PK }{@oa,mimetypeapplication/epub+zipPK}{@iTunesMetadata.plistc artistName Oracle Corporation book-info cover-image-hash 666325507 cover-image-path OEBPS/dcommon/oracle-logo.jpg package-file-hash 180326442 publisher-unique-id E10226-12 unique-id 464941249 genre Oracle Documentation itemName Oracle® Fusion Middleware Administrator's Guide for Oracle SOA Suite and Oracle Business Process Management Suite, 11g Release 1 (11.1.1.6.1) releaseDate 2012-03-12T15:47:16Z year 2012 PK"=PK}{@META-INF/container.xml PKYuPK}{@OEBPS/bam_monitor.htm Monitoring Oracle Business Activity Monitoring

24 Monitoring Oracle Business Activity Monitoring

This chapter describes how to use Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control to view Oracle Business Activity Monitoring (Oracle BAM) performance statistics and logs, and monitor Oracle BAM web services counters, and Oracle BAM server and web components such as Active Data Cache, Event Engine, Report Cache, Enterprise Message Sources, and Report Server.

This chapter includes the following topics:

24.1 Introduction to Monitoring Oracle BAM

You can monitor several aspects of the Oracle BAM components using Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control.

The OracleBamServer page in Fusion Middleware Control enables you to monitor each of the Oracle BAM Server Components: Active Data Cache, Event Engine, Report Cache, and Enterprise Message Sources. For more information, see Section 24.2, "Monitoring Oracle BAM Server Components".

The OracleBamWeb page in Fusion Middleware Control enables you to monitor Oracle BAM Report Server. For more information, see Section 24.3, "Monitoring Oracle BAM Web Applications".

In addition, the Performance Summary pages for each component allow you to track specific statistics of your choosing. For more information, see Section 24.5, "Monitoring Oracle BAM Performance".

Also, you can configure and monitor Oracle BAM logs using Fusion Middleware Control. For more information, see Section 24.6, "Monitoring Oracle BAM Logs".

24.2 Monitoring Oracle BAM Server Components

Oracle BAM Server components are monitored on the Fusion Middleware Control page for Oracle BAM Server.

To monitor Oracle BAM Server components:

Go to the Oracle BAM Server home page by selecting BAM > OracleBamServer in the navigation tree.

In the OracleBamServer page, you can select each tab (Active Data Cache, Event Engine, Report Cache, Enterprise Message Sources) to monitor the individual Oracle BAM Server components.


Note:

Alternatively, on the farm home page, you can also select the Oracle BAM targets from the right side page content area, where it displays details of the farm.


24.2.1 Monitoring Oracle BAM Active Data Cache

Oracle BAM Active Data Cache (Oracle BAM ADC) is designed and optimized to handle large amounts of data in real time. Data coming into Oracle BAM ADC immediately updates all defined calculations and aggregates in real time in an in-memory cache so that this data can be pushed as quickly as possible to Oracle BAM dashboards and reports. Data fed to the Oracle BAM ADC is received from a combination of sources, from Java Message Service (JMS) topics and queues to more traditional data queries and databases. Oracle BAM ADC ensures that no matter the source, when Oracle BAM Server is aware of the incoming data, it is streamed to Oracle BAM alerts and dashboards as incremental changes.

There are two key components to the Oracle BAM ADC, data sets and view sets. Oracle BAM ADC receives transactions (insert, update, upsert, delete) into the data sets. These data sets are constructed based on the design that an Oracle BAM developer defines for data relationships when data objects are defined in Oracle BAM Architect. Data objects can be reflective of flat tables of data, or more complex, star-schema relationships between data objects, which are represented in Oracle BAM as data object look-ups.

After data is updated in the data sets, view sets that are listening on these data sets go into action. The view sets have knowledge of all of the open Oracle BAM dashboards and alerts that users are viewing in the Oracle BAM system. View sets ensure that data updates to these open objects are incrementally updated first, using a push-based mechanism to publish updates to open dashboards and alerts, providing users with the latest information.

Use the Oracle BAM pages in Fusion Middleware Control to monitor statistics for all data objects in Oracle BAM ADC as a group, or select a particular data object from the Data Objects list to monitor.

Description of bam_server_adc_tab.gif follows
Description of the illustration bam_server_adc_tab.gif


Note:

When you select a data object from the list, cached data is displayed to preserve performance. You must refresh the page (using the Refresh icon) to display the latest data associated with the selected data object.

Description of bam_em_refresh.gif follows
Description of the illustration bam_em_refresh.gif

View Sets

Active view sets are those which are typically seen in Oracle BAM reports. Open view sets are the sum of active and static open view sets.

Oracle BAM reports and alerts use active view sets. Oracle BAM Server uses static view sets for internal process. There are also internal parts of the code that use static view sets on system objects (metadata tables). It is possible that if Oracle BAM Server is not closing the static view sets, you observe different values for them.

Static view sets do not support active data generation and are used to fetch data from data objects, therefore, they are kept open for only a very short time when data is fetched. For that reason, in the Open counter, the values appearing most of the time are from active view sets.

View Set Count Variation

You can monitor the view set count for Oracle BAM components Active Data Cache, Report Cache, and Report Server. You may see that view set counts do not match between Active Data Cache, Report Cache, and Report Server metrics.

The Report Server opens view sets through the Report Cache for all of the views contained in the reports opened in browsers. The Active Data Cache opens more view sets than the Report Cache. One such view set opened is in the Active Data Cache through the Event Engine.

Whenever the Event Engine starts, it loads all the defined alerts, and for those alerts that are defined to monitor data changes in the Active Data Cache, corresponding view sets are opened in the Active Data Cache. That is why more view sets are displayed in the Active Data Cache monitoring page than on the Report Cache and Report Server pages.

For most of the views in a report, there is a corresponding view set in the Active Data Cache. View sets opened by the report are shared with the subsequent instances of that report, except for Crosstab views. In reports using the Crosstab view, the view set call is different than the one used by other views. When a report containing a Crosstab view is opened, three view sets are opened in the Active Data Cache. Two of the view sets are closed immediately after fetching the data, while one is kept open to monitor the incoming changes.

Operations Per Second

This statistic includes all of the insert, update, upsert, and delete operations occurring on the selected data object. The accompanying graph displays statistics for the last 5 minutes.

Average Batch Size for Operations

This statistic is the average number of records included in each batch operation on the selected data object. The accompanying graph displays statistics for the last 5 minutes.

Waiting Threads

Certain operations must be synchronized, requiring a data object to be locked. This statistic displays the number of threads that are blocked, waiting for the data object to be unlocked to perform subsequent operations.

Total Transactions

This statistic displays the number of transactions on Oracle BAM data objects. It is the sum of committed and rolled back transactions. The accompanying graph also displays the number of open and completed transactions.

For example, if you add a row in an Oracle BAM data object and save it (commit), it is one transaction. This metric is useful only if the client of Oracle BAM Server is using transactions.

Transactions can also be used by an EMS, when connecting to a JMS topic or queue.

You can configure this metric to track transactions in the Oracle BAM sensor actions in BPEL and in the Oracle Data Integrator knowledge modules.

In regard to Rolled Back Transactions, if an invalid insert operation is attempted on an Oracle BAM data object, Oracle BAM Server rolls back the transaction.

24.2.2 Monitoring the Event Engine Component

The Event Engine is used by Oracle BAM Server to evaluate and execute Oracle BAM alerts. The Event Engine monitors complex data conditions and implements specified rules. Rules can include a series of conditions and actions attached to an event. The Event Engine continuously monitors the information in the Active Data Cache for certain conditions and executes the related actions defined in associated rules.

The Event Engine is responsible for tracking events based on date, time, or data changes. The Event Engine design employs a satellite concept, in which there are four different systems (satellites) within which event clauses can be registered and tracked.

The Date and Time satellites are both based on a scheduler, and they are used for time based alerts, for example, "Email a snapshot of this Oracle BAM dashboard to me every morning at 8 a.m."

The Manual satellite is use to manually send alerts by name (using a web service call).

The Data satellite is used to track alerts that are based on specific changes in the data of a given data object, such as "Call this web service when SUM(Sales) > 10000 in the MediaSales data object," or "Let me know when anything in this dashboard changes."

You can monitor statistics for active Event Engine rules, condition met rates, and processing queues.

Description of bam_server_eetab.gif follows
Description of the illustration bam_server_eetab.gif

Active Rules

This statistic displays the number of alert rules that are active (not expired or invalid) in Oracle BAM Event Engine. It displays the total number of alert rules in Oracle BAM Event Engine, which is the sum of alerts created for all of the Oracle BAM users.

Rule Fire Rate Per Second

This group of statistics displays the rates of events over the last 5 minutes for Actual, Events Accepted, and Events Rejected rates.

Actual rule fire rate per second is the number of events fired per second in Event Service. It is the number of events fired per second, taking into account number of times alerts fired events in the previous 5 minutes. For example, if when the OracleBamServer page was loaded, only 2 alerts fired in previous 5 minutes, the value shown would be 2/(5 X 60), that is 0.0067. So, if fired twice in 300 seconds, it would fire 0.0067 times in one second.

Events Accepted is the number of events fired per second from the satellite. That it, the number of events fired per second from alerts configured, that were accepted (for further processing), taking into account events that were accepted in the previous 5 minutes. The value shown is calculated in the same way as Actual. Unless the Event Engine's queue thresholds are exceeded, all events fired are accepted and processed further.

Events Rejected is the number of rejecting events per second. That is, the number of events fired per second from alerts configured, that were rejected (for further processing), taking into account events that were rejected in the previous 5 minutes. The value shown is calculated the same way as Actual. Fired events are rejected when the Event Engine's queue thresholds are exceeded. Ideally this value should be zero.

Processing Queues Sizes

This graph displays the size of the event processing queue, that is, the number of events waiting to be processed. These queues are emptied as soon as the events are processed, so there would have to be a large number of events being generated simultaneously to see alerts waiting for processing in the queues.

The Processing Queues Sizes graph displays statistics for the last 5 minutes. The graph displays Rules Fired Queue, Alert Actions Queue, and Alerts History Queue health.

The Rules Fired Queue displays the number of events that were fired that are waiting to be processed. The Event Engine maintains internal in-memory queue for fired events where all the events are placed temporarily, before being pulled out from here for further processing, as soon as the Event Engine resources are available. This metric shows the number of events fired waiting in queue to be picked by the system.

The Alert Actions Queue displays the number of actions waiting to be processed. The Event Engine maintains internal in-memory queue for actions where all the actions are placed temporarily, before being pulled out from here for further processing, as soon as the Event Engine resources are available. This metric shows the number of actions waiting in queue to be picked by the system.

The Alerts History Queue displays the number of alert history items to be saved. The Event Engine maintains internal in-memory queue for all history items, where all the items are temporarily placed, and before picking them up to save to back end. This metric shows the number of history items waiting in queue to be picked by the system.

24.2.3 Monitoring the Report Cache Component

The Report Cache assists the Active Data Cache with maintenance of the view set snapshots in memory. The Report Cache opens view sets in the Active Data Cache for the Report Server (an Oracle BAM web applications component). It then caches the snapshot (in small parts) and the active data before sending it to the Report Server. This allows for random access into the snapshot and recovery from losing the connection to Oracle BAM Server. The Report Cache also, along with the Active Data Cache, supports view set sharing.

Description of bam_server_rc_tab.gif follows
Description of the illustration bam_server_rc_tab.gif

Active Data Sessions

This statistic displays the total number of Report Cache sessions with active data.

When a user opens multiple browser windows on a single computer to view Oracle BAM reports, all of the open browser windows share the same active data session. It does not matter whether the user opens the same report or different reports in each browser window, the Active Data Sessions count is always 1.

Active Data Reports

This statistic displays the total number of open reports requesting active data.

Files Count

This statistic displays the total number of files currently managed by FileBasedPersistenceManager when the Oracle BAM Server is configured to use a file-based persistence manager. For more information, see Section 23.3.5, "Configuring the Report Cache Persistence Manager".

Elements Count

This statistic displays the total number of elements currently managed by InMemoryPersistenceManager when the Oracle BAM Server is configured to use a memory-based persistence manager. For more information, see Section 23.3.5, "Configuring the Report Cache Persistence Manager".

View Sets

This group of statistics displays the following counters:

Average Open Time (sec) is the average time taken to open a view set.

Outgoing Message Rate (per sec) is the number of change lists delivered per second by Report Cache to all of its clients.

Message Rate Per Viewset (sec) the number of change lists delivered per second per view set.

Total Open Viewsets is the total number of view sets (that is, the sum of shared, unshared, and inherited view sets) maintained in Report Cache for all of the views contained in the reports opened in browsers.

The Open Viewsets graph displays shared, inherited, and unshared view sets.

Shared Viewsets are the parent view sets (these are the view sets that are opened first).

Inherited Viewsets are the child view sets (these view sets are opened later).

Unshared Viewsets (independent view sets) are neither shared or inherited.

View set sharing occurs whenever possible for performance reasons (the consumers require the exact same view sets, so the view sets can be shared). If the view sets cannot be shared, they are unshared.

When users who do not have any differences in row-level security open the same report at close to the same time, the view sets that are created for them in the Active Data Cache are shared in the Report Cache.


Note:

View set counts may not match between Active Data Cache, Report Cache, and Report Server metrics. For more information, see "View Set Count Variation".


24.2.4 Monitoring the Enterprise Message Sources

Enterprise Message Sources (EMS) are used by applications to provide direct Java Message Service (JMS) connectivity to Oracle BAM Server by mapping messages directly to Oracle BAM data objects. Oracle BAM Server can read data directly from any JMS-based message queue or topic. This option offers guaranteed messaging. It is more difficult to configure and not as fast to perform rigorous data transformations in XML Stylesheet Language (XSL) than in an Extract Transform and Load (ETL) tool like Oracle Data Integrator.

The EMS feature does not configure ETL scenarios, but rather maps from a message directly to a data object on Oracle BAM Server; however, you can still use XSL transformations before the data is inserted (updated, upserted, or deleted) into the data object. Each EMS reads from a specific JMS topic or queue, and the information is delivered into a data object in the Active Data Cache. The Oracle BAM Architect web application is used to configure EMS definitions.

For more information about configuring EMS definitions, see the Oracle Fusion Middleware Developer's Guide for Oracle SOA Suite.

Description of bam_server_ems_tab.gif follows
Description of the illustration bam_server_ems_tab.gif


Note:

Data is displayed in the Enterprise Message Source page only when EMS definitions are created and started in Oracle BAM Architect. Fusion Middleware Control may take some time to fetch the data and display the statistic in the Enterprise Message Source page.

Refreshing the page displays the latest EMS data. You can refresh the page using the Refresh icon.

Description of bam_em_refresh.gif follows
Description of the illustration bam_em_refresh.gif

Enterprise Message Sources

Select the EMS to monitor from the list. You can choose to display aggregated statistics for all EMS definitions, or select a particular EMS to monitor from the list provided.

Messages

Monitor the number of messages received by the selected EMS. You can find rejection statistics in the Performance Summary metrics page.

The accompanying graph displays the number of Received Messages broken down into Accepted Messages and Rejected Messages, and at the top of the graph the number of Total Received Messages is displayed.

Operations Per Second

Monitor the rate of insert, update, upsert, and delete operations performed by the selected EMS.

The Operations Per Second graph displays statistics for last 5 minutes.

For more granular detail about the rates for each type of operation, go to the Performance Summary page. For more information, see Section 24.5, "Monitoring Oracle BAM Performance".

24.2.5 Monitoring the Client Requests in Progress

The Oracle BAM Client Requests in Progress chart is displayed in the lower right corner of the Oracle BAM Server home page. Client requests include all of the requests made to the Oracle BAM Server Enterprise Java Beans (EJB).

Description of bam_em_server_chart.gif follows
Description of the illustration bam_em_server_chart.gif

There are a lot of internal requests made when opening a single report (for permissions, the report metadata, the views data, and so on); however, the user may or may not see those internal requests displayed in this chart.

24.3 Monitoring Oracle BAM Web Applications

Oracle BAM web applications are monitored in the OracleBAMWeb page of Fusion Middleware Control.

To monitor Oracle BAM Report Server go to the OracleBAMWeb page by selecting BAM > OracleBamWeb in the navigation tree.

Figure 24-1 BAM Web Statistics

Description of Figure 24-1 follows
Description of "Figure 24-1 BAM Web Statistics"

24.3.1 Monitoring Oracle BAM Report Server

Oracle BAM Report Server applies the report definitions to the data sets retrieved from the Oracle BAM ADC for presentation in a browser. It manages information paging for viewing and printing reports. After reports are created, they are stored in the Oracle BAM ADC so that report creation is not repeated each time. Most reporting views are designed to support live, active displays of data changing in real time.

