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Oracle Solaris Studio 12.3: Debugging a Program With dbx     Oracle Solaris Studio 12.3 Information Library
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Document Information


1.  Getting Started With dbx

2.  Starting dbx

3.  Customizing dbx

4.  Viewing and Navigating To Code

5.  Controlling Program Execution

6.  Setting Breakpoints and Traces

7.  Using the Call Stack

8.  Evaluating and Displaying Data

9.  Using Runtime Checking

Capabilities of Runtime Checking

When to Use Runtime Checking

Runtime Checking Requirements

Using Runtime Checking

Turning On Memory Use and Memory Leak Checking

Turning On Memory Access Checking

Turning On All Runtime Checking

Turning Off Runtime Checking

Running Your Program

Using Access Checking

Understanding the Memory Access Error Report

Memory Access Errors

Using Memory Leak Checking

Detecting Memory Leak Errors

Possible Leaks

Checking for Leaks

Understanding the Memory Leak Report

Generating a Leak Report

Combining Leaks

Fixing Memory Leaks

Using Memory Use Checking

Suppressing Errors

Types of Suppression

Suppression by Scope and Type

Suppression of Last Error

Limiting the Number of Errors Reported

Suppressing Error Examples

Default Suppressions

Using Suppression to Manage Errors

Using Runtime Checking on a Child Process

Using Runtime Checking on an Attached Process

On a System Running Solaris

On a System Running Linux

Using Fix and Continue With Runtime Checking

Runtime Checking Application Programming Interface

Using Runtime Checking in Batch Mode

bcheck Syntax

bcheck Examples

Enabling Batch Mode Directly From dbx

Troubleshooting Tips

Runtime Checking Limitations

Works Better With More Symbols and Debug Information

SIGSEGV and SIGALTSTACK Signals Are Restricted on x86 Platforms

Works Better When Sufficient Patch Area is Available Within 8 MB of All Existing Code (SPARC platforms only).

Runtime Checking Errors

Access Errors

Bad Free (baf) Error

Duplicate Free (duf) Error

Misaligned Free (maf) Error

Misaligned Read (mar) Error

Misaligned Write (maw) Error

Out of Memory (oom) Error

Read From Array Out-of-Bounds (rob) Error

Read From Unallocated Memory (rua) Error

Read From Uninitialized Memory (rui) Error

Write to Array Out-of-Bounds Memory (wob) Error

Write to Read-Only Memory (wro) Error

Write to Unallocated Memory (wua) Error

Memory Leak Errors

Address in Block (aib) Error

Address in Register (air) Error

Memory Leak (mel) Error

10.  Fixing and Continuing

11.  Debugging Multithreaded Applications

12.  Debugging Child Processes

13.  Debugging OpenMP Programs

14.  Working With Signals

15.  Debugging C++ With dbx

16.  Debugging Fortran Using dbx

17.  Debugging a Java Application With dbx

18.  Debugging at the Machine-Instruction Level

19.  Using dbx With the Korn Shell

20.  Debugging Shared Libraries

A.  Modifying a Program State

B.  Event Management

C.  Macros

D.  Command Reference


Runtime Checking Limitations

Runtime checking has the following limitations.

Works Better With More Symbols and Debug Information

Access checking requires some symbol information in the load objects. When a load object is fully stripped, runtime checking might not catch all of the errors. Read from uninitialized memory errors might be incorrect and therefore are suppressed. You can override the suppression with the unsuppress rui command. To retain the symbol table in the load object, use the-x option when stripping a load object

Runtime checking cannot catch all array out-of-bounds errors. Bounds checking for static and stack memory is not available without debug information.

SIGSEGV and SIGALTSTACK Signals Are Restricted on x86 Platforms

Runtime checking instruments memory access instructions for access checking. These instructions are handled by a SIGSEGV handler at runtime. Because runtime checking requires its own SIGSEGV handler and signal alternate stack, an attempt to install a SIGSEGV handler or SIGALTSTACK handler results in an EINVALerror or ignoring the attempt.

SIGSEGV handler calls cannot be nested. Doing so results in the error terminating signal 11 SEGSEGV. If you receive this error, use the rtc skippatch command to skip instrumentation of the affected function.

Works Better When Sufficient Patch Area is Available Within 8 MB of All Existing Code (SPARC platforms only).

Two problems might arise if sufficient patch area is not available within 8 megabytes of all existing code.

If either of the above conditions applies to your program, and the program starts to behave differently when you turn on access checking, it is likely that the trap handler limitation affects your program. To work around the limitation, you can do the following: