1. With the fragment open in the Fragment Editor, click Elements.

  2. In the Fragment Elements dialog (see Section A.60, "Fragment Elements Dialog"), select the desired element and then click Edit.

  3. In the Element dialog, follow the same steps as if you were editing an element in a contribution region.

  4. Click OK to close the Element dialog and then OK again to close the Fragment Elements dialog.

13.12.7.3 Deleting an Element in a Fragment

To delete an element in a fragment, perform these tasks:

  1. With the fragment open in the Fragment Editor, click Elements.

  2. In the Fragments Element dialog (see Section A.60, "Fragment Elements Dialog"), select the desired element and then click Delete.

  3. Click OK to close the Fragment Elements dialog.

The Elements button only displays in the Fragment Editor when the fragment is of the type "staticlist" (see Section 13.12.2, "Specifying Fragment Properties").

The Fragment Elements dialog contains an Advanced button. This opens a text editor that you can use to customize your element even more. However, when you start editing an element this way, you cannot return to the Fragment Elements dialog graphical user interface because there is no interface support for these edits.

Static list fragments are designed for use with the Contributor application. As such, when you add the static list to a page template, you must add it to a contribution region and then assign a data file to that region.

13.13 Fragment Libraries

A fragment is a container for code (HTML, XML, JavaScript, Idoc Script, and optionally JSP or ASP), files referenced by that code (graphics, CSS, and additional scripts), and parameters that govern how that code is added to a template.

A fragment library is a container for one or more fragments, and it is how Site Studio stores and manages fragments.

You work with fragment libraries in the following ways:

13.13.1 About Fragment Libraries

Fragments are stored in fragment libraries. A fragment library is stored in the content server as a managed content item.

The library comprises two parts: an XML file and a zip file. The XML file describes every fragment in the library, and the zip file holds all of the fragment assets referenced by each fragment in the library.

In the content server, the XML file serves as the alternate file (the Web Location), and the zip file serves as the native file. If you were to search for the fragment library "SS_Fragments_Examples" (a library included with Site Studio), you would see the following on the content information page:

MetadataAssigned values
Content ID:SS_Fragments_Examples
Title:SS_Fragments_Examples
WebsiteObjectType:Fragment
Web Location:HTTP://<Site>/groups/public/documents/adacct/ ss_fragments_examples.xml
Native File:SS_Fragments_Examples.zip

The default fragments that ship with Site Studio are stored in the following fragment libraries:

  • SS_Fragments_IDOC

  • SS_Fragments_JSP

  • SS_Fragments_ASP

  • SS_Fragments_Examples

  • SS_Fragments_Dynamic

  • SS_Fragments_Plain

  • SS_Fragments_CSP_Examples

13.13.2 Saving a Fragment in a Fragment Library

When you save a fragment that you've created with the Fragment Editor, you must choose a fragment library to store the fragment in. You can store the fragment in its own library, or you can store it, along with several others, in the same library. You are prompted for this the first time you save the fragment.

To save a fragment in a fragment library, perform these tasks:

  1. When finished making changes to a fragment (see Section 13.8, "Editing Fragments"), click the Save icon (Figure 13-29) on the Designer toolbar (or click File then select Save).

    Figure 13-29 Save Icon

    Save Icon

    The Save Fragment dialog (see Section A.67, "Save Fragment Dialog") opens.

  2. Click New to create a library for this fragment.

    Or, if you have created a library, select it in the list and then click OK.

  3. On the Assign Info Form, enter the appropriate metadata for the library (Content ID, Type, Title, and so on) and then click Assign Info.

The library is created in the content server, and it displays in the Save Fragment dialog (preceded with the text "server:") the next time you open it.


Note:

The Save Fragment dialog opens only the first time you save a fragment. You're taken directly to the Assign Info Form with each subsequent save.

As you create and manage fragments, you may find it easier to group related fragments in relatively small numbers (or in some cases put a single fragment in a library by itself) because fragments cannot be moved around, backed up, or distributed individually. They are handled and managed as fragment libraries (see Section 13.13.4, "Uploading and Downloading Fragment Libraries").

The default fragments that ship with Site Studio are stored in read-only fragment libraries, which is why you don't see them in the Save Fragment dialog (and also why you cannot edit the individual fragments).

You can make your own fragment libraries read-only to prevent others from accidentally overwriting or erasing a fragment (see Section 13.13.3, "Making a Fragment Library Read-Only").

13.13.3 Making a Fragment Library Read-Only

Making a fragment library read-only can be very useful, especially if you're working with multiple designers in the same organization. The sample fragments that come with Site Studio are all stored in read-only fragment libraries to prevent accidental erasure or overwriting.

By making your fragment library read-only:

  • The fragments in the fragment library cannot be overwritten or deleted by others (they can only be copied and edited).

  • The fragment libraries won't appear in the Save Fragment dialog, which prevents others from adding fragments to that library.

To make a fragment read-only, perform these tasks:

  1. Log onto the content server and search for the fragment library.

  2. Open the Content Information Page for the fragment library.

  3. Right-click the Web Location file (with the .xml file extension), choose Save Target As, and save it to your system.

  4. Check the fragment library out of the content server and download the native file (with the .zip extension).

  5. Open the .xml file in a text editor and add the text readonly="true" to the root element <fragments> tag. The resulting tag should look like this:

    <fragments name="SS_Fragments" readonly="true">
    
  6. Save and close the file and then check both files back into the content server, specifying the .zip file as the Primary File and the .xml file as the Alternate File.

    It may be necessary to refresh the Toolbox in Designer to see the read-only fragments.

As an alternative to these steps, you could also use Designer's Download Fragment Library feature, extract the .xml file out of the downloaded zip, re-archive the zip, and use Designer's Upload Fragment Library feature to return the library to the content server (see Section 13.13.4, "Uploading and Downloading Fragment Libraries").

13.13.4 Uploading and Downloading Fragment Libraries

After you create and edit a fragment or collection of fragments, you can move the fragment library (which the fragments are stored in) from one content server to another. This can be especially useful if you're working with other designers or developers and want to share fragments with them. Or, perhaps you simply want to create a backup of your fragment library for safekeeping.

To do this, you use the Download Fragment Library and Upload Fragment Library feature in Designer.

13.13.4.1 Downloading a Fragment Library

When you download a fragment library, Site Studio places the library (currently located in the content server) in a single zip file and downloads it onto your system. You can then easily transport the zip file.

To download a fragment library from the server, perform these tasks:

  1. Click File then Fragments, then select Download Fragment Library.

  2. In the Oracle Content Server Dialog, click Select beside the fragment library to download.

  3. In the Windows Save As dialog, browse to a location on your file system and then click Save.

13.13.4.2 Uploading a Fragment Library

When you upload a fragment library (after downloading it following the previous steps), Site Studio checks the zip file into the content server and extract its contents to the appropriate directory (\weblayout\fragments\) where it can be used by the web site.

To upload a fragment to the server, perform these tasks:

  1. Click File then Fragments, then select Upload Fragment Library.

  2. In the Windows Open dialog, browse to the fragment library (zip file) on your file system and then click Open.

  3. On the Assign Info Form, enter a Content ID, Type, and Title for the fragment library.


    Note:

    Do not alter the WebsiteObjectType metadata. It must be set to "Fragment" to be recognized by your web site.

  4. Click Assign Info to close the Oracle Content Server Dialog and return to Designer.

Instead of using the Upload Fragment Library feature in Designer, you can also check the fragment library into the content server directly and then use the Site Studio Administration page to deploy the fragment library to the required location. For more information on Fragment Library deployment, see the Oracle WebCenter Content Administrator and Manager's Guide for Site Studio.

PKcaSRSPK=\EOEBPS/c06_customizing.htm Customizing Designer

6 Customizing Designer

The Designer interface provides a powerful working environment for creating and managing web sites. When you first open Designer, you see five main areas to work in: the Site Hierarchy pane and the on-screen Properties pane on the left, the workspace and Site Assets pane in the middle, and the Toolbox on the right (see Section 5.3, "Main Designer Window").

The arrangement of the workspace and each pane is only a default. Like most applications, you can completely customize the interface if you like. You can, for example, hide, move, and resize panes; modify the available menus and toolbars; and add or modify keyboard shortcuts.

This section covers the following topics:

6.1 Customizing the Panes in Designer

In Designer, you can change the location and placement of each window and pane and therefore change your working environment. You can, for example, do the following:

6.1.1 Showing or Hiding Panes

To show or hide panes and toolbars in Designer, perform these tasks:

  1. Click View.

  2. Click the item to show or hide in the interface.

    You can show or hide the Site Hierarchy pane, Properties pane, Site Assets pane, Toolbox, Status Bar, Standard Toolbar, Site Toolbar, Formatting Toolbar, and Table Toolbar.

    Figure 6-1 Showing or Hiding Interface Items

    Checklist Menu to Show or Hide Interface Items
  3. The window or toolbar that you selected appears or disappears in the Designer interface.

6.1.2 Resizing a Pane

To resize a pane in Designer, perform these tasks:

  1. Place your mouse over the border of a pane.

  2. Click and drag the border to resize the pane.

Figure 6-2 Dragging Pane Borders

Moving and Dragging a Pane Border

6.1.3 Moving or Docking a Pane to a Different Border

By default, the Site Hierarchy pane and Properties pane are docked on the left, and the Toolbox is docked on the right. You can move these panes around and even dock them to a different border in Designer.

  1. Select the title bar of the pane to move.

  2. Click and drag the pane to a different location and release the mouse.

  3. To dock the window on a different border, click and drag the pane to the new border until you see a gray box surround the area and then release the mouse.

Figure 6-3 Docking a Pane

Docking a pane

6.2 Using the Customize Dialog

In addition to changing the size and location of each pane, you can customize the Designer interface. In the Customize dialog, you can customize keyboard commands, right-click menus, shortcuts to outside applications, and much more. Perform the following steps to open the Customize dialog:

  1. Click View, then select Customize.

    The Customize dialog opens (see Section A.1, "Customize Dialog").

  2. Make the necessary changes and then click Close.

Dialog Tabs

The Customize dialog includes several tabs:

6.3 Creating a New Menu

On the Commands tab of the Customize dialog (see Section A.1.1, "Customize Dialog: Commands Tab"), you can view the menus and commands available on the menu bar in Designer. You can create a menu and populate it with commands from the menus appearing on this tab. In conjunction with options on the Toolbars tab, you can create a toolbar to display frequently used commands together (again by copying commands from this tab).

To create a menu, perform these tasks:

  1. Click View, then select Customize.

  2. On the Commands tab, under Categories, click New Menu.

  3. Under Commands, click New Menu and hold down the mouse button.

    A small icon appears.

  4. Drag the icon to the Menu bar. Release the mouse button.

    The menu "New Menu" appears on the Menu bar.

  5. Click New Menu on the Menu bar, and you see an empty space below the menu name.

    You can populate the menu by dragging and dropping commands from other menus into this space.

  6. Click Close to close the Customize dialog.

Notes

6.4 Customizing Toolbars

On the Toolbars tab of the Customize dialog (see Section A.1.2, "Customize Dialog: Toolbars Tab"), you can set options to show and hide the toolbars available in Designer. You can also create a toolbar and populate it with commands from the Commands tab dialog; delete any toolbars you may have created; and restore any icons you may have previously removed from the original toolbars.

You can do any of the following:

6.4.1 Showing and Hiding Toolbars

To show and hide toolbars, perform these tasks:

  1. Click View, then select Customize.

  2. Click the Toolbars tab.

    • To show a toolbar, select the appropriate checkbox.

    • To hide a toolbar, clear the appropriate checkbox.

  3. Click Close to close the Customize dialog.

You can also show and hide toolbars directly from the View menu by clicking the name of the appropriate toolbar on the menu drop-down list. If you want to display explanatory text with toolbar icons, click Show text labels.

6.4.2 Creating a New Toolbar

To create a toolbar, perform these tasks:

  1. On the Toolbars tab, click New.

  2. In the Toolbar Name dialog, type the name of the toolbar and click OK.

    The toolbar name appears in the Toolbars column. A toolbar icon appears opposite the name.

  3. Drag the toolbar icon from the Toolbars tab to the desired position in relation to the other toolbars in Designer. After you release your mouse, the toolbar icon changes, signifying an empty toolbar.

  4. To populate the toolbar, open the Commands tab, identify the individual commands you want to display on the toolbar, and drag each icon, in turn, from the Commands box to the toolbar. (You can also drag and drop other toolbar commands.) After you release the mouse, the icon or text for each command appears on the toolbar. (You have simply copied the icon, which remains associated with the original menu.)

  5. Click Close to close the Customize dialog.

After you create a toolbar, you can customize it further by right-clicking the icon or text and clicking Button Appearance on the popup menu.

You cannot delete any of the original toolbars provided with Designer. To delete a toolbar you have created, select the toolbar on the Toolbars tab and click the Delete button.

6.4.3 Resetting a Toolbar

If you have removed icons from an original toolbar provided with Designer, you can restore those icons to the toolbar at any time.

To reset a toolbar, perform these tasks:

  1. On the Toolbars tab, select the toolbar to restore and click Reset.

    The toolbar now displays all of the icons originally associated with the toolbar.

  2. To restore all of the toolbars, click Reset All.

  3. Click Close to close the Customize dialog.


    Note:

    The Reset and Reset All commands apply only to the default set of toolbars provided with Designer. If you create a toolbar and then remove an icon from that toolbar, the only way to restore the icon is by going to the Commands tab again and dragging that icon from the Commands box then dropping it onto the toolbar.

6.5 Adding Shortcuts to the Tools Menu

On the Tools tab of the Customize dialog (see Section A.1.3, "Customize Dialog: Tools Tab"), you can add shortcuts to outside applications to the Tools menu in Designer to give you immediate access to these applications.

To add a shortcut to a tool, complete the following:

  1. Click View, then select Customize.

  2. Click the Tools tab.

  3. Click New (Figure 6-4) on the icon bar above the Menu Contents pane.

    Figure 6-4 New Shortcut Icon

    New Shortcut icon

    A placeholder for the tool appears in the pane.

    Insert your cursor in the Command text field and type the full path for the executable file of the application you want to be available from the Tools menu.

    or

    With your cursor in the Command text field, click the Open (Figure 6-5) button opposite the field. In the Open dialog, locate the executable for the application you want to add. Select the file and click Open.

    Figure 6-5 Open Icon

    Open dialog icon

    Instead of typing the full path for the executable in the Command line, you may type the file name of the executable only and type the directory for the executable in the Initial Directory field.

  4. You can use the Arguments field to direct the application to open a certain file. The argument requires the full path and file name for the executable followed by the full path and file name for the document you want to open. In this instance, the path for the executable should have forward slashes, there should be a space between the two paths, and the path off the document should be enclosed in quotation marks. For example:

    C:/Program Files/Office/winword.exe "C:\Documents\sa.doc"
    
  5. In the Initial Directory field, type the directory for the executable only if the executable file name by itself is entered in the Command field (step 4). Otherwise, leave it empty.

  6. Click Close to close the Customize dialog.

    The shortcut for the application is now available on the Tools menu. If you have entered an argument, not only does the application open when you select it from the Tools menu, but the document specified in the argument opens, too.

You can delete a tool at any time by selecting the tool in the Menu Contents pane and clicking Delete (Figure 6-6).

Figure 6-6 Delete Icon

Delete icon

You can change the order in which tools are displayed in the Tools menu by clicking the Move Up or Move Down icon (Figure 6-7 and Figure 6-8, respectively).

Figure 6-7 Move Up Icon

Move Up icon

Figure 6-8 Move Down Icon

Move Down icon

6.6 Assigning Keyboard Shortcuts

On the Keyboard tab of the Customize dialog (see Section A.1.4, "Customize Dialog: Keyboard Tab"), you can assign keyboard shortcuts to commands in the menus of Designer. Many of the commands have one or more keyboard shortcuts assigned by default. You can change or delete these keyboard shortcuts, and you can add new ones.

To assign a keyboard shortcut, perform these tasks:

  1. Click View, then select Customize.

  2. Click the Keyboard tab.

  3. Under Category, select the menu that contains the command to assign a shortcut to.

  4. Under Commands, select the command to assign the shortcut to.

    A description for the command appears in the Description panel. Any keyboard shortcuts already assigned appear under Current Keys.

  5. From the Set Accelerator For drop-down list, select Default if you want the keyboard shortcut to be available generally when you are working in Designer.

  6. Place your cursor in the Press New Shortcut Key text box. Then, on your keyboard, press the actual key or combination of keys you want to assign for that shortcut.

    To use the Shift, Ctrl, or Alt key with another letter, press Shift, Ctrl, or Alt followed by the letter.

  7. Click the Assign button.

  8. Click Close to close the Customize dialog.

6.7 Customizing Menus

On the Menu tab of the Customize dialog (see Section A.1.5, "Customize Dialog: Menu Tab"), you can customize the behavior of popup menus in Designer.

You can do any of the following:

6.7.1 Adding a Command to a Popup Menu

To add a command to a popup menu, perform these tasks:

  1. Click View, then select Customize.

  2. Click the Menu tab.

  3. Under Select Context Menu, select the popup menu you want to customize.

    The popup menu appears to the upper-left of the Customize dialog.

  4. In the Customize dialog, click the Commands tab.

  5. Under Categories, select the appropriate menu. Under Commands, select the command you want to add to the popup menu. Drag the command onto the popup menu and position it where you want it to appear on the menu. Let go of the mouse.

  6. Click Close to close the Customize dialog.

6.7.2 Deleting a Command From a Popup Menu

To delete a command from a popup menu, perform these tasks:

  1. Click View, then select Customize.

  2. Click the Menu tab.

  3. Under Select Context Menu, select the popup menu you want to edit.

    The popup menu appears to the upper-left of the Customize dialog.

  4. On the popup menu, right-click the command you want to delete and click Delete on the popup menu that appears.

  5. Click Close to close the Customize dialog.

You can restore any deleted command to a popup menu by selecting the menu from the Select Context Menu drop-down list and clicking the Reset button.

6.7.3 Controlling the Display of Menus

You can control the on-screen appearance of menus in two ways. You can turn on or off the "shadow" that displays around them, and you can control how they open. These options apply to menus on the Menu bar and to the menus that appear when you right-click a section or page template in the Site Hierarchy pane or a fragment in the Toolbox.

To control how menus appear on-screen, perform these tasks:

  1. Click View, then select Customize.

  2. Click the Menu tab.

  3. Under Select Context Menu, select any popup menu.


    Note:

    Whichever menu you select, your selection in step 4 applies to all menus in Designer.

  4. Under Menu Animations, select the animation to use:

    • None: The list of menu commands appears in the usual way.

    • Unfold: The list of menu commands opens from top-left to bottom-right.

    • Slide: The list of menu commands opens from top to bottom.

    • Fade: The list of menu commands slowly appears on-screen.

  5. To display a shadow effect around menus, click the Menu shadows checkbox. To hide the shadow effect, clear the checkbox.

  6. Click Close to close the Customize dialog.

For information on customizing the menus on the Menu bar in Designer, see Section 6.3, "Creating a New Menu."

6.8 Setting Display Options

On the Options tab of the Customize dialog (see Section A.1.6, "Customize Dialog: Options Tab"), you can control display settings, like screentips, large icons on the toolbar, and personalized menus.

To set display options, perform these tasks:

  1. Click View, then select Customize.

  2. Click the Options tab.

  3. Under Toolbar, click Show ScreenTips on toolbars if you want the popup text to identify an icon as you pass your cursor over it. If you want the screentips to also display the shortcut key assigned to the command, click Show shortcut keys in ScreenTips. To display large icons, click Large Icons.

  4. Under Personalized Menus and Toolbars, select the Menus show recently used commands first checkbox if you want the menu commands to be ordered in terms of their frequency of use.

    If you do so, you may also select Show full menus after a short delay.

  5. Click Close to close the Customize dialog.

You can click the Reset my usage data button at any time to return Designer to its original state.

6.9 Formatting the Code in Source View

On the Source View tab of the Customize dialog (see Section A.1.7, "Customize Dialog: Source View Tab"), you can change the way code on a page template appears when viewed in Source view. You can change the font face and font size and also apply automatic formatting options.

In this pane, you also control which DTD the page should conform to in the DOCTYPE menu.

To format the code that opens in Source view, perform these tasks:

  1. Click View, then select Customize.

  2. Click the Source View tab.

  3. Under Editor, from the Font drop-down list, select the font from those available, and from the Size drop-down list, select the font size you want the code to display in.

  4. Under Automatic Formatting, select Apply automatic formatting when switching to Source view to automatically format the code according to the options on this tab.

    For a description of each formatting option, see Section A.1.7, "Customize Dialog: Source View Tab."

  5. Click Close to close the Customize dialog.

6.10 Showing or Hiding Warning Messages

On the Warning Dialogs tab of the Customize dialog (see Section A.1.8, "Customize Dialog: #Warning Dialogs Tab"), you can control which warning messages display and which ones remain hidden as you work in Designer.

To show and hide warning messages, perform these tasks:

  1. Click View, then select Customize.

  2. Click the Warning Dialogs tab.

  3. Select the checkboxes for the warning messages to display and clear the checkboxes for the warning message to remain hidden.

    Click Check All if you want all messages to display or Clear All if you want all messages to remain hidden.

  4. Click Close to close the Customize dialog.


    Note:

    By default, certain warning messages display when you first run Designer.

6.11 Setting Miscellaneous Options

On the Miscellaneous tab of the Customize dialog (see Section A.1.9, "Customize Dialog: Miscellaneous Tab"), you can change various options in Designer, such as whether to connect to the last site you worked on and whether to prevent fragments unrelated to your site from appearing in the Toolbox.

To change the miscellaneous options in Designer, perform these tasks:

  1. Click View, then select Customize.

  2. Click the Miscellaneous tab.

  3. To display only the fragments written in the same language (HCSP/JSP or ASP) as your site in the Toolbox, check Filter fragments in other languages.

  4. To display only the fragments that belong to your site (and not other sites in the content server) in the Toolbox, check Filter libraries from other sites.

    Fragments in fragment libraries not identified as part of your site no longer appear in the Toolbox. To make a fragment part of your site, add it as a site asset to the "Fragment Libraries" category.

  5. To display only the fragments that you have created (and not the default ones that ship with Site Studio) in the Toolbox, check Filter default libraries.

  6. To automatically connect to the last site you worked on when starting Designer, check Reconnect at startup.

  7. To display the Project Status icon in Designer's status bar, check Enable project status checking. For more information, see Section 7.3.2, "Viewing the Project Status in Designer."

  8. Click Close to close the Customize dialog.

6.12 Changing Log File Settings

On the Log File tab of the Customize dialog (see Section A.1.10, "Customize Dialog: Log File Tab"), you can specify when a log file is created and how detailed it should be.

To change the log file settings, perform these tasks:

  1. Click View, then select Customize.

  2. Click the Log File tab.

  3. To create a log file each time you open Designer, check the box Reset log file each time Designer starts.

  4. To create a detailed log of all communication with the content server, check the box Log details of all communication with the Content Server.

  5. Click Close to close the Customize dialog.

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10 Working With Content Files

This section covers the following topics:

10.1 About Content Files

Content files are the files used to store any of the materials viewed on a web site. These files contain the site content modified by templates and definitions, and editable through Contributor, such as contributor data files and images. Native documents are also content files.

This section is about the types of content files and related files as viewed in the Site Assets pane:

10.1.1 Contributor Data Files

A contributor data file is an XML file that is created and maintained by Site Studio. It is used to store the content of a web site and checked in to the content server. If a site contributor wants to update the content of a web page, its associated contributor data file is retrieved from the server and the data made available in the Contributor editor, where the contributor can modify the content. After the contributor is done making changes to the data file, it is checked back in to the content server and the web page is updated to reflect the new content.

For more information, see Section 3.15, "Contributor Data Files and Native Documents."

10.1.2 Native Documents

A native document is a third-party file that is viewed in Site Studio and edited using the application originally used to create it (for example, Microsoft Word is used for Word documents). When the file is checked in, it is converted into HTML (using Dynamic Converter) and then made available to the web page.

For more information, see Section 3.15, "Contributor Data Files and Native Documents."

10.1.3 Conversion Definitions

A conversion definition is used to transform a native document to display inline on a web site. The conversion definition is a rule, template, or combination that defines how a native document is converted to HTML and displayed in the page.

When you add a native document to a web page, the conversion definitions can specify a (Dynamic Converter) template or rule that is used to convert the document into HTML.

10.1.4 Images

You can add, copy, and remove images from your site. The supported image formats are GIF and JPG. Images cannot be added to a web site until they are added to the content server as an asset.

10.2 Creating a New Content File

To create a content file, perform these tasks:

  1. In the menu on the Site Assets pane, select the content file type to create.

  2. Click the Create New icon (Figure 10-1), select New, and then select the specific document type to create.

    The Assign Info Form opens for you to check the item into the content server.

    Figure 10-1 Create New Icon

    Create new icon
  3. Enter appropriate values for the Assign Info Form.

    For guidelines on naming Site Studio assets, see Section 4.2, "Naming Site Assets."

  4. When complete, click Assign Info.

  5. The content file is created.

You may find that the most common method of creating the contributor data files is when you assign content. When you run the Switch Content wizard (see Section A.76, "Switch Content Wizard"), the wizard can create a contributor data file for you.

10.3 Copying a Content File

You can select a content file from the list to copy, select a content file from the content server to copy, or select a content file from your local instance to copy.

Copying a content file from the Site Assets pane

  1. In the menu on the Site Assets pane, select the content file type.

  2. Select the content file you want to copy from the list.

  3. Click the Create New icon (Figure 10-2), select Copy, and then Selected:

    The Assign Info Form opens for you to check the item into the content server.

    Figure 10-2 Create New Icon

    Create New icon
  4. Enter appropriate values for the Assign Info Form.

  5. When complete, click Assign Info.

  6. The content file is copied.

Copying a content file from the content server

  1. In the menu on the Site Assets pane, select the content file type.

  2. Click the Create New icon (Figure 10-2), select Copy, and then from Server.

    A search results page opens.

  3. Click the corresponding Select button of the one you want to copy.

    The Assign Info Form opens for you to check the item into the content server.

  4. Enter appropriate values for the Assign Info Form.

  5. When complete, click Assign Info.

  1. The content file is copied.

Copying a content file from your local instance

  1. In the menu on the Site Assets pane, select the content file type.

  2. Click the Create New icon (Figure 10-2), select Copy, and then from Local.

    A navigation window opens.

  3. On your local instance, navigate to the content file you want to copy.

  4. Select the contributor data file and click Open.

    The Assign Info Form opens for you to check the item into the content server.

  5. Enter appropriate values for the Assign Info Form.

  6. When complete, click Assign Info.

  7. The content file is copied.

10.4 Viewing the Content Information of a Content File

To view content information for a content file, perform these tasks:

  1. In the menu on the Site Assets pane, select the content file type.

  2. Select a content file from the list.

  3. Click the Doc Info icon (Figure 10-3).

    The content information page opens.

    Figure 10-3 Doc Info icon

    Document Info icon

10.5 Adding a Content File to a Site

To add a content file to a site, perform these tasks:

  1. In the menu on the Site Assets pane, select the content file type.

  2. Click the Add to Site icon (Figure 10-4).

    A search results page opens.

    Figure 10-4 Add to Site Icon

    Add to Site icon
  3. Select the content files to add, click Site Studio, and then Select Marked Documents.

  4. Depending on your configuration, you may receive a caution that you are about to add existing asset(s) to your site. Click OK.

    The content files are now associated with the web site.

10.6 Removing a Content File from a Site

To remove a content file from a site, perform these tasks:

  1. In the menu on the Site Assets pane, select the content file type.

  2. From the list, select the content file to be removed and click the Remove From Site icon (Figure 10-5).

    When you remove a content file, you are simply removing its association with a site. You are not deleting the file from the content server.

    Figure 10-5 Remove from Site Icon

    Remove from Site icon

10.7 Editing a Contributor Data File

To edit the source of a contributor data file, perform these tasks:

  1. In the menu on the Site Assets pane, select Contributor Data Files.

  2. From the list, select the contributor data file to be edited and click the Edit icon (Figure 10-6).

    The selected contributor data file is opened and can be edited in source view.

    Figure 10-6 Edit Icon

    Edit icon

The design of a contributor data file is such that editing should be done through Contributor, rather than in Source view in Designer. While it is possible to edit the file directly, it is much easier to edit the contributor data file through Contributor or switch to a different file through the Switch Content Wizard (see Section 12.3, "Assigning Content With The Switch Content Wizard").

10.8 Working With Native Documents

In Site Studio, you can assign a contributor data file or a native document to a contribution region, and individual contributors can add and edit contributor data files and native documents on the web site.

A contributor data file is generated by Site Studio. It is an XML file that is designed to be edited using the Contributor application. As an XML file, it is in a web-ready format that can be easily pulled into a web page (similar to the way an include file can be pulled into another web page).

A native document, however, is generated by a third-party application (Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and so on) and is generally introduced by you or a contributor. The document, in its original state, cannot be viewed on a web page so it is converted into a web page (using Dynamic Converter) when the server delivers the page to the browser.

Unlike contributor data files, native documents do not require the Contributor for editing. The converted document opens in the placeholder as the page opens, and the appropriate application (Microsoft Word, and so on) is loaded when the contributor edits the data.

This section covers the following topics:

10.8.1 Requirements for Native Documents

A native document can be assigned to a contribution region in the same way that a contributor data file can. Native documents are added to the site in the same way that contributor data files are added to the site (create a link to the file, add the file to a dynamic list, or check the file in so that its metadata matches a dynamic list or a query performed on the site).

Unlike contributor data files, however, native documents require additional configuration steps on the server so that they appear on the web site as intended. These steps include the following:

  • You must have Dynamic Converter installed and running on the content server so that it can convert native documents into web pages.

  • You must have Check Out and Open installed and running on the content server so that contributors can check out and edit a native document directly from the web site using the menu on the contribution graphic.

  • The native documents must be a supported file format of Dynamic Converter.

  • By default, a blank Dynamic Converter template (one with minimal settings) is used to convert the document so that it looks similar to the original. To further customize the appearance of the web page so that it matches the site, you should fine tune the template (or templates) used to convert the document (see Section 10.8.3, "Using a Conversion Definition With Native Documents").

  • You, or the contributors, must have the associated third-party application installed on the computer that is being used to edit the file.

  • If you, or contributors, plan to add native documents to the site using a method outside of Site Studio (for example, using the Oracle Content Server check-in form, WebDAV Client, or Web Folders), then you must check those files in with the same metadata used by the site, and if necessary, a section of the site.

10.8.2 Editing a Native Document

To edit a native document, perform these tasks:

  1. In the menu on the Site Assets pane, select Native Documents.

  2. From the list, select the native document to be edited and click the Edit icon (Figure 10-7).

    You must have Check Out and Open installed to edit a native document. Documents are opened in the appropriate application. For example, Microsoft Word or PowerPoint.

    Figure 10-7 Edit Icon

    Edit icon
  3. When you complete your edits, save the file. It is saved to the server.

10.8.3 Using a Conversion Definition With Native Documents

When you assign a native document to a contribution region (or allow contributor to add native documents to the site), conversions are used to transform native documents to display inline on a web site. Conversion definitions specify the rules that are used to control how a native document is converted to HTML and displayed in the page.

When you have a defined conversion definition, adding native documents to the web page is as simple as adding any other asset.

To add a conversion definition to a region template, follow these steps:

  1. In the region template, right-click. The contextual menu opens.

  2. Choose Insert Object, then Dynamic Conversion.

    The Insert Dynamic Conversion dialog (see Section A.78, "Insert Dynamic Conversion Dialog") appears.

  3. Select the conversion definition or enter the name of a new conversion definition.

  4. Click OK.

  5. The conversion definition is now part of the region template. A wcmDynamicConversion tag (see the Oracle WebCenter Content Technical Reference Guide for Site Studio) is written to the Region Template and the name of the conversion definition is a parameter in the tag. You can now assign a native document by using the Assign Content dialog (see Section A.54, "Assign Content Dialog"), or the contributor can add the native document.

The wcmConversionDefinition tag can also be written in source view directly.

With native documents, you do not have the kind of formatting control over the final web page like you do with contributor data files (which can be precisely controlled in an element).

As such, you should spend time designing conversion templates specific to your site and then encouraging contributors to use styles in the native document that you can map to styles in the conversion template.

10.8.4 Using Dynamic Converter Template Selection Rules

When you have native documents on your site, one thing you must do is specify a conversion definition to control the look and feel of those documents on the web site. You can specify conversion templates or rules (which govern the use of conversion templates) in the conversion definition by using the Native Document Conversion Settings dialog (see Section A.25, "Native Document Conversion Settings Dialog").

The available templates and rules that appear in this dialog must be set up ahead of time using the Dynamic Converter Template Selection Rules page. To access the Template Selection Rules page you must have the dynamic converter component installed on your content server. From the main menu of the server, select Administration then Dynamic Converter Admin and then Template Selection Rules.

Figure 10-8 Dynamic Converter Template Selection Rules Page

Dynamic Converter Template Section Rule spage

On the Template Selection Rules page, you can create and edit rules, layouts, and more. For more information, see the Administrator's Guide for Dynamic Converter.

10.8.5 Sample Fragments for Native Documents

In the Toolbox, under "Other Fragments," there are a few fragments designed specifically for native documents that you can use. Each fragment enables you to add a native document directly to the page template (outside of a placeholder) and perform a dynamic conversion using a conversion template and layout from Dynamic Converter.

  • Dynamic Conversion: Adds a converted document to your page template. It includes three parameters that you can use to specify the document, a conversion template, and a conversion layout.

  • Dynamic Conversion IFrame: Similar to the first fragment except that it adds the converted document in an IFrame (so that you can scroll through the entire document without scrolling down the web page). It includes several parameters that you can use to specify the document, the template, and the attributes of the IFrame.

  • Random Conversion. Performs a random dynamic conversion of native documents based on a query specified in the content server. It includes four parameters that you can use to specify a query, a query limit, and the conversion templates.

While fragments offer many methods of incorporating native documents, you may find it more useful to directly assign the native document to placeholders. For more information on these fragments, see Section C.4, "Other Fragments."

10.8.6 Using Direct Delivery

Normally when a native doc is included in a website it is converted to HTML by DC and included in a web page. There are situations where it might be desirable to deliver the file, such as a Microsoft Word document, in its native format instead. Direct delivery allows this option. Using direct delivery, a Microsoft Word document may be delivered as a Microsoft Word document from the same friendly URL that would have previously delivered converted content. In previous versions of Site Studio it was possible to deliver PDF files directly; however, this involved redirecting to the weblayout URL and losing the site context. Direct delivery can now be used with PDF and any other native format to deliver the file from the friendly URL without the redirect to the weblayout, thus helping to maintain the users context within the site. This means that a path containing an entry such as /groups/public/documents would be seen in the users browser. The feature allows a global list of file extensions to be configured and then overrides may be applied, via custom section properties, at the section level.

For more information on enabling direct delivery, see the Oracle WebCenter Content Technical Reference Guide for Site Studio.

10.9 Working With Images

Images are just as important as text in the construction of a web site. They can serve as displays of information, anchors for text, or simple decoration to improve the look of a web site.

Depending on the content server configuration, multiple renditions of an image may be automatically created and stored on the server. For instance, a small preview version of the image or a lower resolution of the image that was uploaded to the content server.

PKIttPK=\E OEBPS/toc.ncxf Oracle® WebCenter Content User's Guide for Site Studio Designer, 11g Release 1 (11.1.1) Cover Title and Copyright Information Contents Preface 1 Introduction 2 Setting Up Site Studio Designer on Client Computers 3 Understanding Site Studio Web Sites 4 Efficient Web Site Planning 5 Getting Started With Designer 6 Customizing Designer 7 Creating Your Web Site 8 Working With Templates 9 Working With Definitions 10 Working With Content Files 11 Working With Scripts and Forms 12 Building a Site 13 Working With Fragments 14 Working With Site Reports 15 Using Workflows 16 Setting Up Manager A User Interface B Replicating Your Site C Sample Fragments D Design Mode Glossary Index Copyright PKZY'kfPK=\EOEBPS/c04_best_practices.htm Efficient Web Site Planning

4 Efficient Web Site Planning

Site Studio Designer 11gR1 uses site assets to make the maintenance and upkeep of web sites as efficient as possible. To best create a web site in Site Studio, some design points should be remembered when planning the web site and the site assets of the web site.

Planning is key to building a successful web site with Site Studio. Before you begin inserting text, graphics, and scripts into your page templates, you should ask: What is the function or role of the site? Is it a department-level site, a company-wide site, an internal site, an external site? How many users will visit the site? How many users will contribute to the site? Will there be different security access levels for each contributor? Do you plan to replicate or publish the site? Is the site expected to grow over time?

These are all important questions to ask before you begin. We cannot predict your particular needs, but we can suggest some key points that you should consider before developing your site:

The information in this section is about the functionality introduced in Site Studio 10gR4, and does not apply to previous versions of Site Studio.

4.1 Planning the Web Site

When creating a static web site, just using pure HTML, little thought is typically required to planning the way the site flows. One of the major advantages that Site Studio offers the designer is reusability of the site assets. This does mean that the most involved, and most important, aspect of creating a web site is planning the site. All of the aspects of the web site should be considered, including where certain information will display (even if the specific information is not yet determined).

Proper planning of the web site helps determine how to maximize reusability of the web site through appropriate use and reuse of page templates, subtemplates, and region templates.

You should ask yourself the following questions as you plan the web site:

4.1.1 Why Is Planning Important?

It is important to understand that the more time spent on the planning process, the easier the web site and the site assets are to create and manage. You might think that there is more time required to plan a managed web site using Site Studio, but the result is much less time spent managing the assets.

Proper planning is vital to making the site easier to run. In the beginning stages, it might seem as if more time is being spent before any pages are complete compared to older methods of creating a web site. But the results of time spent properly planning the web site makes the construction of it through the site assets much easier, and the maintenance of the web site, especially with making later changes when the web site is live.

4.1.2 What Parts of the Site Will Be Reused?

When you consider the web site, you should look at all content and all of the structure and consider what is reusable, and what should be used only once. When considering this, it could be thinking of simply the layout of the page, or it could be simply what data is displayed, or it could be a consideration of a certain piece of data displaying in a certain way.

Because there are so many ways of arranging and reusing the different parts of the site, it may be helpful to look at these examples of organization and reuse to think about while you consider your own web site.

In a typical web site, there is the navigation on the left, the banner graphic on top, and a large central area with the information on the page itself. We would expect that the banner and the navigation should be on all pages, so this would be placed on the page template itself. But the information in the middle will obviously be different from page to page. This is where the considerations are most important.

The way the information is organized is the most important consideration. When you look at one page, it may have objects arranged in one column, or in an array, or broken up with images. It's possible to arrange everything in one placeholder, but there is the other aspect, where you can create smaller sections, each with its own smaller contributor data file.

Consider a page on your web site that would list open employment positions. You could create the page such that it is one placeholder, listing all internal positions and all external positions. Or you could create a subtemplate within that placeholder (which would then contain separate placeholders and region templates, and so forth), so that the external positions would be stored separately from the internal positions. Each could be maintained in a separate contributor data file, so that the external web site would contain only the external announcements, and the internal web site would contain both the contributor data file with external announcements and the one with internal announcements.

Another use would be where each department in the company could list their own job openings; then, on one central page, you could collect all of those individual openings and display them all. In these instances, you can use a subtemplate to easily manage the differing numbers of placeholders.

Other considerations for how you lay the data out on the page, and how to organize the placement of the data within the web site, needs this kind of consideration on a page by page basis.

You should consider these questions: Would it be best to use one placeholder on the page template, then use a subtemplate to break that placeholder up into parts? Or would it be better to have a few more page templates to allow for different placeholder arrangements?

Another example would be an instance where you have a small piece of information that does not necessarily need a separate page, but you would definitely want to reuse. An example of this could be stockholder contact information, or possibly job application information, separate from typical corporate contact information. The information is not enough to necessarily warrant its own page.

In all of these cases, the page template would be the same. It would have the banner, the navigation, a footer, and then in the middle, the placeholder representing the area that can be replaced and filled with any information you need, structured exactly as you need it. It was the consideration of how to use a subtemplate to further use a placeholder or multiple placeholders within that template that enables you to keep the single look that you need for all pages.

It would also be possible to achieve this layout with different page templates on each page. Again, it depends on how you plan your site.

As you can see, the most important part of the site creation is to figure out how each portion of the web site, both in terms of structure and content, is displayed. With Site Studio, the more time you invest in planning before you create, the less time you spend creating the hundreds and even thousands of pages your web site delivers.

4.2 Naming Site Assets

Site assets in Site Studio Designer are intended to be reused. Since the asset itself can be used in not only different areas of a web site, but also in different web sites that you are designing, the naming of each asset is important. With a good naming scheme, assets can be more easily managed and more easily deployed in one or many areas of a web site, and one or many web sites.

The best way to name an asset is to describe what it does and how it functions, rather than by using a name based on where an asset is used in a web site.

The first thought of many designers is to put the name of the web site in the name of each asset. This would group them when listing the contents of the content server. But the difficulty here is when you run multiple web sites, since all of the assets are reusable. Rather than create an entirely new set of assets and definitions for a certain section in your web site, you can easily import the other assets you've already created. In doing so, though, when the assets have the name of the other web site in the name, this can cause some issues of continuity, understanding, and even some confusion regarding why some assets are present. Names of the assets should also avoid the place of the asset within the web site.

Figure 4-1 Hierarchy Showing a Poorly Named Template

Hierarchy showing poorly-named page templates

In the image, you can see the issue in naming an asset based on location. By naming the page template originally intended to be the primary page template as "primary_template," we caused some problems when we realized that it would also be the template used on the secondary pages. Proper planning would have eliminated this issue, giving the template a name such as page_template_with_2_placeholders.

Consider these two different methods of naming the site assets in your project:

Naming convention with little planning toward maintenance:Naming convention with considered planning toward maintenance
placeholder_def_1

p_def_2

default_definition

front_page_template

subtemplate_up

element_title

region_replace

element_def_WYSIWYG_fulledit

element_def_imageonly_minedit

placeholderdef_subtemplate_newslist

regiondef_customform

regiontemplate_title_and_body

pagetemplate_home

pagetemplate_errorhandler


Future updates are much easier to handle when the assets are named to describe what they do, allowing you to place them as needed. This also means you do not have to look in all managed web sites for an asset that you have already created.

If you are planning on sharing Site Studio assets between Site Studio Designer and the Site Studio extension for JDeveloper, you should be aware that some characters do not work in JSP pages. For this reason you should not use operators and words reserved by Java (for instance, '-' or '+'). For more information on the Java requirements, see the following links:

http://java.sun.com/docs/books/tutorial/java/nutsandbolts/variables.html

and

http://java.sun.com/j2ee/1.4/docs/tutorial/doc/JSPIntro7.html

You should also be aware that you should avoid using multi-byte characters (MBC) in any value that may become a URL. Site Studio does not support MBC in fields where the value may become part of the URL. The SiteID, ContentID, URLPageName and URLDocName fields are examples of fields that become URLs. Fragments may use MBC internally, but should not be used if the fragment generates a URL.

Additionally, if you already have data files or native documents with MBC in the content ID then you will need to use a different method to reference the document, such as the SSUrlFieldName configuration option to use a metadata field other than the dDocName.

4.3 Planning the Contribution Model

As you plan the site hierarchy and prepare the assets for the web site, you must think about a "contribution model." That is, how content gets placed on the site by users (contributors and managers).

You should ask yourself the following questions as you plan the contribution model:

4.3.1 How Much of the Site Will be Provided by the User?

There are some things that the designer must add to the site, such as the background color, positioning devices (HTML tables or CSS), site navigation, and custom scripts. But much of the content for each web page (that is, the actual information on the page) can be created and edited by a contributor.

To really harness the power of Site Studio, you should open up as much of the web site as possible to these users. This way, your web site can be continuously updated without the bottlenecks or delays typically associated with a web site.

4.3.2 How Much Control Will the User Have?

On every page template, you can have one large contribution region or several small contribution regions. Within a region template, you can have one or several elements, each one appearing as a field in Contributor where users (contributors) add and edit content.

There are different types of elements that can be used for specific purposes, like adding and editing text, graphics, and updating lists. You can turn on or off certain formatting attributes, such as the choice of typeface, font size, images, tables, and custom properties. These choices depend on how much control you want the contributor to have over a given web page. You can also enforce what content is added using the validation feature or your own validation scripts.

In addition to these, you can allow users to modify the site hierarchy by enabling the Manager application on one or several pages.

You must balance this control with the desire for consistency, as dictated by your organization's guidelines.

4.3.3 Will There Be Different Security Access for Each User?

You should know your users, their role in the organization, and their knowledge of web publishing before you give them access to the site. You may want to provide equal access to all contribution regions on the web site for all users, or you may want to limit access for some and grant full access to others.

For example, you may want to provide full access to the entire web page for members of the marketing department and access to only a portion of that page to all other departments. To do this, you would set up different users on the content server, assign a different contributor data file or native document to each region, and assign unique security metadata (using the metadata framework on the content server) to those files.

As a result, only the files that a particular contributor has permission to edit will display a contribution graphic (Figure 4-2) on them on the web page when in contribution mode.

Figure 4-2 Contribution Graphic

Contribution Graphic

Sections of the web site can also be marked so that only certain users can view them. This is handled in the section settings within the web site hierarchy. After the section has limited access, the section is available for viewing (and editing, if you want) to only those users that you want to have access.

4.3.4 Will Contributors Submit Native Documents?

In addition to using Contributor to add and edit content stored in Site Studio data files, contributors can also add native documents (created from applications like Microsoft Word, Excel, or PowerPoint) to the site. These documents are be converted into web-viewable renditions using Dynamic Converter.

Contributors can add new and existing native documents directly to the web site (for example, by assigning one to a region, using the link wizard, or adding one to a dynamic list). They can also use existing methods in the content server to check in the document (the content server's content check-in, Desktop Integration Suite client, Oracle Content Server's folders functionality, and so forth).

Contributors can also edit the native documents directly from the web site (using the "Check Out and Open" option on the Menu icon of the contribution graphic and the edit document features in Contributor).

Native documents are displayed on a web page, and not in reusable chunks as the case with a contributor data file.

If you allow contributors to submit native documents to the web site (and again, you control this in a contribution region, an element, and a list fragment), you should educate them on how they should use the native document and any style guidelines you may be enforcing.

4.3.5 How Will the Contribution Process Be Coordinated?

If you are the designer, manager, and contributor of your web site, you know when and where the site must be updated. If, as the designer, you are working with a single contributor or manager, you must communicate the required updates for the site. Specifically, you should inform them of certain changes to the site. The contributor, however, may also alert you when content has been added.

If you are working with multiple users, communication can quickly become complex. You must include some kind of communication process between users. One solution is to introduce a formal review process using workflows. This means that various persons review and approve site changes before they become "live."

If you would like to give the contributors a brief overview of how Site Studio works, you may want to distribute the Oracle WebCenter Content User's Guide for Site Studio Contributor to them.

4.4 Order of Site Asset Creation

After the web site has been planned, the assets used to construct the web site in Designer should be created. For the most efficient use, it is recommended that you create these assets in a particular order.

The most efficient method of asset creation for most web sites is to build the assets "from the bottom up:"

  1. Element definitions (see Section 4.5, "Creating Element Definitions")

  2. Region definitions (see Section 4.6, "Creating Region Definitions")

  3. Region templates (see Section 4.7, "Creating Region Templates")

  4. Subtemplates (see Section 4.8, "Creating Subtemplates")

  5. Placeholder definitions (see Section 4.9, "Creating Placeholder Definitions")

  6. Page templates (see Section 4.10, "Creating Page Templates")

  7. Site hierarchy (see Section 4.11, "Planning the Site Hierarchy")

Of course it is not entirely necessary to create the assets in this order. However, you typically create the web site more quickly and efficiently if you follow this order.

4.5 Creating Element Definitions

The most efficient assets to define first are the elements. Elements are the assets that define the editing interface that the contributor uses. The specific use of each one is handled through element definitions. By creating an element definition, you are defining how the contributors work with the data files by defining the editing regions and the toolbars accessible to the contributors.

In the element definition you can control exactly which editing features are available to the contributor in the toolbar. For instance, you might not want the contributor to be able to change the font size or color, but still be able to use bold and italics. Generally you define at least one of each kind of element (WYSIWYG, text only, image only, static list, dynamic list, and custom) and usually, you define two or more of each type of element to allow for the different toolbars in Contributor.

The element definition is used to control the toolbar that the contributors can access to edit the pages. However, it might be that you want to have several different definitions for each element so that you can have multiple options of toolbars for the contributors, rather than one or two. It is important to consider the role of the contributor and how much they contribute on different pages.

It is highly recommended that you name the element definitions carefully, as naming the elements with respect to place on the page or with the name of the site in them can make reusing them less intuitive. It is not recommended that you name the element in terms of its place on the page, within the web site, or even by using the name in the web site within the element definition. The optimal method for naming an element definition is to list a relative amount of access in the toolbar, such as "element_WYSIWYG_fulledit" or "element_text_undo_only."

Notice that the element definitions were named starting with the word "element." That is to make all elements appear together when searching for them in the content server. Using other naming conventions such as including the name of the web site would also group the assets in the web server, but this would make the definitions less intuitive to manage if you use the same definitions for multiple web sites.

4.6 Creating Region Definitions

You should create region definitions before you create region templates. A definition (region definition, placeholder definition, element definition) controls which data is displayed and how the contributor interacts with the data. The template (region template, subtemplate) control how the data is displayed. The region definition, specifically, controls which elements (WYSIWYG, Image only, and so forth) open in Contributor. The region template is used to arrange the placement of the elements and how that particular data is displayed on the web page.

As you create a region template, you are asked to associate it with a region definition. If the definition is not already defined, the region template is not easily associated with the definition afterward.

The typical region definition contains multiple elements, and various combinations of these elements are used on several different region templates. That is, the region definitions are as broad and encompassing as possible. This allows multiple region templates to access the same grouping of elements (but it does not have to be the same data file) and arranging them in different ways. If you add many element definitions to a region definition, however, you should be aware that all element definitions listed in the region definition open in Contributor, even if only a few are visible on the page.

Because the region definitions limit the availability of elements in the contribution model, it is especially important to follow good naming conventions for region definitions. This helps you sort out which definitions are best suited for the different region templates you create.

4.7 Creating Region Templates

Region templates are the assets that format the data files into HTML. You use region templates to place the content, such as text, images, or other simple items, that would not be inside of an element, and the elements. The region templates are used to arrange the elements (limited by the region definition) into the layout desired to be reused as you see fit in the different places in your web site.

The region template has available to it only those elements that have element definitions listed in the region definition for the template. However, the region template does not have to use all elements listed in the definition. This allows for a great deal of variety in the different templates available.

It is likely that region templates are the largest number of assets you create for the web site. Because of this, the na7[Ȥming convention you use in creating the region templates is important. The name should help define what the template does, not where on the page it is used or where in the web site. A name such as "regtem_titlebodyview" or "rt_bodynoimage" would likely be a more useful name when maintaining the site than would, say "regiontemplate14" or "RT_SupportForum."

Since region templates can contain HTML and images and other assets (for example, a region template-specific CSS) that are not part of the data file that is passed through the elements, the templates can be used to incorporate some information and text that is not editable by the contributor. However, it is important to understand that any of that information is not part of the contributor data file that the contributor edits. This means that as you reuse a region template, the data associated with it opens in the same manner regardless of what data is associated with that region template. It also means that the designer is the only person who would be able to modify that particular data. The contributor would be able to create and edit any data that is assigned to the elements in the region template through the placeholder, but anything that is placed outside of the elements, but still within the region template, would be static.

4.8 Creating Subtemplates

Subtemplates are major portions of HTML that can contain placeholders. This makes them very useful as a way to reduce several page templates while still maintaining several different ways the pages in the web site can appear.

Subtemplates can only appear in a placeholder. Subtemplates can only contain a placeholder, or static content such as HTML or an image. A subtemplate can also reference a CSS file.

You should ask yourself the following questions as you plan subtemplates:

4.8.1 Is a Subtemplate Necessary for the Site?

One of the benefits of using a subtemplate is that you can reduce the number of page templates used in a web site. Through a subtemplate, you can have the same page template used for both primary and secondary pages.

This is one reason why planning is essential. While a subtemplate can reduce the number of page templates, it also means that you have a subtemplate to manage for the web site. Fewer page templates means that site-wide changes are easier to make. Subtemplates can also add a level of static information because you can add HTML, images, and other similar static site assets to a page that you may want placed on a certain number of pages (such as the secondary pages) that would otherwise have to be managed separately from the subtemplate.

The subtemplate can also help you place multiple placeholders within a single placeholder. Since a placeholder can contain a subtemplate, and a subtemplate can contain a placeholders, then it could be that you want the subtemplate present for future web site expansion that is still to be determined.

4.9 Creating Placeholder Definitions

Placeholder definitions are what connect each placeholder to the content and other assets associated with that placeholder to display.

You should ask yourself the following questions as you plan placeholder definitions:

4.9.1 How Will The Placeholder Function On The Page?

The placeholder, not to be confused with the placeholder definition, is simply a mark on the page in the Designer application. Placeholders are just conceptual boundaries in Designer.

Figure 4-3 Placeholder as seen in Designer

Placeholder as seen in Designer

As you see in Figure 4-3, the placeholder is just a marker, using the word "placeholder" and also lists the name of the placeholder. The actual amount of space that a placeholder uses on a web page is determined by the size of the content placed in it.

The data associated with the placeholder depends on which page the placeholder is on, which happens after the site structure is complete and you begin to place content in the sections of the web site.

It is the placeholder definition that determines how the placeholder functions, and what the placeholder contains. This means that you should view the placeholder as an available section for you to use and reuse content in broad areas. It is common to have a page template, for instance, with only the navigation and the header image and nothing but a placeholder in between.

In Figure 4-3, there is only a banner, a side navigation piece that is a fragment, and the placeholder. All of it is arranged using a table. This basic design could reliably be used as the entire structure of a web site, depending on how you use the placeholder.

This placeholder would then be easily replaced on any number of pages with the content specific to those pages. The content can be broken down into smaller placeholders if your design planning has led you to create a site based on a minimal number of page templates and using multiple placeholders and subtemplates in different ways.

4.9.2 What Will The Placeholder Definition Control?

The placeholder is little more than a tag that is meant to define an area on the page where the content is shown. The placeholder definition lists which region definitions (and their associated region templates) and which subtemplates are available to pass information through.

You can also control other details on a placeholder-by-placeholder basis through the placeholder definition. Some of these items include workflow, whether the contributor can edit the data displayed through the placeholder, whether the contributor can edit the metadata, ability to view web site usage reports, and the ability to view content tracker reports.

4.10 Creating Page Templates

A large number of web sites can be reduced to two simple page templates: the home page, and then all other pages. It is not uncommon for a web site to have a home page that is distinct in terms of layout and design compared to the other pages in the web site.

It may be the case that there are multiple templates for your site. It is also possible to make an entire web site work with one page template. If you do design the web site with several page templates, you should possibly consider the use of subtemplates to reduce the number of page templates. Fewer page templates on a web site makes site-wide changes much easier.

You should ask yourself the following questions as you plan page templates:

4.10.1 How Should Fragments Be Used?

Fragments are especially useful for maintaining dynamic content or content built with a custom script. Fragments could also be used for content that you would like to manage separately from the site assets and the contributor data files. This might be as simple as a copyright statement or as complex as a JavaScript menu. The number of fragments and the complexity of those fragments varies, depending on your site.

For more information on fragments, see Chapter 13, "Working With Fragments."

4.10.2 Will Primary and Secondary Pages Require Different Templates?

Primary and secondary pages can both use the same page templates. However, since secondary pages are the only pages that can have dynamically placed content, you should consider the effect on how you view your page templates (and even your placeholders and placeholder definitions) with respect to the advantages of dynamically placed content.

A secondary page serves as the backdrop for content added to the site by a contributor. Secondary pages are required if you allow contributors to add contributor data files or native documents (both of which amount to new web pages) to the web site. These files are made available to the site when they are picked up by a dynamic list, a search, or the target of a link.

It may be that you first build your site with just primary pages, saving secondary pages until after you set up contribution regions on the primary pages and know exactly what type of content contributors submit to the site. Then, you could add the secondary pages to handle this content.

Regardless of whether you use the same or different page templates for the primary and secondary pages in your web site, it is important that you name the page templates appropriately. This is the same for all other site assets in Site Studio.

Consider the example shown in Figure 4-4:

Figure 4-4 Hierarchy Showing a Poorly Named Template

Hierarchy showing poorly-named page templates

The same page template was used for both the primary and secondary pages. The page template name was based on where the template was based on initial placement, and when the site was expanded the reuse of the page template created a confusing arrangement.

The most efficient naming of site assets, including page templates, should be based on how the page template is used. Naming conventions based on where the asset is used in a web site (for instance, "page_template_primarypage") or based on in the order of creation (for instance "pagetemplate3") can make the assets harder to manage.

4.11 Planning the Site Hierarchy

The site hierarchy is the framework of your web site. You should give yourself plenty of time to plan the hierarchy before you start creating web pages. The site hierarchy not only helps you organize and manage content on your site, but it is also used by Site Studio to automate certain tasks.

Figure 4-5 Site Hierarchy Pane

Site Hierarchy pane

You should ask yourself the following questions as you plan the site hierarchy:

4.11.1 How Deep Should the Hierarchy Be?

A deep hierarchy places information at multiple levels where information is heavily categorized. This works well for large organizations or any organization that anticipates growth on the web site.

When planning the web site, a lot of care should be taken in considering the hierarchy of the web pages within the site. The web site hierarchy can be as deep as you want, and as deep as you want. You can create as many different sections from the home page as needed, and a section can contain as many sections as needed as well. However, the thing that should be kept in mind while designing the hierarchy is that while the structure can be as wide as needed (that is, sections can be nested to any depth), that this can create unwieldy URLs. The wider a section is nested in a web site, then the longer the URL is to retrieve that information. Usually this is a trivial consideration, but for some designers this can be a major point.

Each section listed in the site hierarchy can have a primary page, and a secondary page. Since secondary pages are the pages that have replaceable content, the secondary pages are used to create multiple versions of the pages within a section. The primary page within a section is the page that opens for that section, it could be considered the landing page for that section.

4.11.2 How Will The User Navigate the Site?

While you use your site hierarchy to manage your site, visitors use your hierarchy to browse to and locate content. In Site Studio, when you add a navigation fragment to a page template, the fragment reads your site hierarchy and generates links that comprise the overall site navigation. You can easily add, remove, and rename sections of your site, and these changes are seen in your site navigation. You should think carefully about the visitor's experience as you construct this hierarchy.

4.11.3 How Should the Sections Be Named?

Your site hierarchy has individual sections with names such as Products, Services, and About Us. These names are important. They not only help you organize content on your site, but they display in the navigation on the site, where visitors see it. It is a good idea to revisit these names regularly to ensure that they reflect the content of the sections they represent.

Another thing to consider as you assemble your site hierarchy is the web site address that contributors and site visitors see in their web browser address bar. By default, Site Studio uses the names (labels) that you give to the sections in your site hierarchy.

You can override these values, if you like, by specifying a different path name and page name for each section (see Section 7.2.2, "Changing the Path Used in a Site Address"). It is best to plan this ahead of time to minimize any late changes to the site address or paths used in the address, which could result in broken links or missing shortcuts for contributors and site visitors.

4.11.4 How Reusable Should The Page Templates Be?

As you plan your site, you can create new page templates for each section, or you can reuse page templates that are already being used in other sections. When you design to use a small number of page templates, you then have fewer assets to manage, which makes the entire web site easier to manage.

By reusing page templates, you can maintain the look and feel of your web site in one or just a handful of page templates, and the changes are seen immediately across the site.

By creating new and unique page templates in each section, you might have more flexibility in the design of the site layout as a whole. You can create a unique design or slightly modify a different page template to accommodate the content that display there. However, if you make significant global changes to the site, then you have to modify multiple page templates. This might become a repetitive task that lends itself to mistakes and inconsistency.

If you choose multiple page templates, you should try to reuse fragments with referenced snippets as much as possible so that you can make global changes to just one or a handful of fragments.

However, through thoughtful use of subtemplates with the placeholders, it is typically possible to reduce the number of page templates.

4.11.5 Should There Be Both Primary and Secondary Pages?

There are several ways to handle page templates. You can assign one primary page and one secondary page for every section of your site hierarchy.

The primary page is the web page that users see when they go to that section on the web site (similar to the default page on a conventional web site). The information on the page is statically linked. Contributors can change the contributor data file or the native document on the primary page, or the information in the data file through the contributor interface.

The secondary page is a page that can have its content dynamically placed. A secondary page can have static content, but what makes secondary pages useful is their ability to have dynamically-placed content.

You can create a site comprised entirely of primary pages, but then you'll have to create new sections with new primary pages in order for the site to grow. By using secondary pages, your site can grow on its own from additional content submitted by contributors, and you, the designer, do not have to do anything. Your site becomes much more scalable with secondary pages.

Primary and secondary pages can have the same page template. The page template is not related to whether the page using the template is primary or secondary.

4.11.6 How Will Content Be Reused?

You can share and reuse contributor data files and native documents across a single web site and even multiple web sites in the content server. When you add these items to your site, you specify a specific location, or multiple locations by reusing associated site assets, where you would like them to appear.

You can even add content to your site that is not currently associated with any web site in the content server. You can show the same document on different sites, each with its own look and feel, without having to create multiple versions of that same document.

If you choose to do this, however, you must ensure that the content is appropriate for the web site and for public viewing. Workflows are good to implement to ensure this. You also must ensure that you have a secondary page with a replaceable region template in each section where the content appears.

4.11.7 Will A Manager Be Necessary?

You can create and manage the site hierarchy yourself, or you can hand this responsibility over to the site manager. Using the Manager application, site managers can create sections, modify sections, and more.

These changes can significantly change the appearance and behavior of the site. You should think about these changes and how they affect the structure of the site, workflow, replication, the role of contributors, and much more.

For more information on setting up Manager, see Chapter 16, "Setting Up Manager."

PKYA7PK=\EOEBPS/g00_glossary.htm Glossary

Glossary

The following terms are frequently used in the Site Studio suite of applications. They are listed here in alphabetical order.

Active Server Page (ASP)

An HTML page that includes one or more scripts, or small embedded executable code, that are processed on a Microsoft web server before being sent to a web browser. ASP pages have the .asp file extension. In Site Studio, you can create web sites with Idoc Script, JSP (JavaServer Pages), or ASP.

It is important to note that sites created in ASP is limited to the functionality available in Site Studio 10gR3.

See also: legacy site.

address

See site address.

administrator

An individual who uses the performs the administrative Site Studio tasks on the content server. This would include tasks such as assigning web addresses to the site, backing up the site, replicating the site, and so on.

See also: designer, contributor, manager.

ASP

See Active Server Page (ASP).

backup

The process of creating an extra copy of your web site and all files associated with it for archiving or safeguarding. Site Studio's backup feature is accessed from Oracle Content Server's web interface (the Site Studio Administration page).

See also: administrator, restore.

Cascading Style Sheet (CSS)

A file that provides control over how page content is displayed. More specifically, how different HTML elements, such as headers and links, appear on the page. A means of separating structure from presentation to control the formatting and layout of content in one place. Style sheets can be included in an HTML document by linking to an outside style sheet, embedding a document-wide style in the <HEAD> tag of the document, or embedding inline styles where needed.

content ID

A unique identifier for each content item on the content server. Content IDs are assigned when content items are checked in to the content server. Depending on the server configuration, they may be assigned automatically, or the person checking in the item may have to assign the ID. Content IDs are stored in a metadata field called dDocName.

content server

The central repository of all files associated with a Site Studio web site. The server provides advanced content management features such as library services (check-in, check-out, and the like), versioning, workflow, content conversion, and more.

Content Server form

A specially formatted web form that can be used by a site visitor to submit information to a Site Studio web site.

Content Tracker report

A detailed report that shows how many times a piece of content was viewed. The report is made available through the integration between Site Studio and Content Tracker (an add-on to Oracle Content Server).

See also: site report.

contribution graphic

The graphic that displays beside each contribution region on the web page, when the page is viewed in contribution mode. Clicking the edit icon opens Contributor (or a third-party application for a native document), enabling contributors to edit the region content assigned to the region. Clicking the menu icon provides more options, such as switching the file assigned to the region and approving or rejecting a document for workflow.

contribution mode

A way of viewing a web page in a web browser whereby you can see and edit the contribution regions (and perhaps instances of Manager) on the page.

When the page is viewed in contribution mode, you see a contribution graphic beside each editable region. Click the graphic to edit the contents of the region (a data file or native document), approve it or reject the contents (when workflow is used), update its metadata, and so on. You enter contribution mode using a combination of keystrokes (the default is Ctrl+Shift+F5).

contribution region

An area where contributors can add and edit content on a web page, as defined by the site designer. When the web page is viewed in contribution mode, contributors can edit the content in the region using either Contributor (for contributor data files) or the application associated with the content (for native documents).

See also: placeholder, replaceable region.

Contributor

One of three applications in Site Studio. Contributor is used to edit contributor data files associated with a contribution region. The way you set up a contribution region and contribution elements in Designer affects the appearance and behavior of the Contributor application. Typically, you have many different contributors using the Contributor application.

See also: Designer, Manager.

contributor

An individual who edits the content on a Site Studio web site, using either Contributor or a third-party application. The contributor can be anyone familiar with the content on the web site (a manager, a member of the sales or marketing team, a member of human resources, and so on). Using Site Studio, you often have multiple contributors working with a handful of managers and one designer.

See also: designer, administrator, manager.

contributor data file

An XML file created by Site Studio and designed to be opened and edited using the Contributor application. A contributor data file stores site content, and can be assigned to a contribution region, where it appears on the web site. The file itself, however, is stored as a managed content item in the content server, separate from the page templates, region templates, subtemplates, and other managed site assets. This enables content (created by contributors) to be separate from presentation (created by site designers).

See also: native document.

contributor-only section

A section in the site hierarchy that only appears on the site when it is viewed in contribution mode. Contributor-only sections can be useful to convey information, like instructions for contributing to the site, from designers to managers, managers to contributors, and so on.

conversion definition

A file that specifies the conversion rules for native documents on a web site. Each conversion definition is a rule, template, or combination that defines how a native document is converted to HTML and displayed in the page.

conversion rule

A statement that specifies what criteria a native document on the content server must meet to be converted using a specific conversion template.

conversion template

A part of Dynamic Converter used in Site Studio to define how native documents are converted to HTML for viewing in a web browser. Native documents on the content server are converted based on their metadata and file type.

CSS

See Cascading Style Sheet (CSS).

custom configuration script

A JavaScript file that overrides the default Contributor editor configuration to provide contributors with a customized editing experience. Each configuration script can be used to add or replace commands, toolbar buttons, and context menu items. Any part of the editor can be customized to fulfill a specific requirement.

custom element

A type of element that uses a custom element form. A custom element is quite different from the other elements (WYSIWYG, plain text, dynamic list, static list, and image) in that it is used to create a custom interface (web-based form) in the Contributor application. Contributors use the interface to add various types of content and perform actions that cannot be performed in the other elements.

See also: WYSIWYG element, plain text element, image element, static list element, custom element form.

custom element form

An HTML file that defines custom forms for use in elements (for example, selection forms for specific file types). Custom element forms are used to create a custom interface that contributors use to add and control various types of content to a web site.

design view

One of three views for displaying the site assets that are templates (page templates, subtemplates, and region templates). In design view, you see what your template looks like as you design it. You can use the formatting toolbar, properties pane, drag and drop, right-click mouse options, and many familiar word processing commands to edit the content in this view. Site Studio uses markers for fragments, placeholders, and similar items that do not display properly in a dynamic WYSIWYG environment.

See also: preview, source view, form view.

Designer

One of three applications in Site Studio. Designer provides the development environment where designers can create the site and site assets, add fragments and construct contribution regions, and more. The Designer application is used with Manager and Contributor to build and maintain a site.

See also: Manager, Contributor.

designer

An individual who uses the Designer application to build web sites. This individual might be a web master, web developer, or member of the web team. The designer focuses on how the web site looks: the structure of the pages, the way the pages are laid out, the imagery, and the corporate identity. The actual site content is typically created and maintained by contributors.

See also: contributor, manager, administrator.

dynamic content

Content that opens in an area defined by a placeholder based on where the page template is used. In some cases, a fragment can also display content that is dynamically generated. When viewing a template in Designer that has dynamic content, a small box with the name of the fragment or the placeholder appears.

See also: static content.

dynamic list

A list of files (contributor data files or native documents) that is based on a query performed in the content server. You can have, for example, a dynamic list that queries the content server for files with the document type "Press Releases" and opens those items on the page. The list can be simple, such as a list of links, or it can be complex, such as a list showing the title, an excerpt, and a link for each file. The dynamic list can be implemented as an element, and can also be implemented as a fragment. In the Toolbox in Designer, you have a category called "Dynamic List Fragments," which includes sample dynamic lists.

In Site Studio releases prior to 10gR4, dynamic lists were created using a fragment. Starting with the 10gR4 release, dynamic lists can be created either by using a fragment or by creating a dynamic list element definition. The dynamic lists function similarly, but implementing dynamic lists as elements maximizes the reusability of the site assets.

See also: list fragment, static list.

editing area

Part of the Contributor editor workspace where contributors make changes to contributor data files associated with a contribution region on a Web page. Each editing area has its own toolbar and its own field for entering the data. In some cases, such as with an image or custom element, the editing area does not have any place to enter text. In many cases, there are more editing areas for data than appears on the screen. This could be because the contributor data file contains data not displayed on the web page, or that the designer has included areas meant to display only when Contributor is open.

See also: element toolbar, contributor-only section.

element

The smallest chunks of reusable information in a Site Studio web site. When using contributor data files on your site, you must create one or more elements in each contribution region. Each defined element is of a particular type: WYSIWYG, text only, image only, static list, dynamic list, or custom. These types characterize what the element content consists of, and, through element definitions, what editing options are available to contributors. If you add just one element, the contributor sees one field in Contributor; if you add several elements, the contributor sees several fields in Contributor. Elements are not used with native documents, only contributor data files.

See also: WYSIWYG element, plain text element, image element, static list element, dynamic list element, custom element.

element definition

A file that defines the editing experience for element types. Specifically, they specify what a contributor can do when editing an element. Element definitions are also used to specify validation scripts.

element toolbar

Each editing area in the Contributor editor has a toolbar specific to the type of area. Some toolbars have WYSIWYG items, or text-only, or image-only. Static lists and dynamic lists also have their own toolbars.

See also: editing area.

element validation

A way for designers to enforce specific rules on the content that is added in Contributor. You can regulate how much content is added, whether it is formatted in a certain way, and much more. Element validation is set up in an element definition. You can use the default validation script that comes with Site Studio or create your own.

eXtensible Markup Language (XML)

A widely used programming language (and standard by the W3C) that facilitates the interchange of data between computer applications. XML is similar to HTML (the language used for web pages) in that both use markup tags. However, as opposed to HTML, XML tags say nothing about the presentation of the data contained in the tags, only their structure. Computer programs automatically extract data from an XML document using its associated DTD as a guide.

form view

One of the views of site assets available while in Designer. This view is the graphical interface to the different definitions (placeholder definition, region definition, element definition) and configuration settings (such as the manager configuration setting). The other view available to definitions and settings is source view.

See also: source view.

fragment

A container for code, files referenced by that code, along with parameters that govern how that code is added to a template. Using fragments, you can create and edit features for your site, while keeping them separate from the site. Site Studio includes numerous sample fragments that are provided in the Toolbox in Designer. You can open and edit fragments using the Fragment Editor. Fragments are written in eXtensible Markup Language (XML), and they are stored in fragment libraries in the content server.

See also: snippet, toolbox.

fragment asset

A file referenced by a fragment and stored with the fragment in a fragment library on the content server. Graphics, cascading style sheets, and JavaScript files are all frequently used fragment assets. Once you add an asset to a fragment, you can easily refer to it from each snippet in the fragment.

Fragment Editor

Part of the Designer application that is used to open and edit fragments. You can use the Fragment Editor to add and edit fragment properties, snippets, assets, parameters, and so on. You open the Fragment Editor each time you create a new fragment or edit an existing one from the Toolbox in Designer.

fragment library

A collection of one or more fragments and their assets for use with a Site Studio web site. It is stored as a managed content item in the content server. A fragment library comprises an XML (eXtensible Markup Language) file that describes all of its contents, and a zip file that stores its contents. The sample fragment libraries that ship with Site Studio are automatically checked into the content server when you install the component.

fragment properties

The identifying characteristics of a fragment, such as its name, type, and choice of scripting language. The first thing you do when you create or edit a fragment is specify its properties.

HCSP

See Hyper Content Server Page (HCSP).

Hyper Content Server Page (HCSP)

A dynamic web page containing HTML and the Idoc Script code (a proprietary scripting language). HCSP pages can request services from the content server. They have the .hcsp file extension. In Site Studio, you can build page templates and fragments with Idoc Script.

home page

A page that serves as an entry point to the web site. It generally contains links to the main sections of the site. In Designer and Manager, a home page is the same as a primary page: the only difference is that you add it to the root of the site hierarchy rather than to one of the sections of the site hierarchy. Many navigation fragments in the Toolbox contain a link to your home page.

Hypertext Markup Language (HTML)

A formatting language used for documents on the World Wide Web (WWW). HTML files are plain-text files with formatting code that tells a web browser (or web-capable device) how to display text, position graphics and objects, and display links to other web pages.

HTML

See Hypertext Markup Language (HTML).

HTML table

A way of presenting content in a tabular format. On a web site, HTML tables can be used to position content and therefore, design web pages. In Site Studio, you can use HTML tables to design your page templates (such as placing fragments and contribution regions in each table cell).

Idoc Script

A proprietary scripting language used to create dynamic Web pages in Oracle Content Server. Idoc Script provides the ability to reference variables, conditionally include content in HTML pages, loop over results returned from queries, and more. In Site Studio, you can build templates and fragments with Idoc Script. The file extension for assets in Idoc Script is .hcsp.

image element

A type of element that allows only one or more images. An image element offers options specific to adding images for a contributor (such as browsing the content server for an image, replacing an existing image, and applying a CSS class to an image). This element can be useful when you want to specify an area where only an image (and no text) should appear on a web page.

See also: WYSIWYG element, plain text element, static list element, custom element.

JavaScript

A cross-platform scripting language that can be added to existing HTML code on a web page to create basic online functions and interactivity.

JavaServer Pages (JSP)

A scripting language for the serving-side use of servlets, or small programs, that run on the web server. JSP is similar to Microsoft's Active Server Pages (ASP); they both request programs from the web server before displaying the results in a client web browser. JSP pages have the .jsp file extension. In Site Studio, you can create a web site with Idoc Script, JSP, or ASP.

It is important to note that sites created in JSP only has the functionality available in Site Studio 10gR3.

See also: legacy site, Active Server Pages (ASP).

JSP

See JavaServer Pages (JSP).

layout page

"Layout page" is a term from pre-10gR4 Site Studio releases. The current term is page template.

See also: legacy site, page template.

legacy site

Sites which are made with the functionality of the pre-10gR4 architecture. You can continue to use legacy sites in Site Studio 10gR4 and higher, but they do not take advantage of the new architecture and features introduced in Site Studio 10gR4 and higher.

link

An item on a web page that takes the user from one web page to another, or to a different position within a web page. Links enable visitors to navigate your web site. In Designer, links are automatically created when you add a navigation fragment to a template. You can add more links yourself, usually to cross-reference another part of your site or perhaps another site. You can also enable contributors to create links on the web site using the Contributor application.

Link wizard

A feature in Site Studio (Designer and Contributor) that enables you to quickly and easily creates links to other sections, to other files, and to other sites in the content server. The multi-step wizard walks you through the necessary steps to create the link, choose a target section or file for the link, and choose a format for the link.

list fragment

A type of fragment that opens either a static list or a dynamic list. Static list fragments display a fixed number of rows and columns, each containing an element (WYSIWYG, plain text, or image). Contributors can modify the list, for example, by adding, editing, and deleting rows and columns of information. Dynamic list fragments display a list of files (contributor data files or native documents) based on a query performed in the content server. Contributors can add and remove the files that appear in this list.

See also: static list, dynamic list.

Manager

One of three applications in Site Studio. Manager is a web-based site management console that can be used by one or more site managers to maintain the structure of the site. Site designers can add the Manager application to a site in Designer. The look and feel and behavior can be changed for each instance of Manager.

See also: Designer, Contributor.

manager

An individual who uses the Manager application to reorganize the site navigation and hierarchy. Site managers can add or remove sections to the site without using Site Studio Designer by using a web-based tool that the site designer makes available to them. A manager typically works with one designer and multiple contributors.

Manager configuration settings

Files that define the functionality that is available in Site Studio Manager. The manager configuration settings are used to control what access levels the manager has when accessing the Manager application. These settings include if the manager can control the hierarchy and rearrange it, and if they can reassign a page template to a section.

metadata

Yn"Data about data." In other words, information that describes the characteristics and properties of an item (such as title, author, content ID, and so on). As you build your site, you can use this metadata to handle the content in different ways, such as creating a dynamic list that queries content items matching a particular document type or security.

native document

A content file created using familiar third-party applications such as Microsoft Word. Native documents are converted to HTML format using Dynamic Converter, and they are edited using their associated application.

See also: contributor data file.

navigation

The way visitors make their way around a web site. The navigation on your web site is usually a collection of links that point to each main category, or section, on the site. In Site Studio, you can add a navigation fragment from the Toolbox, and it instantly creates a navigation menu, pointing to each section in your site hierarchy.

page template

A fully-formed HTML file that defines the layout and high-level look-and-feel of web pages, including the placement of contribution regions (that is, editable areas on the page), navigation aids (in the form of fragments) and site-wide images (banners and the like). Page templates are the highest-level site design object.

A page template in Site Studio is a web page that you associate with a section in your site hierarchy. It may contain HTML, XML, JavaScript, Idoc Script, and other elements (such as global images). Page templates can be reused throughout the site. A page template is different from a typical web page in that you add mostly background information to it, saving the bulk of the content for placement through the placeholders.

parameter

An attribute that governs the appearance and behavior of a fragment or other managed content. You can specify a set of parameters when you create a new fragment, and you can enter values for the defined parameters when you add the fragment to a page template, subtemplate, or region template.

placeholder

An insertion point (a tag) on a page template to identify where there is a contribution region (that is, editable area) on the Web page. They are simply conceptual spaces where other content opens when the page template or subtemplate is viewed in the context of the web site.

See also: replaceable region, contribution region.

placeholder definition

A file that defines what region definitions, region templates, and subtemplates are allowed for the associated placeholders. They also specify what contributor actions are allowed for the placeholders.

plain-text element

A type of element that allows only text, without modifying the font or other formatting modification. A plain-text element typically offers only the minimum editing options for a contributor (such as cut, copy, paste, and spell checker). This element can be useful when you want to prevent contributors from manually formatting the text on a web page (such as a title or heading).

See also: WYSIWYG element, image element, static list element, custom element.

preview

One of three views in Designer for viewing a template (page template, subtemplate, and region template). The Preview tab provides an actual view of the page template, subtemplate, or region template as it appears in a web browser. Preview is useful for previewing dynamic (server-side) content, fragments, and contribution regions, since the content in these cases must be generated in order to be seen fully.

See also: source view, design view.

primary page

The landing page of a site section. This page is the page displayed when a visitor first enters that section. It represents the "index" file of the site section.

See also: secondary page.

project file

An XML file that stores all information about a Site Studio web site on the content server. Project files are created by Site Studio when a new site is created in Designer, and the file is stored in the content server as a managed content item.

properties pane

A pane in Designer summarizing the properties of a section, page template, default placeholder definition, element, fragment, HTML tags, and more. The properties pane enables you to view and edit the HTML tags of your templates. You can make many of the same changes in the properties pane that you make to the template directly. The properties pane is especially useful for actions that cannot be performed directly in design view; for example, specifying background color, page margins, and table width.

publication

The process of deploying a completed web site to a location so that it can be viewed by visitors. web sites can be deployed in Site Studio using the Site Studio Publisher. This involves gathering all of the files associated with a web site, building a static copy of the web site, and then copying the completed site to a "live" location.

region content

The data assigned to display in an editable area (contribution region) on a web page. This can be a contributor data file or a native document. Contributors are generally responsible for the region content (in the same way that designers are responsible for page templates and fragments). Once you assign region content to a contribution region, contributors can edit the content using Contributor (if using contributor data files) or a third-party application (if using native documents).

region definition

A file that defines the type of content that elements of a particular type consists of. It also specifies the content creation and switching options available to contributors for contribution regions, and sets default metadata for content files associated with these regions.

region template

A partial HTML file (that is, without head and body sections) that defines the layout and look-and-feel of the data in contribution regions within web pages.

replaceable region

A region on a secondary page that allows other files (specifically, new contributor data files and native documents) to display. When contributors add new content to the site, the content opens in the replaceable region on a secondary page. The result is that contributors can add new web pages to the site without designers having to create new sections and new page templates each time.

See also: placeholder, contribution region.

replication

The process of copying a Site Studio web site from one content server to another. You might do this when distributing a site from a development environment to a production environment, backing up the contents of a site, and so on. You use the Site Studio Replicator or Content Server Archiver/Replicator to replicate sites in Site Studio.

restore

A Site Studio feature accessible from the Site Studio Administration page on the content server. You can use the backup and restore feature to quickly and easily back up your entire site (or sites), store it in a compressed ZIP file, move it to another location, and restore your site from this file.

reviewer

An individual who approves content on the site. A reviewer can use the workflow options on the contribution icon to approve and reject content. A reviewer might have the sole responsibility of reviewing content, or the reviewer might be a contributor acting in both roles.

script

Code that is added to a web page to make it more effective in displaying information or interacting with the user.

secondary page

A page of a section typically used to display dynamic content. A secondary page can have static content, but what makes secondary pages useful is their ability to have dynamically placed and replaceable content. As such, they are used to create multiple versions of the pages within a site section; they provide a different content view for a site section. Secondary pages allow you to handle large sites without needing to physically create thousands of pages.

See also: primary page, page template.

section

A category or specific area in your site hierarchy. You generally create sections in your site hierarchy that represent common parts of a web site, such as Products, Services, and About Us. The sections in your site hierarchy display in the navigation menus on your web site. As such, you may use the sections to organize your site, while visitors use the sections to navigate the site. In Designer and Manager, you create sections in the Site Hierarchy pane and then add a primary and (optionally) a secondary page to each section.

site address

A name associated with a web site that allows visitors to locate the site with a web browser.

There are two kinds of addresses that you can use: a domain name address and a folder name address. A domain name address looks something like "http://www.example.com" (where "www.example.com" is the domain name), and a folder name address looks something like "http://UserPC/mysite" (where "UserPC" is the name of the computer hosting the site and "mysite" is the ID of the site).

site asset

A file associated with a Site Studio web site and used to build a web page in some way (including a fragment or region definition in the page template as well). Graphics, cascading style sheets, and custom scripts are all frequently used site assets. You use the Site Assets pane in Designer to add and edit these files.

Site Assets pane

A pane in Designer summarizing the files used on the web site. The files are grouped based on their use (page template, image, contributor data file, native document, and so on). You can use the Site Assets pane to preview, edit, and identify the location of an asset. You can also add new and existing files to the Site Assets pane, thus making those files part of your site.

site connection

What Designer uses to connect to and update a web site stored on the content server. A site connection works much like a typical shortcut that you might add to your desktop for quick access to remote files. You can add, modify, and delete site connections without actually affecting the web site in the content server. You can add as many site connections as you like, each going to a different web site on the same content server or to different content servers.

site hierarchy

A collection of individual sections and page templates that make up the structure of the site. The site hierarchy can be flat, where all sections are located at the top of the hierarchy, or it can be deep, where sections are placed within other sections. Similar to a folder in a folder hierarchy, each section in a site hierarchy is necessary to store related content. While you may think of a site hierarchy as a place to categorize and manage content on your site, Site Studio uses the site hierarchy to manage page templates and generate navigation links on your web site, both of which are essential to the organization of your web site.

See also: section.

Site Hierarchy pane

The pane in Designer and Manager where you can create and maintain the site hierarchy for the web site. The default location for this pane is in the upper left corner of the workspace.

site report

A listing that displays the total number of files used by a web site (or web sites) and to see where those files are being used. There are three kinds of site reports that you can view: web site objects report, web site usage report, and Content Tracker report.

See also: Content Tracker report, web site usage report, web site objects report.

Site Studio

A powerful, flexible web development application suite that offers a comprehensive approach to designing, building, and maintaining enterprise-scale web sites. It goes beyond conventional web site development solutions by offering web site creation and content management all in one. Everything associated with the web site, including all site assets (such as templates, graphics, CSS files, and the like) and all site content, is stored and managed in the content server.

Site Studio Administration

A section in the Oracle Content Server web interface where you can perform many administrative tasks for Site Studio, such as assigning web addresses to a site, backing up sites, and so on.

snippet

The text or code that you store in a fragment, defined by its insertion point in the page template. When you create a fragment, you must add one or more snippets to it. In each snippet, you must specify how it is inserted within the fragment: drop-point, head, top of body, or bottom-of-body. If you are using the fragment to insert text or code in one place in the template, you can create just one snippet. But if you know that parts of your fragment must be inserted in more than one place in the page template, then you must create a snippet for each. If a snippet is defined as placed in the head, then it should not be used on subtemplates or region templates, as these templates do not have headers. You add, edit, and remove snippets in the Fragment Editor.