You can monitor statistics for Oracle BAM Report Server connections, view sets, and reports.

Description of bam_web_reportserver.gif follows
Description of the illustration bam_web_reportserver.gif

Connections

This group of statistics displays the following:

Open Connections is the number of connections open on the Report Server. An open connection corresponds to each user per session. It is different from the number of reports opened, because one user could at most have one connection open at a time regardless of how many reports the user has opened.

Message Rate (per sec) is the total number of messages (view set change lists) delivered per second to all users (connections).

Message Rate Per Connection (sec) is the number of messages (view set change lists) delivered per second per user (connection).

View Sets

This group of statistics displays the number of open view sets, and the average amount of time (in seconds) that it takes to open the view sets on the server.

Average Open Time (sec) is a measure of the average length of time the server requires to construct the view set and send it to the web browser. This statistic does not consider the amount of time required to render the HTML and load the Javascript on the client-side web browser.


Note:

View set counts may not match between Active Data Cache, Report Cache, and Report Server metrics. For more information, see "View Set Count Variation".


Reports

This statistic displays the total number of open reports. The Open Connections graph displays open connections to Oracle BAM web applications. You can use the zoom axis to zoom in on a particular time in which you are interested to see the open connections statistic.

The total number of reports includes the count of duplicate reports opened by the same user. Even if the same report is opened in multiple browser windows, each instance is considered a separate report, because a new view set is opened in Report Server (through Oracle BAM Report Cache) for each report instance, though the view sets are shared.

24.3.2 Monitoring Open Connections

The Oracle BAM Open Connections chart is displayed in the lower right co<"rner of the Oracle BAM Server home page.

Description of bam_web_openconngraph.gif follows
Description of the illustration bam_web_openconngraph.gif

24.4 Monitoring Oracle BAM Web Services

Oracle BAM web services details are not listed in the Oracle BAM pages in Fusion Middleware Control. Oracle BAM web services counters are available by selecting WebLogic Domain > soa_bam_domain > BAM_Server in the navigation tree, and selecting the JEE Web Services tab in the Most Requested region as shown in Figure 24-2.

Oracle BAM provides DataObjectDefinition, DataObjectOperationsByName, DataObjectOperationsByID, DataObjectOperations10131, ManualRuleFire, and ICommand web services. For more information, see "Using Oracle BAM Web Services" in the Oracle Fusion Middleware Developer's Guide for Oracle SOA Suite

You can see the following statistics in JEE Web Services table: Invocation Count, Response Count, Response Error Count, Average Response Time (ms), Average Execution Time (ms), and Dispatch Time Total.

Figure 24-2 Oracle BAM Web Services Counters

Description of Figure 24-2 follows
Description of "Figure 24-2 Oracle BAM Web Services Counters"

24.5 Monitoring Oracle BAM Performance

The performance of Oracle BAM applications is reflected in metrics and statistics. There are separate Performance Summary pages with appropriate metrics for Oracle BAM Server and Oracle BAM web applications.

When you select the Monitoring > Performance Summary menu item in each of the Oracle BAM component menus (as shown in Figure 24-3), the Performance Summary page appears as shown in Figure 24-4.

Figure 24-3 Monitoring Shortcut Menu

Description of Figure 24-3 follows
Description of "Figure 24-3 Monitoring Shortcut Menu"

Figure 24-4 Performance Summary Page

Description of Figure 24-4 follows
Description of "Figure 24-4 Performance Summary Page"

Many metrics are available for capture and display (most of which are also displayed in the Oracle BAM component home pages). Descriptions of each metric are available in the metrics help pages.

To get the most valuable, focused information, use the Metric Palette. Click Show Metric Palette to display the Metric Palette, shown in Figure 24-5.

Choose the metrics in which you are most interested. As you select or deselect metrics from the palette, the metrics graph at the left is updated automatically.

Figure 24-5 Metric Palette for Oracle BAM Web Applications

Description of Figure 24-5 follows
Description of "Figure 24-5 Metric Palette for Oracle BAM Web Applications"

Right-click the metric label and select Help, as shown in Figure 24-6, to find more information about each of the metrics.

Figure 24-6 Metrics Shortcut Menu

Description of Figure 24-6 follows
Description of "Figure 24-6 Metrics Shortcut Menu"

24.6 Monitoring Oracle BAM Logs

Oracle BAM logs are configured and viewed using Fusion Middleware Control.


Note:

Despite having separate log pages for Oracle BAM Server and Oracle BAM web applications, each page displays the logs for all Oracle BAM application components.


For information about using the logger features see the online Help page. For information about configuring the logger, see Section 23.4, "Configuring the Logger."

To view the logs, right-click the OracleBamServer node or OracleBamWeb node in the navigation tree and select Logs > View Log Messages as shown in Figure 24-7.

Figure 24-7 Logs Shortcut Menu

Description of Figure 24-7 follows
Description of "Figure 24-7 Logs Shortcut Menu"

The log viewer page opens as shown in Figure 24-8. Use this page to query for information about the component. Fields and lists are used to customize the query.

Figure 24-8 Log Messages Page

Description of Figure 24-8 follows
Description of "Figure 24-8 Log Messages Page"

After entering your search criteria, click Target Log Files. The Log Files page appears as shown in Figure 24-9. You can view specific log information (shown in Figure 24-10) or download the log.

Figure 24-9 Log Files Page

Description of Figure 24-9 follows
Description of "Figure 24-9 Log Files Page"

Figure 24-10 Log File bam_server1.log

Description of Figure 24-10 follows
Description of "Figure 24-10 Log File bam_server1.log"

PK׵#F<PK}{@OEBPS/index.htm Index

Index

A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X 

A

abort
recovery action, 8.4, 8.5, 13.1, 14.1, 14.3, 17.1, 17.3
actionable email account, 20.2
configuring, 20.1
activating
a composite revision, 7.4.1, 7.4.2
activation specification
definition, 34.1.2
active data cache
monitoring, 24.2.1
activities
configuring for automatic recovery, 12.2
for BPEL 2.0 in process flows and audit trails, 13.1.2
activity message types
Message State list is not applicable, 14.4
adapters
See Oracle Adapters
addresses
configuring multiple send addresses, 20.7
administration tasks
for application developers, 1.5
administrator
role, C.1
ant
creating partitions, 7.8.1
deployment, 7.1.2
application developer
administration tasks, 1.5
application policies
creating, 2.2.1
application roles
creating, 2.2.1
demo user community, A.4
managing in Oracle Enterprise Manager, 20.10.4
Oracle Business Activity Monitoring (BAM), 25.3.4
seeding with WLST scripts, 20.10.3
assertions
definition, 1.4.3.4, 7.5
AsynchAuditBatchSize property
storing multiple audit trail messages in a single transaction, 12.1
audit level
BPEL process service engine, 12.1
BPMN process service engine, 37.1
configuring to display adapter header properties, 34.1
generating orphaned service component instances, 8.2
impact of disabling audit tracking across multiple composite flows, 7.4.2
order of precedence of execution, 1.4.1.1, 7.4.2
overriding the audit level defined at the SOA Infrastructure level, 7.4.2
relation to partitioning the COMPOSITE_INSTANCE table, 9.4.3.1
setting at the BPEL process service component level, 12.5
setting at the SOA composite application level, 7.4.2
SOA composite application, 7.4.2
SOA Infrastructure, 3.1
audit tracking
order of precedence of execution, 1.4.1.1
audit trail
configuring the storage in one transaction, 14.5.4
for BPEL 2.0 projects, 13.1.2
monitoring a BPEL process service component, 13.1
not generated when composite audit level is off, 1.4.1.1
not supported for spring service component, 1.2.4
rolled back transaction error message, 13.1
sensors, 13.1, 38.1
threshold setting, 12.1
viewing for a BPMN process service component, 38.1
audit trail threshold, 37.1
AuditConfig property, 3.1
bpelRecoveryStatus, 4.1, 13.1
excludeBpelMaxCreationTime key, 4.1, 8.2, 8.3
authentication providers
adding, 20.9.1
automatic recovery
configuration, 12.2
in clustered environments, 12.2
is not recovering a specific BPEL instance, B.3.2
automatic release timers
globally disabling for Oracle BPM Worklist, 20.5
automating
the testing of SOA composite applications, 7.5

B

B2B See Oracle B2B
backup, 1.4.3
BAM
See Oracle Business Activity Monitoring
binding components
can only publish web services to the UDDI registry, 36.2
configuring, 34, 34.1
configuring adapters, 34.1.2
configuring the publishing of web services to UDDI, 36.2.1
configuring web services, 34.1.1
definition, 1.2.5
direct binding, 35.1
endpoint properties, 34.1.2.8
faults, 35.1
impact when a composite is shut down, 7.4.1, 7.4.2
instances, 35.1
limitation on policy attachment errors for service binding components, 36.1
limitation on policy attachments, 36
limitation on publishing references to the UDDI registry, 36.2
managing, 36
monitoring, 4.3, 35
monitoring instances and faults, 35.1
monitoring rejected messages, 35.2
Oracle AQ Adapter properties, 34.1.2.1
Oracle AQ Socket properties, 34.1.2.7
Oracle Database Adapter properties, 34.1.2.2
Oracle File Adapter properties, 34.1.2.3
Oracle FTP Adapter properties, 34.1.2.4
Oracle JMS Adapter properties, 34.1.2.5
Oracle MQ Series Adapter properties, 34.1.2.6
policies, 36.1
properties, 34.1
publishing to the UDDI registry, 36.2
references, 1.2.5
rejected messages, 35.2
restrictions on specifying multiple bindings, 36
services, 1.2.5
BPEL 2.0
audit trail, 13.1.2
behavior of activity sensors in compensate and compensateScope activities, 13.4.1
process flow, 13.1.2
BPEL process service components
audit trail and process flow, 13.1
configuring, 12
defining a fault policy, 1.4.3.1
definition, 1.2.4
fault recovery, 14.1
faults, 13.2, 14.1
instance states remain as completed even if the composite instance state becomes stale, 7.2
instances, 13.2, 13.3
limitations on selecting the option to continue instances upon redeployment, 7.2
managing, 14
monitoring, 13, 13.3
policies, 14.2
recovery message information displayed in the Flow Trace page, 13.1
sensor data, 13.4
BPEL process service engines
audit level, 12.1
configuring, 12
deployed processes, 13.8, 16.3.4
fault recovery, 14.3
faults, 13.5, 14.3
instances, 13.5, 13.7
managing, 14
message failure and recovery, 14.4
monitoring, 13
monitoring faults, 13.5
monitoring instances, 13.5
payload validation, 12.1, 37.1
request and thread statistics, 13.6
BPEL processes
automatic recovery configuration, 12.2
automatic recovery in cluster environments, 12.2
setting the instance name during design time, 7.4.4
starting and stopping a managed server on which the SOA Infrastructure is deployed in the middle of BPEL processing, 7.4.3
BPEL sensors
disabling at the service engine level, 12.1
disabling at the SOA composite application level, 7.4.2
order of precedence for setting, 7.4.2
BPMN process service components
audit trail and process flow, 38.1
behavior of instances after redeployment, 7.2
fault recovery, 39.1
faults, 38.2, 39.1
instances, 38.2, 38.3
monitoring, 38
policies, 39.2
selecting the option to continue instances upon redeployment, 7.2
BPMN process service engines
audit level, 37.1
deployed processes, 38.7
fault recovery, 39.3
faults, 38.4, 39.3
instances, 38.4, 38.6
message failure and recovery, 39.4
monitoring, 38
request and thread statistics, 38.5
browsers
Copy details to clipboard link does not appear with Mozilla Firefox, 13.1
limitation on using the Safari Browser to view WSDL file content, B.8.1
supported, 2.1
bulk recovery
cannot perform bulk fault recovery on the Faults tab of a flow trace, 13.1
of faults, 8.4, 8.5
business event messages
cannot be recovered, 8.4, 8.5
business events
BPEL component in a retired composite cannot receive a business event, 33.3
consistency levels, 33.2
database agent subscriptions, 33.2
definition, 33
events consumed by multiple revisions of the same composite, B.5.3
fault recovery, 33.4
faults, 33.4
managing, 33
messages are lost between EDN and composites or composites across clusters, B.5.5
pausing the delivery of events, B.5.1
picked up twice or more by the SOA server, B.5.4
policies on event subscriptions are not supported, 33.2
receiving events in a composite with multiple revisions, 33.3
rolled back OAOO event messages appear in the log files, B.5.2
service component subscriptions, 33.2
setting the number of retries, B.5.1
subscribers, 33.3
subscribing to, 33.2
troubleshooting, B.5
tuning event delivery, B.5.1
business faults, 1.4.3.1
business monitors
BPEL monitors, 7.9
BPEL sensors, 7.9
BPMN measurements, 7.9
enabling and disabling, 7.9
setting the status level for all sensors, 7.9
business rule execution tracing, 19.7
audit levels, 19.7
development level, 19.7.1
production level, 19.7.2
business rule messages
cannot be recovered, 8.4, 8.5
business rules
engine cache and operation statistics, 19.2
monitoring, 19
business rules service engines
deployed components, 19.5
faults, 19.4
instances, 19.3

C

callback messages
configuring automatic recovery attempts, 12.4
configuring unresolved messages for automatic recovery, 12.2
performing manual message recovery, 14.4
recovering in resolved and undelivered states, 14.4
stranded, 14.4
callback server URL
property, 3.1
property change requires a restart, 3.1
capture composite instance state
displaying created instances immediately even if a constraint is defined, 7.4.2
if disabled, the Recent Instances section does not show instances requiring fault recovery as running, 6.1
impact of creating a new instance when this property is disabled, 3.1
meaning of ? icon, 8.2
property, 3.1
case agnostic group names
enabling in human tasks, 20.11
chunking
enabling data checking for SOAP over HTTP deliveries, 3.1
specifying a chunk size, 3.1
clusterDbTimeRefresh property
definition, 12.3
clusters
automatic recovery of BPEL processes, 12.2
configuring master node recovery, 12.3
component tables
partitioning, 9.4
composite sensors
audit trail, 13.1, 38.1
searching for, 8.2
composite URLs
editing, 8.1
configuration plan
selecting in the Deploy SOA Composite wizard, 7.1
consistency levels
of business events, 33.2
continue
recovery action, 8.4, 8.5, 13.1, 14.1, 14.3, 17.1, 17.3
conversation ID
creating on the Test Web Service page, 1.2.3
definition, 1.2.3
generating, 1.2.3
not creating on the Test Web Service page, 1.2.3
Copy details to clipboard link
does not appear with Mozilla Firefox, 13.1
cross references
Oracle Mediator, 18
custom drivers
changing the driver name, 3.5

