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Oracle® Fusion Middleware Developer's Guide for Oracle Data Integrator
11g Release 1 (11.1.1)

Part Number E12643-04
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2 Oracle Data Integrator QuickStart

The Oracle Data Integrator QuickStart will introduce you to the basic steps of creating an integration project with Oracle Data Integrator and show you how to put them immediately to work for you. It will help you get started with Oracle Data Integrator by pointing out only the basic functionalities and the minimum required steps.

This section is not intended to be used for advanced configuration, usage or troubleshooting.

2.1 Oracle Data Integrator QuickStart List

To perform the minimum required steps of an Oracle Data Integrator integration project follow the ODI QuickStart list and go directly to the specified section of this guide.

Before performing the QuickStart procedure ensure that you have:

  1. Installed Oracle Data Integrator according to the instructions in the Oracle Fusion Middleware Installation Guide for Oracle Data Integrator.

  2. Set up the Oracle Data Integrator repository architecture. This means create the repositories to store the metadata for the applications involved in the transformation and integration processing, the developed project versions and all of the information required for their use (planning, scheduling and execution reports). To set up the Oracle Data Integrator repository architecture:

    1. You need to create one master repository containing information on the topology of a company's IT resources, on security and on version management of projects and data models. Refer to Section 3.3, "Creating the Master Repository"for more details.

      To test your master repository connection, refer to Section 3.4, "Connecting to the Master Repository".

    2. You need to create at least one Work Repository containing information about data models, projects, and their operations. Refer to Section 3.5, "Creating a Work Repository"for more details.

      To test your work repository connection and access this repository through Designer and Operator, refer to the section Section 3.6, "Connecting to a Work Repository".

ODI QuickStart list

The first part of the QuickStart (steps 1 to 3) consists of setting up the topology of your information system by defining the data servers, the schemas they contain, and the contexts. Refer to the Chapter 1, "Introduction to Oracle Data Integrator" if you are not familiar with these concepts.

The second part of the QuickStart (step 4) consists of creating a model. A model is a set of datastores corresponding to data structures contained in a physical schema: tables, files, JMS messages, elements from an XML file are represented as datastores.

The third part of the QuickStart (steps 5 to 7) consists of creating your integration project. In this project you create integration interfaces to load data from one or several source datastores to one target datastore.

The last part of the QuickStart (steps 8 and 9) consists of executing the interface you have create d in step 7 and viewing and monitoring the execution results.

  1. To connect source and target systems you need to declare data servers. A data server can be a database, a MOM, a connector or a file server and is always linked with one specific technology. How to create a data server corresponding to the servers used in Oracle Data Integrator is covered in the Chapter 4, "Creating a Data Server".

  2. A physical schema is a defining component of a data server. It allows the datastores to be classified and the objects stored in the data server to be accessed. For each data server, create the physical schemas as described in Chapter 4, "Creating a Physical Schema". Use the default Global context.

  3. In Oracle Data Integrator, you perform developments on top of a logical topology. Refer to the Chapter 1, "Introduction to Oracle Data Integrator" if you are not familiar with the logical architecture. Create the logical schemas and associate them with the physical schemas in the Global context. See Chapter 4, "Creating a Logical Schema" for more information.

  4. Integration interfaces use data models containing the source and target datastores. Data Models are usually reverse-engineered from your data servers metadata into the Oracle Data Integrator repository. Create a model according to the Section 5.2, "Creating and Reverse-Engineering a Model".

  5. The developed integration components are stored in a project. How to create a new project is covered in the Section 9.2, "Creating a New Project".

  6. Integration interfaces use Knowledge Modules to generate their code. For more information refer to the E-LT concept in the Chapter 1, "Introduction to Oracle Data Integrator". Before creating integration interfaces you need to import the Knowledge Modules corresponding to the technology of your data. How to import a Knowledge Module is covered in the Section 19.2.3, "Importing Objects". Which Knowledge Modules you need to import is covered in the Oracle Fusion Middleware Connectivity and Knowledge Modules Guide for Oracle Data Integrator.

  7. To load your target datastores with the data from the source datastores you need to create an interface. An interface consists of a set of rules that define the loading from one or more source datastores to one target datastore. How to create a new interface for your integration project is covered in the Section 11.3, "Creating an Interface".

  8. Once you have finished creating the integration interface, you can execute it. The interface execution is covered in the Section 11.3.8, "Execute the Integration Interface". Select Local (No Agent) to execute the interface directly by Oracle Data Integrator.

  9. You can view and monitor the execution results in Operator. How to follow the interface's execution in Operator is covered in the Chapter 21, "Monitoring Integration Processes".

  10. An integration workflow may require the loading of several target datastores in a precise sequence. If you want to sequence your interfaces, create a package. This is optional step covered in Chapter 10, "Creating a new Package".