See also: fragment.

source view

One of three views in Designer for displaying templates (page templates, subtemplates, and region templates). Source view displays the code that makes up the template. You have complete control over the template while working in source view. If you do not like the way something looks in design view, you can always switch to source view to change it. You may, in fact, find yourself starting off in design view to initially create the template and then switching to source view to fine-tune the appearance and behavior of the template.

See also: preview, design view, form view.

static content

All content placed directly on a template, making it not editable by the contributor.

See also: dynamic content.

static list

A fixed number of rows and columns, each containing a contribution element (WYSIWYG, plain text, or image). Static lists can be used to bundle several elements in a table-like layout. Contributors can, therefore, add, edit, and delete the rows and columns of information, even rearrange them. Within each element, contributors have the same editing capabilities that they have in a standalone element. A static list can be implemented as an element, or as a fragment. In the Toolbox in Designer, you have a category called "Static List Fragments" that includes sample static lists.

See also: dynamic list.

static list element

In Site Studio releases prior to 10gR4, static lists were created using a fragment. Starting with the 10gR4 release, static lists can be created either by using a fragment or by creating a static list element definition. The static lists function similarly, but implementing static lists as elements maximizes the reusability that all site assets have.

See also: list fragment, plain text element, image element, static list element, dynamic list element, custom element.

subtemplate

A partial HTML file (that is, without head and body sections) that can be inserted into a placeholder on a page template to divide the placeholder into further smaller, reusable areas with their own placeholders and contribution regions. Subtemplates may contain very simple HTML code, but they may also be quite complex, with their own scripts and the like.

Switch Content wizard

A feature in Site Studio (Designer and Contributor) that enables you to quickly and easily change the content of a contribution region. The multi-step wizard walks you through the necessary steps to change the contributor data file, native document, or even subtemplate (if the site designer has enabled changing the subtemplate).

target section

The section on your site where a contributor data file or native document opens when you click a link that goes to that file. You can specify a target section for these files on your site or let Site Studio go through a linking evaluation to determine where the content should display. With target sections, you can make a file display on your web site without moving it or changing its metadata attributes in the content server. As a result, you can share and reuse content on one or multiple web sites using target sections.

template

A reusable piece of HTML code (with scripting code and the like). Site Studio 10gR4 uses three template types: page template, subtemplates, and region templates.

See also: page template, region template, subtemplate.

toolbox

A window in Designer that shows all of the fragments on the content server. They are divided into four categories: navigation fragments, dynamic list fragments, static list fragments, and other fragments. You use the toolbox to add a fragment to a template or edit the fragment directly using the Fragment Editor. You may, on occasion, have to refresh Designer to see the latest fragments available on the content server (if your organization has multiple designers).

See also: fragment, Fragment Editor.

Uniform Resource Locator (URL)

The address that defines the route to a file on an internet server (web server, FTP server, mail server, and so on).

URL

See Uniform Resource Locator (URL).

validation script

A JavaScript file that defines the validation rules for element data in order to determine that the data meets the requirements (for example, it does not exceed a certain maximum length or contain some illegal characters).

web page

A file containing HTML and possibly scripts, intended for viewing in a web browser. In Site Studio, a page template is combined with contribution regions, contributor data files, native documents, images, and other site assets to form a web page that the user sees in a web browser.

web site

A collection of HTML or script-based web pages that are linked and stored on a server. In Site Studio, a web site is defined by its site hierarchy, navigation scheme, and page templates. It is stored, managed, and served up by Oracle Content Server (which means you can take advantage of the many built-in content management features on the server).

web site objects report

A report that shows all of the explicitly referenced files on the content server used by a site. This report displays files by category (page templates, contributor data files, fragment libraries, and so forth).

See also: site report.

web site usage report

A report that shows a detailed summary of information for a single file, specifically where it is being used. The report breaks this down by web sites where it is used, sections where it is used, and so on.

See also: site report.

workflow

A feature in Oracle Content Server that can be used in Site Studio to review the content of a web site before it is released for publication. A single workflow can address a portion of a single web page or all of the content on the site. Typically, multiple workflows might be used to review different portions of a web site. Designated reviewers have the authority to approve or reject content during the workflow process.

workspace

The area (in the center) of Designer where you work with site assets and fragments.

WYSIWYG element

A type of element that allows full formatting and editing of the content. A WYSIWYG element typically offers all possible formatting and editing options, such as changing the font, centering text, and creating links to new and existing files. Site designers can enable and disable each option to customize the contributor's experience.

See also: plain text element, image element, static list element, dynamic list element, custom element.

XML

See eXtensible Markup Language (XML).

PK1qcYPK=\EOEBPS/content.opf Oracle® WebCenter Content User's Guide for Site Studio Designer, 11g Release 1 (11.1.1) en-US E10613-02 Oracle Corporation Oracle Corporation Oracle® WebCenter Content User's Guide for Site Studio Designer, 11g Release 1 (11.1.1) 2011-11-01T08:34:59Z Describes how to use Site Studio Designer to design, build, publish, and maintain a Web site whose content and assets are managed by Oracle WebCenter Content Server. PK~PK=\EOEBPS/c07_creating.htm Creating Your Web Site

7 Creating Your Web Site

The first thing you do in Site Studio is connect to an Oracle Content Server and create your assets. You do this using the Connection Manager in Designer. With the Connection Manager, you identify a content server, create a web site on that server (more specifically, a project file), and create a connection name that is used by Designer to connect to the site.

As soon as you've done this, you can start constructing your site assets into a web site, using a site hierarchy to define the arrangement of the information. A site hierarchy comprises the individual sections of your site, like Products, Services, and About Us. In each section, there is a primary page and often a secondary page.

You can spend a considerable amount of time setting up the site and site hierarchy, which is discussed next.

7.1 Site Connections

With Site Studio, you create your site on the content server and then associate various files (page templates, fragments, data files, and so on) with the site. To create the site, you must create what is called a site connection in Designer.

Designer uses a site connection to connect to and update web sites stored in the content server. A site connection works much like a typical shortcut that you might add to your desktop for quick access to another program or file. You can add, edit, and delete a site connection without actually affecting the web site in the content server. You can add as many site connections as you like, each one going to a different web site.


Note:

Site Studio 11gR1 is fully backward compatible. This means that you can use Site Studio Designer 11gR1 to work with sites created in earlier Site Studio releases. It is important to note, though, that these sites continue to work in "legacy" mode; that is, they use the pre-10gR4 architecture and they do not take advantage of the architecture and features introduced in Site Studio 10gR4.

Perform the steps outlined in these topics to manage a site connection:

7.1.1 Creating a New Site Connection

To create a web site, you must create a site connection that is used to connect to, and update, the web site on the content server. If this is the first time you have opened Designer, you are automatically taken to this dialog.

To create a site connection, perform these tasks:

  1. Click the Site Connection Manager icon in the Site toolbar (or select File, then Site, and then Connection Manager) to open the Site Connection Manager dialog. For more information, see Section A.2, "Site Connection Manager Dialog."

Figure 7-1 Site Connection Manager icon

Site Connection Manager icon
  1. Click New to open the Site Connection Details dialog. For more information, see Section A.3, "Site Connection Details Dialog."

  2. In the Server Cgi URL text box, enter the Cgi URL address of the content server that hosts your site.

    Rather than type the complete address of your server, you can choose an address in the menu (replacing <server> with the name of your server).

    The default address, http://<server>/stellent/idcplg, is for Oracle Content Server versions 7.x, 10gR3, and 10gR4. The two other addresses available from the drop-down list are for legacy versions: http://<server>/intradoc-cgi/idc_cgi_isapi.dll for Windows, and http://<server>/intradoc-cgi/nph-idc_cgi.exe for UNIX.

  3. Click Connect. You may be prompted to enter your login credentials.

  4. Click New to create a site on the content server.

    The Create New Site dialog appears (see Section A.4, "Create New Site Dialog").

    Or, to create a site connection using an existing web site on the server, choose it from the list of names beside "Site Label," and then skip to step 10.

  5. Enter an ID for the web site. (The ID is used throughout your site, for example, in the web site URL and in the metadata for the files referenced by the site.)

  6. Enter a Name for the web site.

    Since the Site ID field is a full-text index field, you should take care to not use a Site ID that would appear in the full-text search engine's "stop list." If you do, your Site Studio site will not work as expected in Site Studio Designer. An example of this would be a web site for the World Health Organization, which might use the shortened site ID "who."

    The name appears in Designer and the "Web Sites" menu in the content server. It can be a friendly name with spaces, if you like.


    Important:

    The Site ID should not contain the underscore character "_" as this may cause problems with indexing the web sites and full-text metadata fields. The underscore is, by default, used as a word break when indexing, and a wild card while searching.

  7. Choose hcsp/jsp as the type. (The site type governs other scripting choices in Designer, in particular, the scripting format for page templates and fragments.)


    Important:

    You can create a site using JSP or ASP. However, only sites created with HCSP can take advantage of the features introduced with 10gR4. In other words, JSP and ASP sites behave as pre-10gR4 sites.


    Note:

    You cannot change the ID or Type after you close this dialog.

  8. Click OK to return to the Site Connection Details dialog.

  9. Site Studio automatically inserts a connection name, which you see when you connect to your site in Designer (the Site Hierarchy menu and the Recent Sites menu). You may use this name or enter a different one.

  10. Click OK to return to the Site Connection Manager.

  11. Check Automatically connect when done (if it is not already checked), and then click Done.

    Designer opens the site from the content server and download the available fragments that are stored there. Your web site opens in the Site Hierarchy pane.

Figure 7-2 Web site in Site Hierarchy page

Web Site displayed in the Site Hierarchy pane

7.1.2 Editing a Site Connection

You can edit the site connections that you create in Designer. You can change the name of the site connection, the content server associated with the site connection, and the web site associated with the site connection. (You cannot change the site ID, name, or type.)

To edit a site connection, you must first disconnect from the site if the site is currently open in Designer.

To edit a site connection, perform these tasks:

  1. If you are currently connected to the site you want to edit, click the Disconnect icon (Figure 7-3) in the Site toolbar (or select File, then Site, and then Disconnect).

Figure 7-3 Disconnect icon

Disconnect icon
  1. Click the Site Connection Manager icon (Figure 7-4) in the Site toolbar (or select File, then Site, and then Connection Manager) to open the Site Connection Manager dialog. For more information, see Section A.2, "Site Connection Manager Dialog."

Figure 7-4 Site Connection Manager icon

Site Connection Manager icon
  1. Highlight the connection name and then click Edit.

  2. In the Site Connection Details dialog, make the necessary changes to the Server Cgi URL, the Site Label, or the Connection Name. For more information, see Section A.3, "Site Connection Details Dialog."

  3. Click OK to return to the Site Connection Manager.

  4. With the site connection you just edited still highlighted, check Automatically connect when done (if it is not already selected), and then click Done.


    Note:

    You cannot change the ID or Type after you create a site. These values are used throughout your site.

7.1.3 Deleting a Site Connection

You can remove the site connections that you create in Designer. This removes only the connection and not the actual web site on the content server (see note below). To remove a site connection, you must first disconnect from the site if it is currently open in Designer.

To delete a site connection, perform these tasks:

  1. If you are currently connected to the site to edit, click the Disconnect icon (Figure 7-5) in the Site toolbar (or select File, then Site, and then Disconnect).

Figure 7-5 Disconnect icon

Disconnect icon
  1. Click the Site Connection Manager icon (Figure 7-6) in the Site toolbar (or select File, then Site, and then Connection Manager) to open the Site Connection Manager dialog. For more information, see Section A.2, "Site Connection Manager Dialog."

Figure 7-6 Site Connection Manager icon

Site Connection Manager icon
  1. Highlight the connection name and click Delete.

  2. Click Yes to confirm the deletion.

  3. Click Done to close the Site Connection Manager.

To delete the actual web site on the content server, you must log on to the server and delete the project file created by Site Studio. Before you do this, you must stop the running web site (see Section 7.4, "Starting and Stopping a Web Site") so that revisions of the project file are not checked in (automatically) when you are trying to delete it.

7.2 Site Addressing

Like any web site, in Site Studio you must associate an address with your web site so that you, contributors, and visitors can locate the site with a web browser.

Site Studio can identify a web site using a folder address, a domain address, or a combination of both. The Administrator can specify a domain, a folder, or a combination to map to a particular web site.

When you first set up your site in Designer, you have a folder name address, which comprises the name of the hosting computer and the site ID. This address works well for internal purposes, such as a departmental web site or a demonstration site. However, if you intend to make the site publicly available on the Internet, you should configure one or more domain names and point them to the site.

A folder-based site, using a folder address, uses only the folder to identify a site. An example of this would be www.example.com/SiteStudio, where the folder SiteStudio identifies the specific site on the domain.

A domain-based site uses simply a domain to identify a site. Examples would be www.example.com, or sales.example.com. The domain identifies the site.

The combination of both uses a domain and a folder (or any number of folders). Common examples of this are to use language folders, such as www.example.com/en/ or www.example.com/fr/. Using the combination of domain and folder also creates a convenient way to move your site from design to the production system.

A domain address requires additional DNS configuration that the site manager or site administrator must perform.

These topics cover site addressing in greater detail:

7.2.1 Mapping Domain Names to Your Site

A domain name is a unique name that identifies a web site. You can point one or more domain names to your Site Studio web site, and you most likely do this if you plan to make your site publicly available on the Internet.

The way to do this is get the domain name, configure it on a name server, and then map the domain name to your site using Site Studio. This topic only discusses the last step, mapping the domain name. For help configuring the domain name, contact the appropriate third party.

There are two places in Site Studio where you can map a domain name:

7.2.1.1 Mapping a Domain Name Using Designer

To map a domain name using Site Studio Designer, perform these tasks:

  1. Select File, then Site, then select Advanced, and then Edit Site Addresses.

    This opens the Site Addresses dialog (Figure 7-7). For more information, see Section A.5, "Site Addresses Dialog."

  2. To add a domain, click the New Site Address icon (Figure 7-7) and type a name in the space provided.

    Figure 7-7 New Site Address icon

    New Site Address icon

    When you enter a domain name, do not add the protocol specifier (http or https). Only enter the domain name.

  3. Press Enter on your keyboard to add the domain.

    Repeat these steps for each additional domain name to add.

  4. To make the domain name the default one used by Site Studio, click Set Default.

  5. To remove an existing domain name, select it and click the Delete icon (Figure 7-8).

    Figure 7-8 Delete icon

    Delete icon
  6. Click OK.

7.2.1.2 Mapping a Domain Name Using the Manage Web Site Addresses Page

To map a domain name using the Manage Web Site Addresses page, perform these tasks:

  1. Log onto the content server as an administrator and click Administration.

  2. Click Site Studio Administration to open the Site Studio Administration page.

  3. Click Manage Web Site Addresses to open the Manage Web Site Addresses page.

  4. To add a domain, select the web site in the Web Site menu.

  5. Enter the domain name in the Address field.

  6. Click Add to add the domain name to the web site.

    The page refreshes, showing the web site address in the list of addresses.

  7. To make the domain name the default one used by Site Studio, click the Actions icon (Figure 7-9) beside the name and choose Select As Default Address.

  8. To remove an existing domain name, click the Actions icon (Figure 7-9) beside the name and choose Remove Site Address.

    Figure 7-9 Actions icon

    Actions icon

You can map multiple domain names to your site. When you do this, users see whatever domain name they entered the site with the entire time they browse the site. The domain name that you specify as a default is used by Site Studio when you preview your site, assign content to a region, and so forth.

7.2.2 Changing the Path Used in a Site Address

When you open your site using a domain-based address, you see the http protocol (or https, depending on how the content server is configured), followed by the domain name, followed by the section, followed by a web page. For example:

http://www.example.com/products/index.htm

When you open your site using a folder-based address, you see the http protocol (or https, depending on how the content server is configured), followed by the name of the computer (that hosts the site), followed by the ID of the web site, followed by the section, followed by a page name. For example:

http://UserPC/mysite/products/index.htm

You can change the name that appears in this path by changing the properties of the site, the properties of a section, and the properties for a page template. You change these values using the Properties pane (Figure 7-10).

Figure 7-10 Properties Pane

Properties pane

To change the path names used in a site address, perform these tasks:

Name in pathHow to change its value in the URL
To change the server-relative name in a path-based addressYou can override the value of the Site ID by specifying a URL Directory Name for the root of the site hierarchy.
  • Open the Site Hierarchy pane.

  • Click the root of the site.

  • Open the Properties pane.

  • Enter a value for URL Directory Name.

To change the name of a section
  • Open the Site Hierarchy pane.
  • Click the section you want to change.

  • Open the Properties pane.

  • Enter a value for URL Directory Name.

To change the name for a primary page
  • Open the Site Hierarchy pane.
  • Click the page template you want to change.

  • Open the Properties pane.

  • Enter a value for URL Page Name.


The name used for secondary pages is the content ID (dDocName) of the contributor data file or native document appearing on that page. If desired, you can specify a different value. When you specify a URL Directory Name, you can change the label of a section as many times as you like without affecting the URL.

7.3 Project Files

When you create a web site, Site Studio creates a project file and checks it into the content server. The project file stores your site hierarchy and key information about your web site. Whenever you open and edit your site hierarchy in designer, you are editing the project file.

You do not edit the project file directly, but there are occasions when you perform steps that affect the project file:

7.3.1 Specifying the Metadata That is Assigned to a Project File

When you create a web site for the first time (see Section 7.1.1, "Creating a New Site Connection"), Site Studio creates a project file and checks it into the content server. Like any other content item, there are metadata values that must be assigned to this file.

You can specify the metadata that is assigned to all project files using the "Set Project Default Document Information" page in the content server.

To specify the metadata for new project files, perform these tasks:

  1. Log onto the content server as an administrator and click Administration.

  2. Click Site Studio Administration to open the Site Studio Administration page.

  3. Click Set Project Default Document Information to open the Set Project Default Document Information page.

  4. Select the metadata that you would like to use for your Site Studio project files.

  5. Click Update.

7.3.2 Viewing the Project Status in Designer

As you work in Designer, you may notice a project status icon in the lower right corner. This icon tells you if you are connected to the project file on the content server and if your site hierarchy and the project file are synchronized with one another.

Here is a summary of each icon you may see in the project status area in Designer:

IconDefinition
Green Check project status icon
Your site hierarchy matches the project file on the content server.
Red Circular Arrows project status icon
Your site hierarchy does not match the project file on the content server. You should refresh your site hierarchy.
Question Mark project status icon
The up-to-date status cannot be determined. Either the content server is down, or you have lost your network connection. To resolve this, troubleshoot your network connection or the system running the content server.
Rex X project status icon
Designer is not connected to a web site. To resolve this, reconnect to a web site (see Section 7.1, "Site Connections").

7.3.3 Committing Changes to a Project File

The changes you make to your site hierarchy in Designer affect the contents of the project file on the content server. Site Studio automatically checks in a revision of the project file every ten minutes. To commit changes to the project file sooner than this scheduled time, follow these steps.

To commit site hierarchy changes to the project file, perform these tasks:

  1. In Designer, select File then Site, then select Advanced and then Commit Project Changes.

  2. Click OK to the confirmation message.


    Note:

    Because of the way Site Studio manages project files, there is no worry about losing your site hierarchy changes; even if your connection with the content server is disrupted or the server is temporarily down.

7.3.4 Viewing the Content Information Page for the Project File

You can view your project file's content information page at any time from Designer. Viewing the content information page can be useful when you want to see the details of your project file in the content server, update its metadata, download the file, and so on.

To view the content information page for the project file, select File then Site, then select Advanced and then View Project DOC_INFO in Designer.

This takes you to the Content Information page for the project file in the content server.

7.4 Starting and Stopping a Web Site

You can start and stop a web site in Site Studio, similar to the way you start and stop web sites on a web server. You might do this, for example, to troubleshoot the site, to restart the site after a global update, or prevent content from being viewed or downloaded.

Before you stop the site, you should create a temporary page that opens instead of the site when the site is stopped. This way, users know why the site is not accessible.

You can do either of the following:

7.4.1 Stopping the Web Site

To stop the web site, perform these tasks:

  1. Open the Site Studio Administration page.

  2. Click Manage Web Sites to open the Manage Web Sites page.

  3. Highlight a web site and then click Stop Web Site.

  4. When you are finished performing the necessary administrative tasks on your site, return to the Manage Web Sites page, highlight your site, and click Start Web Site.

7.4.2 Configuring a Temporary Page for the Stopped Site

To configure a temporary page for when the site is stopped, perform these tasks:

  1. Create a web page stating that your site is temporarily down and check the file into the content server.

  2. In Designer, highlight your site or a section in the Site Hierarchy pane.

  3. Open the Properties pane.

  4. Beside Stopped Site Page, click the Additional Information icon (Figure 7-11) and browse to the web page to use when the site is stopped.

Figure 7-11 Additional Information Icon

Additional Information icon
PK8 PK=\EOEBPS/c08_templates.htm Working With Templates

8 Working With Templates

This section covers the following topics:

8.1 About Templates

Templates are the files used to place and arrange content on a web site. Templates are HTML files; page templates are complete files with <HEAD> and <BODY> tags, while subtemplates and region templates are partial HTML sections, placed within a page template between the <BODY> tags, and are used only for content related to the body.

The way Site Studio handles web sites is unlike typical web site development tools. One area where this is clearly seen is in the use of page templates, subtemplates, and region templates.

You can add whatever static content and dynamic content you like to any one of these templates. However, as you spend more time with each of these templates, you see why it makes more sense to add relatively little static content directly to the page. Adding content directly to the page limits reusability and makes localization more difficult, among other things.

The content that you add directly to a template is likely to be information that remains static, or consistent, across the site. It is what establishes the basic look and feel of the site, and may include such things as background colors, background images, and HTML tables (to position text and graphics).

The rest of the content is built from the contributor data files, which are updated by contributors and are associated with the templates. The templates control how the data is displayed, and the definitions control which data is displayed.

The templates are each similarly used to combine the static and dynamic content to complete each part of the site they control.

This section is about the three types of templates as viewed in the Site Assets pane:

8.1.1 About Page Templates

Page templates are fully-formed HTML files that define the layout and complete structure of a web page, including the placement of contribution regions (that is, editable areas on the page), navigation aids (in the form of fragments) and site-wide images (banners and the like). They provide the framework within which site content is displayed. The number of page templates required for a web site depends on the site complexity, but usually a small number can easily be used.

When fewer page templates are used, site-wide changes are made much more easily. The page template represents the asset that is a complete web page in HCSP, JSP, or ASP. Just as on a region template, or a subtemplate, you can place anything directly on the template, like text, or an image, or a fragment, and it appears on every instance that template is used. This is also true of subtemplates and region templates.

Page templates consist of standard HTML layout and formatting code, along with Site Studio tags to specify where fragments and/or placeholders go. As such, they are typically light-weight in that they only contain high-level references to where contribution regions go on the page; they do not specify anything about what goes in these regions, both in terms of content and visual presentation. That is handled by region definitions and templates. Page templates typically include site-wide graphics, such as corporate banners or page layout images, and other recurring, non-editable content, such as navigation aids.

As you reuse the page template, the objects arranged on it are displayed each time the page template opens. Also, when you use the page templates efficiently, then you can create an entire web site with few (or even one) page templates, ensuring that the standard look and feel of your web site is maintained while also making the site management as simple as possible.

For more information, see Section 3.12, "Page Templates."

8.1.2 About Region Templates

Region templates are partial HTML files that define the layout and look-and-feel of the data in contribution regions within web pages. They are partial HTML files in that they do not have a head and body section. This allows them to be inserted into other HTML code as the web pages are generated for the Site Studio site.

These templates consist of standard HTML layout and formatting code, along with Site Studio tags to specify where elements (from contributor data files) or dynamic conversions (of native documents) are placed. Some elements from contributor data files may be displayed in some region templates, but not in others, which allows the information to be reused across different pages. Region templates are used to display data within the placeholder and are used to arrange the elements (limited by the region definition) into the layout desired in your web site. For more information, see Section 3.10, "Region Templates and Region Definitions."

Since the creation of a region template requires you associate it with a region definition, it is recommended that you create region definitions first, then create region templates.

8.1.3 About Subtemplates

Subtemplates are the same as page templates, but with one important difference: subtemplates do not have <HTML>, <HEAD>, and <BODY> sections. As such, they are essentially chunks of HTML code that can be inserted in page templates. Subtemplates may contain very simple HTML code, but they can also be quite complex. The code in a subtemplate is treated exactly as it would be when placed directly in a page template, whether it is a script or a CSS file or any other inserted asset.

Subtemplates can only be placed within placeholders, and subtemplates may contain their own placeholder or placeholders. Subtemplates are often used as a way to divide one placeholder, singly placed on a page template, into multiple placeholders. This helps make a page template that is more easily reused.

8.1.4 About Cascading Style Sheets

Cascading style sheets (CSS) are used to control positioning, layout, and other styles on a page. Stylesheets are edited in source view. They are usually added to other objects such as a page template or a subtemplate, just as it would be inserted in any static HTML page.

8.2 Managing Templates as Site Assets

All templates, just as all other site assets, are easily managed through the Site Assets pane. Here you can add new templates, modify the information on existing templates, and remove templates from the site.

This section covers the following topics:

8.2.1 Creating a New Template

To create a template, perform these tasks:

  1. From the list of asset types, select the template type to create.

  2. Click the Create New icon (Figure 8-1), select New, and then select the template type (this will most always be HCSP).

    The Assign Info Form opens for you to check the template into the content server.

    Figure 8-1 Create New Icon

    Create new icon
  3. Enter appropriate values for the Assign Info Form.

    For guidelines on naming Site Studio assets, see Section 4.2, "Naming Site Assets."

  4. When complete, click Assign Info.

  5. The template is created.

There is an additional way to create page templates after the site hierarchy is created. For more information, see Section 8.2.2, "Creating a Page Template From the Site Hierarchy."

8.2.2 Creating a Page Template From the Site Hierarchy

Another method of creating page templates is available, but only after you have created a site hierarchy:

  1. In the site hierarchy, right-click a section and then select either Select Home Page, Select Primary Page, or Select Secondary Page, depending on where the page template is used.

    Depending on which you selected from the menu, one of these dialogs opens:

  2. Select Create a new page template.

  3. Click OK.

  4. Add the information to check the page template into the content server.

    For guidelines on naming Site Studio assets, see Section 4.2, "Naming Site Assets."

  5. The page template is created and associated with the section.

When you create a page template this way, the contextual data is presented in the Preview tab. If you create a page template through the site assets pane, then you must assign the page template to a section to see the data which opens based on which section the page is in.

8.2.3 Copying a Template

You can select a template from the list to copy, select a template from the content server to copy, or select a template from your local instance to copy.

Copying a template from the Site Assets pane

  1. In the menu on the Site Assets pane, select the template type.

  2. Select the template you want to copy from the list.

  3. Click the Create New icon (Figure 8-2), select Copy, and then Selected:

    The Assign Info Form opens for you to check the item into the content server.

    Figure 8-2 Create New Icon

    Create New icon
  4. Enter appropriate values for the Assign Info Form.

  5. When complete, click Assign Info.

  6. The template is copied.

Copying a template from the content server

  1. In the menu on the Site Assets pane, select the template type.

  2. Click the Create New icon (Figure 8-2), select Copy, and then from Server.

    A search results page opens.

  3. Click the corresponding Select button of the one you want to copy.

    The Assign Info Form opens for you to check the item into the content server.

  4. Enter appropriate values for the Assign Info Form.

  5. When complete, click Assign Info.

  1. The template is copied.

Copying a template from your local instance

  1. In the menu on the Site Assets pane, select the template type.

  2. Click the Create New icon (Figure 8-2), select Copy, and then from Local.

    An open file dialog opens.

  3. On your local instance, navigate to the template you want to copy.

  4. Select the file and click Open.

    The Assign Info Form opens for you to check the item into the content server.

  5. Enter appropriate values for the Assign Info Form.

  6. When complete, click Assign Info.

  7. The template is copied.

8.2.4 Viewing the Content Information of a Template

To view content information for a template, perform these tasks:

  1. In the menu on the Site Assets pane, select the template type.

  2. Select a template from the list.

  3. Click the Doc Info icon (Figure 8-3).

    The content information page opens.

    Figure 8-3 Doc Info icon

    Document Info icon

8.2.5 Viewing the Content Information of a Page Template from the Site Hierarchy

There may be times when you want to view the content information page for a page template. You can use the features available in the content server to update the metadata, send a link to the file by e-mail, subscribe to it, and so on.

You can view the content information page using the site hierarchy pane.

To view the metadata of a page template, right-click the desired page template in the site hierarchy pane and choose View Document Info.

8.2.6 Adding a Template to a Site

To add a template to a site, perform these tasks:

  1. In the menu on the Site Assets pane, select the template type.

  2. Click the Add to Site icon (Figure 8-4).

    A search results page opens.

    Figure 8-4 Add to Site Icon

    Add to Site icon
  3. Select the templates to add, click Site Studio, and then Select Marked Documents.

  4. Depending on your configuration, you may receive a caution that you are about to add existing asset(s) to your site. Click OK.

    The templates are now associated with the web site.

8.2.7 Removing a Template from a Site

To remove a template from a site, perform these tasks:

  1. In the menu on the Site Assets pane, select the template type.

  2. From the list, select the template to be removed and click the Remove From Site icon (Figure 8-5).

    When you remove a template, you are simply removing its association with a site. You are not deleting the file from the content server.

    Figure 8-5 Remove from Site Icon

    Remove from Site icon

8.3 Understanding the Contribution Regions

The area that the contributor can edit is called the contribution region. This area is defined by the designer by using a placeholder. Within that placeholder, the subtemplate (if used) and region template are used to control how the data associated within the contribution region is displayed. The definitions - placeholder, region, and element, are used to control how the contributor edits and interacts with that data.

Element definitions are used to determine what toolbar icons and editing capabilities are available to the contributor. The elements are arranged on the region template. The region template is the smallest "chunk" of HTML that is controlled as a site asset, allowing you to use and reuse that one particular section of HTML and associated content passed through the template. The region definition defines which elements are available to use in a region template. It also defines what level of access the contributor has in switching the region content.

A region definition can contain more element definitions than are placed in the region template. Those element definitions listed in the region definition, but not used on the region template, still appear in Contributor when editing the data file. This is especially useful to remember if you use a "teaser" of information on one page to go to the full set of information on another page. This concept is covered in more detail in Section 3.10, "Region Templates and Region Definitions."

The boundaries of the contribution region are set by the placeholder. In a general sense, the placeholder is the area that is called the contribution region. The placeholder is not an asset - it is just a marker on a page template (or subtemplate) that is used to show where the contribution region is relative to the placement of the other objects on the site template or subtemplate. The placeholder definition assigned to a placeholder defines if the contributor has access to edit data, and if the contributor can switch the content.

The placeholder definition also defines which region definitions are available in the placeholder, and which region templates are available and which is the default for each region definition within the placeholder.

Since a placeholder does not have to be accessible to contributors, and since a placeholder can contain a subtemplate that is then divided into other placeholders, it's not always the case that a placeholder is strictly a contribution region. But in a general sense, when you conceive of a simple placeholder, it is the contribution region that the contributor works with.

8.4 Inserting Placeholders

Placeholders are used on page templates and subtemplates to mark an area to place the content. Placeholders are not assets; placeholder definitions are used to define how the placeholder is used on the page, and what content is placed on the page.

To insert the placeholder, follow these steps:

  1. Click in the template where you want to place the placeholder.

  2. On the toolbar, click the Insert Placeholder button.

  3. The Define Placeholder dialog (see Section A.75, "Define Placeholder Dialog") appears.

    The dialog lists the placeholder names created in the Placeholder Definition Mappings dialog (see Section A.73, "Placeholder Definition Mappings Dialog").

  4. Select the placeholder name to associate with the placeholder and click OK.

8.5 Inserting Objects

Other site assets are easily added by placing the objects directly in the template. This can be done by selecting the icon from the toolbar, or by right-clicking on the template and adding the available site asset.

Adding an object to a page template, subtemplate, or region template is very simple.

To add an object, follow these steps:

  1. Right-click in the template where you want to place the asset.

  2. A contextual menu appears. Select Insert Object.

  3. A further contextual menu opens, and those site assets that are available to insert are displayed.

    For instance, you are not able to select an element unless you are in a region template.

  4. After the site asset has been selected, it is added to the template.

When you add an asset that has dynamic content (such as a placeholder), then a marker appears in place of what content might be there. When you add an asset that has static content, such as an image, then the content appears.

An asset can also be added directly in source view.

On a region template, the region definition limits which elements are available to add.

8.6 Inserting Fragments

Fragments are simple to add to any template. To add a fragment to a template, you select the fragment from the fragment toolbox, and it is inserted at the selected location in the template.

However, there is one important consideration to use with a fragment.

A number of the fragments that are shipped with Site Studio Designer are composed of snippets that are used in the head and the body of the page template. Since subtemplates and region templates do not have a head, only a body, then the fragments do not work properly if inserted on these templates.

For you to have fragments that work properly in a subtemplate or a region template, you should create your own fragments that have no head snippet, and one body snippet. Fragments that have a head snippet and body snippet will work in a page template, but will not work in other templates. This limits the reusability of the fragment.

For more information, see Chapter 13, "Working With Fragments."

8.7 Working With Text

Working with text in Design view is much like working with text in a word processing program (with word-wrapping, line breaks, formatting options, and so on). To add text to a page template, simply click in the page template where you would like to add the text and start typing. Designer takes care of the necessary HTML code behind the scenes.

After you add and edit your text, you can format it by changing the typeface and font size, indenting or centering the text, adding bulleted or numbered lists, and so on.

Adding text directly to a template is discouraged. When the text is on the template, rather than the contributor data file, this makes localization more difficult.

8.8 Arranging Objects on the Template

How you arrange the information on your page, if you need a specific layout structure, can be done either with HTML tables or the use of CSS to place objects.

For the most part, when you insert an asset on a page template, subtemplate, or region template, it is inserted where you place the cursor. However, this does not necessarily mean that the asset appears in the finished web page the same way it appears in Designer. Variances such as the consumer's browser choice, the browser window size, and what other objects a contributor has placed in the contributor data file can make the web site appear to be organized differently.

Using CSS is the more efficient method, because CSS files are a managed object and can allow for maximizing reusability. If you place a table in an asset, such as a subtemplate, then to use that same structure in other assets, you must re-create the table. If you do use tables in this way, then you must make the changes across multiple places when you want to make the changes.

With CSS, you can identify the exact placement of each site asset, including elements, within the style sheet.

Many prefer to use tables because they are easy to set up and create on the web page. A table offers a quick solution of structuring the relative placement. With a table, you can create a shape of cells that place data into relative placement to each other.

8.9 Applying CSS Classes

Site Studio, by default, applies font and paragraph settings directly (inline) to the text.

Alternatively, you can apply classes from a cascading style sheet to your text (and images). Using CSS classes, you can store all of your font and paragraph settings in one location and then apply those settings to your web page.

This saves you time, because rather than change the font and paragraph settings for each individual heading or paragraph, you can specify a class for each one. If you must change those settings, simply update the class.

To implement CSS classes, you insert a reference to your style sheet in the head of your page template. You can do this using a relative path, for example:

<link href="<!--$HttpRelativeWebRoot-->groups/public/documents/adacct/stylesheet.css" type="text/css" rel="stylesheet" />

Or, more typically, you put them in a fragment. Placing CSS references in a fragment does not expose the directory structure of your server.

Then, apply the class names from the style sheet to your text and graphics by editing the page template in Source view or by using the Properties pane in Design view.

Figure 8-6 Using the Properties Pane to Apply the Class "MyNewStyle."

Property classname in Properties pane

The Site Assets pane in Designer can be very useful for adding, editing, and identifying the path to the Cascading Style Sheet in the content server.

Many of the fragments that come with Site Studio contain CSS files as an asset to the fragment (see Section 13.12.5, "Adding, Editing, and Deleting Fragment Assets"). You can reference class names from those CSS files, too, if you like.

You may also want to make these classes available to contributors while working in the Contributor application. This helps you enforce consistency across the site and make site-wide style updates much easier.

8.10 Working With HTML Tables

HTML tables are often used in web page design. They can be used to structure a web page when you do not want to use cascading style sheets to do so. The treatment of HTML tables in a page template is no different from tables in other web pages.

There are two principal uses for an HTML table: (1) to present data in a tabular format, and (2) to lay out text and graphics on a web page. As the designer of the site, you may find yourself using tables more frequently for the latter.

Working in a table, you can control how content appears on the web page by specifying the size and location of the table, the size of each column and row, and the content that goes into each cell. You keep your site visitors from seeing the table by hiding its borders. In Site Studio, tables are especially useful for positioning contribution regions and the elements within them.

To make specific edits to your table, you can modify the HTML <TABLE> tag directly in the Properties pane. You can also make changes in source view.

Figure 8-7 Properties of the <TABLE> Tag in Design View

Table Tag Properties in the Properties pane

In the Properties pane, you can change the background color, border width, cell padding, and several other settings. All of the attributes that would be entered into the <TABLE> tag are available in the Property Panel. For a complete description of the <TABLE> tag, visit the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) web site: http://www.w3.org/TR/html401/struct/tables.html#edef-TABLE.

8.11 Viewing Templates in Designer

There are three ways to view a template while in Designer: Design view, Source view, and the preview. Each offers a different way to look at each template while working with that template in Designer.

In each template window in the Designer workspace, there will be three tabs at the bottom. Select the tab to choose with the Design view, the Source view, or the Preview for that template.

This section covers these topics:

8.11.1 Design View

When you open a template (page template, region template, or subtemplate) in Designer, it opens in the workspace in design view, where you can edit the template as needed. The workspace then functions as an editor that offers many common editing features.

Design view displays all objects as they are arranged on the template. In design view you will see the positioning of both static content (for example, a fixed banner graphic) and dynamic content (for example, placeholders and fragments). Depending on how the template was set up and what positioning methods are used (for instance, using tables or CSS to align assets), this view may approximate the page layout when viewed in a web browser. You see text, images, colors, hyperlinks, and tables as they appear on the actual web site, but dynamic content (from fragments and scripts) is represented as tags rather than the actual content. This is because most fragments and scripts require server-side scripting and dynamically rendered content.

Figure 8-8 Design View

Design view of a template for a web page

You can edit the text and objects using common editing keystrokes (for example, Ctrl+C and Ctrl+V to copy and paste), the application toolbars (see Section 5.10, "Toolbars"), and right-click menus (see Section 5.6.7, "Right-Click Menus"). To select an object, simply click it, so it displays selection handles (Figure 8-9).

Figure 8-9 Selected Object in Design View

Selected object in design view

For edits that cannot be performed using design view, you can use the properties pane (see Section 5.5, "Properties Pane"). If you cannot make a specific edit here, you can always edit the actual code in source view.

Designer can also highlight the location of HTML tags in design view. To turn this feature on, click the Show/Hide HTML Tags icon (Figure 8-10) in the formatting toolbar. You can click the down arrow next to the icon to show or hide specific HTML tags.

Figure 8-10 Show/Hide HTML Tags

Show/Hide HTML Tags icon

8.11.2 Source View

Source view displays the code that is in the template: HTML, XML, JavaScript, Idoc Script, Site Studio tags, and so on.

Figure 8-11 Source View

Source view of a template for a web page

The information in source view appears as color-coded text:

  • Black is used for XML code, HTML tag attributes, and text that appears on the web page.

  • Purple is used for HTML tags.

  • Blue is used for HTML tag attribute values.

  • Green is used for Idoc Script, HTML comments, and code inserted by Site Studio.

You can change many of these settings, including the typeface, indentation levels, and line wrapping. For more information, see Section 6.9, "Formatting the Code in Source View."

Source view offers complete control over the site template. This can be especially true if you are implementing several custom assets. In fact, you may find yourself starting off in design view to create the page and then switching to source view to customize the appearance and behavior of the page.

8.11.3 Preview

Preview provides an actual view of a web page with all assets in place, as it appears in a web browser for consumers. This is useful for previewing templates and checking how fragments and placeholders are positioned on the template (which may be hard to see in design mode, especially if the page layout is controlled by CSS).

Figure 8-12 Preview

Preview of a web page

Note:

Site Studio requires Internet Explorer 7 or higher to provide previewing capabilities.

8.12 Region Templates and Region Definitions

Region definitions specify what contribution regions on a web page contain, whereas region templates define what contribution regions look like. In other words, region definitions specify the structure (and attributes) of site content, and region templates define the visual presentation of that content on a web page.

There can be multiple region templates for each region definition. This allows site content to be displayed differently depending on the context within the site. If there are multiple region templates for a region definition, then the default region template is used unless a different one was specifically set to be used.

Since the creation of a region template requires you associate it with a region definition, it is recommended that you create region definitions first, then create region templates.

8.13 Working With Native Documents and Conversion Definitions

Native documents require that a conversion definition is available to define the rules and templates in place to convert the native document on the web page. To use and convert native documents, you must first have Check Out and Open and Dynamic Converter installed on the content server.

The dynamic conversion can only be located on a region template. Adding the conversion to the region template is simple, and works the same way that adding any other asset to the template would.

To add the dynamic conversion to the region template, follow these steps:

  1. Open the region template that you want the converted document to appear on.

  2. Right-click and from the menu select Insert Object, and then select Dynamic Conversion.

    The Insert Dynamic Conversion dialog (see Section A.78, "Insert Dynamic Conversion Dialog") opens.

  3. Select the dynamic conversion to use.

  4. Click OK.

For more information on native documents and conversion definitions, see Section 10.8, "Working With Native Documents."

PKA5#PK=\EOEBPS/e01_user_interface.htm User Interface

A User Interface

Site Studio Designer includes numerous dialogs and administrative pages that you use to create and administer your site:

A.1 Customize Dialog

The Customize Dialog is used to modify the designer interface to match the needs of the designer.

A.1.1 Customize Dialog: Commands Tab

The Designer application includes numerous menus and commands. You can change the way these menus and commands appear and even create menus and then populate them with commands. In conjunction with the Toolbars tab (see Section A.1.2, "Customize Dialog: Toolbars Tab"), you can create a toolbar to display frequently used commands.

Figure A-1 Commands Tab dialog

Commands Tab dialog
ElementDescription
CategoriesDisplays existing menus. Use New Menu to create a menu in Designer.
CommandsDisplays available commands. Use New Menu to create a command for a menu in Designer.
DescriptionDisplays a description of the selected menu.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.
CloseCloses the Customize dialog.

A.1.2 Customize Dialog: Toolbars Tab

The Designer application includes numerous toolbars. You can show and hide these toolbars, create a toolbar and then populate it with commands (see Section A.1.1, "Customize Dialog: Commands Tab"); delete toolbars; and restore icons that were removed from the original toolbars.

Figure A-2 Toolbars Tab dialog

Toolbars Tab dialog
ElementDescription
ToolbarsDisplays a checkbox for each toolbar item in Designer. Select the checkbox to show that item in the toolbar or clear the checkbox to hide that item in the toolbar. For more information about the toolbars, see Section 5.10, "Toolbars."

Contributor Toolbar: Includes Insert Region, Insert Element, and so on

Formatting Toolbar: Includes typeface, bold, align left, and so on.

HTML Toolbar: Includes HTML styles, insert image, insert rule, and so on.

Menu Bar: Includes File, Edit, View, and so on.

Site Toolbar: Includes Choose Site, Assign Content, and so on.

Standard: Includes Copy, Paste, Save, and so on.

Table Toolbar: Includes Insert Table, Insert Row, Insert Column, and so on.

ResetResets the existing toolbar. Select the toolbar you want to restore and then click this button.

This command applies only to the default set of toolbars provided with Designer. If you created a toolbar and then removed an icon from it but wanted to restore that icon, then you must go to the Commands tab, drag the icon from the Commands box, and drop it onto the toolbar.

Reset AllResets all of the toolbars in Designer.

This command applies only to the default set of toolbars provided with Designer. If you created a toolbar and then removed an icon from it but wanted to restore that icon, then you must go to the Commands tab, drag the icon from the Commands box, and drop it onto the toolbar.

NewOpens the Toolbar Name dialog where you can create a toolbar.

When the toolbar displays in the Toolbars column, drag its icon from the Toolbars tab to the desired position in relation to the other toolbars in Designer.

To populate the toolbar, open the Commands tab and drag each icon (representing a command) from the Commands box to the toolbar. You can further customize the toolbar by right-clicking the icon or text and clicking Button Appearance in the popup menu.

RenameRenames a toolbar. You can only rename toolbars that you create. You cannot rename the toolbars that come with Designer.
DeleteDeletes a toolbar. You can only delete toolbars that you create. You cannot delete the toolbars that come with Designer.
Show text labelsDisplays explanatory text with the toolbar icon.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.
CloseCloses the Customize dialog.

A.1.3 Customize Dialog: Tools Tab

The Designer application includes numerous toolbars and menus. In addition to these, you can add a shortcut to an outside application in the Tools menu to provide immediate access to that application.

Figure A-3 Tools Tab dialog

Tools Tab dialog
ElementDescription
Menu contentsDisplays the names of existing menus.
Surrounding text describes param_new.gif.
Creates the menu. A placeholder for the tool appears in the Menu contents pane.
Surrounding text describes param_delete.gif.
Deletes the menu that you created.
Surrounding text describes param_up.gif.
Moves the item up in the Tools menu.
Surrounding text describes param_down.gif.
Moves the item down in the Tools menu.
CommandSpecifies the path to the executable file (the application) that is used for this menu.

Use the Browse button to browse to the executable file rather than typing in the full path.

You can also type the name of the executable file without the path and then use the initial directory to identity the path.

ArgumentsUse to direct the application to open a particular file. The argument requires the full path and file name for the executable (used to open the file) followed by the full path and file name of the file.

The path for the executable should have forward slashes; there should be a space between the two paths; and the path off the document should be enclosed in quotation marks. For example:

C:/Program Files/Office/winword.exe "C:\Documents\sa.doc"

Initial directoryThe directory for the executable file only if the executable file by itself was entered in the Command field; otherwise, this field can be left empty.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.
CloseCloses the Customize dialog.

A.1.4 Customize Dialog: Keyboard Tab

The Designer application includes numerous commands that have one or more keyboard shortcuts assigned to them. You can create, change, and delete keyboard shortcuts.

Figure A-4 Keyboard Tab dialog

Keyboard Tab dialog
ElementDescription
CategoryDisplays the menus. Select the menu that contains the command you want to assign a shortcut to.
CommandsDisplays the available commands for the menus. Select the command to assign the shortcut to.
DescriptionDisplays a description of the command.
Set Accelerator forSpecifies when the keyboard shortcut is available. Select Default if you want the keyboard shortcut to be available in general when working in Designer.
Current KeysDisplays keyboard shortcuts already assigned to the command.
Press New Shortcut KeyPlace your cursor in this text box then, using your keyboard, press the actual key combination to assign to the shortcut.
AssignAssigns the shortcut key to the command.
RemoveDeletes the keyboard shortcut.
Reset AllRestores all of the keyboard shortcuts available when you first started Designer.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.
CloseCloses the Customize dialog.

A.1.5 Customize Dialog: Menu Tab

The Designer application includes numerous popup menus. You can customize the behavior of these popup menus by adding, deleting, and changing the way the popup menus work.

Figure A-5 Menu Tab dialog

Surrounding text describes Figure A-5 .
ElementDescription
Show Menus forSelects the menu to modify. Designer uses the Default Menu.
ResetResets the menu for Designer.
Menu animationsControls how the menu commands appear in Designer (includes menus on the Menu bar and popup menus). There are four options:

None: The list of menu commands appears in the usual way.

Unfold: The list of menu commands opens from top-left to bottom-right.

Slide: The list of menu commands opens from top to bottom.

Fade: The list of menu commands slowly appears on-screen.

Menu shadowsDisplays a shadow effect around the menu.
Select context menuModifies the menu command.

When you choose this, a popup menu appears in the upper-left corner of the Customize dialog. Click the Commands tab and under Categories, select the appropriate menu.

Under Commands, select the command to add to the popup menu.

Drag the command onto the popup menu and position it where you would like it to appear on the menu.

ResetResets the commands from the Select Context Menu drop-down list.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.
CloseCloses the Customize dialog.

A.1.6 Customize Dialog: Options Tab

The Designer application includes numerous menus, icons, and screen tips. You can control the way these work on this tab.

Figure A-6 Options Tab dialog

Options Tab dialog box
ElementDescription
Show ScreenTips on toolbarsOpens popup text (a screentip) when the cursor passes over an icon.
Show shortcut keys in ScreenTipsThe screentip that opens when the cursor passes over an icon also displays the shortcut key assigned to that command.
Large IconsDisplays large icons in the user interface.
Menus show recently used commands firstCommands are listed based on their frequency of use.
Show full menus after a short delayOpens the full menu after a short delay.
Reset my usage dataReturns the Designer to its original state.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.
CloseCloses the Customize dialog.

A.1.7 Customize Dialog: Source View Tab

The Designer application opens multiple views of site assets. These can include Source view, Design view, and Preview. You can customize the way the code opens in source view by changing the font face, font size, and certain automatic formatting.

Figure A-7 Source View Tab dialog

Source View Tab dialog box
ElementDescription
FontSelects the font (from those available on your computer) that is used to display the code in Source view.
SizeSelects the font size that is used to display the code in Source view.
Apply automatic formatting when switching to Source viewEach time you switch to Source view when working on an asset, the code is automatically formatted according to the following choices.
Indent block level tagsSuccessive block-level tags are indented to make the text easier to read.
Indent SizeSets the indent size by number of characters.
Place each tag attribute on a new lineEach attribute of a tag appears on a new line. The attributes are indented to the same degree as the tag itself.
Tab sizeIdentifies the number of characters per tab.
Enable Line WrappingEnables line wrapping.
Line LengthSpecifies the maximum number of characters per line when you enable line wrapping.
Treat unknown tags as inline elementsEnsures that any unknown tags that Designer encounters are treated as generic inline elements (for example, SPAN) during HTML Tidy actions.
Generate XHTML-compliant markupTurns existing HTML into XHTML-compliant markup. Consequently, elements in HTML are combined with XML to create a more standards-aware language (for example, closing all HTML tags).
doctypeAdds the specified doctype to the header of the HTML for the web page.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.
CloseCloses the Customize dialog.

A.1.8 Customize Dialog: Warning Dialogs Tab

The Designer application opens numerous warning and confirmation messages. You can control which warning messages open and which ones remain hidden.

Figure A-8 Warning Dialogs Tab dialog

Warning Dialogs Tab dialog box
ElementDescription
Enable Warning DialogsProvides checkboxes beside each warning message.

Select the checkbox to display the warning message, or clear the checkbox to hide the warning message.

By default, certain warning messages open when you first open Designer.

Check AllChecks all of the warning messages so that all of them open.
Clear AllClears all of the warning messages so that none of them open.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.
CloseCloses the Customize dialog.

A.1.9 Customize Dialog: Miscellaneous Tab

When Designer opens, it automatically connects to the last site you worked on and it downloads certain fragments for display in the Toolbox. You can change these options, if you like.

Figure A-9 Miscellaneous Tab dialog

Miscellaneous Tab dialog box
ElementDescription
Filter fragments in other languagesWhen checked, only the fragments written in the same language as your site (HCSP/JSP or ASP) appear in the Toolbox.
Filter fragments from other sitesOnly the fragments that belong to your site (and not other sites in the content server) appear in the Toolbox.

Fragments in fragment libraries not identified as part of your site no longer appear in the Toolbox. To make a fragment part of your site, add it as a site asset to the "Fragment Libraries" category.

Filter default librariesOnly the fragments that you have created for your site (and not the default ones that ship with Site Studio) appear in the Toolbox.
Reconnect at startupWhen opening Designer, you are automatically connected to the last site you worked on.
Enable project status checkingWhile working in Designer, a project status icon displays in the lower right telling you if the site hierarchy matches the latest project file in the content server.
Enable accessibility modeWhile working in Designer, the menus are changed to work better with a screen reader.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.
CloseCloses the Customize dialog.

A.1.10 Customize Dialog: Log File Tab

Site Studio creates a detailed log file for your site. You can control what is logged and the details of the log on this tab.

Figure A-10 Log File Tab dialog

Log File Tab dialog box
ElementDescription
Reset log file each time Designer startsCreates a log file each time Designer starts.
Log details of all communication with the Content ServerCreates a detailed log of all communication with the content server.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.
CloseCloses the Customize dialog.

A.2 Site Connection Manager Dialog

Designer uses a site connection to connect to and update a web site in the content server. You can create, edit, and delete site connections using this dialog.

Figure A-11 Site Connection Manager dialog

Site Connection Manager dialog box
ElementDescription
Connection Name | web site ID | Server Cgi URL

(Status area)

Displays each connection name, the corresponding web site, and content server Cgi URL.
Automatically connect when doneAutomatically connects to the site (using the site connection you just created) when you close the Site Connection Manager dialog.
NewOpens the Site Connection Details dialog (see Section A.3, "Site Connection Details Dialog"), where you can create a site connection.
EditOpens the Site Connection Details dialog (see Section A.3, "Site Connection Details Dialog"), where you can edit an existing site connection.
DeleteDeletes an existing site connection.
DoneCloses the Site Connection Manager dialog and connects to the web site using the highlighted site connection (if you checked "Automatically connect when done").
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.

You must first disconnect from a web site before you can edit or delete that site in the Site Connection Manager.

A.3 Site Connection Details Dialog

Designer uses a site connection to connect to and update a web site in the content server. You can create and edit site connections using this dialog. When creating a site connection, you identify the content server where the site resides, the name of the actual web site, and a name for the connection.

Figure A-12 Site Connection Details dialog

Site Connection Details dialog box
ElementDescription
Server Cgi URLThe address of the content server that hosts the web site.

You can type the complete Cgi URL address of the content server, or you can choose a placeholder address in the menu, replacing <server> with the name of your server.

ConnectConnects to the content server using the Cgi URL address you provided above.

You are prompted to enter your login credentials to connect to the server.

Site LabelDisplays existing web sites on the server. Choose an existing site or click New to create a new one.
NewOpens the Create New Site dialog (see Section A.4, "Create New Site Dialog"), where you can create a web site.
Connection NameThe name that displays in Designer to identify this site connection.

You can use the default name provided or enter a new one.

OKSaves your settings and closes the Site Connection Details dialog.
CancelCancels your settings and closes the Site Connection Details dialog.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.

A.4 Create New Site Dialog

Designer uses a site connection to connect to and update a web site in the content server. You can create a web site using this dialog (accessible from the Site Connection Details dialog (see Section A.3, "Site Connection Details Dialog"). When creating a site, you specify a site ID, name, and type.

Figure A-13 Create New Site dialog

Create New Site dialog box
ElementDescription
IDThe identification of the web site. This ID is used to uniquely identify this site and its associated files in the content server (not to be confused with a Content ID).

You should use only valid characters (no spaces, no symbols, and so on), which this dialog forces you to do when you enter a value. You may also want to keep the value relatively short.

You see the ID again when working with the "siteid" fragment parameter or CSP.

NameThe name of the web site.

The name that you use becomes the title of the project file in the content server, and it appears as the title of your site in the "Web Sites" menu in the content server. (This value does not affect the TITLE tag in your page templates.)

TypeThe type, or scripting choice, for your web site:

hcsp/jsp: Creates an Idoc Script or JavaServer Pages-enabled web site, which governs other choices in Site Studio.

asp: Creates an Active Server Pages-enabled web site, which governs other choices in Site Studio.

You can create a web site in HCSP, JSP, or ASP. But only those sites built in HCSP have the full functionality, architecture and features introduced in Site Studio 10gR4.

OKSaves your settings and closes the Create New Site dialog.
CancelCancels your settings and closes the Create New Site dialog.

A.5 Site Addresses Dialog

You can open your site using a domain-based address or a folder-based address. Using this dialog, you can add one or more domain names that point to your web site.

Figure A-14 Site Addresses dialog

Site Addresses dialog box
ElementDescription
Surrounding text describes param_new.gif.
Click this to add a domain name that resolves to your web site.

(When you click this, a text box opens where you can enter your address and then click Enter.)

Surrounding text describes param_delete.gif.
Deletes the selected site address.
Set DefaultSets the selected address as the default address.

The default address is used in several places in Site Studio, such as by Designer to connect to and preview your site and when you assign content to a contribution region.

OKSaves your settings and closes the Site Address dialog.
CancelCancels your settings and closes the Site Address dialog.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.

Before a domain name address works, you must properly configure the domain name (DNS record) on a name server.

The default folder address you see when you first open this dialog is the one used by Site Studio when the site was first created.

A.6 Choose Default Link Format Dialog

When you create a hyperlink in Designer and in Contributor, you have numerous choices regarding the format of the link. Using this dialog, you can choose a default link format for designers and contributors, and you can hide this option so that it does not appear in the Link Wizard (see Section A.18, "Link Wizard").

Figure A-15 Choose Default Link Format dialog

Choose Default Link Format dialog box
ElementDescription
Path-based URLAbsolute Path: Generates a full path. For example: <!--$ssServerRelativeSiteRoot-->products/index.htm (where "<!--$ssServerRelativeSiteRoot-->" gets replaced with the path to the root of the web site).