D

data sources
creating and managing for adapters in Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console, 2.2.5
definition, 3.1
managing SOA Infrastructure data sources from Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console, 2.2.5
properties, 3.1
database connections
resolving slow connections, B.2.2
database growth
delete before purging large amounts of data, then add the indexes back in, 9.3.2
developing a purging and partitioning methodology, 9.2
executing the purge scripts, 9.3.6
instance purging states, 9.3.3
looped purge in parallel script, 9.3.2
looped purge script, 9.3.1
management, 9
managing with the purge script, 9.3
moving long running instances to a different partition, 9.4.6
partial partitioning of components, 9.4.7
purge scripts are only supported on Oracle databases, 9.3
purge scripts supported on different Oracle SOA Suite releases, 9.3
purge scripts to run when upgrading, 9.3
purging the instances of a specific SOA composite application, 9.3.5
referential integrity and equipartitioning, 9.1.2.1
resequenced message purge states for Oracle Mediator, 9.3.4
resolving issues caused by high transaction volume, B.6.5
selecting the schema partition keys, 9.1.2.2
database schemas
components with, 9.1.2
purge scripts are only supported on Oracle databases, 9.3
reducing the size of, 9.2
database tables
partitioning, 9.1.2
decision service components
definition, 1.2.4
deployed components, 19.5
faults, 19.4
instances, 19.6
log files, 19.8
monitoring, 19
statistics, 19.2
decision tracing
See business rule execution tracing
default composite revision
distinguishing the default revision from other revisions, 1.4.3.3, 7.4.1, 7.4.1
impact of retiring, 7.4.1, 7.4.1
impact of undeploying, 7.4.1, 7.4.1
impact of undeploying when no other active, available revisions exist, 7.3, 7.4.1
retiring, 7.4.1
setting, 7.4.1
undeploying, 7.3
undeploying causes the next active, available revision to become the default, 7.3
Delete Rejected Messages option
when to use, 8.6, 8.7
demo user community, A
definition, A.1
groups, A.3
installing in the database, A.1
must run the installation script locally in a domain, A.1
organizational hierarchy, A.2
permissions defined in the WorkflowPermission class, A.7
roles granted to and owned by users, A.6
soa-infra application roles, A.4
SOATestDemoApp application roles, A.5
users, A.2
deployment
ant, 7.1.2
composites with task flows, 7.1.1
exporting a deployed SOA composite application, 7.7
from SSO-enabled Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control, 7
guidelines, 7.1
issues with deploying the same composite with a human workflow into multiple partitions, 7.1
lifecycle states, 7.4
managing the state of deployed composites, 7.4.1, 7.4.2
of SOA composite applications, 7.4.1
restrictions on cross references between composites, 7.1
revisions of different composites, 7.1
selecting partitions, 7.1
SOA composite applications, 7.1
using the Redeploy SOA Composite wizard to redeploy an existing instance, 7.1
WLST, 7.1.2
Diagnostic Framework
definition, 11.1.2
diagnostics
frameworks, 11.1
getting dump descriptions, 11.1.4
incident processing rules, 11.1.3
listing the supported dumps, 11.1.4
manually executing dumps, 11.3
notification creation, 11.2
notifications, 11.1.1.1
querying problems and incidents, 11.5
supported database diagnostic dumps, 11.1.4.3
supported deployed composite metadata diagnostic dumps, 11.1.4.4
supported deployed composite WSDL/schema cache diagnostic dumps, 11.1.4.7
supported diagnostic scenarios and MBeans, 11.1.1.2
supported event diagnostic dumps, 11.1.4.6
supported instance audit trail diagnostic dumps, 11.1.4.5
supported runtime environment diagnostic dumps, 11.1.4.1
supported runtime platform configuration diagnostic dumps, 11.1.4.2
supported SOA dumps, 11.1.4
using Diagnostic Framework, 11.1.2
using WLDF, 11.1.1
viewing incident packages, 11.4
watch creation, 11.2
watches, 11.1.1.1
direct binding
cannot configure properties for, 34
definition, 35.1
monitoring, 35.1
no policies and properties tabs are available, 35.1
Direct Binding Invocation API
inbound invocations of composites and outbound invocations of Oracle Service Bus (OSB), 10.1
direct Java invocations
using, 3.7
Disable Alert link
definition, 4.1, 6.1
dispatcher engine threads, 12.1, 37.1
dispatcher invoke threads, 12.1, 37.1
dispatcher system threads, 12.1, 37.1
distributed cache
storing instance and callback message data, 14.5
distribution lists
Oracle Business Activity Monitoring (BAM), 23.6
downloading
the deployable JAR file, 7.7
drivers
configuring, 26.4
deploying Oracle User Messaging Service, 28.1
deploying with Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control, 28.1.2
deploying with Oracle Fusion Middleware Configuration Wizard, 28.1.3
deploying with WLST, 28.1.1
deploying with wsadmin, 28.1.4
email driver, 26.4.1.4
messaging extension driver, 26.4.1.3
properties, 26.4.1.1
proxy driver, 26.4.1.9
securing driver properties with passwords, 26.4.1.2
SMPP driver, 26.4.1.5
undeploying, 28.2
unregistering, 28.2
VoiceXML driver, 26.4.1.7.1
worklist driver, 26.4.1.8
XMPP driver, 26.4.1.6
dumps
getting descriptions of, 11.1.4
listing the supported dumps, 11.1.4
manually executing, 11.3
supported database diagnostic dumps, 11.1.4.3
supported deployed composite metadata diagnostic dumps, 11.1.4.4
supported deployed composite WSDL/schema cache diagnostic dumps, 11.1.4.7
supported event diagnostic dumps, 11.1.4.6
supported instance audit trail diagnostic dumps, 11.1.4.5
supported runtime environment diagnostic dumps, 11.1.4.1
supported runtime platform configuration diagnostic dumps, 11.1.4.2
supported with Oracle SOA Suite, 11.1.4
durable BPEL processes
definition, 7.2
limitations on selecting the option to continue instances upon redeployment, 7.2
durable processes
definition, B.5.5
dynamic assignments, 20.2
functions, 20.2

E

ECIDs
adding an index on the DLV_MESSAGE.ECID column to improve SQL performance when searching messages for a specific ECID, 14.4
copying from the Warning dialog on the Flow Trace page, 13.1
definition, 13.1, 14.4, 38.1
restrictions, 13.1, 38.1
searching for, 8.2, 8.3
specifying when creating a message recovery search criteria, 14.4
EJB transaction timeouts
updating, B.2.3
email addresses
configuring the outgoing email address, 20.1
configuring the Reply To address, 20.1
correcting, 22.5
email driver
client API, 26.4.1.4.4
common properties, 26.4.1.4.2
configuring, 26.4.1.4
custom properties, 26.4.1.4.3
interoperability, 26.4.1.4.1
email notification messages
configuring the number of, 20.6
email server
adding the hostname and IP address to the /etc/hosts file, 20.1
IMAP, 20.1
SMTP, 20.1
emulations, 1.4.3.4
endpoint addresses
displaying the addresses of all external services, 7.4.2
endpoint properties
definition, 34.1.2
inbound adapters, 29.1
outbound adapters, 29.2
endpoint reference
changing for Oracle Service Registry, 34.1.3
endpoint URLs
editing, 8.1
specifying during instance creation, 8.1
engine cache and operation statistics
for business rules, 19.2
enterprise message sources, 24.2.4
equipartitioning
definition, 9.1.2.1
event definition language
definition, 33.2
Event Delivery Network
definition, 33.1
EDN-DB, 33.1
EDN-JMS, 33.1
event engine
monitoring, 24.2.2
exhausted messages
resetting to the undelivered state, 14.4
exhausted state
definition, 14.4
message recovery, 14.4
exporting
a deployed SOA composite application, 7.7

F

Facade API
examples, 10.3
finding composite and component instances, 10.3.2
oracle.soa.management.facade.Locator interface, 10.1
overview of interfaces, 10.2
programmatically managing SOA composite applications, 10.1
retrieving the state of a composite, 10.3
top level entry point, 10.1
Farm home page
navigating to Oracle SOA Suite pages, 2.2.6
fault policy, 8.4
creating, 1.4.3.1, 8.4.1, 8.4.2, 8.4.3, 8.5
defining, 8.4
definition, 1.4.3.1
required for BPEL process fault recovery, 1.4.3.1
Fault Time From field, 3.1
faults
automatic recovery configuration, 12.2
automatic recovery configuration for invoke and callback messages, 12.4
automatic recovery in clustered environments, 12.2
binding components, 35.1
BPEL process service component fault recovery, 14.1
BPEL process service engine fault recovery, 14.3
BPMN process service component fault recovery, 39.1
BPMN process service engine fault recovery, 39.3
bulk recovery, 8.4, 8.4, 8.5
bulk recovery at SOA Infrastructure level does not permit a check of composite states, 8.4
business events, 33.4
business events fault recovery, 33.4
business fault definition, 1.4.3.1
business rules service engines, 19.4
example of bulk-fault recovery for BPEL processes, 8.4.1.2
example of bulk-fault recovery for BPMN processes, 8.4.2.2
example of bulk-fault recovery for Oracle Mediator, 8.4.3.2
example of single-fault recovery for BPEL processes, 8.4.1.1
example of single-fault recovery for BPMN processes, 8.4.2.1
example of single-fault recovery for Oracle Mediator, 8.4.3.1
examples of BPEL process fault recovery, 8.4.1
examples of BPMN process fault recovery, 8.4.2
examples of nonrecoverable faults, 1.4.3.1
examples of Oracle Mediator fault recovery, 8.4.3
examples of recoverable faults, 1.4.3.1
human workflow fault recovery, 22.2, 22.4
human workflow service components, 21.1, 22.4, 22.4
human workflow service engines, 21.4, 22.2
in audit trail, 13.1, 38.1
inbound adapters, 30.1
options for single-fault recovery, 8.4
Oracle Mediator, 17.1, 17.3
Oracle Web Service Manager fault definition, 1.4.3.1
outbound adapters, 30.5, 30.6, 30.7
recovery, 1.4.3.1, 8.4
recovery actions, 8.4, 8.5
recovery of SOA composite application faults, 4.1, 6.1
SOA composite application fault recovery, 8.5
SOA Infrastructure, 8.4
SOA Infrastructure fault recovery, 8.4
system fault definition, 1.4.3.1
types, 1.4.3.1
File Adapter logs, 30.9
flow traces
canceled onMessage branches are not displayed, 13.1
for composite-to-composite invocations on multiple servers, 13.1.1
impact when instance tracking is disabled, 7.4.2
issues viewing on lower end hosts, B.7.4
viewing faults, 13.1
viewing sensors, 13.1
functions
restrictions on adding multiple properties to a function, 20.2

G

Go to BPEL Recovery Console link
definition, 4.1, 6.1
governance
definition, 1.4.3.3
Gridlink
definition, 1.4.3
group names
enabling case agnostic group names in human tasks, 20.11
groups
demo user community, A.3
partitioning, 9.4.3.2
seeding with LDAP tools, 20.10
GUID attribute
mapping requirements, 20.9.3

H

heartBeatInterval property
definition, 12.3
HTTP binding
cannot change httpBinding property, 34
human workflow
configuring Oracle HTTP Server for task form attachments, 20.3
deploying composites with task flows, 7.1.1
faults not persisted in the dehydration store, 8.4, 8.5
moving data from a test to a production environment, 22.6
notification properties, 20.1
notifications, 22.5
prerequisites for configuring notification properties, 20.1
task service properties, 20.2
task status, 21.2
troubleshooting, B.4
troubleshooting AMX extension issues, B.4.14
troubleshooting design time at runtime issues, B.4.10
troubleshooting human workflow API usage issues, B.4.11
troubleshooting identity service issues, B.4.17
troubleshooting notification issues, B.4.3
troubleshooting Oracle BPM Worklist/task region issues, B.4.15
troubleshooting Oracle JDeveloper data control/form generation issues, B.4.12
troubleshooting service/System MBean Browser issues, B.4.13
troubleshooting task action issues, B.4.2
troubleshooting task assignment, routing, and escalation issues, B.4.1
troubleshooting task comments/attachment issues, B.4.9
troubleshooting task form/action issues, B.4.8
troubleshooting task history issues, B.4.7
troubleshooting task mapping attribute issues, B.4.5
troubleshooting task report issues, B.4.6
troubleshooting task view issues, B.4.4
troubleshooting test-to-production issues, B.4.16
WSDL files security, 5.7
human workflow service components
configuring, 20
definition, 1.2.4
fault recovery, 22.4
faults, 21.1, 22.4
instances, 21.1, 21.3
managing, 22
monitoring, 21
performing fault recovery from Oracle BPM Worklist, 1.4.3.1, 8.4
policies, 22.1
recommendation not to use oracle/wss10_saml_token_service_policy in a production environment, 22.1
URI of task details application, 22.3
human workflow service engines
configuring, 20
deployed workflows, 21.7
fault recovery, 22.2
faults, 21.4, 22.2, 22.4
instances, 21.4, 21.6
managing, 22
monitoring, 21
requests and operation statistics, 21.4, 21.5

I

identity service
customizing the provider, 20.9.4
GUID attribute mapping requirements, 20.9.3
third-party providers, 20.9
IMAP email server
configuring, 20.1
IMAP server
restarting the SOA server after configuring, 20.1
incident packages
creating, 11.1.2
viewing, 11.4
indexes
recommendation to delete before purging large amounts of data, then add the indexes back in, 9.3.2
indexing
LDAP attributes, 20.9.2.2
instance and callback message data
storing in Oracle Coherence distributed cache, 14.5
instance and fault metrics pages
disabling in the System MBean Browser, 3.1.1
disabling the retrieval of instance and fault count metrics, 3.1, 3.1, 3.1, B.6.1
optimizing the loading of, 3.1, 3.1, 3.1, B.6.1
setting a default search criteria to fetch recent instances and faults only within a recent duration, 3.1
instance ID
creating, 1.2.3, 8.2
displayed in the SOA composite application Instances page, 1.2.4
for BPEL process service components, 13.3
for service components, 1.2.4
for SOA composite applications, 1.2.3
instance names
setting during design time, 7.4.4
instance states, 3.1
definition, 3.1
filtering by execution state, 8.2, 8.3
filtering by fault state, 8.2, 8.3
filtering by recovery state, 8.2, 8.3
for composites in which one BPEL process is completed and another is faulted, 8.2.2
meaning of the ? icon, 8.2
of BPEL process service component remain as completed even if the composite instance state becomes stale, 7.2
of service components and SOA composite applications, 8.2.2
scenarios under which the state is not evaluated, 8.2
instance tracking
impact of disabling audit tracking across multiple composite flows, 7.4.2
impact on flow traces when tracking is disabled, 7.4.2
instances
behavior of service component instances after redeployment, 7.2
binding components, 35.1
business rules service engines, 19.3
capturing the composite instance state, 3.1
clicking the refresh icon to view the actual number of total instances, 7.4.2
decision service components, 19.6
deleting at the SOA Infrastructure level, 8.3, 8.3
deleting from a composite application home page, 8.2, 8.2
deleting large numbers of, 9.3
deleting running, rolled back instances, 8.2, 8.3
deleting with the looped purge in parallel script, 9.3.2
deleting with the looped purge script, 9.3.1
displaying created instances immediately even if a constraint is defined, 7.4.2
distinguishing unit test instances from other instances, 1.2.3, 7.5
executing the purge scripts, 9.3.6
finding composite and component instances programmatically, 10.3.2
human workflow service components, 21.1, 21.3
human workflow service engines, 21.4, 21.6
inbound adapters, 30.1
initiating a test instance, 7.4.2, 8.1
invoking multiple instances, 8.1
keeping current BPM composite instances running after redeployment, 7.2
limitations on selecting the option to continue instances upon redeployment, 7.2
mismatch between composite instances and service component instances, 8.2.1
monitoring BPEL process service component instances, 13.3
moving long running instances to a different partition, 9.4.6
orphaned service component instances, 8.2
outbound adapters, 30.5
passing security properties with messages during testing, 8.1
possible reasons for redeployment failure, 7.2, 7.2
purging the instances of a specific SOA composite application, 9.3.5
scenarios in which the Test button is disabled, 8.1
service components, 1.2.4
setting the instance name during design time, 7.4.4
SOA composite applications, 1.2.3
specific BPEL instance is not being recovered, B.3.2
specifying the XML payload data during testing, 8.1
states, 3.1
states for purging, 9.3.3
statistics
Oracle Mediator, 16.2.2
terminating, 8.2
Test button is disabled when a composite is stopped or retired, 7.4.2
throughput details, 13.2
WSDL URL that does not contain the revision number is processed by the default composite, 8.1
instant messaging
messages are not actionable, 20.1
interaction specification
definition, 34.1.2
invocations
direct binding, 3.7
invoke messages
configuring automatic recovery attempts, 12.4
configuring unresolved messages for automatic recovery, 12.2
performing manual message recovery, 14.4
situations in which the Last Modified Date column remains empty, 14.4
invoked decision function, 19.7.1
invoked decision service, 19.7.1
IPv4 support, B.7.5
IPv6 support, B.7.5

J

JAR files
downloading the deployable JAR file, 7.7
Java EE applications
navigating through, 2.2.4
JCA Adapters
See Oracle Adapters
JMS sensors
values are not displayed, 13.4

L

large document threshold, 37.1
setting a, 12.1
LDAP attributes
indexing recommendations, 20.9.2.2
LDAP tools
seeding users, groups, and application roles, 20.10
LDAP user profile
configuring for Oracle User Messaging Service (UMS), 26.5
lifecycle
of SOA composite applications, 1.4.3.3, 7.4
performing bulk lifecycle management tasks in partitions, 7.8.2
local optimization
calls when a composite is unreachable, 3.7.4
condition checks for using, 3.7
configuring, 3.7, 7.6.2
forcing the use of, 3.7.2
overriding, 3.7.2
viewing the local optimization setting for policies, 7.6.2
Locator
entry point for Facade API clients, 10.1, 10.2
log files
accessing, 2.2.1
configuring, 3.4
decision service components, 19.8
encoding property, 3.4.1
from all managed servers, B.1.1
Oracle Business Activity Monitoring (BAM), 24.6
Oracle User Messaging Service (UMS), 27.2, 27.2
log levels
setting for troubleshooting, B.1
log tracing, B.1
loggers
deployment, B.1
Event Delivery Network (EDN), B.1
human workflow/approval management extensions (AMX)/rules, B.1
Oracle Adapters, B.1
Oracle B2B, B.1
Oracle BPEL Process Manager, B.1
Oracle BPM Suite, B.1
Oracle Business Activity Monitoring (BAM), 23.4
Oracle Mediator, B.1
Oracle User Messaging Service (UMS), 27.2.1
Oracle Web Services Manager (OWSM), B.1
SOA Infrastructure, B.1
logging in
to Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control, 2.1
logging out
of Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control, 2.3
looped purge in parallel script
deleting instances with, 9.3.2
looped purge script
deleting instances with, 9.3.1

