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Oracle® Fusion Applications Customer Data Management Implementation Guide
11g Release 1 (11.1.2)
Part Number E20433-02
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16 Common Customer Data Management Configuration: Define Classifications

This chapter contains the following:

Classifications: Explained

FAQs for Define Classifications

Classifications: Explained

The classifications model provides you with a flexible tool to categorize entities such as parties, projects, tasks, and orders. Classifications enable you to classify an entity, such as a party, in a way that the rest of the world sees it, in addition to the way that it is referenced within your organization.

The major components of classifications are:

Classification Categories

Classification categories give you the ability to classify entities under a broad subject area. For example, you can classify organizations based on the industries they operate in. Classification categories are a logical grouping of one or more classification codes and allow classification code rules to be defined.

Classification Rules

Classification categories can have rules that define how classifications can be assigned to entities. When you set up classification categories specific rules can be created, such as allowing the parent classification code to be assigned to a party, and allowing multiple classification codes to be assigned to an entity.

Classification Codes

The individual values within the classification category are called classification codes. For example, in the 1987 SIC classification category there is a classification code of software that can be assigned to a party in the software industry. You can organize classification codes into a hierarchical tree, with a parent classification code at the top of the tree and child classification codes branching off from the parent code or other classification codes.

Classification Code Hierarchy

You can create hierarchies of classification codes within a classification category. For example, you can set up a classification category of IT containing the classification codes hardware, keyboards, and printers. You can then set up the classification code of hardware as the parent code at the top of the tree, with the classification codes of keyboards and printers as child codes underneath. You can create further child classification codes, such as dot matrix, ink-jet, and laser below the printer classification code.

Entity Assignment

Define which entities can be assigned to a classification category by entering the entity table name and creating a Where clause in SQL. Only entities that satisfy the Where clause are assigned the classification category. For example, a classification category called industries with the Where clause of where "party_type = ORGANIZATION" would have the result that only organizations can be classified with the industries classification category.

FAQs for Define Classifications

What happens if I allow parent code assignment?

You can assign the parent classification code to an object, as well as the child classification codes. The parent classification code is the code at the top of the classification code tree.

If you don't allow parent classification codes to be assigned to an object, then you can assign only child classification codes, or codes that are below another classification code in the tree, to an object.

What happens if I allow multiple class code assignment?

You can assign more than one classification code from this classification category to an object.

If you don't allow multiple classification codes to be assigned to an object, then you can assign only one classification code from this classification category to an object.

Can I update an existing entity assignment rule?

No. You can delete the entity assignment rule and create a new one.