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Oracle® Fusion Applications Workforce Development Implementation Guide
11g Release 1 (11.1.2)
Part Number E20380-02
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17 Common HCM Configuration: Define Workforce Business Processes and Events

This chapter contains the following:

Define Checklists

Define Profile Eligibility

Define Checklists

Checklist Components: How They Fit Together

Use checklists for actions that require the completion of standard tasks, such as creating users or reassigning resources. For example, employee hire and termination actions typically require a number of people to complete standard tasks. You create and maintain tasks within a checklist template. You can create checklist templates that can be allocated to persons either automatically or manually.

The figure shows the components of a checklist template and their major relationships.

Checklist template

This figure shows the components of the checklist allocation process and how they relate to each other.

Components of the checklist allocation
process and how they relate to each other

Action

Actions track changes in personal circumstances, for example, new hire, transfer, or termination. Link an action to a checklist template to allocate the checklist to persons automatically when they experience the action. Note that, the checklist template is still available for manual allocation, even if it is linked to an action.

Task

You create tasks within a checklist template, however, managers can also create and maintain tasks within an allocated checklist. You can enter a task duration and specify if a task is required. When the task appears in an allocated checklist, the date in the target end date field reflects this duration. You can set the checklist status to completed only if all the required tasks are complete.

Eligibility Profile

Link an eligibility profile to a checklist task to control whether that task appears in a specific allocated checklist. The task appears in the allocated checklist of a worker only if the worker matches the eligibility criteria.

Task Performer

Performer is the person carrying out the task. You select the task performers' areas of responsibility when you create a checklist template. During checklist allocation, the persons with the selected responsibilities are automatically assigned as performers for the tasks and notified of the assignment. You can view, but not update, the task performers in the allocated checklist.

Allocated Checklist

Allocated checklists are those that have been allocated to workers and contain the tasks relevant to them.

Task Owner

Task owner, generally synonymous with a manager, is the person responsible for ensuring task completion. Managers can display the tasks within an allocated checklist and monitor the status themselves or assign alternative owners for the tasks.

Checklist and Task Statuses: Explained

Managers can display the allocated checklists for their workers and update the checklist and task statuses as necessary. Performers and owners can view the checklist tasks assigned to them in their worklist and update the task status. Note that these statuses are not used to determine the checklist or task availability, they are for information purposes only.

The checklist and task statuses are:

Initiated

The status of the checklist and the tasks in the checklist is automatically set to initiated when you allocate the checklist.

Completed

Use this status to indicate that the checklist or task is complete. You can set the checklist status to completed only if all the required tasks are complete. The checklist status is automatically set to completed when you set the status of the last required task to completed. Note that the task does not disappear from the allocated checklist or the worklist when you set the status to completed. You must delete it yourself if required.

Rejected

Use this status to reject a checklist, for example, because it was wrongly allocated to a person. Task owners or performers can use this status to decline ownership of a task, for example, if the task has been wrongly assigned to them.

Outstanding

Use this status to indicate that the checklist or task is not complete by the target date.

Other Task Statuses

Use the other statuses to record progress made against the checklist or tasks, for example, to indicate that tasks are in progress or the checklist is suspended because of unavailability of resources.

Creating a Checklist Template: Worked Example

This example demonstrates how to create a checklist template that is allocated automatically to all newly hired workers to track certain tasks involved in hiring a worker. The tasks in the checklist vary according to eligibility rules.

The following table summarizes key decisions for this scenario:


Decisions to Consider

In this Example

Allocate checklist automatically?

Yes, checklist is allocated automatically to persons experiencing new hire action.

Which tasks to include in the checklist?

  • Create E-mail Account

  • Issue Laptop

  • Issue Meal Vouchers

What are the task performers' responsibilities?

  • Performers for the tasks Create E-mail Account and Issue Laptop have the responsibility IT Support Representative.

  • Performers for the task Issue Meal Vouchers have the responsibility HR Representative.

Do eligibility rules apply to any tasks?

  • Issue Laptop applies to manager users only

  • Issue Meal Vouchers applies to work location India only

Create a checklist template, associate it with the Hire action, and create three tasks for the template.

Prerequisites

  1. Create an eligibility profile Manager_Users for all manager users.
  2. Create an eligibility profile Work_Location_India for work location India.
  3. Create a responsibility IT Support Representative and assign persons to this responsibility.

Creating a Checklist Template

  1. On the Person Management Overview page, click Manage Checklist Templates to open the Manage Checklist Templates page.
  2. Click Create.
  3. On the Create Checklist Templates page, complete the fields, as shown in this table:

    Field

    Value

    Name

    New Hire

    Category

    On Boarding

    Action

    Hire


Creating Checklist Tasks

  1. In the Tasks region, click Create.
  2. For each task, complete the fields, as shown in this table:

    Field

    Create E-mail Account Task

    Issue Laptop Task

    Issue Meal Vouchers Task

    Required

    Yes

    No

    No

    Eligibility Profile

     

    Manager_Users

    India_Work_Location

    Responsibility Type

    IT Support Representative

    IT Support Representative

    HR Representative


  3. Click Submit.

FAQs for Define Checklists

Can managers make changes in the checklist template after creating it?

No. Managers cannot edit or delete the checklist template that they create using the save as template option. However, they can allocate the checklist template to workers and edit the checklist and task attributes within the allocated checklists. The HR specialist can make changes in the checklist template if required and make the revised template available for allocation to all users.

How do changes in the checklist template affect allocated checklists?

Each allocated checklist is a specific instance of the checklist template. Therefore, changes in the checklist template do not affect the allocated checklists. Similarly, the checklist template is unaffected by changes in the allocated checklists.

Define Profile Eligibility

Eligibility Components: How They Work Together

You add eligibility criteria to an eligibility profile, and then associate the profile with an object that restricts eligibility.

The following figure shows the relationships between eligibility components.

Eligibility profile components and
associated objects

Eligibility Criteria

You can add different types of eligibility criteria to an eligibility profile. For many common criteria, such as gender or employment status, you can select from a list of predefined criteria values. However, you must create user-defined criteria and derived factors before you can add them to an eligibility profile.

Eligibility Profile

When you add an eligibility criterion to a profile, you define how to use it to determine eligibility. For example, when you add gender as a criterion, you must specify a gender value (male or female) and whether to include or exclude persons who match that value.

Associating the Profile with Objects

You can associate an eligibility profile with different kinds of objects:

Derived Factors: Explained

Derived factors define how to calculate certain eligibility criteria that change over time, such as a person's age or length of service. You add derived factors to eligibility profiles and then associate the profiles with objects that restrict eligibility.

Derived Factor Types

You can create six different types of derived factors: age, compensation, length of service, hours worked, full-time equivalent, and a combination of age and length of service.

Determination Rules and Other Settings

For each factor that you create, you specify one or more rules about how eligibility is determined. For example, the determination rule for an age derived factor specifies the day on which to evaluate the person's calculated age for eligibility. If the determination rule is set to the first of the year, then the person's age as of the first of the year is used to determine eligibility.

For the full-time equivalent factor, you specify the minimum and maximum full-time equivalent percentage and whether to use the primary assignment or the sum of all assignments when evaluating eligibility. For example, if the percentage range is 90 to 100 percent for the sum of all assignments, then a person who works 50 percent full-time on two different assignments is considered eligible.

Other settings define the unit of measure for time or monetary amounts, rounding rules, and minimums and maximums.

Derived Factors: Examples

The following scenarios illustrate how to define different types of derived factors:

Age

Benefits administrators frequently use age factors to determine dependent eligibility. You can also use age as a factor when determining life insurance rates. Age factors typically define a range of ages, referred to as age bands, and rules for evaluating the person's age. The following table illustrates a set of age bands that could be used to determine eligibility for life insurance rates that vary based on age.


Derived Factor Name

Greater Than or Equal To Age Value

Less Than Age Value

Age Under 25

1

25

Age 25 to 34

25

35

Age 35 to 44

35

45

Age 45 to 54

45

55

Age 55 to 64

55

65

Age 64 or Older

65

75

The determination rule and other settings for each age band are the same:


Field

Value

Determination Rule

First of calendar year

Age to Use

Person's

Units

Year

Rounding

None

Length of Service

A derived factor for length of service defines a range of values and rules for calculating an employee's length of service. The following table illustrates a set of length-of-service bands that could be used to determine eligibility for compensation objects such as bonuses or severance pay.


Derived Factor Name

Greater Than or Equal To Length of Service Value

Less Than Length of Service Value

Service Less Than 1

0

1

Service 1 to 4

1

5

Service 5 to 9

5

10

Service 10 to 14

10

15

Service 15 to 19

15

20

Service 20 to 24

20

25

Service 25 to 29

25

30

Service 30 Plus

30

999

The determination rule and other settings for each length-of-service band are the same:


Field

Value

Period Start Date Rule

Date of hire (This sets the beginning of the period being measured.)

Determination Rule

End of year (This sets the end of the period being measured.)

Age to Use

Person's

Units

Year

Rounding

None

Compensation

A derived factor for compensation defines a range of values and rules for calculating an employee's compensation amount. The following table illustrates a set of compensation bands that could be used to determine eligibility for compensation objects such as bonuses or stock options.


Derived Factor Name

Greater Than or Equal To Compensation Value

Less Than Compensation Value

Less than 20000

0

20,000

Salary 20 to 34000

20,000

35,000

Salary 35 to 49000

35,000

50,000

Salary 50 to 75000

50,000

75,000

Salary 75 to 99000

75,000

100,000

Salary 100 to 200000

100,000

200,000

Salary 200000 Plus

200,000

999,999,999

The determination rule and other settings for each compensation band are the same:


Field

Value

Determination Rule

First of year

Unit of Measure

US Dollar

Source

Stated compensation

Rounding

Rounds to nearest hundred

Age to Use: Points to Consider

The Age to Use value that you select is an important aspect of an age derived factor. This value determines whose birth date is used to calculate the derived age.

Selecting Person's Age to Use

In most cases, you use the Person's value in the Age to Use field to define an age derived factor for either a participant or dependent eligibility profile. In this case, each person's birth date is used to calculate the age criterion by which eligibility is evaluated for that person.

Example

For example, if you select Person's as the Age to Use value, and associate the age derived factor with a dependent eligibility profile, each dependent's eligibility is evaluated based on the age calculated from his or her own birth date.

Selecting Other Age to Use Values

You might select another predefined value in the Age to Use field if you intend to evaluate participant or dependent eligibility or rates based on someone else's age, such as a spouse, child, or other dependent.

Note

If you choose Inherited Age, the evaluation is based on the date of birth as defined in the person extra information flexfield.

Example

If you select Person's oldest child as the Age to Use value, and associate this derived factor with a dependent eligibility profile, eligibility for all dependents is evaluated based on the age of the participant's oldest child. Consequently, when the oldest child reaches the maximum age of eligibility, for instance, all dependents become ineligible.

User-Defined Criteria: Explained

You can define your own criteria to meet any special needs of your organization. For example, if your organization employs deep sea divers and offers different benefits or benefits rates based on how deep they dive, you can create Depth of Diving as a new eligibility criterion.

The data for the eligibility criterion must be stored in a table that is accessible to the application. If the data is stored in either the Person or Assignment table, you can select the table and column from a list, and then specify the lookup type used to validate input values. You can also allow a range of valid values if the field stores a numeric value or a date.

Note

To select the correct values for the column and lookup fields, you must have a basic understanding of the structure of the table that stores the eligibility criterion information.

If the data is stored in a table other than the Person or Assignment table, you must first create a formula to retrieve the data from the table, and then set the formula type to User-Defined Criteria.

You can define two sets of criteria on the User-Defined Criteria page. The participant must meet the criteria defined in either set to be considered eligible (or to be excluded from eligibility if the Exclude check box is selected when the criteria is added to an eligibility profile).

After you have created your user-defined criteria, you can add it to an eligibility profile.

User-Defined Criteria: Examples

The following scenarios illustrate how to define different types of user-defined criteria. In each example, you must first create the user-defined criteria and then add it to an eligibility profile and set the criteria values to use in the profile.

Set Eligibility Based on Custom Attribute

A commercial diving company wants to offer different benefit rates to employees who dive to depths greater than 330 feet. This data is stored for each employee in a custom attribute called Dive_Depth in the Person table. To define eligibility based on diving depth, set the following values on the Create or Edit User-Defined Criteria page:


Field

Value

Table

Person

Column

Dive_Depth_Attribute

Lookup

Dive_Depth_Validation

Enable range validation one

Selected

Save the user-defined criteria, and then add it to an eligibility profile. Set the following values on the User-Defined Criteria tab, which is under the Other tab on the Create or Edit Eligibility Profile page:


Field

Value

Set 1 Meaning

329

Set 1 To Meaning

9999

Exclude

Deselected

Save the eligibility profile and associate it with a variable rate profile.

Exclude Work-at-Home Assignments from Eligibility

An employer wants to exclude work-at-home assignment from eligibility for a transportation benefit option. To accomplish this, set the following values on the Create or Edit User-Defined Criteria page:


Field

Value

Table

Assignment

Column

Work_at_home

Lookup

YES_NO

Enable range validation one

Deselected

Save the user-defined criteria, and then add it to an eligibility profile. Set the following values on the User-Defined Criteria tab:


Field

Value

Set 1 Meaning

Yes

Exclude

Selected

Save the eligibility profile and associate it with the transportation benefit option.

Use a Formula to Determine Eligibility

A company wants to offer a spot incentive bonus to hourly employees who worked 100 percent of their scheduled shift hours in a three month period. To determine eligibility for the bonus, create a formula that calculates scheduled hours less worked hours for each week in the previous three months. If the result of successive calculations is less than or equal to zero, then the formula returns a result of Yes. The first step is to create the formula. Once the formula has been defined, create a user-defined criterion to run the formula. Enter the following values on the Create or Edit User-Defined Criteria page:


Field

Value

Access One Formula

Worked_Sched_Hours_Percent

Enable range validation one

Deselected

Save the user-defined criteria, and then add it to an eligibility profile. Set the following values on the User-Defined Criteria tab:


Field

Value

Set 1 Meaning

Yes

Exclude

Deselected

Save the eligibility profile and associate it with the bonus compensation object.

Note

For very complex scenarios, your organization or implementation team can write a custom program to evaluate eligibility, and then create a formula that calls the custom program.

Range of Scheduled Hours: Example

This example illustrates how to define eligibility criteria based on the number of hours an employee is scheduled to work within a specified period of time.

Weekly and Monthly Ranges

You want to limit eligibility for a benefits offering to employees who were scheduled to work between 30 and 40 hours each week or between 130-160 each month as of the end of the previous quarter. To do this, add two different ranges on the Range of Scheduled Hours tab, which is under the Employment tab on the Create or Edit Eligibility Profile page.

Set the values for the first range as shown in this table:


Field

Value

Sequence

1

Minimum Hours

30

Maximum Hours

40

Scheduled Enrollment Periods

Weekly

Determination Rule

End of previous quarter

Set the values for the second range as shown in this table:


Field

Value

Sequence

2

Minimum Hours

130

Maximum Hours

160

Scheduled Enrollment Periods

Monthly

Determination Rule

End of previous quarter

Eligibility Profiles: Explained

An eligibility profile defines criteria used to determine whether a person qualifies for a benefits offering, variable rate profile, variable coverage profile, compensation object, checklist task, or other object for which eligibility must be established.

The following are key aspects of working with eligibility profiles:

Planning and Prerequisites

Before you create an eligibility profile, consider the following:

Specifying Profile Types and Usage

When you create an eligibility profile, you specify whether the profile applies to participants or dependents. Use participant profiles to define criteria for employees or ex-employees who are eligible for company-sponsored benefits. Use dependent profiles for participants' spouses, family members, or other individuals who qualify as dependents. Dependent profiles can be associated only with plans and plan types.

An eligibility profile's usage determines the type of objects the profile can be associated with. For example, if you set the profile usage to Benefits, the profile is available for selection when you are associating eligibility profiles with benefits objects, such as programs, plans, plan types, options, variable rate profiles, and variable coverage profiles. You can also set the usage to Compensation, Checklist, or Global.

Defining Eligibility Criteria

Criteria defined in an eligibility profile are divided into categories:

Some criteria, such as gender, provide a fixed set of choices. The choices for other criteria, such as person type, are based on values defined in tables. You can define multiple criteria for a given criteria type.

Excluding from Eligibility

For each eligibility criterion that you add to a profile, you can indicate whether persons who meet the criterion are considered eligible or are excluded from eligibility. For example, an age factor can include persons between 20 and 25 years old or exclude persons over 65. If you exclude certain age bands, then all age bands not explicitly excluded are automatically included. Similarly, if you include certain age bands, then all age bands not explicitly included are automatically excluded.

Assigning Sequence Numbers

You must assign a sequence number to each criterion. The sequence determines the order in which the criterion is evaluated relative to other criteria of the same type.

Adding Multiple Criteria

If you define multiple values for the same criteria type, such as two postal code ranges, a person needs to satisfy at least one of the criteria to be considered eligible. For example, a person who resides in either postal range is eligible.

If you include multiple criteria of different types, such as gender and age, a person must meet at least one criterion defined for each criteria type.

Viewing the Criteria Hierarchy

Select the View Hierarchy tab to see a list of all criteria that you have saved for this profile. The list is arranged by criteria type.

Combining Eligibility Criteria or Creating Separate Profiles: Points to Consider

You can define multiple criteria in an eligibility profile or create separate profiles for individual criterion. To determine the best approach, consider the following:

Support for Multiple Eligibility Profiles

If you are defining eligibility criteria for a checklist task, variable rate profile, or variable coverage profile, you must include all criteria in a single eligibility profile, because these objects can be associated with only one eligibility profile. You can, however, associate multiple eligibility profiles with benefits offerings and compensation objects.

Efficiency and Performance

For optimum performance and efficiency, you should usually attach profiles at the highest possible level in the benefits object hierarchy and avoid duplicating criteria at lower levels. Plan types in program, plans in program, plans, and options in plans inherit the eligibility criteria associated with the program. For example, to be eligible for a benefits plan type, a person must satisfy eligibility profiles defined at the program level and at the plan type in program level.

However, it is sometimes faster to create more than one profile and attach the profiles at various levels in the hierarchy. For example, you might exclude employees from eligibility at the program level who do not have an active assignment. At the level of plan type in program, you might exclude employees who do not have a full-time assignment. Finally, at the plan level, you might exclude employees whose primary address is not within a service area you define.

Note

Eligibility criteria can be used to include or exclude persons from eligibility. Sequencing of criteria is more complicated when you mix included and excluded criteria in the same profile. For ease of implementation, try to keep all excluded criteria in a separate eligibility profile.

Eligibility Profiles: Examples

The following examples illustrate scenarios where eligibility profiles are needed and briefly describe the setup required for each scenario.