M

managed servers
starting and stopping, B.7.1
managing database growth, 9
mark cancelled
message recovery action, 14.4
masteAliveThreshold property
definition, 12.3
master nodes
recovering, 12.3
maxMessageRaiseSize property
definition, 12.2, 12.2
MDS connections
managing, 2.2.1
Mediator
See Oracle Mediator
message recovery
adding an index on the DLV_MESSAGE.ECID column to improve SQL performance when searching messages for a specific ECID message, 14.4
exhausted state, 14.4
filtering the display of instances by whether or not they are recoverable, 8.2, 8.3
in BPEL process service engines, 14.4
in BPMN process service engines, 39.4
managing failed automatic recovery attempts, 14.4
mark cancelled action, 14.4
Message States list not applicable to activity message types, 14.4
obtaining the ECID value for message recovery, 13.1, 14.4
recover action, 14.4
recovering callback messages in resolved and undelivered states, 14.4
recovery message information displayed in the Flow Trace page, 13.1
recovery message information displayed in the SOA Infrastructure home page, 4.1
recovery message information displayed on the SOA composite application home page, 1.2.1, 6.1
recovery options, 14.4
reset action, 14.4
resynchronizing lost, in-memory, Quartz-scheduled jobs, 14.4
situations in which the Last Modified Date column remains empty, 14.4
stranded callback messages, 14.4
message sources, 24.2.4
messaging extension driver
client API, 26.4.1.3.5
common properties, 26.4.1.3.2
configuring, 26.4.1.3
custom properties, 26.4.1.3.3
driver application archive (EAR), 26.4.1.3.1
extension driver security, 26.4.1.3.4
using, 26.4.1.3.6
migration
of human workflow data from a test to a production environment, 22.6
monitor
role, C.1
Mozilla Firefox
Copy details to clipboard link does not appear, 13.1
MTOM attachments
attaching to outbound web services, 34
multiple instances
invoking, 8.1
multiple send addresses
configuring, 20.7

N

nodeReapInterval property
definition, 12.3
nodeReapThreshold property
definition, 12.3
nodes
recovering, 12.3
nonfatal connection
specifying a retry count, 3.1
notification service
pluggable, 20.4
notifications
actionable addresses, 20.1
configuration modes, 20.1
configuring the number of email notification messages, 20.6
configuring the outgoing email address, 20.1
configuring the Reply To address, 20.1
creating, 11.2
human workflow
incoming email, 22.5
outgoing, 22.5
properties, 20.1
prerequisites for configuring, 20.1
restarting the server after IMAP and SMTP email server configuration, 20.1
sender and default sender addresses must match values on the Workflow Notification Properties page, 20.1

O

operator
role, C.1
optSoapShortcut
SOAP optimization is automatically configured in 11g, 3.1
Oracle Adapters
configuring, 29
configuring binding components, 34.1.2
deployed resource adapters, 2.2.4
endpoint properties, 34.1.2.8
inbound adapters, 29.1
outbound adapters, 29.2
faults
inbound adapters, 30.1
outbound adapters, 30.5, 30.6, 30.7
File Adapter logs, 30.9
in multiple revisions of SOA composite applications that include an inbound adapter are displayed as running, 8.2
instances
inbound adapters, 30.1
outbound adapters, 30.5
monitoring, 30
Oracle AQ Adapter properties, 34.1.2.1
Oracle Database Adapter properties, 34.1.2.2
Oracle File Adapter properties, 34.1.2.3
Oracle FTP Adapter properties, 34.1.2.4
Oracle JMS Adapter properties, 34.1.2.5
Oracle MQ Series Adapter properties, 34.1.2.6
Oracle Socket Adapter properties, 34.1.2.7
properties
inbound adapters, 30.4
outbound adapters, 30.8
rejected messages
inbound adapters, 30.2, 30.3
Oracle AQ Adapter
properties, 34.1.2.1
Oracle B2B
accessing from Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control, 32.2
bindings, 32
configuring, 31
database tables are not deleted by the Oracle SOA Suite purge scripts, 9.3
foreign key constraints must be disabled before dropping the partition, 9.4.5
infrastructure monitoring, 32.1
metrics, 31.1
monitoring, 32, 32
server properties, 31
Oracle BAM adapter
configuring, 23.7
configuring HTTPS, 23.7.2.1
configuring to retry sending messages, 23.7.1.1
Oracle BPM Worklist
configuring with Oracle HTTP Server, 5.2
globally disabling automatic release timers, 20.5
performing fault recovery from, 1.4.3.1
performing human workflow service component fault recovery, 8.4
Oracle Business Activity Monitoring (BAM)
adding members to application roles, 25.3.3
adding users in Oracle BAM Administrator, 25.3.6
application roles, 25.3.4
availability management, 25.2
calling web services, 23.9.6
configuration property files, 23.10
configuration property reference, 23.11
configuring, 23
configuring advanced properties, 23.10
configuring credential mapping, 23.7.4, 23.9.1
configuring distribution lists, 23.6
configuring Oracle BAM adapter, 23.7
configuring Oracle BAM batching properties, 23.8
configuring Oracle BAM connection factories, 23.7.2
configuring Oracle Data Integrator integration properties, 23.3.6
configuring Oracle User Messaging Service (UMS), 23.5
configuring server basic properties, 23.3
configuring SSL, 23.9.3
configuring the application URL, 23.2.2, 23.3.3
configuring the data source JNDI, 23.3.2
configuring the embedded LDAP server, 25.3.5
configuring the logger, 23.4
configuring the outbound email account, 23.3.7
configuring the report cache persistence manager, 23.3.5
configuring the report loading indicator, 23.2.3
configuring the server name, 23.2.4
configuring trusted domains, 23.7.3
configuring user permissions, 23.9.2
configuring viewset sharing, 23.3.4
configuring web applications properties, 23.2.1
configuring web basic properties, 23.2
defining users and groups, 25.3.1
managing, 25
managing object ownership, 25.3.7
monitoring, 24
monitoring logs, 24.6
monitoring open connections, 24.3.2
monitoring Oracle BAM active data cache, 24.2.1
monitoring performance, 24.5
monitoring the client requests in progress, 24.2.5
monitoring the enterprise message sources, 24.2.4
monitoring the event engine component, 24.2.2
monitoring the report cache component, 24.2.3
monitoring the report server, 24.3.1
monitoring web applications, 24.3
monitoring web services, 24.4
removing invalid users from Oracle BAM Administrator, 25.3.8
securing, 23.9
securing JMS resources, 23.9.5
user management, 25.3
using Oracle Internet Directory, 23.9.4
using previously seeded group members, 25.3.2
Oracle Business Process Management Suite
administration, 1.4
configuration, 1.4.1
definition, 1.3
management, 1.4.3
monitoring, 1.4.2
service components, 1.2.4
Oracle Coherence
definition, 14.5
Oracle Coherence distributed cache
architecture, 14.5.1
availability requires use of Oracle Exalogic, 14.5
configuring in the System MBean Browser, 14.5.3
configuring the storage of multiple audit trail messages in one transaction, 14.5.4
performance recommendations, 14.5.2
starting the data grid nodes, 14.5.5
storing instance and callback message data, 14.5
Oracle Data Integrator
configuring with Oracle Business Activity Monitoring (BAM), 23.3.6
Oracle Database Adapter
properties, 34.1.2.2
Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control
accessing Oracle B2B, 32.2
deploying drivers, 28.1.2
logging in, 2.1
logging out, 2.3
Oracle Exalogic
definition, 14.5
Oracle Exalogic platforms
setting the AsynchAuditBatchSize property, 12.1
storing instance and callback message data in Oracle Coherence distributed cache, 14.5
Oracle File Adapter
properties, 34.1.2.3, 34.1.2.4
Oracle Fusion Middleware, 1.1
Oracle Fusion Middleware Configuration Wizard
deploying drivers, 28.1.3
Oracle HTTP Server
configuring Oracle SOA Suite and Oracle HTTP Server for SSL communication, 5.6.5
configuring with Oracle BPM Worklist, 5.2
Oracle Internet Directory
using with Oracle Business Activity Monitoring (BAM), 23.9.4, 23.9.4
Oracle JMS Adapter
properties, 34.1.2.5
Oracle Mediator service components
configuring, 15, 15
definition, 1.2.4
fault recovery, 1.4.3.1
fault recovery examples, 8.4.3
managing, 17
monitoring, 16
resequenced message purge states for, 9.3.4
setting the instance name during design time, 7.4.4
Oracle Mediator service engines
managing, 17
monitoring, 16
Oracle MQ Series Adapter
properties, 34.1.2.6
Oracle Service Bus (OSB)
invoking, 10.1
Oracle Service Registry
changing the endpoint reference and service key, 34.1.3
configuring caching of WSDL URLs, 34.1.3.1
configuring the publishing of web services to UDDI, 36.2.1
inquiry URL, 3.1
properties, 3.1
publishing to nondefault businesses, 36.2.2
publishing web services to the UDDI registry, 36.2
Oracle Single Sign-On (OSSO)
configuring, 5.1
Oracle SOA Composer
providing a nonadministrator with access, 20.10.4
Oracle SOA Suite
administration, 1.4, 2
configuration, 1.4.1
definition, 1.2
management, 1.4.3
monitoring, 1.4.2
Oracle Socket Adapter
properties, 34.1.2.7
Oracle SSL ciphers, 3.1
Oracle User Messaging Service (UMS)
accessing configuration pages, 26.3
adding or removing user messaging preferences business terms, 26.3.2
architecture, 26.1.2
client aliases, 26.6.5
components, 26.1.1
configuring, 26
configuring the email driver, 26.4.1.4
configuring the messaging extension driver, 26.4.1.3
configuring the proxy driver, 26.4.1.9
configuring the SMPP driver, 26.4.1.5
configuring the VoiceXML driver, 26.4.1.7
configuring the worklist driver, 26.4.1.8
configuring the XMPP driver, 26.4.1.6
configuring to send and receive notifications, 20.1
configuring to the LDAP user profile, 26.5
definition, 26.1
deregistering messaging client applications, 27.1.2
driver configuration, 26.4
driver properties, 26.4.1.1
enabling client security, 26.6.3
enabling security, 26.6.2
keystore configuration, 26.6.4
logging configuration, 27.2.1
managing, 28, 28
message status, 27.1.1
metrics and statistics, 27.3
monitoring, 27
monitoring drivers using the All tab, 27.1.3
securing, 26.6
securing JMS resources, 26.6.6
securing passwords, 26.4.1.2
sender and default sender addresses must match values on the Workflow Notification Properties page, 20.1
setting the storage method, 26.3.1
troubleshooting, 26.7
UMS client applications, 26.1.1
UMS drivers, 26.1.1
UMS server, 26.1.1
viewing log files, 27.2
web service security on notification, 26.6.1
Oracle Virtual Assembly Builder
description, 1.4.3
Oracle SOA Suite support, 1.4.3
Oracle wallet password, 3.1
Oracle Web Service Manager faults, 1.4.3.1
Oracle WebLogic Server
starting and stopping a managed server on which the SOA Infrastructure is deployed in the middle of BPEL processing, 7.4.3
Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console
accessing, 2.2.5
administering security of human workflow users, 2.2.5
configuring adapter connections for composite references, 2.2.5
creating and managing data sources of adapters, 2.2.5
creating and managing JMS resources of adapters, 2.2.5
deploying human task user interfaces, 2.2.5
managing data sources of the SOA Infrastructure, 2.2.5
managing JTA settings, 2.2.5
performing Oracle SOA Suite administrative tasks from, 2.2.5
oracle.soa.local.optimization.force property
using, 3.7.2
OracleSystemUser, 25.3
oracle.webservices.local.optimization property
using, 3.7.2
ora-human-intervention action
fault policy definitions, 8.4, 8.5, 8.5
orphaned service component instances
deleting, 8.2
for which no SOA composite application instance has been created, 8.2.1
generating, 8.2
OVAB
See Oracle Virtual Assembly Builder
OWSM
See Oracle Web Services Manager

P

partial partitioning
restricting partitioning to tables with high growth rates, 9.4.3.1
partitioning
all tables of a service component and service engine, 9.4.3.1
always partition the COMPOSITE_INSTANCE table, 9.4.3.1
component tables, 9.1.2, 9.4, 9.4.3, 9.4.3.2
configuring partitions, 9.4.1
constraints, 9.4.3.1
developing a methodology, 9.2
executing the verification script, 9.4.4
groups, 9.4.3.2
limitations on, 1.4.3.5
moving long running instances to a different partition, 9.4.6
no tables of a service component and service engine, 9.4.3.1
Oracle B2B foreign key constraints must be disabled before dropping the partition, 9.4.5
partial partitioning of components, 9.4.7
range partition keys, 9.4.3.2
restricting partitioning to tables with high growth rates, 9.4.3.1
running the purge scripts before performing partitioning, 9.4
selecting the schema partition keys, 9.1.2.2
verification script, 9.4.2
verifying and dropping partitions, 9.4.5
partitions
accessing the Undeploy SOA Composite wizard, 7.3
activating all composites in a partition, 7.8.2
API management of, 10.1, 10.2
bulk lifecycle management tasks, 1.4.3.5, 7.8, 7.8.2
cannot rename an existing partition, 7.8.1
cannot restrict login access to, 7.8
cannot start, stop, activate, or retire, 7.8
cannot transfer deployed composites to a different partition, 7.8.1
composites using the same inbound resource deployed to different partitions, 7.8
creating, 7.8.1
creating with ant and WLST, 7.8.1
default partition, 1.4.3.5, 7.1, 7.8
definition, 1.2.1, 1.4.3, 1.4.3.5, 7.8
deleting, 7.8, 7.8.1
deleting and undeploying all composites in the partition, 2.2.3, 7.3
deploying a composite to a partition, 7.8.2
invalid names for, 7.8.1
issues with deploying the same composite with a human workflow into multiple partitions, 7.1
limitations on using the socket adapter, 7.8
managing, 7.8
minimum of one required for deployment, 7.1, 7.8.1
naming conventions, 7.8.1
not associated with a state, 1.4.3.5, 7.8
recreating deployed composites in another partition, 7.8.1
retiring all composites in a partition, 7.8.2
selecting during deployment, 7.1
shutting down all composites in a partition, 7.8.2
starting all composites in a partition, 7.8.2
top level entry point for partition management APIs, 10.1, 10.2
undeploying all composites in a partition, 7.3, 7.4.1, 7.8.2
valid names for, 7.8.1
passwords
changing the default password in the embedded LDAP server, 20.10.1
payload validation
BPEL process service engine, 12.1, 37.1
fault generation for invalid payloads, 7.4.2
for synchronous services, 7.4.2
SOA composite applications, 7.4.2
SOA Infrastructure, 3.1
payloads
resolving large payload errors, B.6.3
saving, 8.1
pluggable notification service, 20.4
registration, 20.4.2
policies
binding components, 36.1
BPEL process service components, 14.2
BPMN process service components, 39.2
configuring security policies for human workflow web services, 20.12
definition, 1.4.3.2
details about which policies to use, 7.6
execution of, 1.4.3.2.1
faults, 1.4.3.1
human workflow service components, 22.1
in SOA composite applications, 7.6
limitation on policy attachment errors for service binding components, 36.1
limitation on policy attachments for binding components, 36
local attachments, 7.6.2
location of errors in services and references, 36.1
multiple servers with the same policy, 36.1.1
no support for policies on event subscriptions, 33.2
Oracle Mediator, 17.2
overriding policy configuration property values, 36.1.1
policy sets, 36.1
recommendation not to use oracle/wss10_saml_token_service_policy in a production environment with human tasks, 22.1
supported categories, 1.4.3.2
policy sets
definition, 20.12, 36.1
popped ruleset, 19.7.1
ports
changing the SOA Infrastructure server URL port, 3.3
privileges
required for performing specific tasks, 1.4, C.1
process flow
for BPEL 2.0 projects, 13.1.2
monitoring a BPEL process service component, 13.1
programmatic management of SOA composite applications, 10.1
properties
actionable addresses, 20.1
actionable email account
configuring, 20.2
audit level of BPEL process service engine, 12.1
audit level of BPMN process service engine, 37.1
audit level of SOA composite application, 7.4.2
audit level of SOA Infrastructure, 3.1
audit trail threshold, 12.1, 37.1
binding components, 34.1
callback server URL, 3.1
capture composite instance state of SOA Infrastructure, 3.1
changing of specific properties with green and red arrow icons requires a restart, 3.1
chunking, 3.1
clusterDbTimeRefresh, 12.3
data sources, 3.1
dispatcher engine threads, 12.1, 37.1
dispatcher invoke threads, 12.1, 37.1
dispatcher system threads, 12.1, 37.1
dynamic assignment and task escalation functions, 20.2
for local optimization, 7.6.2
heartBeatInterval, 12.3
inbound adapters, 30.4
large document threshold, 12.1, 37.1
masteAliveThreshold, 12.3
maxMessageRaiseSize, 12.2, 12.2
nodeReapInterval, 12.3
nodeReapThreshold, 12.3
notification properties, 20.1
Oracle Service Registry, 3.1
Oracle SSL ciphers, 3.1
Oracle wallet password, 3.1
order of precedence, 3.1
order of precedence of execution, 1.4.1, 7.4.2
outbound adapters, 30.8
payload validation in SOA composite applications, 7.4.2
payload validation in SOA Infrastructure, 3.1
payload validation in the BPEL process service engine, 12.1, 37.1
qualityOfService, 14.5.2
server URL, 3.1
SOA Infrastructure, 3.1
startupRecoveryDuration, 12.2
startWindowTime, 12.2
stopWindowTime, 12.2
subsequentTriggerDelay, 12.2, 12.2
threshHoldTimeInMinutes, 12.2
UDDI Registry, 3.1
web service binding, 3.1
proxy driver
client API, 26.4.1.9.3
common properties, 26.4.1.9.1
configuring, 26.4.1.9
custom properties, 26.4.1.9.2
proxy server
best practices for setting proxy properties, B.7.3
specifying, B.7.3
purging
deleting indexes before purging large amounts of data, then adding the indexes back in, 9.3.2
deleting instances with the looped purge in parallel script, 9.3.2
deleting instances with the looped purge script, 9.3.1
deleting large numbers of instances with the purge scripts, 9.3
deleting orphaned instances, 8.2
developing a methodology, 9.2
executing the purge scripts, 9.3.6
instances, 9.3
instances states for purging, 9.3.3
purge script capabilities, 9.3
purge scripts supported on different Oracle SOA Suite releases, 9.3
purge scripts to run when upgrading, 9.3
resequenced message purge states for Oracle Mediator, 9.3.4
scripts are only supported on Oracle databases, 9.3
the instances of a specific SOA composite application, 9.3.5
when to use the Delete With Options dialog or the purge scripts, 8.2, 8.3
pushed ruleset, 19.7.1

Q

QualityOfService property
enabling or disabling Oracle Coherence cache, 12.1

R

recover
message recovery action, 14.4
recoverable activities
definition, 14.4
recovery
of master nodes, 12.3
recovery actions
abort, 8.4, 8.5, 13.1, 14.1, 14.3, 17.1, 17.3
continue, 8.4, 8.5, 13.1, 14.1, 14.3, 17.1, 17.3
replay, 8.4, 8.5, 13.1, 14.1, 14.3, 17.1, 17.3
rethrow, 8.4, 8.5, 13.1, 14.1, 14.3, 17.1, 17.3
retry, 8.4, 8.5, 13.1, 14.1, 14.3, 17.1, 17.3
redeployment
behavior of BPMN instances after redeployment, 7.2
behavior of service component instances after redeployment, 7.2
from SSO-enabled Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control, 7
guidelines, 7.2
keeping current BPM composite instances running after redeployment, 7.2
limitations on selecting the option to continue instances upon redeployment, 7.2
possible reasons for failure, 7.2, 7.2
redeploying multiple composites at once is not supported, 7.2
SOA composite applications, 7.2
references
definition, 1.2.5, 4.3
displaying the endpoint addresses of, 7.4.2
displaying the WSDL files of, 7.4.2
location of policy errors, 36.1
monitoring, 4.3
Refresh Alarm Table button
resynchronizing lost jobs, 14.4
refresh icon
location, 7.4.1
rejected messages
binding components, 35.2
definition, 1.4.3.1
deleting at the SOA Infrastructure level, 8.6
deleting from the application home page, 8.7
inbound adapters, 30.2, 30.3
when to use the Delete Rejected Messages option, 8.6, 8.7
replay
recovery action, 8.4, 8.5, 13.1, 14.1, 14.3, 17.1, 17.3
reports engine
monitoring, 24.3.1
request breakdown
statistics in Oracle Mediator, 16.3.3
requests and operation statistics in human workflow service engines, 21.4, 21.5
resequencer tables
purging, 9.3.4
reset
message recovery action, 14.4
RESTful web service
security options in the Test Web Service page, 8.1
testing in the Test Web Service page, 8.1
rethrow
recovery action, 8.4, 8.5, 13.1, 14.1, 14.3, 17.1, 17.3
retiring
a default SOA composite application revision, 7.4.1
a SOA composite application revision, 7.4.1, 7.4.2
impact of retiring a default SOA composite application revision, 7.4.1, 7.4.1
impact of undeploying a default SOA composite application revision, 7.4.1, 7.4.1
retry
recovery action, 8.4, 8.5, 13.1, 14.1, 14.3, 17.1, 17.3
revisions
definition, 1.4.3.3
distinguishing the default revision from other revisions, 1.4.3.3
undeployment of default composite revision, 7.3
undeployment of default composite revision when no other active, available revisions exist, 7.3
version added to the application name, 1.4.3.3
roles
administrator, C.1
audit trail access, C.1.15
BPEL process service component home page access, C.1.10
BPEL process service engine access, C.1.6
business events page access, C.1.19
business rules service engine access, C.1.9
composite home page access, C.1.5
creating, C
decision service component home page access, C.1.13
flow trace page access, C.1.14
human task service component home page access, C.1.12
human workflow service engine access, C.1.8
matrix of role functionality, C.1.1
monitor, C.1
operator, C.1
Oracle B2B pages access, C.1.18
Oracle Mediator service component home page access, C.1.11
Oracle Mediator service engine access, C.1.7
references home page access, C.1.17
required for performing specific tasks, 1.4, C.1
services home page access, C.1.16
SOA Composite menu access, C.1.4
SOA Infrastructure menu access, C.1.3
SOA Infrastructure page access, C.1.2
System MBean Browser access, C.1.20
routing statistics in Oracle Mediator, 16.2.4
RPC/literal-style WSDL files
specifying, 8.1.1
rule execution tracing
See business rule execution tracing
rules
See business rules

S

SAML message-protected policy configuration
setting up for the SOA Infrastructure, 5.3
search criteria
setting a default search criteria to fetch recent instances and faults only within a recent duration, 3.1
Secure Socket Layer
See SSL
securing
Oracle Business Activity Monitoring (BAM), 23.9
Oracle User Messaging Service (UMS), 26.6
security
application policies, 2.2.1
application roles, 2.2.1
automatically authenticating Oracle BPM Worklist users in SAML SSO environments, 5.4.1
automatically authenticating Oracle BPM Worklist users in Windows Native authentication environments, 5.4.2
automatically authenticating Oracle Business Process Management Process Composer users in Windows Native authentication environments, 5.4.3
available documentation, 5.1
configuring for human workflow WSDL files, 5.7
configuring for two-way SSL communication, 5.6.3
configuring Oracle HTTP Server with Oracle BPM Worklist, 5.2
configuring Oracle Single Sign-On (OSSO), 5.1
configuring Oracle SOA Suite and Oracle HTTP Server for SSL communication, 5.6.5
configuring SSL between SOA composite application instances and Oracle WebCache, 5.6.6
developing new security providers for use with Oracle WebLogic Server, 5.1
enabling an asynchronous process deployed to an SSL-enabled, managed server to invoke another asynchronous process over HTTP, 5.6.8
invoking references in one-way SSL environments in Oracle JDeveloper, 5.6.4
listing Oracle Internet Directory as the first authentication provider, 5.5.1
passing security properties with messages during testing, 8.1
policies in SOA composite applications, 7.6
procedures unique to Oracle SOA Suite, 5.1
programming security for Oracle WebLogic Server, 5.1
recommendation to configure either all or no managed servers with SSL, 5.6.1
securing an Oracle WebLogic Server production environment, 5.1
securing and administering web services, 5.1
securing Oracle WebLogic Server, 5.1
securing web services for Oracle WebLogic Server, 5.1
setting up SAML message-protected policy configuration for the SOA Infrastructure, 5.3
switching from non-SSL to SSL configurations with Oracle BPM Worklist, 5.6.2
understanding Oracle WebLogic Server security, 5.1
using a custom trust store for one-way SSL during design time, 5.6.7
seeding
users, groups, and application roles with LDAP tools, 20.10
sensors, 13.1, 38.1
behavior of activity sensors in BPEL 2.0 compensate and compensateScope activities, 13.4.1
business monitors, 7.9
disabling BPEL sensors at the service engine level, 12.1
disabling BPEL sensors at the SOA composite application level, 7.4.2
displaying the current state, 7.4.2
JMS sensor values are not displayed, 13.4
monitoring, 13.4
server URL
property, 3.1
property change requires a restart, 3.1
ServerManager
top level entry point for partition management APIs, 10.1, 10.2
service and reference binding components
See binding components
service components
BPEL processes, 13, 14
BPMN processes, 38
definition, 1.2.4
human workflow, 20, 21, 22
instance IDs, 1.2.4
instances, 1.2.4
Oracle Mediator, 15
orphaned instances, 8.2
service engines
BPEL processes, 13, 14
BPMN processes, 38
definition, 1.2.6
human workflow, 20, 21, 22
monitoring at the SOA Infrastructure level, 4.1
monitoring the average request processing times, 4.2
no management pages for the spring service component, 1.2.4
Oracle Mediator, 15
service infrastructure
definition, 1.2.7
monitoring the average request processing times, 4.2
service key
changing for Oracle Service Registry, 34.1.3
services
definition, 1.2.5, 4.3
location of policy errors, 36.1
monitoring, 4.3, 36.2.2
Set Time Threshold link
definition, 4.1, 6.1
Show Details link
definition, 4.1, 6.1
shutting down
a composite revision, 7.4.1, 7.4.2
SMPP driver
client API, 26.4.1.5.4
common properties, 26.4.1.5.2
configuring, 26.4.1.5
custom properties, 26.4.1.5.3
interoperability, 26.4.1.5.1
SMTP email server
configuring, 20.1
SMTP server
restarting the SOA server after configuring, 20.1
SOA composite applications
activating a revision, 7.4.1, 7.4.2
application states after SOA Infrastructure shutdown, 3.2.2
audit level, 7.4.2
configuring for two-way SSL communication, 5.6.3
configuring Oracle SOA Suite and Oracle HTTP Server for SSL communication, 5.6.5
contents, 1.2.8
definition, 1.2.2
deleting instances, 8.2, 8.3
deployed states, 7.4
deploying, 7
deploying a revision, 7.4.1
fault recovery, 8.5
faults, 8.5
filtering by instance states, 8.2, 8.3
finding the composite and component programmatically, 10.3.2
impact of retiring a default revision, 7.4.1, 7.4.1
impact of undeploying a default revision, 7.4.1, 7.4.1
in which one BPEL process is completed and another is faulted, 8.2.2
instances, 1.2.3
lifecycle, 1.4.3.3
managing, 8
managing the application state at the SOA Infrastructure level, 7.4.1
managing the application state from the SOA composite application home page, 7.4.2
message recovery information displayed on the home page, 1.2.1, 6.1
monitoring, 6
monitoring faults, 6.1
monitoring instances, 6.1
packaging, 7
payload validation, 7.4.2
policies, 7.6
programmatically managing, 10.1
purging instances of, 9.3.5
redeploying, 7.2
redeploying a revision, 7.4.1
retiring a default revision, 7.4.1
retiring a revision, 7.4.1, 7.4.2
retrieving the composite state programmatically, 10.3
securing, 5
setting the default revision, 7.4.1
setting the instance name during design time, 7.4.4
showing the composite XML definition, 7.4.2
showing the WSDL and endpoint URI, 7.4.2
shutting down a revision, 7.4.1, 7.4.2
starting up a revision, 7.4.1, 7.4.2
Test button is disabled when a composite is stopped or retired, 7.4.2
test instances, 8.1
testing, 1.4.3.4, 7.4.2, 7.5
undeploying, 7.3
undeploying a revision, 7.4.1
undeploying the default composite revision, 7.3
SOA Composite menu
description of options, 2.2.2
navigating through, 2.2.2
SOA Governance
definition, 1.4.3.3
SOA Infrastructure
audit level, 3.1
cannot change the Infrastructure port from Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console, 3.3
changing ports, 3.3
configuring, 3
during startup, may not be completely initialized to administer incoming requests, 4.1, 7.8
fault recovery, 8.4
faults, 8.4
managing the application state, 7.4.1
may not completely initialize to administer incoming requests until all deployed composites are loaded, 3.2.1
message recovery information displayedp in the home page, 4.1
monitoring, 4
payload validation, 3.1
processing requests, 4.2
properties, 3.1
recent instances and faults, 4.1
restarting the SOA Infrastructure does not activate endpoints when a retired composite is activated, 3.2.3
starting and stopping, 3.2
startup failure when cwallet.sso includes the SOA map, 3.2.4
state of composites after SOA Infrastructure shutdown, 3.2.2
waiting for startup initialization to complete, 3.2.1, 7.4.2
SOA Infrastructure application
definition, 1.2.1
SOA Infrastructure menu
description of options, 2.2.1
navigating through, 2.2.1
SOA Partition menu
navigating through, 2.2.3
sources
message, 24.2.4
spring service components
definition, 1.2.4
no spring service engine management pages, 1.2.6
scope of support in Oracle Enterprise Manager, 1.2.4
SSL
configuring for two-way SSL communication, 5.6.3
configuring Oracle SOA Suite and Oracle HTTP Server for SSL communication, 5.6.5
configuring SOA composite applications for two-way SSL communication, 5.6.3
configuring SSL between SOA composite application instances and Oracle WebCache, 5.6.6
configuring with Oracle Business Activity Monitoring (BAM), 23.9.3
enabling an asynchronous process deployed to an SSL-enabled, managed server to invoke another asynchronous process over HTTP, 5.6.8
invoking references in one-way SSL environments in Oracle JDeveloper, 5.6.4
key alias, 5.6.3
recommendation to configure either all or no managed servers with SSL, 5.6.1
switching from non-SSL to SSL configurations with Oracle BPM Worklist, 5.6.2
using a custom trust store for one-way SSL during design time, 5.6.7
Start Time From field
setting a default search criteria to fetch recent instances and faults only within a recent duration, 3.1
starting
a managed Oracle WebLogic Server on which the SOA Infrastructure is deployed in the middle of BPEL processing, 7.4.3
starting up
a composite revision, 7.4.1, 7.4.2
startupRecoveryDuration property
definition, 12.2
startWindowTime property
definition, 12.2
stopping
a managed Oracle WebLogic Server on which the SOA Infrastructure is deployed in the middle of BPEL processing, 7.4.3
stopWindowTime property
definition, 12.2
stress testing
invoking multiple instances, 8.1
subsequentTriggerDelay property
definition, 12.2, 12.2
synchronous services
payload validation, 7.4.2
system dispatcher messages
definition, 12.1
system faults, 1.4.3.1
System MBean Browser
ASNSDriverIMAddress property, 20.1
ASNSDrivers property, 20.7
AsynchAuditBatchSize, 12.1, 14.5.4
AuditConfig property, 3.1, 3.1, 4.1, 4.1, 6.1, 6.1, 8.2, 8.3, 13.1, 13.1
BpelcClasspath property, 12.1
bpel.config.auditlevel property, 12.5
CustomNSDriverPropertyNames property, 20.1, 20.4.2
DisableAsserts, 12.1
DisableSensors, 12.1
disabling instance and fault count metrics retrieval, 3.1.1
ExpirationMaxRetry property, 12.1
ExpirationRetryDelay property, 12.1
FaxCoverPageCount property, 20.1
GlobalTxMaxRetry property, 3.1
GlobalTxRetryInterval property, 3.1
HttpProxyAuthRealm property, 3.1
HttpProxyAuthType property, 3.1
HttpProxyHost property, 3.1
HttpProxyPassword property, 3.1
HttpProxyPort property, 3.1
HttpProxyUsername property, 3.1
HttpServerURL property, 3.1
HttpsServerURL property, 3.1
InstanceKeyBlockSize property, 12.1
instructions on using, 2.2.1
invoking custom MBeans with WLST, 2.2.1
KeystoreLocation property, 3.1, 5.6.3
MaximumNumberOfInvokeMessagesInCache property, 12.1
MaxRecoveryAttempt property, 12.1
navigational path, 3.1
OneWayDeliveryPolicy property, 12.1
QualityOfService, 12.1
QualityofService, 14.5.3
RetryNotificationMessageThrottle property, 20.1
ServerURL property, 3.3
SOA Infrastructure advanced configuration properties, 3.1
StatsLastN property, 12.1
SyncMaxWaitTime property, 12.1
UddiCacheLifetime property, 3.1, 34.1.3.1

T

tablespaces
extending to avoid problems at runtime, B.6.4
task auto release
configuring, 20.2
portal realm mapping configuration, 20.2
pushback assignee, 20.2
task auto release configuration, 20.2
worklist application URL configuration, 20.2
task escalations, 20.2
task flows
deployment, 7.1.1
task forms
configuring Oracle HTTP Server for task form attachments, 20.3
task service
configuring the workflow custom classpath URL, 20.2
configuring the workflow service session timeout, 20.2
task service properties
human workflow, 20.2
test cases
contents of, 7.5
definition, 1.4.3.4
test runs
definition, 7.5
test suite
assertions, 1.4.3.4
definition, 1.4.3.4
emulations, 1.4.3.4
testing
automating the testing of SOA composite applications, 7.5
initiating a test instance, 8.1
passing security properties with messages, 8.1
restrictions on displaying payload data in the Test Web Service page, 8.1
restrictions on stress tool of Test Web Service page, 8.1
scenarios in which the Test button is disabled, 7.4.2, 8.1
specifying the XML payload data, 8.1
Test button is disabled when a composite is stopped or retired, 7.4.2
WSDL URL that does not contain the revision number is processed by the default composite, 8.1
third party application servers
instructions for using this guide, 1.4
thread dumps from all managed servers, B.1.1
threshHoldTimeInMinutes property
definition, 12.2
throughput
instance details, 13.2
timeouts
resolving, B.2.1
setting, 12.1
TopLink sessions
managing cache, 2.2.1
transaction timeouts
setting, 12.1
transient processes
definition, B.5.5
troubleshooting
additional documentation for, B.9
AMX extension issues, B.4.14
application transaction does not complete and the underlying composite is stuck in a running state, B.3.4
asynchronous transactions return with an error after a long time, B.2.4
automatic recovery of BPEL instances is not recovering a specific instance, B.3.2
best practices for starting and stopping a managed server, B.7.1
business events, B.5
design time at runtime issues, B.4.10
event delivery network, B.5
extending tablespaces, B.6.4
flow diagram display issues on lower end hosts, B.7.4
human workflow API usage issues, B.4.11
human workflow issues, B.4
identity service issues, B.4.17
increasing database connection values, B.2.2
limitations on Safari browser use, B.8.1
long running, synchronous calls to remote web services error out, B.2.4
notification issues, B.4.3
Oracle BPM Worklist/task region issues, B.4.15
Oracle JDeveloper data control/form generation issues, B.4.12
Oracle User Messaging Service (UMS), 26.7
resolving connection timeouts, B.2.1
resolving database growth caused by high transaction volume, B.6.5
resolving exception errors caused by large payloads, B.6.3
resolving message failure caused by too many open files, B.6.2
runtime diagnostics, B.3
runtime failure with a "Cannot read WSDL" error, B.3.1
service/System MBean Browser issues, B.4.13
setting log levels, B.1
slow application performance, B.6.6
SOA server startup problems, B.7.2
some composites are retried multiple tines on failure, B.3.3
task action issues, B.4.2
task assignment, routing, and escalation issues, B.4.1
task attribute mapping issues, B.4.5
task comments/attachment issues, B.4.9
task form/action issues, B.4.8
task history issues, B.4.7
task report issues, B.4.6
task view issues, B.4.4
test-to-production issues, B.4.16
updating EJB transaction timeouts, B.2.3

U

UDDI Registry
configuring the publishing of web services to, 36.2.1
inquiry URL, 3.1
properties, 3.1
publishing to, 36.2
publishing web services to, 36.2.2
UMS
See Oracle User Messaging Service
undeploying
a composite revision, 7.4.1
undeployment
deleting a partition and all its composites, 7.3
from SSO-enabled Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control, 7
guidelines, 7.3
of all composites in a partition, 7.3
of an application instance does not cause the instance to complete, 13.7, 16.3.2
of default composite revision, 7.3
of default composite revision when no other active, available revisions exist, 7.3, 7.4.1
SOA composite applications, 7.3
unit tests
assertions, 1.4.3.4
distinguishing unit test instances from other instances, 1.2.3, 7.5
emulations, 1.4.3.4
of SOA composite applications, 1.4.3.4
running, 7.5
test cases, 1.4.3.4
test suites, 1.4.3.4
users
demo community, A
demo user community, A.2
seeding with LDAP tools, 20.10

V

verification script
executing, 9.4.4
for partitioning, 9.4.2
not provided for business rules, 9.4.4
VoiceXML driver
client API, 26.4.1.7.4
common properties, 26.4.1.7.2
configuring, 26.4.1.7
custom properties, 26.4.1.7.3
interoperability, 26.4.1.7.1

W

watches
creating, 11.2
web browsers
Copy details to clipboard link does not appear with Mozilla Firefox, 13.1
limitation on using the Safari Browser to view WSDL file content, B.8.1
supported, 2.1
web service binding properties, 3.1
web services
configuring, 34.1.1
WebLogic Diagnostic Framework
See WLDF
WLDF
definition, 11.1.1
WLST
creating partitions, 7.8.1
deploying drivers, 28.1.1
deployment, 7.1.2
invoking custom MBeans, 2.2.1
workflow custom classpath URL
configuring, 20.2
workflow service session timeout
configuring, 20.2
worklist driver
client API, 26.4.1.8.5
common properties, 26.4.1.8.3
configuring, 26.4.1.8
custom properties, 26.4.1.8.4
installing, 26.4.1.8.1
installing on the IBM WebSphere platform, 26.4.1.8.2
wsadmin
deploying drivers, 28.1.4
WSDL files
displaying the WSDL files of all external services, 7.4.2
human workflow, 5.7
specifying during instance creation, 8.1
specifying RPC/literal style WSDL files, 8.1.1
specifying the default revision, 8.1
WSDL URL that does not contain the revision number is processed by the default composite, 8.1
WS-Reliable Messaging
restrictions, 7.6.1

X

XML definition
of SOA composite applications, 7.4.2
XML payload data
specifying during instance creation, 8.1
XMPP driver
application archive (EAR), 26.4.1.6.4
client API, 26.4.1.6.7
common properties, 26.4.1.6.5
configuring, 26.4.1.6
custom properties, 26.4.1.6.6
definition, 26.4.1.6.1
interoperability, 26.4.1.6.2, 26.4.1.6.3
PK[p&PK}{@OEBPS/ns_config.htm Configuring Oracle User Messaging Service

26 Configuring Oracle User Messaging Service

This chapter describes the features and architecture of Oracle User Messaging Service (UMS). It also describes how to configure and secure Oracle UMS in your environment.

This chapter includes the following topics:

26.1 Introduction to User Messaging Service

Oracle User Messaging Service enables two-way communication between users and deployed applications. Key features include:

26.1.1 Components

There are three types of components that comprise Oracle User Messaging Service. These components are standard Java EE applications, making it easy to deploy and manage them using the standard tools provided with Oracle WebLogic Server.

  • UMS Server: The UMS Server orchestrates message flows between applications and users. The server routes outbound messages from a client application to the appropriate driver, and routes inbound messages to the correct client application. The server also maintains a repository of previously sent messages in a persistent store, and correlates delivery status information with previously sent messages.

  • UMS Drivers: UMS Drivers connect UMS to the messaging gateways, adapting content to the various protocols supported by UMS. Drivers can be deployed or undeployed independently of one another depending on what messaging channels are available in a given installation.

  • UMS Client applications: UMS client applications implement the business logic of sending and receiving messages. A UMS client application might be a SOA application that sends messages as one step of a BPEL workflow, or a WebCenter Portal Spaces application that can send messages from a web interface.

In addition to the components that comprise UMS itself, the other key entities in a messaging environment are the external gateways required for each messaging channel. These gateways are not a part of UMS or Oracle WebLogic Server. Since UMS Drivers support widely-adopted messaging protocols, UMS can be integrated with existing infrastructures such as a corporate email servers or XMPP (Jabber) servers. Alternatively, UMS can connect to outside providers of SMS or text-to-speech services that support SMPP or VoiceXML, respectively.

26.1.2 Architecture

The system architecture of Oracle User Messaging Service is shown in Figure 26-1.

For maximum flexibility, the components of UMS are separate Java EE applications. This allows them to be deployed and managed independently of one another. For example, a particular driver can be stopped and reconfigured without affecting message delivery on all other channels.

Exchanges between UMS client applications and the UMS Server occur as SOAP/HTTP web service requests for web service clients, or through remote Enterprise JavaBeans (EJB) and JMS calls for BPEL messaging activities. Exchanges between the UMS Server and UMS drivers occur through JMS queues.

Oracle UMS server and drivers are installed alongside Oracle SOA Suite or Oracle BAM in their respective Oracle WebLogic Server instances. An Oracle WebCenter Portal installation includes the necessary libraries to act as a UMS client application, invoking a server deployed in a SOA instance.

Figure 26-1 UMS Architecture

Description of Figure 26-1 follows
Description of "Figure 26-1 UMS Architecture"

26.2 Introduction to Oracle User Messaging Service Configuration

Oracle User Messaging Service enables users to receive notifications sent from SOA applications that are developed and deployed to the Oracle WebLogic Server using Oracle JDeveloper.

At the application level, there is notification activity for a specific delivery channel (such as SMS or email). For example, when you build a SOA application that sends email notification, you drag and drop an Email activity from the Oracle JDeveloper Component Palette to the appropriate location within a workflow. The application connects then sends notifications.

For more information about Oracle JDeveloper, see your Oracle JDeveloper documentation.

To enable the workflow participants to receive and forward notifications, use Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control to set the Oracle User Messaging Service environment by configuring the appropriate driver instances that reside on the same Oracle WebLogic Server on which you deploy the workflow application (Figure 26-2). Oracle User Messaging Service includes drivers that support messaging through email, IM, SMS, and voice channels. For more information, see Section 26.4, "Configuring User Messaging Service Drivers."

Figure 26-2 Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control

EM Grid Control
Description of "Figure 26-2 Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control"

For workflow participants to receive the notifications, they must register the devices that they use to access messages through User Messaging Preferences (Figure 26-3).

Figure 26-3 User Messaging Preferences

User Preferences screen
Description of "Figure 26-3 User Messaging Preferences"

26.3 Accessing User Messaging Service Configuration Pages

You configure Oracle User Messaging Service through Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control.

26.3.1 Setting the Storage Method

Use the Server Properties page to set the deployment type for the Messaging Server (that is, select the storage method for runtime and management data) and add (or remove) the User Messaging Preference Business Terms that are used for creating message filters.

Select Persistent (the default) to enable entries and the Messaging Store to persist when the server has been restarted. In the Transient mode (which is recommended for lightweight deployments), the Messaging Server does not maintain any data stored in the Messaging Store after a restart.

26.3.2 Adding or Removing User Messaging Preferences Business Terms

The Server Properties page enables you to add or remove the business terms used to construct the message filters in User Message Preferences. For more information about building messaging filters with business terms, see Section 26.3.2.1, "Adding Business Terms."

26.3.2.1 Adding Business Terms


Note:

Business terms are stored per server instance. If there are multiple instances (as in a cluster), then new business terms must be added to each instance individually.


To add a business term to User Messaging Preferences:

  1. Click Add.

  2. Enter a descriptive name for the business term.

  3. Select a data type (string, number, or date).

  4. Click Apply.

26.3.2.2 Removing Business Terms

To remove a business term from User Messaging Preferences:

  1. Select the business term.

  2. Click Delete.

  3. Click Apply to confirm the new term.

26.4 Configuring User Messaging Service Drivers

Oracle User Messaging Service includes the following drivers.


Note:

For the cluster environment, when you use separate messaging drivers for separate managed server nodes, all the drivers must be configured separately.

UMS Messaging Drivers are configured per instance. Configuring only one does not populate the configuration values to the drivers on the other cluster nodes.


26.4.1 Configuring a Driver

To configure a driver:

  1. Log in to Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control as an administrator.

  2. Expand the Fusion Middleware folder.

  3. Navigate to the User Messaging Service home page.

    Description of ns_login.gif follows
    Description of the illustration ns_login.gif

  4. Click usermessagingserver(soa_server1). The Associated Drivers page appears.

    Description of ns_assoc_drv.gif follows
    Description of the illustration ns_assoc_drv.gif

  5. Select the Local tab to access the drivers collocated with the UMS server instance. These drivers may or may not be registered with the UMS server depending on whether they are properly configured. The ALL tab lists all drivers that are deployed in the domain and registered to all the UMS server instances.

  6. Find the email driver in the list, and then click the adjacent Configure Driver icon.

    The configuration page is displayed.

    Description of ns_configdriver.gif follows
    Description of the illustration ns_configdriver.gif

  7. If needed, expand the Driver-Specific Configuration section and configure the driver parameters. For more information, see Section 26.4.1.1, "Introduction to Driver Properties."

26.4.1.1 Introduction to Driver Properties

Oracle User Messaging Service drivers share common properties (listed in Table 26-1) that are used by the Messaging Engine when routing outbound messages. Typically, administrators set such Quality of Service (QoS) properties as driver cost (Cost) and driver speed (Speed), supported carriers (SupportedCarriers), and supported protocols (SupportedProtocols). Driver developers configure properties that typically do not require modification by the administrator, such as supported delivery types (SupportedDeliveryTypes), and supported content types (SupportedContentTypes).


Note:

Properties such as SendingQueuesInfo are for advanced use and only require modification for advanced deployment topologies.


Table 26-1 Common Driver Properties

NameDescriptionMandatory Property?

Capability

Sets the driver's capability to send or receive messages. The values are SEND, RECEIVE, and BOTH.

Yes

Cost

The cost level of the driver (from 0 - 10). 0 is least expensive; 10 is most expensive. If the value is not in this range, cost is considered to be 0.

No

DefaultSenderAddress

The default address of the sender. The driver uses these addresses when sending a message that has no sender address specified, or when the specified sender address is not in the sender addresses list and the driver does not support using the application-provided sender address.

No

SenderAddresses

The list of sender addresses that the driver supports. If provided by the driver, the messaging engine can use this to route a sending message to the driver by matching against the sender address of the message.

No

SendingQueuesInfo

The information for the driver sending queue.

Yes

Speed

The speed level of the driver (from 0-10, with 10 being the fastest).

No

SupportedCarriers

A comma-delimited list of supported carriers.

No

SupportedContentTypes

The content type supported by the driver.

Yes

SupportedDeliveryTypes

The delivery types supported by the driver.

Yes

SupportedProtocols

A comma-delimited list of supported protocols. Enter an asterisk (*) for any protocol.

No

SupportedStatusTypes

The status types supported by the driver.

No

SupportsCancel

Supports a cancel operation on a message.

No

SupportsReplace

Supports a replace operation on a message.

No

SupportsStatusPolling

For certain protocols, an active polling of the remote gateway must be performed to check the status of a message previously sent. This property indicates whether the driver supports such status polling. If set to true, the messaging engine invokes the driver connection's getStatus() operation.

No

SupportsTracking

Supports a tracking operation on a message.

No


26.4.1.2 Securing Passwords

Sensitive driver properties (namely, passwords) can be stored securely in the credential store using Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control. Properties are marked with the flag Encoded Credential and have a custom entry form field.

To store a sensitive driver property securely:

  1. Go to the driver configuration page of the selected driver.

  2. In the Driver-Specific Configuration section, locate the property with the Encoded Credential flag set.

  3. Select the credential type. (Depending on the selected credential type, you are prompted to enter the username and/or password.) There are three options:

    • Indirect password, create new user (default option): specify the username and real password; the password is stored in the credential store with the username as part of the key. The key and a fixed folder (map name) are stored in the driver deployment's driverconfig.xml file.

    • Indirect password, use existing user: choose an existing username/key in the credential store (to reference the password you stored previously).

    • User a clear text password: specify the password, and it is stored directly in the driverconfig.xml file.

  4. Click Apply to save the changes.

  5. Restart the driver application or the container for the changes to take effect.

You can check the password in the driver deployment directory's driverconfig.xml file. For an indirect password, the format is:

value="->mapName:keyName"    (mapName is the driver target name, and the key is <parameter_name>.<username>)

For example, here is a sample entry in driverconfig.xml for an email driver's OutgoingPassword property:

<Property value="-&gt;
/Farm_base_domain/base_domain/server_soa/usermessagingdriver-email:
OutgoingPassword.ouser" encodedCredential="true" 
type="java.lang.String" mandatory="no" name="OutgoingPassword"
description="oracle.sdp.messaging.EmailDriverConfig.outgoingPassword"/>

26.4.1.3 Configuring the Messaging Extension Driver

The extension driver extends the messaging capability of the User Messaging Service by enabling support for arbitrary administrator-defined channels (protocols) and delivering the notifications for such channels to an administrator-defined web service listener endpoint.


Note:

An instance of this driver is deployed, but not targeted to any servers in the default installation. To enable this driver instance, it must be targeted to the appropriate servers where UMS (usermessagingserver) is running.


26.4.1.3.1 Driver Application Archive (EAR)

The EAR file is $oracle_home/communications/applications/sdpmessagingdriver-extension.ear.

26.4.1.3.2 Common Properties

These are common driver properties that are indicative of the capabilities of this driver for use by the messaging engine when routing outbound messages. Some properties are set by the driver developer and do not normally require modification, while others can be modified by the administrator to change the routing behavior. Some properties (such as sendingqueuesinfo) are for advanced use and only require modification for advanced deployment topologies. See Table 26-2. For a complete description of these properties and available values, see the JavaDoc for driverconfigpropertynames.

Table 26-2 Extension Driver Common Properties

NameDescriptionMandatory?Default Value

InstanceName

Instance name (for internal use only)

Yes

Extension-Driver

Capability

Message sending and receiving capability

Yes

SEND

SupportedDeliveryTypes

Supported delivery types

Yes

URI

SupportedContentTypes

Supported content types

Yes

text/plain, text/html, text/xml

SupportedStatusTypes

Supported status types

No

DELIVERY_TO_GATEWAY_SUCCESS, DELIVERY_TO_GATEWAY_FAILURE

Cost

Cost

No


Speed

Speed

No


SupportedCarriers

Supported carriers

No


SupportedProtocols

Supported protocols

No

popup

SupportsCancel

Supports cancel operation on the message

No

False

SupportsReplace

Supports replace operation on the message

No

False

SupportsTracking

Supports tracking operation on the message

No

False

SupportsStatusPolling

Supports status polling operation on the message

No

False

SenderAddresses

Sender addresses

No


DefaultSenderAddress

Default sender address

No


SendingQueuesInfo

Driver sending queue info

Yes

OraSDPM/QueueConnectionFactory:OraSDPM/Queues/OraSDPMDriverDefSndQ1


26.4.1.3.3 Custom Properties

This driver supports multiple configuration groups called extension endpoint groups. An extension endpoint group holds the configuration for a remote endpoint at which to deliver extension notifications. Each endpoint must have a distinct combination of protocol and mapped domain. The properties of the extension endpoint group are listed in Table 26-3:

Table 26-3 Extension Driver Custom Properties

NameDescriptionMandatory?

Group Name

The name of this extension endpoint configuration group.

Yes

Endpoint URL

Remote endpoint listener URL.

Yes

Mapped Domain

The extension endpoint used to deliver messages where the domain part of the recipient URI matches this value.

No

Protocol

The extension endpoint used to deliver messages where the protocol (scheme) part of the recipient URI matches this value.

Yes

Security Policies

Comma-separated list of WS-Security policies to apply to this endpoint.

No

Username

Username to propagate through WS-Security headers.

No

Keystore Alias

Keystore alias to use for looking up WS-Security policy public keys.

No

Credential Store Key

Key to use for looking up the WS-Security username and password from the Oracle Web Services Management credential store map.

No


26.4.1.3.4 Extension Driver Security

If the remote extension endpoint is secured using WS-Security, then additional configuration of the extension driver is required. There are two typical WS-Security configurations that are supported. The extension driver can either use SAML tokens or username tokens.

To use extension driver security:

  1. To use SAML tokens, the Security Policies configuration property should contain value oracle/wss11_saml_token_identity_switch_with_message_protection_client_policy, and the Keystore Alias configuration property should contain a valid alias for keystore entries that is accepted by the remote extension endpoint.

  2. To use username tokens, the Security Policies configuration property should contain value oracle/wss11_username_token_with_message_protection_client_policy, and the Credential Store Key configuration property should contain a valid alias for a credential store entry that is accepted by the remote extension endpoint.

For more details about using WS-Security policies, see Oracle Fusion Middleware Security and Administrator's Guide for Web Services.

26.4.1.3.5 Client API Messageinfo Support

Table 26-4 describes whether the protocol or driver implementation honors the following message delivery-related properties that are specified through the client API.

Table 26-4 Client API MessageInfo Support

NameDescriptionSupported?

Expiration

Expiration means how much later in seconds for the message to expire.

False

Delay

Delay means how much later to send the message out.

False


26.4.1.3.6 Usage Instructions

Perform the following steps to use the extension driver:

To use the extension driver:

  1. Implement and deploy a web service listener endpoint based on the MessagingNotifyService WSDL (umsnotify.wsdl):

    <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="no"?>
    <wsdl:definitions xmlns:soap="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/wsdl/soap/"
                      xmlns:tns="http://xmlns.oracle.com/ucs/messaging/extension"
                      xmlns:wsdl="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/wsdl/"
                      xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema"
                      name="MessagingNotifyService"
                      targetNamespace="http://xmlns.oracle.com/ucs/messaging/extension">
     
        <wsdl:types>
     
        <xsd:schema targetNamespace="http://xmlns.oracle.com/ucs/messaging/extension">
          <xsd:element name="notification">
            <xsd:complexType>
              <xsd:sequence>
                <xsd:element name="messageId" type="xsd:string" minOccurs="0"
     maxOccurs="1">
                  <xsd:annotation>
                    <xsd:documentation>Unique message identifier from User
     Messaging Service.</xsd:documentation>
                  </xsd:annotation>
                </xsd:element>
                <xsd:element name="sender" type="xsd:string">
                  <xsd:annotation>
                    <xsd:documentation>The sender address.</xsd:documentation>
                  </xsd:annotation>
                </xsd:element>
                <xsd:element name="recipient" type="xsd:string">
                  <xsd:annotation>
                    <xsd:documentation>The recipient address (typically
     username).</xsd:documentation>
                  </xsd:annotation>
                </xsd:element>
                <xsd:element name="subject" type="xsd:string" minOccurs="0"
     maxOccurs="1">
                  <xsd:annotation>
                    <xsd:documentation>The subject of the message, if
     available.</xsd:documentation>
                  </xsd:annotation>
                </xsd:element>
                <xsd:element name="contentType" type="xsd:string"
     default="text/plain">
                  <xsd:annotation>
                    <xsd:documentation>The MIME type of the message. e.g.
     text/plain, text/html, text/xml.</xsd:documentation>
                  </xsd:annotation>
                </xsd:element>
                <xsd:element name="content" type="xsd:string">
                  <xsd:annotation>
                    <xsd:documentation>The main body of the message. Textual
     content only (no binary content).</xsd:documentation>
                  </xsd:annotation>
                </xsd:element>
                <xsd:element name="parameters" type="tns:parameter" minOccurs="0"
     maxOccurs="unbounded">
                  <xsd:annotation>
                    <xsd:documentation>Additional key-value pairs. This interface
     does not define any specific key-value pair meanings. Use of such parameters
     is defined on a private basis by particular implementations of this interface.
       </xsd:documentation>
                  </xsd:annotation>
                </xsd:element>
              </xsd:sequence>
            </xsd:complexType>
          </xsd:element>
          <xsd:complexType name="parameter">
            <xsd:sequence>
              <xsd:element name="name" type="xsd:string">
                <xsd:annotation>
                  <xsd:documentation>Parameter name</xsd:documentation>
                </xsd:annotation>
              </xsd:element>
              <xsd:element name="value" type="xsd:string">
                <xsd:annotation>
                  <xsd:documentation>Parameter value</xsd:documentation>
                </xsd:annotation>
              </xsd:element>
            </xsd:sequence>
          </xsd:complexType>
          <xsd:element name="notificationResponse">
            <xsd:complexType>
              <xsd:sequence>
                <xsd:element name="messageId" type="xsd:string" minOccurs="0"
     maxOccurs="1">
                  <xsd:annotation>
                    <xsd:documentation>A message identifier returned in response to
     successfully accepting the message. If returned, the identifier should be
     unique. Note: A fault is raised if the message cannot be
     accepted.</xsd:documentation>
                  </xsd:annotation></xsd:element>
              </xsd:sequence>
            </xsd:complexType>
          </xsd:element>
          <xsd:element name="notificationFault">
            <xsd:complexType>
              <xsd:sequence>
                <xsd:element name="code" type="xsd:string"/>
                <xsd:element name="message" type="xsd:string"/>
              </xsd:sequence>
            </xsd:complexType>
          </xsd:element>
        </xsd:schema>
      </wsdl:types>
      <wsdl:message name="notifyRequest">
        <wsdl:part element="tns:notification" name="parameters" />
      </wsdl:message>
      <wsdl:message name="notifyResponse">
        <wsdl:part element="tns:notificationResponse" name="parameters"/>
      </wsdl:message>
      <wsdl:message name="notifyException">
        <wsdl:part element="tns:notificationFault" name="parameters"/>
      </wsdl:message>
      <wsdl:portType name="Notify">
        <wsdl:operation name="invoke">
          <wsdl:input message="tns:notifyRequest"/>
          <wsdl:output message="tns:notifyResponse"/>
          <wsdl:fault message="tns:notifyException" name="NotifyException"/>
        </wsdl:operation>
      </wsdl:portType>
      <wsdl:binding name="NotifySOAPBinding" type="tns:Notify">
        <soap:binding style="document"
     transport="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/soap/http" />
        <wsdl:operation name="invoke">
          <soap:operation
            soapAction="http://www.oracle.com/ucs/messaging/extension" />
          <wsdl:input>
            <soap:body use="literal" />
          </wsdl:input>
          <wsdl:output>
            <soap:body use="literal" />
          </wsdl:output>
          <wsdl:fault name="NotifyException">
            <soap:fault name="NotifyException" use="literal"/>
          </wsdl:fault>
        </wsdl:operation>
      </wsdl:binding>
     
      <wsdl:service name="NotifyService">
        <wsdl:port binding="tns:NotifySOAPBinding" name="Notify">
          <soap:address location="http://localhost:8001/NotifyService"/>
        </wsdl:port>
      </wsdl:service>
    </wsdl:definitions>
    
  2. Configure the extension driver.

    1. Target the predeployed extension driver called usermessagingdriver-extension or a new deployment to the appropriate servers where UMS (usermessagingserver) is running and start the driver.

    2. In Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control, navigate to the usermessagingserver home page.

    3. Click User Messaging Service > Driver Properties.

    4. Select and Edit the driver usermessagingdriver-extension or create a new driver with the same name as your new driver deployment.

    5. Under Driver-Specific Configuration, add a new extension endpoint configuration group and specify the correct properties: EndpointURL is the URL to the web service listener endpoint created in Step 1. Protocol is the value of the new messaging channel for which you want to add notification support (for example, popup).

    6. Under Common Configuration, update Supported Protocols with a comma-separated list of protocols defined in each Extension Endpoint group.

    7. Click OK to save the configuration.

This completes the configuration and integration of a new messaging channel (protocol) in UMS using the extension driver.

To send notifications to this new channel (protocol), recipients must be specified for the URI delivery type using the URI addressing format:

URI:scheme:scheme-specific-address-value

where scheme is the protocol. The URI delivery type is optional. For example, if the extension driver was configured to support the protocol popup, an application can compose a message to popup:john.doe@example.com.

End users can also declare their messaging preferences by creating a new messaging channel for the new channel type in the Worklist/UMS Preferences UI. User preferences are only applied when applications send user-based notifications (that is, to recipients of the form USER:username).


Note:

Proper configuration of SSL/TLS in the Oracle WebLogic Server container is a prerequisite for secure connections between UMS and the email server. See "Configuring SSL" in Oracle Fusion Middleware Securing Oracle WebLogic Server.


26.4.1.4 Configuring the Email Driver

The email driver both sends and receives messages (that is, its capability property is set to both by default). The email driver sends messages over SMTP and uses either IMAP or POP3 for receiving messages.

26.4.1.4.1 Email Driver Interoperability

This section details interoperability features of the email driver.

The email driver is compatible with these protocols: POP3, IMAP4, and SMTP.

Email driver features include:

  • Automatic connection retry

  • SMTP for message sending

  • IMAP4 and POP3 for message receiving (using polling)

  • scalable, highly available

  • Message loss prevention and duplication avoidance

The gateway vendors and versions in Table 26-5 have been verified.

Table 26-5 Email Driver Gateway Vendors and Versions

VendorVersion

Oracle Beehive

Release 1 (1.4.3)

Oracle Collaboration Suite

10g Release 1 (10.1.2)

Microsoft Exchange

2003

Dovecot (IMAP4/POP3)

0.99.11

sendmail (SMTP)

8.13.1


26.4.1.4.2 Common Properties

Table 26-6 lists common driver properties that are indicative of the capabilities of this driver for use by the messaging engine when routing outbound messages. Some properties are set by the driver developer and do not normally require modification, while others can be modified by the administrator to change the routing behavior. Some properties such as sendingqueuesinfo are for advanced use and only require modification for advanced deployment topologies. For a complete description of these properties and available values, see the JavaDoc of driverconfigpropertynames.

Table 26-6 Common Email Properties

NameDescriptionMandatoryDefault Value

InstanceName

Instance name (for internal use only)

Yes

Email-Driver

Capability

Message sending and receiving capability

Yes

Both

SupportedDeliveryTypes

Supported delivery types

Yes

Email

SupportedContentTypes

Supported content types

Yes

text/plain, text/html, multipart/mixed, multipart/alternative, multipart/related

SupportedStatusTypes

Supported status types

No

DELIVERY_TO_GATEWAY_SUCCESS, DELIVERY_TO_GATEWAY_FAILURE, USER_REPLY_ACKNOWLEDGEMENT_SUCCESS, USER_REPLY_ACKNOWLEDGEMENT_FAILURE

Cost

Cost

No

N/A

Speed

Speed

No

N/A

SupportedCarriers

Supported carriers

No

N/A

Supported Protocols

Supported protocols

No

N/A

SupportsCancel

Supports cancel operation on the message

No

False

SupportsReplace

Supports replace operation on the message

No

False

SupportsTracking

Supports tracking operation on the message

No

False

SupportsStatusPolling

Supports status polling operation on the message

No

False

SenderAddresses

Sender addresses

No

N/A

DefaultSenderAddress

Default sender address

No

N/A

SendingQueuesInfo

Driver sending queue info

Yes

OraSDPM/QueueConnectionFactory:OraSDPM/Queues/OraSDPMDriverDefSndQ1


26.4.1.4.3 Email Custom Properties

Table 26-7 lists properties specific to this driver and generally associated with configuring access to the remote gateway and certain protocol or channel-specific behavior.

Table 26-7 Custom Email Properties

NameDescriptionMandatory?Default Value

MailAccessProtocol

Email receiving protocol. The possible values are IMAP and POP3. Required only if email receiving is supported on the driver instance.

No

IMAP

RetryLimit

This value specifies the number of times to retry connecting to the incoming mail server, if the connection is lost for some reason. The default value is -1, which means there is no limit to the number of tries.

No

-1

MailDelFreq

The frequency to permanently remove deleted messages. The unit is in seconds and the default value is 600 seconds. A negative value indicates the messages should not be expunged. For the POP3 protocol, the message is expunged after it is processed.

No

600

AutoDelete

This value indicates if the driver should mark the messages deleted after they have been processed. The default is Disabled. For the POP3 protocol, the messages are always deleted right after they are processed.

No

Disabled

Debug

This value indicates if the driver is running in Debug mode. When enabled, JavaMail prints out requests and responses between the email driver and the mail server to Fusion Middleware Control. The default is Disabled.

No

Disabled

CheckMailFreq

The frequency with which to retrieve messages from the mail server. The unit is in seconds and the default value is 30 seconds.

No

30

ReceiveFolder

The name of the folder from which the driver is polling messages. The default value is INBOX.

No

INBOX

OutgoingMailServer

The name of the SMTP server. This is mandatory only if email sending is required.

