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Oracle Solaris Studio 12.3: Fortran User's Guide     Oracle Solaris Studio 12.3 Information Library
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Document Information


1.  Introduction

2.  Using Solaris Studio Fortran

3.  Fortran Compiler Options

4.  Solaris Studio Fortran Features and Extensions

4.1 Source Language Features

4.1.1 Continuation Line Limits

4.1.2 Fixed-Form Source Lines

4.1.3 Tab Form

4.1.4 Source Form Assumed Mixing Forms Case

4.1.5 Limits and Defaults

4.2 Data Types

4.2.1 Boolean Type Rules Governing Boolean Type Alternate Forms of Boolean Constants



Hollerith Alternate Contexts of Boolean Constants

4.2.2 Abbreviated Size Notation for Numeric Data Types

4.2.3 Size and Alignment of Data Types

4.3 Cray Pointers

4.3.1 Syntax

4.3.2 Purpose of Cray Pointers

4.3.3 Declaring Cray Pointers and Fortran 95 Pointers

4.3.4 Features of Cray Pointers

4.3.5 Restrictions on Cray Pointers

4.3.6 Restrictions on Cray Pointees

4.3.7 Usage of Cray Pointers

4.4 STRUCTURE and UNION (VAX Fortran)

4.5 Unsigned Integers

4.5.1 Arithmetic Expressions

4.5.2 Relational Expressions

4.5.3 Control Constructs

4.5.4 Input/Output Constructs

4.5.5 Intrinsic Functions

4.6 Fortran 200x Features

4.6.1 Interoperability with C

4.6.2 IEEE Floating-Point Exception Handling

4.6.3 Command-Line Argument Intrinsics

4.6.4 PROTECTED Attribute

4.6.5 Fortran 2003 Asynchronous I/O

4.6.6 Extended ALLOCATABLE Attribute

4.6.7 VALUE Attribute

4.6.8 Fortran 2003 Stream I/O

4.6.9 Fortran 2003 IMPORT Statement

4.6.10 Fortran 2003 FLUSH I/O Statement

4.6.11 Fortran 2003 POINTER INTENT Feature

4.6.12 Fortran 2003 Enhanced Array Constructor

4.6.13 Object-Oriented Fortran Support

4.6.14 Additional Fortran 2003 and Fortran 2008 Features

4.7 Additional I/O Extensions

4.7.1 I/O Error Handling Routines

4.7.2 Variable Format Expressions

4.7.3 NAMELIST Input Format

4.7.4 Binary Unformatted I/O

4.7.5 Miscellaneous I/O Extensions

4.8 Directives

4.8.1 Form of Special f95 Directive Lines Fixed-Form Source Free-Form Source

4.8.2 FIXED and FREE Directives Scope Uses Restrictions

4.8.3 Parallelization Directives

4.9 Module Files

4.9.1 Searching for Modules

4.9.2 The -use=list Option Flag

4.9.3 The fdumpmod Command

4.10 Intrinsics

4.11 Forward Compatibility

4.12 Mixing Languages

5.  FORTRAN 77 Compatibility: Migrating to Solaris Studio Fortran

A.  Runtime Error Messages

B.  Features Release History

C.  Fortran Directives Summary


4.7 Additional I/O Extensions

The section describes extensions to Fortran 95 Input/Output handling that are accepted by the f95 compiler that are not part of the Fortran 2003 standard. Some are I/O extensions that appeared in the Fortran 77 compiler, f77, and are now part of the Fortran compiler.

4.7.1 I/O Error Handling Routines

Two new functions enable the user to specify their own error handling routine for formatted input on a logical unit. When a formatting error is detected, the runtime I/O library calls the specified user-supplied handler routine with data pointing at the character in the input line causing the error. The handler routine can supply a new character and allow the I/O operation to continue at the point where the error was detected using the new character; or take the default Fortran error handling.

The new routines, SET_IO_ERR_HANDLER(3f) and GET_IO_ERR_HANDLER(3f), are module subroutines and require USE SUN_IO_HANDLERS in the routine that calls them. See the man pages for these routines for details.

4.7.2 Variable Format Expressions

Fortran 77 allowed any integer constant in a format to be replaced by an arbitrary expression enclosed in angle brackets:

1 FORMAT(< expr > … )

Variable format expressions cannot appear as the n in an nH… edit descriptor, in a FORMAT statement that is referenced by an ASSIGN statement, or in a FORMAT statement within a parallel region.

This feature is enabled natively in f95, and does not require the -f77 compatibility option flag.

4.7.3 NAMELIST Input Format

4.7.4 Binary Unformatted I/O

Opening a file with FORM=’BINARY’ has roughly the same effect as FORM=’UNFORMATTED’, except that no record lengths are embedded in the file. Without this data, there is no way to tell where one record begins, or ends. Thus, it is impossible to BACKSPACE a FORM=’BINARY’ file, because there is no way of telling where to backspace to. A READ on a ’BINARY’ file will read as much data as needed to fill the variables on the input list.

4.7.5 Miscellaneous I/O Extensions