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Oracle Solaris Studio 12.3: Debugging a Program With dbx     Oracle Solaris Studio 12.3 Information Library
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1.  Getting Started With dbx

2.  Starting dbx

3.  Customizing dbx

4.  Viewing and Navigating To Code

5.  Controlling Program Execution

6.  Setting Breakpoints and Traces

7.  Using the Call Stack

8.  Evaluating and Displaying Data

9.  Using Runtime Checking

10.  Fixing and Continuing

11.  Debugging Multithreaded Applications

12.  Debugging Child Processes

13.  Debugging OpenMP Programs

14.  Working With Signals

15.  Debugging C++ With dbx

16.  Debugging Fortran Using dbx

17.  Debugging a Java Application With dbx

18.  Debugging at the Machine-Instruction Level

19.  Using dbx With the Korn Shell

20.  Debugging Shared Libraries

A.  Modifying a Program State

B.  Event Management

C.  Macros

D.  Command Reference



The Oracle Solaris Studio 12.3 Debugging a Program With dbx manual gives instructions on how to use the dbx command-line debugger, an interactive source level debugging tool.

Supported Platforms

This Oracle Solaris Studio release supports platforms that use the SPARC family of processor architectures running the Oracle Solaris operating system, as well as platforms that use the x86 family of processor architectures running Oracle Solaris or specific Linux systems.

This document uses the following terms to cite differences between x86 platforms:

Information specific to Linux systems refers only to supported Linux x86 platforms, while information specific to Oracle Solaris systems refers only to supported Oracle Solaris platforms on SPARC and x86 systems.

For a complete list of supported hardware platforms and operating system releases, see the Oracle Solaris Studio 12.3 Release Notes.

Oracle Solaris Studio Documentation

You can find complete documentation for Oracle Solaris Studio software as follows:

Resources for Developers

Visit the Oracle Technical Network web site to find these resources for developers using Oracle Solaris Studio:

Access to Oracle Support

Oracle customers have access to electronic support through My Oracle Support. For information, visit or visit if you are hearing impaired.

Typographic Conventions

The following table describes the typographic conventions that are used in this book.

Table P-1 Typographic Conventions

The names of commands, files, and directories, and onscreen computer output
Edit your .login file.

Use ls -a to list all files.

machine_name% you have mail.

What you type, contrasted with onscreen computer output
machine_name% su


Placeholder: replace with a real name or value
The command to remove a file is rm filename.
Book titles, new terms, and terms to be emphasized
Read Chapter 6 in the User's Guide.

A cache is a copy that is stored locally.

Do not save the file.

Note: Some emphasized items appear bold online.

Shell Prompts in Command Examples

The following table shows the default UNIX system prompt and superuser prompt for shells that are included in the Oracle Solaris OS. Note that the default system prompt that is displayed in command examples varies, depending on the Oracle Solaris release.

Table P-2 Shell Prompts

Bash shell, Korn shell, and Bourne shell
Bash shell, Korn shell, and Bourne shell for superuser
C shell
C shell for superuser