Relative path: Uses a relative path instead of a full path. For example: ../products/index.htm

ID-based URLContains the hard-coded ID of the target location without referencing a section name or label. Choose an option:

Client Side javascript:link() / javascript:nodelink() format: Uses client-side JavaScript and the ID of the target location.

Server Side wcmUrl() format: Uses server-side Idoc Script and the ID of the target location.

URL Token ssLINK / ssNODELINK format: Uses a Site Studio token and the ID of the target location.

Hide the "Choose Format" page in the Designer Hyperlink WizardPrevents the Create Hyperlink Wizard - Choose Format screen (see Section A.18.3, "Link Wizard - Choose URL Format") from displaying in the Create Hyperlink Wizard for designers.
Hide the "Choose Format" page in the Contributor Hyperlink WizardPrevents the Create Hyperlink Wizard - Choose Format screen (see Section A.18.3, "Link Wizard - Choose URL Format") from displaying in the Create Hyperlink Wizard for contributors.
OKSaves your settings and closes the Choose Default Link Format dialog.
CancelCancels your settings and closes the Choose Default Link Format dialog.
HelpOpens the online Help.

A.7 Define Environment Properties Dialog

When replicating a web site, the properties of the site are replicated as well from one server to the next. In this dialog, you can specify properties that are not replicated and instead remain on the source server. The settings are called environment properties.

Figure A-16 Define Environment Properties dialog

Define Element Properties dialog box
ElementDescription
NameThe name of the property.

Check the box beside the name to turn it into an environment property.

TypeThe type of property.
DescriptionA description of the property.
OKSaves your settings and closes the Environment Properties dialog.
CancelCancels your settings and closes the Environment Properties dialog.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.

A.8 New Section Dialog

Each section in the site hierarchy contains a label, a URL directory name, and a section ID. These values are used repeatedly throughout your site. You can choose these values when you first create a section, and you can edit them after you create the section (using the Site Hierarchy pane and the Properties pane).

Figure A-17 New Section dialog

New Section dialog box
ElementDescription
LabelThe section label displays in the Site Hierarchy pane and in the navigation menu on your web site (generated by navigation fragments).
URLThe URL is used in the web browser address bar, and it appears in all (path-based) hyperlinks that target the section. This value should not contain spaces or special characters, as they can create linking problems on the web site.

Site Studio automatically strips out illegal characters as you enter the label.

Auto-generate section IDAutomatically generates a section ID (also referred to as "nodeID") that is used in certain (ID-based) hyperlinks that target the section.
Manually enter section IDSelect to enter the section ID (also referred to as "nodeID") yourself. This value is used in certain (ID-based) hyperlinks that target the section.
OKSaves your settings and closes the New Section dialog.
CancelCancels your settings and closes the New Section dialog.
HelpOpens the online Help for this specific dialog.

A.9 Custom Section Properties Dialog

Each section in the site hierarchy contains properties (ID, label, default placeholder definition, and so on). In addition to these, you can create a custom property and then modify the web site to read that value and consequently, perform a certain function. The custom section properties that you add to your site are listed here. You can edit or delete them at any time using this dialog.

Figure A-18 Define Custom Section Properties dialog

Custom Section Properties dialog box
ElementDescription
Name | Type | Description

(Viewing area)

Displays existing custom section properties.
AddOpens the Define Custom Section Property dialog (see Section A.10, "Define Custom Section Property Dialog"), where you can add a custom section property.
DeleteDeletes a custom section property.
EditOpens the Define Custom Section Property dialog (see Section A.10, "Define Custom Section Property Dialog"), where you can edit a custom section property.
OKSaves your settings and closes the Define Custom Section Properties dialog.
CancelCancels your settings and closes the Define Custom Section Properties dialog.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.

A.10 Define Custom Section Property Dialog

Each section in the site hierarchy contains properties (ID, label, default placeholder definition, and so on). In addition to these, you can create a custom property and then modify the web site to read that value and consequently, perform certain function. You can add and edit a custom section property using this dialog.

Figure A-19 Define Custom Section Property dialog

Define Custom Section Property dialog box
ElementDescription
NameThe name of the custom section property. The name displays in the Properties pane when you select a section in the Site Hierarchy pane.
TypeThe type of action to take for this property (similar to the way a fragment parameter works).

text: Provides a simple text box that you can use to add text.

bigtext: Provides a much larger text box (in a popup window) where you can add and edit text.

boolean: Provides a True or False value that you can choose from.

integer: Provides an integer value. The integer value may not contain decimal points.

float: Provides a value, including decimal points.

size: Provides a sizing value, in pixels or percentage.

color: Provides an RGB hexadecimal value (for example, 0xFF0000) and a color picker.

url: Provides a dialog (see Section A.18.1, "Link Wizard - Choose Type of Link") that you use to browse to a URL and then select it as a value.

manageddoc: Opens a content server window that you can use to browse to a document in the content server and then select it as a value (dDocName).

managedurl: Opens a content server window that you can use to browse to the URL of a document in the content server and then select it as a value.

managedquery: Opens the Edit Query Text dialog (see Section A.22, "Edit Query Text Dialog"), where you can build a query.

cssstyle: Provides a text box where you can specify a CSS style value.

siteid: Provides a dialog (see Section A.16, "Select Site Dialog") that you use to select a web site in the content server.

nodeid: Opens a dialog (see Section A.17, "Select Section Dialog") that you use to select a section in your site hierarchy.

DescriptionOptional setting used to display a description of the property at the bottom of the Properties pane.
OKAdds the custom section property and closes the Define Custom Section Property dialog.
CancelCancels your settings and closes the Define Custom Section Property dialog.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.

After you add the custom section property, you must go through your site hierarchy and enter a value for each section. Then, you must modify your site assets to read that custom property and perform a certain function.

A.11 Select (Home) Page Template Dialog

A home page is like a primary page, except that it is associated with the root of the web site rather than one of its sections. It is the default, or landing, page for visitors when they enter the site. You can add a home page using this dialog.

Figure A-20 Select Page Template dialog

Select Page Templatedialog box
ElementDescription
Create a new page templateCreates the home page with the file extension that you specify below:

hcsp: Use for Idoc Script web sites.

jsp: Use for JSP web sites.

asp: Use for ASP web sites.

The available file extensions depend on the type of site you created using the Site Connection Details dialog (see Section A.3, "Site Connection Details Dialog").

You can create a web site in HCSP, JSP, or ASP. But only those sites built in HCSP have the functionality that is in 10gR4 and later releases. You should not create a web site in ASP or JSP unless you have determined that you have very specific needs that require a site built in ASP or JSP.

Select existing page template from the content serverAdds an existing page template (from the content server) to your web site, making it the home page. You can select it from the menu if the page template is one you created recently; if not, select <Choose From Server> to browse to it in the content server when this dialog closes.
Create a new page template from an existing oneCreates a copy of an existing page template and adds it to your web site, making it the home page. This action saves you time by letting you reuse another page template rather than re-create the design from scratch.

The page template that you are creating this from can come from one of two sources:

stored in the content server: Selects a page template stored on the content server. You can select it from the menu if the page template is one you created recently; if not, select <Choose From Server> to browse to it in the content server when this dialog closes.

stored on the file system: Selects a page template stored on the file system. This option can be especially useful if you created a page template on your file system and want to reuse it. The file, however, must have the appropriate file extension (.hcsp, .jsp, or .asp).

Use an external URLThis option applies only to primary pages (see Section A.12, "Select (Primary) Page Template Dialog").
Apply recursively to all subsectionsApplies the same page template to every section below this one in the site hierarchy.

This action is the same as opening each section in the site hierarchy, adding a page template, and choosing "Select existing page template from the content server."

OKCloses the Select Page Template dialog and associates the page template with the root of your site hierarchy.
CancelCloses the Select Page Template dialog without associating a page template with the root of your site hierarchy.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.

A.12 Select (Primary) Page Template Dialog

In most cases, each section in the site hierarchy contains a primary page, which acts as the default, or landing, page for that section. You can create a primary page for each section in the site hierarchy or reuse the same primary page throughout the site hierarchy. You can add a primary page using this dialog.

Figure A-21 Select Page Template dialog

Select Layout Page dialog box
ElementDescription
Create a new page templateCreates a primary page for this section of the site, using the file extension that you specify below:

hcsp: Use for Idoc Script web sites.

jsp: Use for JSP web sites.

asp: Use for ASP web sites.

The available file extensions depend on the type of site you created (see Section A.3, "Site Connection Details Dialog").

You can create a web site in HCSP, JSP, or ASP. But only those sites built in HCSP have the functionality that is in 10gR4 and later releases. You should not create a web site in ASP or JSP unless you have determined that you have very specific needs that require a site built in ASP or JSP.

Select existing page template from the content serverAdds an existing page template from the content server to your web site, making it the primary page for this section. You can select it from the menu if the page template is one you created recently; if not, select <Choose From Server> to browse to it in the content server when this dialog closes.
Create a new page template from an existing oneCreates a copy of an existing page template and adds it to your web site, making it the primary page for this section. This action saves you time by letting you reuse another page template rather than re-create the design from scratch.

The page template used to create the new one may come from one of two sources:

stored in the content server: A page template stored on the content server is used. You can select it from the menu if the page template is one you created recently; if not, select <Choose From Server> to browse to it in the content server when this dialog closes.

stored on the file system: A page template stored on the file system is used. This option is especially useful if you created a page template on your file system and want to reuse it. This file must have the appropriate file extension (.hcsp, .jsp, or .asp).

Use an external URLUses the web page of another web site (possibly a partner site or department-level site) instead of a page template. When visitors go to this section, they are taken to the URL that you specify here.
Apply recursively to all subsectionsApplies this same page template to every section below this one. This is the same as opening each section below this one in the site hierarchy, adding a page template, and choosing "Select existing page template from the content server."
OKCloses the Select Page Template dialog and associates the primary page with this section in the site hierarchy.
CancelCloses the Select Page Template dialog without associating the primary page with this section in the site hierarchy.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.

A.13 Select (Secondary) Page Template Dialog

In most instances, the secondary page is used for a list of items, or items found in a search. A secondary page can also serve as a backdrop for files (data files or native documents) added to the site by a contributor. As such, they are only required when you allow contributors to add files to the web site. You can add a secondary page to the root of your site and to a section of your site. Furthermore, you can create a secondary page or reuse a secondary page from another section. You add secondary pages using this dialog.

Figure A-22 Select Page Template dialog

Select Page Template dialog box
ElementDescription
Create a new page templateCreates a secondary page for this section of the site, using the file extension that you specify below:

hcsp: Use for Idoc Script web sites.

jsp: Use for JSP web sites.

asp: Use for ASP web sites.

The available file extensions depend on the type of site you created (see Section A.3, "Site Connection Details Dialog").

You can create a web site in HCSP, JSP, or ASP. But only those sites built in HCSP have the functionality that is in 10gR4 and later releases. You should not create a web site in ASP or JSP unless you have determined that you have very specific needs that require a site built in ASP or JSP.

Select existing page template from the content serverAdds an existing page template from the content server to your web site, making it the secondary page for this section. You can select it from the menu if the page template is one you created recently; if not, select <Choose From Server> to browse to it in the content server when this dialog closes.
Create a new page template from an existing oneCreates a copy of an existing page template and adds it to your web site, making it the secondary page for this section. This action saves you time by letting you reuse another page template rather than re-create the design from scratch.

The page template used to create the new one may come from one of two sources:

stored in the content server: A page template stored on the content server is used. You can select it from the menu if the page template is one you created recently; if not, select <Choose From Server> to browse to it in the content server when this dialog closes.

stored on the file system: A page template stored on the file system is used. This option is especially useful if you created a page template on your file system and want to reuse it. This file must have the appropriate file extension (.hcsp, .jsp, or .asp).

Use an external URLThis option applies only to primary pages (see Section A.12, "Select (Primary) Page Template Dialog").
Apply recursively to all subsectionsApplies this same page template to every section below this one. This is the same as opening each section below this one in the site hierarchy, adding a page template, and choosing "Select existing page template from the content server."
OKCloses the Select Page Template dialog and associates the secondary page with this section in the site hierarchy.
CancelCloses the Select Page Template dialog without associating the secondary page with this section in the site hierarchy.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.

A.14 Site Asset Categories Dialog

You use the Site Asset Categories dialog to customize and even add categories to the Site Assets pane in Designer.

Figure A-23 Site Asset Categories dialog

Site Asset Categories dialog box
ElementDescription
Surrounding text describes param_new.gif.
Creates a category. (A text box opens where you can enter your category and then click Enter.)
Surrounding text describes param_delete.gif.
Deletes an existing category. (Existing files in that category are not deleted from the content server.)
Surrounding text describes param_up.gif.
Moves the selected category up in the list.
Surrounding text describes param_down.gif.
Moves the selected category down in the list.
DescriptionDescribes the asset category.
Website Object TypeIndicates the Website Object Type for the asset.
Query TextThe query that is performed in the content server to display the assets that belong to this category.

Normally, the query picks up everything that contains the correct Type (from above), but you can use this value to further customize the assets that should appear in this category.

The Additional Information button opens the Edit Query Text dialog (see Section A.22, "Edit Query Text Dialog"), where you specify, test, and capture a custom query.

MetadataClick to open the Enable Metadata Modification dialog (see Section A.15, "Enable Metadata Modification Dialog"), where you can make particular metadata available when you add an asset using the Site Assets pane.
OKSaves your settings and closes the Site Asset Categories dialog.
CancelCancels your settings and closes the Site Asset Categories dialog.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.
Reset to DefaultResets the default Site Asset categories (removing any categories that you may have created).

In order for a site asset to appear in the Site Assets pane, it must have the appropriate Websites and Website Object Type metadata assigned to it in the content server.

A.15 Enable Metadata Modification Dialog

You can specify the metadata that is available when you add an asset using the Site Assets pane. You can also specify the default metadata that is assigned to each new asset.

Figure A-24 Enable Metadata Modification dialog

Enable Metadata Verification dialog box
ElementDescription
On | Name | Caption | Type | Default

(Viewing area)

Provides a checkbox for each metadata value in the content server.

Check the box beside each metadata value to allow contributors to change that value when saving a contributor data file, or clear the checkbox to prevent the contributor from changing that metadata value.

The Default column displays the metadata values that is assigned by default (see the Default Values button below).

Check AllChecks all of the metadata values, making all of them available when a file is added using the Site Assets pane.
Clear AllClears all of the metadata values so that they cannot be changed when a file is added using the Site Assets pane.
OKSaves your settings and closes the Enable Metadata Modification dialog.
CancelCancels your settings and closes the Enable Metadata Modification dialog.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.
Default ValuesOpens the Assign Info Form (in the content server), where you specify the default metadata that is assigned to site assets added using the Site Assets pane. This is especially important if you disabled any of the metadata values in the Enable Metadata Modification dialog.
Clear DefaultsClears the default metadata values.
Profile Trigger ValueProvides a box to enter the profile on the Oracle Content Server to honor the setup for that selected profile. This field appears only if profiles are enabled on the Oracle Content Server.

A.16 Select Site Dialog

You use this dialog when you must specify a web site in the content server where a piece of content should appear (also referred to as the target location). One such place is in a fragment parameter or custom section property of type "siteid."

Figure A-25 Select Site dialog

Select Site dialog box
ElementDescription
Site Label | Site ID | Site TypeDisplays the available web sites in the content server.

Select the web site to use.

OKSaves your settings and closes the Select Site dialog.
CancelCancels your settings and closes the Select Site dialog.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.

A.17 Select Section Dialog

When identifying where a piece of content should appear (such as specifying the value for a fragment parameter of type "nodeid"), It may be necessary to select the section on your web site as the target location. You can do so using this dialog.

Figure A-26 Select Section dialog

Surrounding text describes Figure A-26 .
ElementDescription
Site HierarchyDisplays the available sections in the site hierarchy.

Click the section to use it as a value.

Section IDThe node ID for a section. A value is inserted automatically if you select a section using the site hierarchy window.

You can also manually enter a value.

OKSaves your settings and closes the Select Section dialog.
CancelCancels your settings and closes the Select Section dialog.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.

A.18 Link Wizard

The Link wizard can be used to create different types of links to different locations on your site or other sites.

A.18.1 Link Wizard - Choose Type of Link

The first screen in the Link wizard asks you to choose the link type. Depending on your choice here, you see different options in the wizard.

Figure A-27 Link WIzard - Choose Type dialog

Create Hyperlink Wizard - Choose Type dialog box
ElementDescription
Link to a sectionCreates a link to another section on your site or a section on another site in the content server.
Link to a fileCreates a link to a contributor data file or native document on your site or another site in the content server.

You have the option later on to create a link to a new or existing file.

Link to following URLCreates a link to the URL that you specify in this text box.
CancelCancels your settings and closes the Link wizard.
BackDisabled on this screen.
NextTakes you to the next screen in the wizard.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.

A.18.2 Link Wizard - Choose a Section

On this screen in the Link wizard, you identify the section to link to.

Figure A-28 Link Wizard - Choose Section dialog

Create Hyperlink Wizard - Choose Section dialog box
ElementDescription
MenuLists the available sites in the content server that you can create a link to.
Site hierarchy windowLists the sections on the selected site (from above) that you can create a link to.
CancelCancels your settings and closes the Link wizard.
BackTakes you to the previous screen in the wizard.
NextTakes you to the next screen in the wizard.
FinishCompletes the wizard and inserts the link.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.

A.18.3 Link Wizard - Choose URL Format

In the Link wizard, you can use several different linking formats for the hyperlink. There are advantages and disadvantages to each format.

Figure A-29 Link WIzard - Choose URL Format dialog

Create hyperlink Wizard - Choose Format dialog box
ElementDescription
Path Based URLThe link contains a path to the target location. You have two choices for this type of link:

Absolute Path: Generates a full path. For example: <!--$ssServerRelativeSiteRoot-->products/index.htm (where "<!--$ssServerRelativeSiteRoot-->" gets replaced with the path to the root of the web site).

Relative Path: Generates a relative path instead of a full path. For example: ../products/index.htm.

ID Based URLThe link contains the coded identity of the target location rather than the path-based name. You have three choices for this type of link.

Client Side Script Format: Uses client-side JavaScript to construct a link to the target location. For example: javascript:nodelink('123');, javascript:link('myfile');, or javascript:link('myfile','123');.

Server Side Script Format: Uses server-side Idoc Script to construct a link to the target location. For example: <!--$ssNodeLink("123")-->, <!--$ssLink("myfile")-->, or <!--$ssLink("myfile","123")-->.

URL Token Format: Uses a redirect on the server to construct a link to the target location. For example: ssNODELINK/123, ssLINK/myfile, or ssLINK/123/myfile.

CancelCancels your settings and closes the Link wizard.
BackTakes you to the previous screen in the wizard.
NextTakes you to the next screen in the wizard.
FinishCompletes the wizard and inserts the link.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.

If you know that you always want to choose the same format, you can hide this screen so that it does not display again, for both designers and contributors, using the Choose Default Link Format dialog (see Section A.6, "Choose Default Link Format Dialog").

The "Path-based URL" option may be disabled, depending on what you chose on the previous screen (for example, if you're creating a link to a file and you choose its Web Site Section metadata as the target section).

A.18.4 Link Wizard - Choose Content File

In the Link wizard, you can create a link to a new or existing contributor data file or native document. If you create a link to a new file, you can choose the type of file from a list and Site Studio checks it in for you. If you choose an existing file, you can select one from the content server or browse for one locally.

Figure A-30 Choose content file dialog

Choose Content File dialog
ElementDescription
New Contributor data fileChoose to check in a new contributor data file that is the target of the link.
New native fileChoose to check in a new native document to target in the link.

Select the native document type in the menu.

Existing file from serverChoose to view the files associated with the current web site on the server.

The file selected is the target for the link.

Existing local fileChoose to check in a local file to target in the link.
Current itemChoose to select the current file as the link target.
CancelCancels your settings and closes the Link wizard.
BackTakes you to the previous screen in the wizard.
NextTakes you to the next screen in the wizard.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.

When you use the Link wizard to select a file or add a file to your site, Site Studio automatically assigns the appropriate metadata to the file so that it is recognized as part of your site.

A.18.5 Link Wizard - Choose Target Section

In the Link wizard, you can create a link to a contributor data file or native document, and you can control where that file appears on the web site when the link is clicked. This has no relation to where the file is actually stored on the web site or the content server. You can specify any location on your site or another site.

Alternatively, you can let Site Studio identify the section where the file is currently used in the web site.

Figure A-31 Link WIzard - Choose Target Section dialog

Create Hyperlink Wizard - Choose Target Section dialog box
ElementDescription
Use default website section metadataThe file opens in the section where it is stored (using the metadata defined in xWebsiteSection).

If you choose this value, you must use an ID-based link format on the next screen.

Choose a website sectionThe file opens in the section that you specify in the menu.
MenuLists the available sites in the content server.

Select one of these sites as the target location for your file.

Site hierarchy windowLists the available sections on the selected site (from above).

Select one of these sections as the target location for your file.

Link to the Content Item's URLThe link created links directly to the item's web layout URL.
OptionsOpens a link options dialog (see Section A.18.8, "Link Wizard - Link Target Options").
CancelCancels your settings and closes the Link wizard.
BackTakes you to the previous screen in the wizard.
NextTakes you to the next screen in the wizard.
FinishCompletes the wizard and inserts the link.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.

A.18.6 Link Wizard - Check-In Content

When you create a link to a new file, or are linking to one hosted locally, then the item is checked into the content server. This section of the wizard is used to collect all of the necessary content server data. All fields marked in red are required; that is, the item cannot be checked in without providing values for these fields.

Figure A-32 Link Wizard - Check-in Content dialog

Link Wizaard - Check-in Content dialog

A.18.7 Link Wizard - Confirmation

On the last screen in the Link wizard, you see what your hyperlink looks like.

Figure A-33 Link WIzard - Confirmation dialog

Create Hyperlink Wizard - Confirmation dialog
ElementDescription
Link URLShows what the generated link looks like.

You can view this link as is or copy and paste it into another file.

OptionsOpens a link options dialog (see Section A.18.8, "Link Wizard - Link Target Options").
CancelCancels your settings and closes the Link wizard.
BackTakes you to the previous screen in the wizard.
FinishCompletes the wizard and inserts the link.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.

A.18.8 Link Wizard - Link Target Options

The options of the link are available in this smaller dialog from any point in the wizard. Here you can control whether the link opens in a new window or not.

Figure A-34 Link WIzard - Link Target Options

Surrounding text describes Figure A-34 .
ElementDescription
Open link target in new windowWhen checked, the link opens in a new browser window.

_blank: The value specified when the link is opened.

OkAccepts the entered options and returns you to the screen the dialog was launched from.
CancelCancels your settings and closes the Link Target Options dialog.

Choosing the "Open link target in new window" is useful when you want to prevent visitors from inadvertently leaving the web page when they click the link.

A.19 Contribution Region Dialog

A contribution region allows contributors to edit a portion of the web page using the Contributor application or a third-party application (when native documents are used). You can add a contribution region to a page template, specify the options that are available to contributors, and customize document conversion settings (for native documents) in this dialog.

Figure A-35 Contribution Region Dialog

Surrounding text describes Figure A-35 .
ElementDescription
IDAn identification automatically generated by Site Studio.
NameThe name that you give to the contribution region. The name displays in Design view to represent the region. (The name of the region is used for coding purposes and may not contain spaces, or non-ASCII or special characters.)

If you reuse the same data file on multiple page templates, then the name of the region and its elements on each page must be the same.

Contributor editMakes the contribution region editable. Consequently, contributors can edit the content assigned to the region by left-clicking the contribution icon or right-clicking the icon and choosing Edit (to launch Contributor for data files) or Check Out and Open (to launch a third party application for native documents).
Document infoAdds a "Document Info" link to the right-click menu of the contribution icon. Contributors can use this to go to the Content Information page for the data file or native document assigned to the region.
Workflow approveAdds an "Approve Document" link to the right-click menu of the contribution icon. Contributors (contributors designated as reviewers or contributors in the workflow) use this to approve the data file or native document assigned to the region.
Workflow rejectAdds a "Reject Document" link to the right-click menu of the contribution icon. Reviewers (contributors designated as reviewers or contributors in the workflow) use this to reject the data file or native document assigned to the region.
Modify metadataTakes contributors to the Assign Info Form page before saving the data file assigned to the region so that they can update the metadata for the data file.

Define: Opens the Enable Metadata Modification dialog (see Section A.15, "Enable Metadata Modification Dialog"), where you can specify the metadata that is available to contributors when they save the file assigned to the region.

Switch region contentAdds a "Switch Region Content" link to the right-click menu of the contribution icon. Contributors use this to create a file (contributor data file or native document) or browse to an existing file and assign it to the region.

Define: Opens the Region Content Options dialog (see Section A.20, "Region Content Options Dialog"), where you specify the options that are available to a contributor when switching or assigning content to the region.

Switch region templateAdds a "Switch Region Template" link to the right-click menu of the contribution icon. Contributors use this to select a different region template to use in the contribution region.
View Web Site Usage ReportAdds a "View Web Site Usage Report" link to the right-click menu of the contribution icon. Contributors use this to view a site report showing where the file (the contributor data file or native document assigned to the region) is used throughout the site.
View Content Tracker ReportAdds a "View Content Tracker Report" link to the right-click menu of the contribution icon. Contributors use this to view a site report showing how many times a file (the contributor data file or native document assigned to the region) was viewed and who viewed it.
SettingsOpens the Native Document Conversion Settings dialog (see Section A.24, "Native Document Conversion Settings Dialog (Legacy)"), where you specify a Dynamic Converter template or rule that is used to convert native documents assigned to the region.
OKSaves your settings and closes the Contribution Region dialog.
CancelCancels your settings and closes the Contribution Region dialog.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.

A.20 Region Content Options Dialog

The types of files that a contributor can assign are defined using this dialog.

Figure A-36 Region Content Options dialog

Region Content options dialog box
ElementDescription
Create new contributor data fileAllows a contributor to create a contributor data file and assign it.
Create new native documentAllows a contributor to create a native document and assign it.

Document Types: Specifies which native documents a contributor can create.

The Additional Information button opens the Choose Document Types dialog (see Section A.21, "Choose Document Types Dialog"), which you can use to select native document types from a list.

Choose existing in the content serverAllows a contributor to search the content server for an existing contributor data file or native document and assign it.

Query Text: Specifies the actual query that is performed in the content server to display existing files.

The Additional Information button opens the Edit Query Text dialog (see Section A.22, "Edit Query Text Dialog"), which you can use to create, capture, and test the query used to display existing files.

Show Results Only: Shows only the search results and not the content server environment. (This is useful when you want to prevent contributors from browsing to other content in the content server.)

Browse for content locallyAllows a contributor to browse for a file on the local file system and check that file in.
Remove region content associationAllows the contributor to remove an existing contributor data file or native document already assigned. (This adds a "None" option to the Choose Region Content dialog.)
Default MetadataOpens the Enable Metadata Modification dialog (see Section A.15, "Enable Metadata Modification Dialog"), where you specify the metadata that is available to the contributor and the default metadata that is assigned when a contributor creates a file.
OKSaves your settings and closes the Region Content Options dialog.
CancelCancels your settings and closes the Region Content Options dialog.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.

A.21 Choose Document Types Dialog

When you allow a contributor to create a native document and add it to the site, you must specify the type of native document that they can create (for example, Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint).

Figure A-37 Choose Document Types dialog

Choose Document Types dialog box
ElementDescription
List of file typesDisplays the native documents that are available on your system. Check the box beside the type of document to allow contributors to create.

Not all document types in this dialog are supported for contribution (for example, image authoring software).

OKSaves your settings and closes the Choose Document Types dialog.
CancelCancels your settings and closes the Choose Document Types dialog.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.

A.22 Edit Query Text Dialog

There are numerous occasions when you want to specify a custom query to perform in the content server. This query searches for files matching one or more metadata values and then opens those results in Designer, Contributor, or the web site (depending on the element you're using).

You can specify, test, and capture your query using this dialog.

ElementDescription
[Text field]Use this text box to specify your query.
Capture QueryOpens the Content Query Capture screen in the content server that you use to perform a query and then save (capture) that query.
Test QueryUse to test your query in the content server.
OKSaves your settings and closes the Edit Query Text dialog.
CancelCancels your settings and closes the Edit Query Text dialog.

A.23 Conversion Definition Dialog

The conversion definition dialog is used to organize and assign the conversion template or rule as a site asset. After a conversion definition is created and named, then it can be used as a site asset.

Figure A-38 Conversion Definition dialog

Conversion Definition dialog
ElementDescription
Conversion DefinitionEach named conversion definition is listed.
AddOpens the Native Document Conversion Settings dialog (see Section A.25, "Native Document Conversion Settings Dialog") to add a dynamic conversion template or rule to a conversion definition.
RemoveRemoves the selected conversion definition.
EditOpens the data for the selected definition in the Native Document Conversion Settings dialog (see Section A.25, "Native Document Conversion Settings Dialog") to edit the selected conversion definition.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.

A.24 Native Document Conversion Settings Dialog (Legacy)

When you assign a native document to a contribution region, you can specify a (Dynamic Converter) template or rule that is used to convert the document into a web page. You do so using this dialog.

Figure A-39 Native Document Conversion Settings dialog

Surrounding text describes Figure A-39 .
ElementDescription
Use simple inline dynamic conversionA blank template is used to convert the native document. This template contains minimal conversion settings, and therefore the resulting web page appears similar to the original document (which may or may not be desirable).
Use full dynamic conversionSpecifies a Dynamic Converter conversion template and layout page template currently checked into the content server.

Choose Template: Opens a content server window where you can select a conversion template.

Choose Layout: Opens a content server window where you can select a Dynamic Converter layout page.

For the layout, we recommend using "snippet_layout.txt" because it strips out the opening and closing HTML tags. This allows the converted document to be inserted into another web page, which is necessary for Site Studio.

Use single rule dynamic conversionSpecifies a single conversion rule that evaluates and converts the native document. You can select the rule from the menu.
Use rules engine dynamic conversionSpecifies that the default rule evaluation be applied to evaluate and convert the native document.
Use custom dynamic conversion commandSpecifies a custom script that is used to convert the native document.

You can use this option to add your own Idoc Script to the conversion sequence. If you choose this, you can copy the existing conversion syntax from the Command string area (below), paste it into this field, and add your custom script to it.

A dynamic conversion does not take place if the conversion command is missing or invalid.

Command stringDisplays the conversion syntax that is used to convert the native document.
OKSaves your settings and closes the Native Document Conversion Settings dialog.
CancelCancels your settings and closes the Native Document Conversion Settings dialog.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.

Before using this feature, you must create a conversion template or rule in Dynamic Converter.

A.25 Native Document Conversion Settings Dialog

When you add a native document to a web page, the conversion definitions can specify a (Dynamic Converter) template or rule that is used to convert the document into a web page. You do so using this dialog.

Figure A-40 Native Document Conversion Settings dialog

Native Document Conversion Settings dialog box
ElementDescription
NameThe name of the conversion for identification.
Use simple inline dynamic conversionA blank template is used to convert the native document. This template contains minimal conversion settings, and therefore the resulting web page appears similar to the original document (which may or may not be desirable).
Use full dynamic conversionSpecifies a Dynamic Converter conversion template and layout page currently checked into the content server.

Choose Template: Opens a content server window where you can select a conversion template.

Choose Layout: Opens a content server window where you can select a Dynamic Converter layout page.

For the layout, we recommend using "snippet_layout.txt" because it strips out the opening and closing HTML tags. This allows the converted document to be inserted into another web page, which is necessary for Site Studio.

Use single rule dynamic conversionSpecifies a single conversion rule that evaluates and converts the native document. You can select the rule from the menu.
Use rules engine dynamic conversionSpecifies that the default rule evaluation be applied to evaluate and convert the native document.
Use custom dynamic conversion commandSpecifies a custom script that is used to convert the native document.

You can use this option to add your own Idoc Script to the conversion sequence. If you choose this, you can copy the existing conversion syntax from the Command string area (below), paste it into this field, and add your custom script to it.

A dynamic conversion does not take place if the conversion command is missing or invalid.

Command stringDisplays the conversion syntax that is used to convert the native document.
OKSaves your settings and closes the Native Document Conversion Settings dialog.
CancelCancels your settings and closes the Native Document Conversion Settings dialog.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.

A.26 WYSIWYG Element Dialog

The WYSIWYG element becomes a field in Contributor where users (contributors) add, edit, and delete text, graphics, and more. You can control the contributor's experience using this dialog. This particular element is used in legacy sites.

Figure A-41 WYSIWYG Element dialog

WYSIWYG Element dialog box
ElementDescription
IDThe identification that Site Studio assigns to the element.
NameThe name you assign to the element. It should not contain spaces, or non-ASCII or special characters.

If you reuse the same data file in multiple places, then the name of the region and its elements on each page must be the same.

LabelBriefly describes the element. The label displays beside the field in Contributor to let individual contributors know what content should go there.
InfoProvides a more detailed description of the element. This description appears as a tooltip when contributors hover their mouse over the Info icon in Contributor.
TypeIndicates the type of element you are adding.
ActionsActions determine the available editing options for a contributor:

Undo: Contributors can undo their last edit.

Redo: Contributors can redo their last edit.

Cut: Contributors can cut text and images.

Copy: Contributors can copy text and images.

Paste: Contributors can paste text and images.

  • Formatted (on/off): Allows formatting or removes formatting when text is pasted in Contributor.

Insert Link: Contributors can create hyperlinks.

Remove Link: Contributors can remove hyperlinks.

Edit hyperlink targets: Contributors can edit the file that is the target of a hyperlink (using the Element menu and right-click menu).

Bold: Contributors can make the text bold.

Italic: Contributors can make the text italic.

Underline: Contributors can underline the text.

Remove Formatting: Contributors can remove text formatting.

Ordered List: Contributors can add an ordered (numbered) list.

Unordered List: Contributors can add an unordered (bulleted) list.

Indent: Contributors can indent text and images.

Outdent: Contributors can outdent text and images.

Left Justify: Contributors can left-align text and images.

Center Justify: Contributors can center text and images.

Right Justify: Contributors can right-align text and images.

Insert Image: Contributors can add/replace images (gif, jpg, and png).

  • Set QueryText: Opens the Edit Query Text dialog (see Section A.22, "Edit Query Text Dialog"), where you specify the query used to display images to the contributor.

  • Show Results Only (On/Off): Shows or hides the content server environment when a contributor searches for images.

Insert Horizontal Rule: Contributors can add a horizontal rule.

Insert Line Break: Contributors can add a line break.

Insert Non-Breaking Space: Contributors can add a non-breaking space.

Actions (continued)Change Font Face: Contributors can change the font face.

Change Font Size: Contributors can change the font size.

Change Foreground Color: Contributors can change the text color.

Change Background Color: Contributors can change the text background color.

Spell Checker: Contributors can perform a spell check.

Required: Requires information in the field before Contributor closes.

Apply CSS Classes: Contributors can use different CSS classes.

Table Support: Contributors can add and edit tables.

Validation: Used to validate the content added in Contributor (allowing you to enforce certain content requirements for contributors).

Edit Object Properties:When selected, contributors can modify the object properties.

Custom Configuration:

Accessibility Report: When selected, contributors can run an accessibility report on webpages from the WYSIWYG toolbar to see if the pages are compliant with multiple accessibility standards. Please note that this option is meaningful only if Ephox is used as the Contributor editor (which is not the default).

Source Mode: Used to allow contributors to select to edit in WYSIWYG or HTML. If unselected, contributors can edit only in WYSIWYG.

Expand Editor: Used to allow contributors to view the editing area full-screen. Please note that this option is meaningful only if Ephox is used as the Contributor editor (which is not the default).

Apply HTML Tags: Used to determine which tags are available to Contributors who edit in HTML.

Set Element Height: Used to set a fixed height of the element.

  • Set Height: Use to set the height of the element by entering a number and the unit of measurement (centimeters, millimeters, inches, percent, picas, pixels, points).

Do Not Enclose Text in Editor: Used to define how carriage returns are handled in HTML. If text is enclosed, each time the contributor enters a return, a paragraph is created. If not enclosed, a line break is inserted for each return. Please note that this option is meaningful only if Ephox is used as the Contributor editor (which is not the default).

Override Editor CSS: Used to implement a style sheet for the editor window.

Check AllChecks all of the actions so that a contributor has all available editing options.
Clear AllClears all of the metadata values so that a contributor has no editing options.
OKSaves your settings and closes the WYSIWYG Element dialog.
CancelCancels your settings and closes the WYSIWYG Element dialog.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.

A.27 WYSIWYG Element Definition Dialog

The WYSIWYG element becomes a field in Contributor where users (contributors) add, edit, and delete text, graphics, and more. You can control the contributor's experience using this dialog.

Figure A-42 WYSIWYG Element dialog

WYSIWYG Element dialog box
ElementDescription
InfoProvides a more detailed description of the element. This description appears as a tooltip when contributors hover their mouse over the Info icon in Contributor.
TypeIndicates the type of element you are adding.
ActionsActions determine the available editing options for a contributor:

Undo: Contributors can undo their last edit.

Redo: Contributors can redo their last edit.

Cut: Contributors can cut text and images.

Copy: Contributors can copy text and images.

Paste: Contributors can paste text and images.

  • Formatted (on/off): Allows formatting or removes formatting when text is pasted in Contributor.

Insert Link: Contributors can create hyperlinks.

Actions

(continued)

Remove Link: Contributors can remove hyperlinks.

Edit hyperlink targets: Contributors can edit the file that is the target of a hyperlink (using the Element menu and right-click menu).

Insert bookmark: Contributors can insert a bookmarking link.

Bold: Contributors can make the text bold.

Italic: Contributors can make the text italic.

Underline: Contributors can underline the text.

Superscript: Contributors can make the text superscript.

Subscript: Contributors can make the text subscript.

Strikethrough: Contributors can mark the text with a strikethrough bar.

Remove Formatting: Contributors can remove text formatting.

Ordered List: Contributors can add an ordered (numbered) list.

Unordered List: Contributors can add an unordered (bulleted) list.

Indent: Contributors can indent (move to the right) text and images.

Outdent: Contributors can outdent (move to the left) text and images.

Left Justify: Contributors can left-align text and images.

Center Justify: Contributors can center text and images.

Right Justify: Contributors can right-align text and images.

Full Justify: Contributors can fully justify the text and images.

Blockquote: Contributors can place and align the text within a blockquote.

Insert Image: Contributors can add/replace images (gif, jpg, and png).

  • Set QueryText: Opens the Edit Query Text dialog (see Section A.22, "Edit Query Text Dialog"), where you specify the query used to display images to the contributor.

  • Show Results Only (On/Off): Shows or hides the content server environment when a contributor searches for images.

Insert Horizontal Rule: Contributors can add a horizontal rule.

Insert Line Break: Contributors can add a line break.

Insert Symbol: Contributors can add a special character from the symbol map.

Edit hyperlink targets: Contributors can edit the file that is the target of a hyperlink (using the Element menu and right-click menu).

Change Font Face: Contributors can change the font face.

Change Font Size: Contributors can change the font size.

Change Foreground Color: Contributors can change the text color.

Change Background Color: Contributors can change the text background color.

Spell Checker: Contributors can perform a spell check.

Required: Requires information in the field before Contributor closes.

Apply CSS Classes: Contributors can use different CSS classes.

Table Support: Contributors can add and edit tables.

Form support: Contributors can add and edit forms.

Actions (continued)Validation: Used to validate the content added in Contributor (allowing you to enforce certain content requirements for contributors).

Edit Object Properties:When selected, contributors can modify the object properties.

Insert Flash: Contributors can insert Flash files.

  • Set QueryText: Opens the Edit Query Text dialog (see Section A.22, "Edit Query Text Dialog"), where you specify the query used to display images to the contributor.

  • Show Results Only (On/Off): Shows or hides the content server environment when a contributor searches for images.

Custom Configuration: Used to allow configuration scripts to modify the contributor's editing window.

Accessibility Report: When selected, contributors can run an accessibility report on webpages from the WYSIWYG toolbar to see if the pages are compliant with multiple accessibility standards. Please note that this option is meaningful only if Ephox is used as the Contributor editor (which is not the default).

Select All: Contributors can select everything within the editor.

Print: Contributors can print the content as it appears in the editor. Content is not formatted as it would appear on the web page.

Find and Replace: Contributors can perform find and replace functions when editing.

Show HTML Elements: Contributors can view where HTML tags are used with the data and how they are used.

Source Mode: Used to allow contributors to select to edit in WYSIWYG or HTML. If unselected, contributors can edit only in WYSIWYG.

Expand Editor: Used to allow contributors to view the editing area full-screen.

Apply HTML Tags: Used to determine which tags are available to Contributors who edit in HTML.

Set Element Height: Used to set a fixed height of the element.

  • Set Height: Use to set the height of the element by entering a number and the unit of measurement (centimeters, millimeters, inches, percent, picas, pixels, points).

Do Not Enclose Text in Editor: Used to define how carriage returns are handled in HTML. If text is enclosed, each time the contributor enters a return, a paragraph is created. If not enclosed, a line break is inserted for each return.

Override Editor CSS: Used to implement a style sheet for the editor window.

  • Select CSS File: Displays the CSS files on the content available to use.

Check AllChecks all of the actions so that a contributor has all available editing options.
Clear AllClears all of the metadata values so that a contributor has no editing options.
OKSaves your settings and closes the WYSIWYG Element dialog.
CancelCancels your settings and closes the WYSIWYG Element dialog.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.

A.28 Plain Text Element Dialog

The Plain Text element becomes a field in Contributor where users perform basic (and somewhat limited) edits, such as cut, copy, and paste. This can be useful when you want to prevent contributors from formatting text (and thereby creating more consistent, or possibly cleaner web pages). This particular element is used in legacy sites.

Figure A-43 Plain Text Element dialog

Plain Text Element dialog box
ElementDescription
IDThe identification that Site Studio assigns to the element.
NameThe name you assign to the element. This is used for coding purposes and as such should not contain spaces, or non-ASCII or special characters.

If you reuse the same data file in multiple places, then the name of the region and its elements on each page must be the same.

LabelBriefly describes the element. The label opens beside the field in Contributor to let individual contributors know what content should go there.
InfoProvides a more detailed description of the element. This description appears as a tooltip when contributors hover their mouse over the Info icon in Contributor.
TypeIndicates the type of element you are adding.
ActionsActions determine the available editing options for a contributor:

Undo: Contributors can undo their last edit.

Redo: Contributors can redo their last edit.

Cut: Contributors can cut text.

Copy: Contributors can copy text.

Paste: Contributors can paste text.

  • Formatted (on/off): Allows formatting or removes formatting when text is pasted in Contributor (For a Plain Text element, this means text includes HTML formatting tags or no formatting tags).

Spell Checker: Contributors can spell check their work.

Required: Requires contributors to enter information in the field before Contributor closes.

Validation: Used to validate the content added in Contributor (allowing you to enforce certain content requirements for contributors).

Custom Configuration:

  • Select Custom Configuration: Shows or hides the content server environment when a contributor selects a custom configuration.

Set Element Height: Used to set a fixed height of the element.

  • Set Height: Use to set the height of the element by entering a number and the unit of measurement (centimeters, millimeters, inches, percent, picas, pixels, points).

Check AllChecks all of the actions so that a contributor has all available editing options.
Clear AllClears all of the metadata values so that a contributor has no editing options.
OKSaves your settings and closes the Plain Text Element dialog.
CancelCancels your settings and closes the Plain Text Element dialog.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.

A.29 Plain Text Element Definition Dialog

The Plain Text element becomes a field in Contributor where users perform basic (and somewhat limited) edits, such as cut, copy, and paste. This can be useful when you want to prevent contributors from formatting text (and thereby creating more consistent, or possibly cleaner web pages).

Figure A-44 Plain Text Element dialog

Plain Text Element dialog box
ElementDescription
InfoProvides a more detailed description of the element. This description appears as a tooltip when contributors hover their mouse over the Info icon in Contributor.
TypeIndicates the type of element you are adding.
ActionsActions determine the available editing options for a contributor:

Undo: Contributors can undo their last edit.

Redo: Contributors can redo their last edit.

Cut: Contributors can cut text.

Copy: Contributors can copy text.

Paste: Contributors can paste text.

Insert Symbol: Contributors can add a special character from the symbol map.

Spell Checker: Contributors can spell check their work.

Required: Requires contributors to enter information in the field before Contributor closes.

Validation: Used to validate the content added in Contributor (allowing you to enforce certain content requirements for contributors).

Custom Configuration: Used to allow configuration scripts to modify the contributor's editing window.

Select All: Contributors can select everything within the editor.

Print: Contributors can print the content as it appears in the editor. Content is not formatted as it would appear on the web page.

Find and Replace: Contributors can perform find and replace functions when editing.

Actions

(continued)

Set Element Height: Used to set a fixed height of the element.
  • Set Height: Use to set the height of the element by entering a number and the unit of measurement (centimeters, millimeters, inches, percent, picas, pixels, points).

Override Editor CSS: Used to implement a style sheet for the editor window.

  • Select CSS File: Displays the CSS files on the content available to use.

Check AllChecks all of the actions so that a contributor has all available editing options.
Clear AllClears all of the metadata values so that a contributor has no editing options.
OKSaves your settings and closes the Plain Text Element dialog.
CancelCancels your settings and closes the Plain Text Element dialog.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.

A.30 Image Element Dialog

The Image element becomes a field in Contributor where users can perform basic edits that relate to handling images, such as inserting an image, inserting a link, and applying a CSS class. This can be useful when you want to limit a contributor's capabilities to simply editing images. This particular element is used in legacy sites.

Figure A-45 Image Element dialog

Image Element dialog box
ElementDescription
IDThe identification that Site Studio assigns to the element.
NameThe name you assign to the element. This is used for coding purposes and as such should not contain spaces, or non-ASCII or special characters.

If you reuse the same data file in multiple places, then the name of the region and its elements on each page must be the same.

LabelBriefly describes the element. The label opens beside the field in Contributor to let individual contributors know what content should go there.
InfoProvides a more detailed description of the element. This description appears as a tooltip when contributors hover their mouse over the Info icon in Contributor.
TypeIndicates the type of element you are adding.
ActionsActions determine the available editing options for a contributor:

Undo: Contributors can undo their last edit.

Redo: Contributors can redo their last edit.

Required: Requires information in the field before Contributor closes.

Insert Link: Contributors can create hyperlinks.

Remove Link: Contributors can remove hyperlinks.

Edit hyperlink targets: Contributors can edit the file that is the target of a hyperlink (using the Element menu and right-click menu).

Apply CSS Classes: Contributors can use different CSS classes.

Insert Image: Contributors can add/replace images (gif, jpg, and png).

  • Set QueryText: Opens the Edit Query Text dialog (see Section A.22, "Edit Query Text Dialog"), where you specify the query that is used in the content server to display images to the contributor.

  • Show Results Only (On/Off): Shows or hides the content server environment when a contributor searches for images.

Validation: Used to validate the content added in Contributor (allowing you to enforce certain content requirements for contributors).

Edit Object Properties:When selected, contributors can modify the object properties.

Custom Configuration:

Set Element Height: Used to set a fixed height of the element.

  • Set Height: Use to set the height of the element by entering a number and the unit of measurement (centimeters, millimeters, inches, percent, picas, pixels, points).

Check AllChecks all of the actions so that a contributor has all available editing options.
Clear AllClears all of the metadata values so that a contributor has no editing options.
OKSaves your settings and closes the Image Element dialog.
CancelCancels your settings and closes the Image Element dialog.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.

A.31 Image Element Definition Dialog

The Image element becomes a field in Contributor where users can perform basic edits that relate to handling images, such as inserting an image, inserting a link, and applying a CSS class. This can be useful when you want to limit a contributor's capabilities to simply editing images.

Figure A-46 Image Element dialog

Image Element dialog box
ElementDescription
InfoProvides a more detailed description of the element. This description appears as a tooltip when contributors hover their mouse over the Info icon in Contributor.
TypeIndicates the type of element you are adding.
ActionsActions determine the available editing options for a contributor:

Undo: Contributors can undo their last edit.

Redo: Contributors can redo their last edit.

Required: Requires information in the field before Contributor closes.

Insert Link: Contributors can create hyperlinks.

Remove Link: Contributors can remove hyperlinks.

Edit hyperlink targets: Contributors can edit the file that is the target of a hyperlink (using the Element menu and right-click menu).

Actions

(continued)

Apply CSS Classes: Contributors can use different CSS classes.

Insert Image: Contributors can add/replace images (gif, jpg, and png).

  • Set QueryText: Opens the Edit Query Text dialog (see Section A.22, "Edit Query Text Dialog"), where you specify the query that is used in the content server to display images to the contributor.

  • Show Results Only (On/Off): Shows or hides the content server environment when a contributor searches for images.

Validation: Used to validate the content added in Contributor (allowing you to enforce certain content requirements for contributors).

Edit Object Properties:When selected, contributors can modify the object properties.

Custom Configuration: Used to allow configuration scripts to modify the contributor's editing window.

Select All: Contributors can select everything within the editor.

Print: Contributors can print the content as it appears in the editor. Content is not formatted as it would appear on the web page.

Set Element Height: Used to set a fixed height of the element.

  • Set Height: Use to set the height of the element by entering a number and the unit of measurement (centimeters, millimeters, inches, percent, picas, pixels, points).

Override Editor CSS: Used to implement a style sheet for the editor window.

  • Select CSS File: Displays the CSS files on the content available to use.

Check AllChecks all of the actions so that a contributor has all available editing options.
Clear AllClears all of the metadata values so that a contributor has no editing options.
OKSaves your settings and closes the Image Element dialog.
CancelCancels your settings and closes the Image Element dialog.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.

A.32 Custom Element Dialog

The Custom element becomes a field in Contributor that users (contributors) can use to add content that cannot be added using the other elements (WYSIWYG, Plain Text, and Image). More specifically, the Custom element provides a way to create a custom interface (also called a custom element form) that is used to add various types of content (multimedia files, source code, and so on). This particular element is used in legacy sites.

Figure A-47 Custom Element dialog

Custom Element dialog box
ElementDescription
IDThe identification that Site Studio assigns to the element.
NameThe name you assign to the element. This name is used for coding purposes and as such should not contain spaces, or non-ASCII or special characters.

If you reuse the same data file in multiple layout places, then the name of the region and its elements on each page must be the same.

LabelBriefly describes the element. The label opens beside the field in Contributor to let individual contributors know what content should go there.
InfoMore detailed description of the element. This description appears as a tooltip when contributors hover their mouse over the Info icon in Contributor.
TypeIndicates the type of element you are adding.
SettingsOpens the Custom Element Settings dialog (see Section A.34, "Custom Element Settings Dialog"), where you can specify the Custom element form that is used by contributors.
ActionsSet Element Height: Used to set a fixed height of the element.
  • Set Height: Use to set the height of the element by entering a number and the unit of measurement (centimeters, millimeters, inches, percent, picas, pixels, points).

OKSaves your settings and closes the Custom Element dialog.
CancelCancels your settings and closes the Custom Element dialog.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.

A.33 Custom Element Definition Dialog

The Custom element becomes a field in Contributor that users (contributors) can use to add content that cannot be added using the other elements (WYSIWYG, Plain Text, and Image). More specifically, the Custom element provides a way to create a custom interface (also called a custom element form) that is used to add various types of content. Custom elements can also be defined to help data-driven web sites publish based on values, as the custom elements can define boolean value, integer values, and other methods of sorting and filtering data for placement on the web page.

Figure A-48 Custom Element dialog

Custom Element dialog box
ElementDescription
InfoMore detailed description of the element. This description appears as a tooltip when contributors hover their mouse over the Info icon in Contributor.
TypeIndicates the type of element you are adding.
SettingsOpens the Custom Element Settings dialog (see Section A.34, "Custom Element Settings Dialog"), where you can specify the Custom element form that is used by contributors.
ActionsSet Element Height: Used to set a fixed height of the element.
  • Set Height: Use to set the height of the element by entering a number and the unit of measurement (centimeters, millimeters, inches, percent, picas, pixels, points).

OKSaves your settings and closes the Custom Element dialog.
CancelCancels your settings and closes the Custom Element dialog.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.

A.34 Custom Element Settings Dialog

The Custom element becomes a field in Contributor that users (contributors) can use to add content that cannot be added using the other elements (WYSIWYG, Plain Text, and Image). More specifically, the Custom element provides a way to create a custom interface (also called a custom element form) that is used to add various types of content (multimedia files, source code, and so on). You use this dialog to attach the custom element form to the custom element.

Figure A-49 Custom Element Settings dialog

Custom Element Settings dialog box
ElementDescription
Form UrlSpecifies the custom element form that is used with the custom element.
OKSaves your settings and closes the Custom Element Settings dialog.
CancelCancels your settings and closes the Custom Element Settings dialog.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.

A.35 Static List Element Dialog

A static list combines the power and flexibility of a fragment with the contribution capabilities of an element in Contributor. A static list can bundle multiple elements in a table-like layout. Contributors can then add, edit, delete, and rearrange rows and columns of information. You can control the static list options that are available to a contributor using this dialog. This particular element is a legacy technique.

Figure A-50 Static List Element dialog

Static List Element dialog box
ElementDescription
IDThe identification that Site Studio assigns to the element.
NameThe name you assign to the element. This is used for coding purposes and as such should not contain spaces, or non-ASCII or special characters.

If you reuse the same data file on multiple page templates, then the name of the region and its elements on each page must be the same.

LabelBriefly describes the element. The label opens beside the field in Contributor to let individual contributors know what content should go there.
InfoProvides a more detailed description of the element. This description appears as a tooltip when contributors hover their mouse over the Info icon in Contributor.
TypeIndicates the type of element you are adding.
ActionsActions determine the available editing options for a contributor:

Undo: Contributors can undo their last edit.

Redo: Contributors can redo their last edit.

Add Item: Contributors can add a row or column to the list.

Remove Item: Contributors can remove a row or column from the list.

Edit Existing Item: Contributors can edit a row or column in the list.

Move Item Up: Contributors can move a row up in the list.

Move Item Down: Contributors can move a row down in the list.

Insert link: Contributors can create hyperlinks.

Remove link: Contributors can remove hyperlinks.

Edit hyperlink targets: Contributors can edit the file that is the target of a hyperlink (using the Element menu and right-click menu).

Actions

(continued)

Insert Image: Contributors can add/replace images (gif, jpg, and png).
  • Set QueryText: Opens the Edit Query Text dialog (see Section A.22, "Edit Query Text Dialog"), where you specify the query that is used in the content server to display images to the contributor.

  • Show Results Only (On/Off): Shows or hides the content server environment when a contributor searches for images.

Apply CSS Classes: Contributors can apply different classes from a Cascading Style Sheet to text and graphics. If you enable this option, you should probably disable other formatting options (like font face, font size, bold, and italic) to more strictly enforce your CSS classes.

Validation: Used to validate the content added in Contributor (allowing you to enforce certain content requirements for contributors).

Apply HTML Tags: Used to determine which tags are available to Contributors who edit in HTML.

Set Element Height: Used to set a fixed height of the element.

  • Set Height: Use to set the height of the element by entering a number and the unit of measurement (centimeters, millimeters, inches, percent, picas, pixels, points).

Do Not Enclose Text in Editor: Used to define how carriage returns are handled in HTML. If text is enclosed, each time the contributor enters a return, a paragraph is created. If not enclosed, a line break is inserted for each return.

Check AllChecks all of the actions so that a contributor has all available editing options.
Clear AllClears all of the metadata values so that a contributor has no editing options.
OKSaves your settings and closes the Static List Element dialog.
CancelCancels your settings and closes the Static List Element dialog.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.

A.36 Static List Element Definition Dialog

A static list combines the power and flexibility that a fragment would have with the contribution capabilities of an element in Contributor. A static list can bundle multiple elements in a table-like layout. Contributors can then add, edit, delete, and rearrange rows and columns of information. You can control the static list options that are available to a contributor using this dialog.

Figure A-51 Static List Element dialog

Static List Element dialog box
ElementDescription
InfoProvides a more detailed description of the element. This description appears as a tooltip when contributors hover their mouse over the Info icon in Contributor.
TypeIndicates the type of element you are adding.
ElementsOpens the Element Selection Screen (see Section A.37, "Elements Dialog")
ActionsActions determine the available editing options for a contributor:

Add Item: Contributors can add a row or column to the list.

Remove Item: Contributors can remove a row or column from the list.

Edit Existing Item: Contributors can edit a row or column in the list.

Move Item Up: Contributors can move a row up in the list.

Move Item Down: Contributors can move a row down in the list.

Validation: Used to validate the content added in Contributor (allowing you to enforce certain content requirements for contributors).

Set Element Height: Used to set a fixed height of the element.

  • Set Height: Use to set the height of the element by entering a number and the unit of measurement (centimeters, millimeters, inches, percent, picas, pixels, points).

Check AllChecks all of the actions so that a contributor has all available editing options.
Clear AllClears all of the metadata values so that a contributor has no editing options.
OKSaves your settings and closes the Static List Element dialog.
CancelCancels your settings and closes the Static List Element dialog.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.

The actions available in the static list element are for the list as a whole. The specific element definition options for the element definitions referenced within the static list are controlled within each element definition.

A.37 Elements Dialog

The Elements dialog is used to manage the elements associated with a static list. Other elements can be added, re-arranged, modified, or removed from the list.

Figure A-52 Element Selection dialog

Element Selection dialog
ElementDescription
ListList of named elements and their definitions associated with the region definition.
AddOpens the Add Element dialog (see Section A.43, "Element Dialog"). From there you select an element to add to the list.
RemoveRemoves the selected element from the list.
EditOpens the Add Element dialog (see Section A.43, "Element Dialog") to edit the selected element.
Move UpMoves the selected element up the list.
Move DownMoves the selected element down the list.
OKSaves your settings and closes the Element Selection dialog.
CancelCancels your settings and closes the Element Selection dialog.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.

A.38 Static List Element Validation Dialog

When contributors work in the Contributor application, they are generally free to add whatever content they like. As a designer, however, your goal may be to enforce certain standards (for example, limiting the number of rows a contributor can add to a static list). You can enforce this using element validation.

Figure A-53 Static List Element Validation dialog

Static List Element Validation dialog box
ElementDescription
Use default validationNumber Rows
  • min: Enforces a minimum number of rows.

  • max: Enforces a maximum number of rows.

Use external validationUses an external validation script that you provide.

Settings: Opens the Advanced Element Validation dialog (see Section A.52, "Advanced Element Validation Dialog"), where you can enter the values from your script.

OKSaves your settings and closes the Static List Element Validation dialog.
CancelCancels your settings and closes the Static List Element Validation dialog.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.

The default validation options in this dialog are derived from a script, ss_default_validation_script.js, that is provided by Site Studio.

A.39 Dynamic List Element Dialog

A dynamic list combines the power and flexibility of a fragment with contribution capabilities. The dynamic list performs a query in the content server, opens the files that match that query, and allows contributors to modify those files, even add new ones. You can control the contribution options that are available in the dynamic list using this dialog. This particular element is used in legacy sites, or in new sites as an old technique.

Figure A-54 Dynamic List Element dialog

Dynamic List Element dialog box
ElementDescription
IDThe identification that Site Studio assigns to the element.
NameThe name you assign to the element. This is used for coding purposes and as such should not contain spaces, or non-ASCII or special characters.

If you reuse the same data file in multiple places, then the name of the region and its elements on each page must be the same.

LabelBriefly describes the element. The label opens beside the field in Contributor to let individual contributors know what content should go there.
InfoA more detailed description that appears as a tooltip when contributors hover their mouse over the Info icon in Contributor.
TypeIndicates the type of element you are adding.
ActionsActions determine the available editing options for a contributor:

Go to Next Page: Contributors can view the next set of matches in Contributor, if applicable.

Go to Previous Page: Contributors can view the previous set of matches in Contributor, if applicable.

Refresh: Contributors can refresh the dynamic list in Contributor. They likely do this after they add an item to the list.

Create New Item: Contributors can add items (contributor data files or native documents) to the dynamic list.

Exclude Item: Contributors can remove items from the dynamic list. (The item is removed from all dynamic lists on the web site, but it is not removed from the content server.)

Include Item: Contributors can include items in the dynamic list (that were previously excluded).

Actions

(continued)

View Content Information for Item: Contributors can view the Content Information page for an item in the list.

Edit Target Content Item: Contributors can edit the file after they add it to the list.

Show Excluded Items: Contributors can view items not included in the Dynamic List and re-apply them to the list.

Set Element Height: Used to set a fixed height of the element.

  • Set Height: Use to set the height of the element by entering a number and the unit of measurement (centimeters, millimeters, inches, percent, picas, pixels, points).

Check AllChecks all of the actions so that a contributor has all available editing options.
Clear AllClears all of the metadata values so that a contributor has no editing options.
ParametersOpens the Fragment Parameter Values dialog (see Section A.65, "Fragment Parameter Values Dialog"), where you can change the appearance and behavior of the dynamic list.
OKSaves your settings and closes the Dynamic List Element dialog.
CancelCancels your settings and closes the Dynamic List Element dialog.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.

When you allow contributors to add items to a list, they ultimately are adding web pages to the web site.

A.40 Dynamic List Element Definition Dialog

A dynamic list combines the power and flexibility that a fragment would have with contribution capabilities. The dynamic list performs a query in the content server, opens the files that match that query, and allows contributors to modify those files, even add new ones. You can control the contribution options that are available in the dynamic list using this dialog. This particular element is used in legacy sites.

Figure A-55 Dynamic List Element dialog

Dynamic List Element dialog box
ElementDescription
InfoA more detailed description that appears as a tooltip when contributors hover their mouse over the Info icon in Contributor.
TypeIndicates the type of element you are adding.
SettingsOpens the Dynamic List Settings dialog. (see Section A.41, "Dynamic List Settings Dialog")
ActionsActions determine the available editing options for a contributor:

Go to Next Page: Contributors can view the next set of matches in Contributor, if applicable.

Go to Previous Page: Contributors can view the previous set of matches in Contributor, if applicable.

Refresh: Contributors can refresh the dynamic list in Contributor. They likely do this after they add an item to the list.

Create New Item: Contributors can add items (contributor data files or native documents) to the dynamic list.

Exclude Item: Contributors can remove items from the dynamic list. (The item is removed from all dynamic lists on the web site, but it is not removed from the content server.)

Include Item: Contributors can include items in the dynamic list (that were previously excluded).

View Content Information for Item: Contributors can view the Content Information page for an item in the list.

Edit Target Content Item: Contributors can edit the file after they add it to the list.

Show Excluded Items: Contributors can view items not included in the Dynamic List and re-apply them to the list.

ActionsSet Element Height: Used to set a fixed height of the element.
  • Set Height: Use to set the height of the element by entering a number and the unit of measurement (centimeters, millimeters, inches, percent, picas, pixels, points).

Check AllChecks all of the actions so that a contributor has all available editing options.
Clear AllClears all of the metadata values so that a contributor has no editing options.
OKSaves your settings and closes the Dynamic List Element dialog.
CancelCancels your settings and closes the Dynamic List Element dialog.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.

When you allow contributors to add items to a list, they ultimately are adding web pages to the web site.

A.41 Dynamic List Settings Dialog

The Dynamic List Settings dialog is used to modify the settings for the dynamic list element definition. These settings would include the sort order and the specific query on the content server.

Figure A-56 Dynamic List Settings dialog

Surrounding text describes Figure A-56 .
ElementDescription
Query TextThe query on the content server that defines which items display in the dynamic list.
EditOpens the Edit Query Text dialog (see Section A.22, "Edit Query Text Dialog") to construct a query.
Sort FieldSelect the field that serves as the sorting field for the returned search results.
Sort OrderSelect to sort the search results in either ascending or descending order.
Number of results per pageEnter the number of search results returned per page.
Limit search scope to this websiteCheck to return only site assets which are associated with the web site.
Section to display result itemsThe target section in the web site where the results display.
EditOpens the Select Section dialog (see Section A.17, "Select Section Dialog") to select the target section.
OKSaves your settings and closes the Dynamic List Settings dialog.
CancelCancels your settings and closes the Dynamic List Settings dialog.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.

A.42 Region Definition Dialog

The region definition is used to define which elements, by the element definition, are available for use in a selected region template. The region definition is used to organize the set of element definitions available.

Figure A-57 Region Definition dialog

Region Definition dialog
ElementDescription
DescriptionThe name of the region definition.
ElementsMakes select class names available in Contributor.
AddOpens the Add Element dialog (see Section A.43, "Element Dialog") to add an element definition to the region definition.
RemoveSpecifies a class name to be made available in Contributor.

If you add a class name this way, you still must attach the CSS file containing this class to a page template or fragment.

EditOpens the Add Element dialog (see Section A.43, "Element Dialog") with the information for the selected element definition available to edit.
Move UpMoves the selected element definition up the list.
Move DownMoves the selected element definition down the list.
Modify MetadataOpens the Enable Modify Metadata dialog (see Section A.15, "Enable Metadata Modification Dialog") to update Metadata fields for the region definition.
Switch ContentOpens the Region Content Options dialog (see Section A.20, "Region Content Options Dialog") to select the parameters contributors have to switch region content.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.

A.43 Element Dialog

The Element dialog is used to add an element definition to a region definition or a static list element definition. In this dialog you can add name-specific information to allow the element definition to maintain its reusability while still giving it a specific identifying name within the region definition or static list.

Figure A-58 Element dialog

Element Selection dialog
ElementDescription
NameThe name of the element as it appears in the Designer view.
LabelThe label of the element. The label serves as the name of the editing region in the contributor's editing region.
InfoAdditional information about the element definition. The information entered here appears to the Contributor as a tooltip when the contributor hovers the mouse over the label.
Element Definition IDUse to select the name of the element definition to use.
Embed the element definition inside the region definitionCheck the box to embed the element definition in the region definition. This copies the element definition into the region definition, which means that the region definition must be updated when you want to update the element definition.
OKSaves your settings and closes the Element dialog.
CancelCancels your settings and closes the Element dialog.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.
SearchOpens a window displaying the results of a content server search for element definitions.
EditOpens a dialog to select the type of element definition to embed.

The info is what is listed in the hover on the tooltip in Contributor.

A.44 Link Settings Dialog

When you allow contributors to create links, they are able to use a link wizard (the same one that is available in Designer) to create a link to another section, to another site, or to another file. Using this dialog, you can control what types of files (contributor data files and native documents) the contributors can link to and whether they can link to new or existing files.

Figure A-59 Link Settings dialog

Link Settings dialog box
ElementDescription
Create new contributor data fileAllows contributors to create a contributor data file that they can link to.
Create new native documentAllows contributors to create a native document that they can link to.

Document Types: Specifies which native documents contributors can create.

The Additional Information button opens the Choose Document Types dialog (see Section A.21, "Choose Document Types Dialog"), where you can select the document types that are available to contributors.

Choose existing in the content serverAllows contributors to search the content server for an existing contributor data file or native document that they can link to.

Query Text: Specifies the actual query that is performed in the content server to display existing files.

The Additional Information button opens the Edit Query Text dialog (see Section A.22, "Edit Query Text Dialog"), which you can use to create, capture, and test the query used to display existing files.

Show Results Only: Shows only the search results and not the typical content server environment. (This is useful to prevent contributors from browsing to other content in the content server.)

Browse for content locallyAllows contributors to browse for a file on their local file system that they can link to.
Remove region content associationThis option is disabled when you're specifying link settings for a contributor. It is only applicable when setting contribution region options for a contributor.
Default MetadataOpens the Enable Metadata Modification dialog (see Section A.15, "Enable Metadata Modification Dialog"), where you can specify the metadata that is available and the default metadata that is used when contributors create files.
OKSaves your settings and closes the Link Settings dialog.
CancelCancels your settings and closes the Link Settings dialog.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.

A.45 Select CSS Classes Dialog

When you attach a cascading style sheet (CSS) to a page template, subtemplate, or region template, you can identify certain classes from the style sheet that are available to a contributor to choose from when editing text and graphics in Contributor. This can be useful when you want to enforce well-designed and consistent web pages. You can specify the class names that should be available in this dialog.

Figure A-60 Select CSS Classes dialog

Select CSS Classes dialog box
ElementDescription
Allow all stylesheetsMakes all stylesheets within the scope of the current page available to Contributor, including any stylesheets referenced by fragments.
Allow selected stylesheetsMakes only the selected stylesheets available to Contributor.
Add ID...Opens the Select a CSS Stylesheet dialog (see Section A.46, "Select a CSS StyleSheet Dialog") to select stylesheets from the content server.
Add Url...Opens the Choose Fragment Asset dialog (see Section A.47, "Choose Fragment Asset Dialog") to select stylesheets referenced within fragments.
RemoveRemoves the selected stylesheet from the stylesheets available to Contributor.
Allow all classesMakes all classes from the selected stylesheets available in Contributor.
Allow selected classesMakes select class names from the selected stylesheets available in Contributor.
Additional classesSpecifies a class name to be made available in Contributor.

If you add a class name this way, you still must attach the CSS file containing this class to a page template or fragment.

Surrounding text describes param_new.gif.
Creates a class name.
Surrounding text describes param_delete.gif.
Deletes the class name that you added (using the previous option).
OKSaves your settings and closes the Select CSS Classes dialog.
CancelCancels your settings and closes the Select CSS Classes dialog.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.

A.46 Select a CSS StyleSheet Dialog

This dialog is used to select a stylesheet from the content server. Once the stylesheet is selected the styles within the stylesheet will be accessible to Contributor.

Figure A-61 Select A CSS StyleSheet dialog

Select a CSS Stylesheet dialog
ElementDescription
MenuDisplays the content ID of the selected stylesheet.
Search...Opens a search results window displaying all CSS files on the content server. From there, select the CSS file.
OKSaves your settings and returns to the Select CSS Classes dialog.
CancelCancels your settings and returns to the Select CSS Classes dialog.

A.47 Choose Fragment Asset Dialog

This dialog is used to select a stylesheet that is loaded with a fragment. Many of these stylesheets are not normally used except with fragments. Because of this, these fragments are loaded by Url rather than Content ID. Once the stylesheet is selected, the styles within the stylesheet will be accessible to Contributor.

Figure A-62 Choose Fragment Asset dialog

Choose Fragment Asset dialog
ElementDescription
MenuDisplays the available stylesheets loaded as fragment assets.
OKSaves your settings and returns to the Select CSS Classes dialog.
CancelCancels your settings and returns to the Select CSS Classes dialog.

A.48 WYSIWYG Element Validation Dialog

When contributors work in the Contributor application, they are generally free to add whatever text, graphics, and other content they like. As a designer, however, your goal may be to enforce consistency, especially formatting consistency, from one web page to another. You may also want to keep the content to a minimum on a particular page. You can enforce such standards with element validation (available in the WYSIWYG Element dialog).

Figure A-63 WYSIWYG Element Validation dialog

WYSIWYG Element Validation dialog box
ElementDescription
Use default validationUses the default validation options provided by Site Studio. Choose from the following:

min: Enforces a minimum amount of text (in characters).

max: Enforces a maximum amount of text (in characters).

Disallowed characters: Prevents contributors from using the characters that you specify here.

Allow line breaks <br>: When checked, contributors can create a line break (soft return), which is usually done by pressing SHIFT + ENTER on the keyboard.

Allow paragraphs <p>: When checked, contributors can create a paragraph (hard return), which is usually done by pressing ENTER on the keyboard.

Allow images <img>: When checked, contributors can add images.

Use external validationUses an external validation script that you provide.

Settings: Opens the Advanced Element validation dialog (see Section A.52, "Advanced Element Validation Dialog"), where you can enter the values from your script.

OKSaves your settings and closes the WYSIWYG Element Validation dialog.
CancelCancels your settings and closes the WYSIWYG Element Validation dialog.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.

The default validation options in this dialog are derived from a script, ss_default_validation_script.js, that is provided by Site Studio.

A.49 Plain Text Element Validation Dialog

When contributors work in the Contributor application, they are generally free to add whatever text they like (even with the formatting limitations of a plain text element). As a designer, however, your goal may be to enforce consistency, especially if you must keep content to a minimum on a particular page. You can enforce such standards using element validation (available in the Plain Text Element dialog).

Figure A-64 Plain Text Element Validation dialog

Plain Text Element Validation dialog box
ElementDescription
Use default validationUses the default validation options provided by Site Studio. Choose from the following:

min: Enforces a minimum amount of text (in characters).

max: Enforces a maximum amount of text (in characters).

Disallowed characters: Prevents contributors from using the characters that you specify here.

Allow multiple lines: When checked, contributors can add lines of text (by pressing ENTER on their keyboard).

Use external validationUses an external validation script that you provide.

Settings: Opens the Advanced Element Validation dialog (see Section A.52, "Advanced Element Validation Dialog"), where you can enter the values from your script.

OKSaves your settings and closes the Plain Text Element Validation dialog.
CancelCancels your settings and closes the Plain Text Element Validation dialog.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.

The default validation options in this dialog are derived from a script, ss_default_validation_script.js, that is provided by Site Studio.

A.50 Select HTML Tags Dialog

When contributors are capable of editing a web page in the HTML rather than using a WYSIWYG interface, you may want to allow those contributors to edit specified regions using the HTML. As the designer, you can limit the available tags that the contributor can use in editing a region. This is helpful in maintaining a balance between the advanced abilities of some contributors and enforcing standards across a web page.

Figure A-65 Select HTML Tags dialog

Select HTML Tags Dialog
ElementDescription
Allow default HTML tagsAllows the contributor to use the default set of HTML tags.
Allow selected HTML tagsAllows the contributor to use only those tags which are selected.
Surrounding text describes param_new.gif.
Creates an allowed HTML tag.
Surrounding text describes param_delete.gif.
Deletes the HTML tag that you added (using the previous option).
OKSaves your settings and closes the Plain Text Element Validation dialog.
CancelCancels your settings and closes the Plain Text Element Validation dialog.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.

A.51 Image Element Validation Dialog

When contributors work in Contributor (in particular, with an image element), they are generally free to add whatever images they like. As a designer, however, your goal may be to enforce consistency, especially images sizes, from one page to another. You can enforce such standards using element validation (available in the Image Element dialog).

Figure A-66 Image Only Element Validation dialog

Image Only Element Validation dialog box
ElementDescription
Use default validationUses the default validation options provided by Site Studio. Choose from the following:

Width:

  • min: Enforces a minimum width (in pixels).

  • max: Enforces a maximum width (in pixels).

Height:

  • min: Enforces a minimum height (in pixels).

  • max: Enforces a maximum height (in pixels).

Use external validationUses an external validation script that you provide.

Settings: Opens the Advanced Element Validation dialog (see Section A.52, "Advanced Element Validation Dialog"), where you can enter the values from your script.

OKSaves your settings and closes the Image Element Validation dialog.
CancelCancels your settings and closes the Image Element Validation dialog.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.

If you enforce a certain image size in pixels, you may want to instruct contributors on how to change the size of the image using the image properties form.

The default validation options in this dialog are derived from a script, ss_default_validation_script.js, that is provided by Site Studio.

A.52 Advanced Element Validation Dialog

When contributors work in Contributor, they are generally free to add whatever text, graphics, and other content they like. As a designer, however, your goal may be to enforce consistency or to limit the amount of content that is contributed to a web page. You can use the default validation options in Designer or come up with your own validation script and attach it to the element using this dialog.

Figure A-67 Advanced Element Validation dialog

Advanced Element Validation dialog box
ElementDescription
ScriptSpecifies the custom validation script that you use for the element.

The Additional Information button opens an Oracle Content Server Dialog where you can select your validation script from the content server.

LanguageSpecifies the scripting language used in your validation (JavaScript or VBScript).
Method NameSpecifies the method that you use to run the validation.
Content TypeSpecifies the content type (string, XML, HTML) that is used in the validation.
Surrounding text describes param_new.gif.
Adds a parameter.
Surrounding text describes param_delete.gif.
Deletes an existing parameter.
Surrounding text describes param_up.gif.
Moves the parameter up in the list.
Surrounding text describes param_down.gif.
Moves the parameter down in the list.
OKSaves your settings and closes the Advanced Element Validation dialog.
CancelCancels your settings and closes the Advanced Element Validation dialog.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.

A.53 New Item Settings Dialog

When you allow contributors to add an item to a dynamic list, they have the ability to add a new or existing contributor data file or native document. You can control exactly what types of files they can add using this dialog (accessible from the Dynamic List Element Definition dialog).

Figure A-68 New Item Settings dialog

New Item Settings dialog
ElementDescription
Create new contributor data fileAllows contributors to create a contributor data file and add it to the list.
Create new native documentAllows contributors to create a native document and add it to the list.

Document Types: Specifies which native documents contributors can create.

The Additional Information button opens the Choose Document Types dialog (see Section A.21, "Choose Document Types Dialog"), where you can select the document types that are available to contributors.

Choose existing in the content serverThis option is disabled in the context of a dynamic list because the query for the dynamic list already picks up existing files in the content server.

If a contributor wants to add an existing file in the content server that doesn't already appear in the list, then the metadata for that file must be changed to match the metadata used in the list.

Browse for content locallyAllows contributors to browse for a file on their local file system and add it to the list.
Remove region content associationThis option is disabled in the context of a dynamic list. It is only applicable when setting contribution region options for a contributor.
Default MetadataOpens the Enable Metadata Modification dialog (see Section A.15, "Enable Metadata Modification Dialog"), where you can specify the metadata that is available and the default metadata that is assigned to the files added to the list.
OKSaves your settings and closes the New Item Settings dialog.
CancelCancels your settings and closes the New Item Settings dialog.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.

A.54 Assign Content Dialog

Each placeholder on a primary page needs a contributor data file, native document, or subtemplate assigned to it. Each placeholder on a secondary page needs a subtemplate, data file, or native document assigned to it, or it must be designated as replaceable. You perform these tasks in this dialog. The contributor can also assign data files and edit the data files assigned to a placeholder (assuming you allow these actions).

Figure A-69 Assign Content dialog

Assign Content dialog
ElementDescription
Site HierarchyDisplays the site hierarchy and indicates which placeholders have content assigned to them.

The folder icon indicates the section has content assigned or is designated as replaceable.

The X-folder icon indicates the section is missing content or must be designated as replaceable.

Click a section to view and configure the placeholder (or placeholders) on the primary and secondary pages there.

PrimaryDisplays the primary pages in the site hierarchy.
SecondaryDisplays the secondary pages in the site hierarchy.
Show allExpands the site hierarchy and displays the sections that are missing content or are not designated as replaceable. If you have more than one, you see a navigation control (see below) that you can use to go through each one.
FinishedSaves your settings and closes the Assign Content dialog.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.

You can choose not to assign content to a region and instead have a contributor perform this task.

Placeholder Information Tooltip

When the contribution graphic opens in the Assign Region dialog, you can hover over the contribution graphic for the placeholder and when the region highlighting appears, a placeholder information tooltip (Figure A-70) also opens in a small popup window.

Figure A-70 Placeholder Information Tooltip

Placeholder Information Tooltip

The placeholder information tooltip lists the name of the placeholder mapping, placeholder definition, region definition, and region template that have been assigned in the highlighted contribution region. The Content ID of the page template is also displayed. This information can help in remembering what site assets have been assembled in each placeholder.

A.55 Choose Region Content Dialog

Each region on a primary page needs a contributor data file or native document assigned to it. Each region on a secondary page needs a file assigned to it, or it must be designated as replaceable. You can assign a new or existing contributor data file or native document to a region using this dialog, accessible from the Assign Content Dialog (see Section A.54, "Assign Content Dialog").

Figure A-71 Choose Region Content Dialog

Choose Region Content Dialog
ElementDescription
Content IDDisplays the Content ID of the file assigned to the region.

(This field and the ones below are initially blank until you assign a file to the region.)

TitleDisplays the Title of the file assigned to the region.
TypeDisplays the Type (document type) of the file assigned to the region.
AuthorDisplays the Author of the file assigned to the region.
CommentsDisplays the Comments of the file assigned to the region.
Document InfoOpens the Content Information page for the file assigned to the region.
ChooseUse to select a file that you assign to the region. You have four choices:

Existing: Opens the Oracle Content Server dialog where you can select an existing contributor data file or native document and assign it to the region.

New: Displays a list of file types that you can create and assign to the region.

Local: Opens a window that you use to select a file from your local file system, checked it in, and assign it to the region.

None: Removes the existing file assigned to the region.

OKSaves your settings and closes the Choose Region Content dialog.
CancelCancels your settings and closes the Choose Region Content dialog.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.

A.56 Generate Unique Region Content Dialog

Site Studio can automatically generate a unique contributor data file for each region on the same page template throughout the site hierarchy. This is useful when you reuse a page template and want to populate the contribution region on that page wherever it is used on your site. You can specify your own naming convention when you use this feature.

Contributor data files already assigned to a region are not overwritten.

Figure A-72 Generate Unique Region Content Dialog

Generate Unique Region Content Dialog
ElementDescription
Use auto-generated Content IDsThe Content ID is automatically generated based on your settings in the content server.

This option is disabled if the content server is not set up to auto-generate content IDs.

Create Content IDs from the followingThe Content ID is automatically generated based on the naming convention that you specify here:

Prepend with: This prefix is used followed by the naming convention specified below:

  • Use timestamp to ensure uniqueness: The name is based on a unique timestamp (when the file was created and checked into the content server).

  • Use section and region to ensure uniqueness: The name is based on the section and region where the file is located on the web site.

DefineDefines additional default metadata values for each file by using the Assign Info Form in the content server.
Auto-generate titleAutomatically generates a title based on the name of the section and the name of the region.

The title, for example, may look similar to this:

Contribution Data For Section 'Products', Region 'Region1'

Auto-generate commentsAutomatically generates a comment based on the name of the section and the name of the region. The comments, for example, may look something like this:

Comments: This is region content for the Site Studio Web Site Section 'Products', Region 'Region1'

OKSaves your settings and closes the Generate Unique Region Content dialog.
CancelCancels your settings and closes the Generate Unique Region Content dialog.
HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.

A.57 Fragment Editor Dialog

The Fragment Editor comprises a suite of editing options that allow you to edit all parts of a fragment, including its snippets, assets, parameters, and elements. You can open the Fragment Editor from the File menu, and whenever you edit a fragment in the toolbox.

Figure A-73 Fragment Editor dialog

Fragment Editor dialog box
ElementDescription
Surrounding text describes fragment_icon.gif.
Changes the icon associated with the fragment. The icon displays in the Toolbox after you save the fragment.

Click the button to see the available icons and then select one of them.

Surrounding text describes browse_for_image.gif.
Opens the Properties for Fragment dialog (see Section A.58, "Properties for Fragment Dialog"), where you can change the fragment's name, language, and type.
AssetsOpens the Fragment Assets dialog (see Section A.59, "Fragment Assets Dialog"), where you can add, edit, and delete the assets in a fragment.
ElementsOpens the Fragment Elements dialog (see Section A.60, "Fragment Elements Dialog"), where you can add, edit, and delete each element in the fragment.

Elements are only available for static list fragments. As such, this button is disabled if the fragment type is not "staticlist" (see Section A.58, "Properties for Fragment Dialog").

ParametersOpens the Fragment Parameters dialog (see Section A.61, "Fragment Parameters Dialog"), where you can add, edit, and delete each parameter in the fragment.
AddOpens the Snippet Properties dialog (see Section A.64, "Snippet Properties Dialog"), where you can add a snippet to the fragment.
DeleteDeletes the snippet from the fragment.
PropertiesOpens the Snippet Properties dialog (see Section A.64, "Snippet Properties Dialog"), where you can edit a snippet in the fragment.
Name | Location | Include

(Status area)

Displays the existing snippets in the fragment.
Snippet codeDisplays the snippet code. You can edit the text in this window.
PreviewOpens the Fragment Preview dialog (see Section A.66, "Fragment Preview Dialog"), where you can preview the fragment.

You may be prompted to choose a set of parameter values to preview the fragment.

HelpOpens the online help for this specific dialog.

A.58 Properties for Fragment Dialog

The properties of a fragment include the fragment's name, ID, language, and type. Each time you create a fragment, you're prompted to enter these values. You can also change these values after you create a fragment using this dialog.

Figure A-74 Properties for Fragment dialog

Properties for Fragment dialog box
ElementDescription
NameIdentifies the fragment.

The name of the fragment displays in the Toolbox. It can be a friendly name that includes spaces and special characters, if you like.

IDIdentifies the fragment and its individual parts (snippets, assets, parameters, and so on).

You can only change the ID when you first create the fragment. The ID also serves as an XML attribute and as the base name for the classes, files, and directories in the fragment. The ID should be concise, and it should not contain spaces, or non-ASCII or special characters.

LanguageIdentifies the language used by the fragment for server-side scripting.

If your site type is "hcsp/jsp," then the available language is idoc or jsp. If your site type is "asp," then the available language is asp.

TypeIdentifies the type and intended use of the fragment. This determines the available options for the fragment and its location in the Toolbox. There are four types:

navigation: The fragment is used for site navigation (navigation bar, breadcrumbs, search, and so on).

staticlist: The fragment is used to provide advanced contribution capabilities, where contributors can edit individual elements.

dynamic list: The fragment is used to provide advanced contribution capabilities, where contributors can modify files that appear in the list.

other: The fragment is used for miscellaneous purposes, such as a copyright line, embedded multimedia, or a login script.

Library NameIdentifies the library that the fragment is stored in.

Initially, it says "<unsaved>" and appears disabled, until you save the fragment for the first time.

OK