401(k) Eligibility

A 401(k) savings plan is restricted to full-time employees under 65 years of age. To restrict eligibility for the plan, you must first create a derived factor for the age band of 65 and older, if one does not already exist. Then create an eligibility profile. Set the Profile Usage to Benefits and the Profile Type to Participant. Add the following criteria:


Criteria Type

Name

Values

Employment

Assignment Category

Full-Time

Derived Factor

Age

Select the age derived factor you created previously, and then select the Exclude check box.

Associate the eligibility profile with the 401(k) plan.

Bonus Eligibility

A bonus is offered to all employees who received the highest possible performance rating in all rating categories. To restrict eligibility for the bonus, create an eligibility profile. Set the Profile Usage to Compensation and the Profile Type to Participant. Add the following criteria for each rating category:


Criteria Type

Name

Values

Employment

Performance Rating

Select the performance template and rating name, and then select the highest rating value.

Associate the eligibility profile with the bonus compensation object.

Checklist Task Eligibility

A new hire checklist contains tasks that do not apply to employees who work in India. To restrict eligibility for the tasks, create a participant eligibility profile. Set the Profile Usage to Checklist and the Profile Type to Participant. Add the following criteria:


Criteria Type

Name

Values

Employment

Work Location

Select India as the work location, and then select the Exclude check box.

Associate the eligibility profile with each checklist task that does not apply to workers in India.

Creating a Participant Eligibility Profile: Worked Example

This example demonstrates how to create a participant eligibility profile used to determine eligibility for variable life insurance rates. The profile includes two eligibility criteria: age and tobacco. Once the eligibility profile is complete, you can associate it with a variable rate profile.

The following table summarizes key decisions for this scenario.


Decisions to Consider

In this Example

What is the profile type?

Participant

What type of object is associated with this profile?

Variable rate for benefits offering

What types of eligibility criteria are defined in this profile?

Age derived factor (must have been previously defined)

Uses Tobacco criteria

What are the criteria values?

Age: Under 30

Tobacco Use: None

Should persons meeting these criteria be included or excluded from eligibility?

Included

The following figure shows the tasks to complete in this example:

Tasks involved in creating a participant
eligibility profile in this example.

Note

In this example, you create one eligibility profile that defines the requirements for a single variable rate. Typically, you create a set of eligibility profiles, one for each variable rate. When you have completed all steps described in this example, you can repeat them, varying the age and tobacco use criteria, to create a separate profile for each additional rate.

Prerequisites

  1. Create an age derived factor for ages less than 30.

Creating the Eligibility Profile

  1. In the Plan Configuration work area, click Manage Eligibility Profiles.
  2. Click the Create menu, and then click Create Participant Profile.
  3. In the Eligibility Profile Definition region of the Create Participant Eligibility Profile page, complete the fields as shown in this table. Use the default values except where indicated.

    Field

    Value

    Name

    Age Under 30+Non-Smoking

    Profile Usage

    Benefits

    Description

    Participant, age under 30, non smoker

    Status

    Active

    Assignment to Use

    Any assignment


Adding the Derived Factor for Age

  1. In the Eligibility Criteria region, select the Derived Factors tab.
  2. On the Age tab, click Create.
  3. In the Sequence field, enter 1.
  4. In the Age field, select the derived factor that you previously defined for ages under 30.
  5. Do not select the Exclude check box.

Adding the Criteria for Tobacco Use

  1. Select the Personal tab.
  2. On the Uses Tobacco tab, click Create.
  3. In the Sequence field, enter 1.
  4. In the Tobacco Use field, select None.
  5. Do not select the Exclude check box.
  6. Click Save and Close.

Associating the Eligibility Profile with a Variable Rate Profile

  1. In the Plan Configuration work area, click Manage Benefits Rates.
  2. Select the Variable Rates tab.
  3. Click Create.
  4. In the Eligibility Profile field, select the eligibility profile you just created.
  5. Complete other fields as appropriate for the rate.
  6. Click Save and Close.

    Note

    You can reuse this eligibility profile by associating it with other objects that restrict eligibility, including benefits offerings, compensation plans, and checklist tasks.