No

N/A

OutgoingMailServerPort

The port number of the SMTP server; typically 25.

No

25

OutgoingMailServerSecurity

The security setting used by the SMTP server. Possible values are None, TLS, and SSL. The default value is None.

No

None

OutgoingDefaultFromAddr

The default FROM address (if one is not provided in the outgoing message).

No

N/A

OutgoingUsername

The username used for SMTP authentication. Required only if SMTP authentication is supported by the SMTP server.

No

N/A

OutgoingPassword

The password used for SMTP authentication. This is required only if SMTP authentication is supported by the SMTP server. This includes Type of Password (choose from Indirect Password/Create New User, Indirect Password/Use Existing User, and Use Cleartext Password) and Password.

No

N/A

IncomingMailServer

The hostname of the incoming mail server. Required only if email receiving is supported on the driver instance.

No

N/A

IncomingMailServerPort

Port number of IMAP4 (that is, 143 or 993) or POP3 (that is, 110 or 995) server.

No

N/A

IncomingMailServerSSL

Indication to enable SSL when connecting to IMAP4 or POP3 server. The default is Disabled.

No

Disabled

IncomingMailIDs

The email addresses corresponding to the user names. Each email address is separated by a comma and must reside in the same position in the list as their corresponding user name appears on the usernames list. Required only if email receiving is supported on the driver instance.

No

N/A

IncomingUserIDs

The list of user names of the mail accounts from which the driver instance is polling. Each name must be separated by a comma, for example, foo,bar. This is required only if email receiving is supported on the driver instance.

No

N/A

IncomingUserPasswords

The list of passwords corresponding to the user names. Each password is separated by a comma and must reside in the same position in the list as their corresponding user name appears on the usernames list. This is required only if email receiving is supported on the driver instance. This includes Type of Password (choose from Indirect Password/Create New User, Indirect Password/Use Existing User, and Use Cleartext Password) and Password.

No

N/A

ProcessingChunkSize

The number of messages processed during each message polling. The default is 100.

No

100

ImapAuthPlainDisable

Indication to disable or enable plain text authentication (AUTHENTICATE PLAIN command) for IMAP user authentication. The default is Disabled.

No

Disabled. When this property is disabled, that means that plain text is allowed.


26.4.1.4.4 Client API Messageinfo Support

These properties are message delivery-related that are specified through client API. Table 26-8 describes if the protocol or driver implementation honors such properties.

Table 26-8 Client API MessageInfo Support

NameDescriptionSupport

Expiration

Expiration means how long the message may exist until it expires.

False

Delay

Delay means the amount of time that must elapse before the message is sent.

False


26.4.1.5 Configuring the SMPP Driver

Short Message Peer-to-Peer (SMPP) is a popular GSM SMS protocols. User Messaging Service includes a prebuilt implementation of the SMPP protocol as a driver that can send and receive short messages. If the sending feature is enabled, the SMPP driver opens one TCP connection to the Short Message Service Center (SMS-C) as a transmitter for sending. If the driver's receiving feature is enabled, it opens another connection to the SMS-C as a receiver for receiving. Only two TCP connections (both initiated by the driver) are needed for all communication between the driver and the SMS-C.


Note:

The SMPP Driver implements Version 3.4 of the SMPP protocol and only supports connections to an SMS-C or an SMS gateway that supports this version.


26.4.1.5.1 SMPP Driver Interoperability

This section details interoperability features of the SMPP Driver.

The SMPP driver is compatible with this protocol: SMPP v3.4.

SMPP driver features include:

  • Automatic connection retry

  • HTTP proxy for firewall traversal

  • Authentication configuration

  • Configurable chunk size

  • Bulk Sending

  • Encoding: UCS2, IA5, GSM_DEFAULT

  • Priority Setting

  • Configurable Window size

  • Plain text content only

The Gateway vendors in Table 26-9 have been verified.

Table 26-9 SMPP Driver Gateway Vendors

Vendor

Syniverse

Clickatell

Logica CMG

OpenSMPP (simulator)


26.4.1.5.2 Common Properties

Table 26-10 lists common driver properties that are indicative of the capabilities of this driver for use by the messaging engine when routing outbound messages. Some properties are set by the driver developer and do not normally require modification, while others can be modified by the administrator to change the routing behavior. Some properties such as SendingQueuesInfo are for advanced use and only require modification for advanced deployment topologies. For a complete description of these properties and available values see the JavaDoc of DriverConfigPropertyNames.

Table 26-10 Common SMPP Properties

NameDescriptionMandatoryDefault Value

InstanceName

Instance name (for internal use only)

Yes

SMPP-Driver

Capability

Message sending and receiving capability

Yes

Both

SupportedDeliveryTypes

Supported delivery types

Yes

SMS

SupportedContentTypes

Supported content types

Yes

text/plain

SupportedStatusTypes

Supported status types

No

DELIVERY_TO_GATEWAY_SUCCESS, DELIVERY_TO_GATEWAY_FAILURE

Cost

Cost

No

N/A

Speed

Speed

No

N/A

SupportedCarriers

Supported carriers

No

N/A

Supported Protocols

Supported protocols

No

N/A

SupportsCancel

Supports cancel operation on the message

No

False

SupportsReplace

Supports replace operation on the message

No

False

SupportsTracking

Supports tracking operation on the message

No

False

SupportsStatusPolling

Supports status polling operation on the message

No

False

SenderAddresses

Sender addresses

No

N/A

DefaultSenderAddress

Default sender address

No

N/A

SendingQueuesInfo

Driver sending queue info

Yes

OraSDPM/QueueConnectionFactory:OraSDPM/Queues/OraSDPMDriverDefSndQ1


26.4.1.5.3 Custom Properties

Table 26-11 lists properties specific to this driver and generally associated with configuring access to the remote gateway and certain protocol or channel-specific behavior.

Table 26-11 Custom SMPP Properties

NameDescriptionMandatory?Default Value

SmsAccountId

The Account Identifier on the SMS-C.

Yes

N/A

SmsServerHost

The name (or IP address) of the SMS-C server.

Yes

N/A

TransmitterSystemId

The account ID that is used to send messages.

Yes

N/A

ReceiverSystemId

The account ID that is used to receive messages.

Yes

N/A

TransmitterSystemType

The type of transmitter system. The default is Logica.

Yes

The default value is Logica.

ReceiverSystemType

The type of receiver system. The default is Logica.

Yes

The default value is Logica.

TransmitterSystemPassword

The password of the transmitter system. This includes Type of Password (choose from Indirect Password/Create New User, Indirect Password/Use Existing User, and Use Cleartext Password) and Password.

Yes

N/A

ReceiverSystemPassword

The password for the receiver system. This includes Type of Password (choose from Indirect Password/Create New User, Indirect Password/Use Existing User, and Use Cleartext Password) and Password.

Yes

N/A

ServerTransmitterPort

The TCP port number of the transmitter server.

Yes

N/A

ServerReceiverPort

The TCP port number of the receiver server.

Yes

N/A

DefaultEncoding

The default encoding of the SMPP driver. The default is IA5. Choose from the drop-down list: IA5, UCS2, and GSM_DEFAULT.

No

IA5

EncodingAutoDetect

If enabled, the SMPP driver encodes automatically. The default is Enabled.

No

Enabled

LocalSendingPort

The local TCP port used by the SMPP driver to send messages to the SMS-C.

No

N/A

LocalReceivingPort

The local TCP port used by the SMPP driver to receive messages from the SMS-C.

No

N/A

LocalAddress

The hostname (or IP address) of the server that hosts the SMPP driver.

No

N/A

WindowSize

The window size for SMS. This value must be a positive number. Default is 1.

No

1

EnquireInterval

The interval, in seconds, to send an enquire message to the SMS-C. The default is 30 seconds.

No

30

ThrottleDelay

The delay, in seconds, between throttles. Default is 30.

No

30

BindRetryDelay

The minimum delay, in seconds, between bind entry attempts. Default is 30.

No

30

ResponseTimer

Time lapse allowed between SMPP request and response, in seconds. The default is 30.

No

30

RegisteredDeliveryMask

The registered delivery bit mask. The default is 0xFF, which does not change the delivery flag value.

No

0xFF

RangeSetNull

Set to true to set the address range field of BIND_RECEIVER to null. Set to false (the default value) to set the address range field to SmsSystemId. The default is Disabled.

No

Disabled

PriorityAllowed

The highest priority allowed for the SMPP driver. The range is 0 (normal) to 3 (highest). The default is 0.

No

0

BulkSending

Setting this value to enabled (the default) enables sending messages in bulk to the SMS-C.

No.

Enabled

PayloadSending

Determines if the message_payload parameter is always used when sending a message to the SMS-C. The default is Disabled.

No

Disabled

SourceTon

The type of number (TON) for ESME address(es) served through SMPP receiver session. The default is 0.

No

0

SourceNpi

The numbering plan indicator (NPI) for ESME address(es) served through the SMPP receiver session. The default is 0.

No

0

DestinationTon

The TON for destination. The default is 0.

No

0

DestinationNpi

The NPI for destination. The default is 0.

No

0

ExtraErrorCode

A comma-separated list of error codes.

No

N/A

MaxChunks

The maximum SMS chunks for a message. The default is -1 (no maximum).

No

-1 (no maximum)

ChunkSize

The size of each SMS message chunk. Default is 160.

No

160

LongMessageSending

Supports sending long messages. The default is Disabled.

No

Disabled

DatagramMessageMode

Supports datagram message mode. The default is Disabled.

No

Disabled


26.4.1.5.4 Client API MessageInfo Support

These properties are message delivery-related that are specified through client API. Table 26-12 describes if the protocol or driver implementation honors such properties.

Table 26-12 Client API MessageInfo Support

NameDescriptionSupport

Expiration

Expiration means how long the message may exist until it expires.

True

Delay

Delay means the amount of time that must elapse before the message is sent.

False


26.4.1.6 Configuring the XMPP Driver

The XMPP Driver provides unidirectional and bidirectional access from Oracle Fusion Middleware to end users for real-time IM through the Extensible Messaging and Presence Protocol (XMPP). This driver enables end users to receive alert notifications or interactively chat with applications through their IM client of choice.

26.4.1.6.1 Introduction to XMPP

XMPP is an open, XML-based protocol for IM and Presence. XMPP-based software is deployed on thousands of servers across the Internet and is used by millions of people worldwide. XMPP consists of a client/server architecture, which resembles the ubiquitous email network. XMPP servers are completely decentralized, allowing anyone to set up their own server. Messaging is achieved as in the email network, where recipients are addressed by an XMPP ID (or Jabber ID or JID) with the following form: [username]@domain[/resource]. See RFC 3920 for details on the addressing scheme.

In an XMPP network, users identified by their XMPP IDs as mentioned above (which typically consist of a username and the domain of the XMPP server to which the user connects). An end user of XMPP connects to an XMPP server using an XMPP client to send instant messages to other XMPP users. XMPP, however, is not the only protocol network available for IM. XMPP has an extensible and modular architecture. It integrates with proprietary IM networks, enabling XMPP users to communicate with those on other networks.

To use the XMPP Driver in UMS, you must have access to a Jabber/XMPP server and an XMPP account for the UMS XMPP Driver instance with which to log in.

26.4.1.6.2 XMPP Driver Interoperability

This section details interoperability features of the XMPP Driver.

The XMPP driver is compatible with these protocols: XMPP (RFC 3920, 3921).

XMPP Driver features include:

  • Automatic connection retry

  • HTTP proxy for firewall traversal

  • Plain text content only

The gateway vendors and versions in Table 26-13 have been verified.

Table 26-13 XMPP Driver Gateway Vendors and Versions

VendorVersion

ejabberd

2.1.3

jabberd2

2.2.14

jabberd14

1.6.1.1-p1

Oracle Beehive

2.0.1.2.1


26.4.1.6.3 Third-Party Software

The XMPP Driver uses or requires the following third-party software (you may optionally choose to install and configure your own XMPP server):

Table 26-14 Required Third-Party Software

NameInstructionsVersion(s)

Apache Smack

This driver uses the Apache Smack XMPP Java library to connect to a Jabber/XMPP IM Server. This driver includes a licensed copy of Smack (version 3.0.4).

3.0.4



Note:

You are not required to install your own XMPP Server if you have access to an existing server. For a list of public servers, see http://www.jabber.org.


26.4.1.6.4 Driver Application Archive (EAR)

The EAR file is $ORACLE_HOME/communications/applications/sdpmessagingdriver-xmpp.ear.

26.4.1.6.5 Common Properties

Table 26-15 lists common driver properties that are indicative of the capabilities of this driver for use by the messaging engine when routing outbound messages. Some properties are set by the driver developer and do not normally require modification, while others can be modified by the administrator to change the routing behavior. Some properties such as SendingQueuesInfo are for advanced use and only require modification for advanced deployment topologies. For a complete description of these properties and available values, see the JavaDoc of DriverConfigPropertyNames.

Table 26-15 Common XMPP Properties

NameDescriptionMandatoryDefault Value

InstanceName

Instance name (for internal use only)

Yes

XMPP-IM-Driver

Capability

Message sending and receiving capability

Yes

Both

SupportedDeliveryTypes

Supported delivery types

Yes

IM

SupportedContentTypes

Supported content types

Yes

text/plain

SupportedStatusTypes

Supported status types

No

DELIVERY_TO_GATEWAY_SUCCESS, DELIVERY_TO_GATEWAY_FAILURE

Cost

Cost

No

N/A

Speed

Speed

No

N/A

SupportedCarriers

Supported carriers

No

N/A

Supported Protocols

Supported protocols

No

N/A

SupportsCancel

Supports a cancel operation on the message

No

False

SupportsReplace

Supports a replace operation on the message

No

False

SupportsTracking

Supports a tracking operation on the message

No

False

SupportsStatusPolling

Supports a status polling operation on the message

No

False

SenderAddresses

Sender addresses

No

N/A

DefaultSenderAddress

Default sender address

No

N/A

SendingQueuesInfo

Driver sending queue information

Yes

OraSDPM/QueueConnectionFactory:OraSDPM/Queues/OraSDPMDriverDefSndQ1


26.4.1.6.6 XMPP Custom Properties

The XMPP Driver includes the custom properties shown in Table 26-16.

Table 26-16 Custom XMPP Properties

NameDescriptionMandatoryDefault Values

IMServerHost

Jabber/XMPP server hostname.

No

N/A

IMServerPort

Corresponding Jabber/XMPP server port. The default is 5222.

Yes

5222

IMServerUsername

Jabber/XMPP username with which you log in. You may also enter a complete Jabber ID if its domain name is different from the Jabber/XMPP server hostname (for example: myUserName or myUserName@xmpp-domain).

Note: An attempt is made to register this user account if it does not exist and the server supports account registration.

No

N/A

IMServerPassword

Corresponding password for the username listed above. Includes Type of Password (choose from Indirect Password/Create New User, Indirect Password/Use Existing User, Use Cleartext Password) and Password.

No

N/A

SecurityMode

Security mode to use when making a connection to the server. Available options are: None (Security is disabled and only unencrypted connections are used), TLS (Security through TLS encryption is used whenever it is available), and SSL (Security through SSL encryption is used). The default is TLS.

No

TLS

SASLAuthenticationEnabled

Whether to use SASL authentication when logging into the server. If SASL authentication fails, then the driver tries to use non-SASL authentication. By default, SASL is enabled.

No

Enabled


26.4.1.6.7 Client API MessageInfo Support

These properties are message delivery-related that are specified through the client API. Table 26-17 describes if the protocol or driver implementation honors such properties.

Table 26-17 Client API MessageInfo Support

NameDescriptionSupport

Expiration

Expiration means how long the message may exist until it expires.

False

Delay

Delay means the amount of time that must elapse before the message is sent.

False


26.4.1.7 Configuring the VoiceXML Driver

The VoiceXML Driver supports the Genesys VoiceGenie gateway's outbound call protocol to send messages authored in VoiceXML. The gateway delivers the message using text-to-speech synthesis.

26.4.1.7.1 VoiceXML Driver Interoperability

This section details interoperability features of the VoiceXML Driver.

The VoiceXML driver is compatible with this protocol: VoiceXML over HTTP (VoiceGenie gateway protocol).

The VoiceXML driver features include:

  • VoiceXML content only

The gateway vendor and version in Table 26-18 has been verified.

Table 26-18 VoiceXML Driver Gateway Vendor and Version

VendorVersion

Genesys VoiceGenie

6.4.2


26.4.1.7.2 Common Properties

Table 26-19 lists common driver properties that are indicative of the capabilities of this driver for use by the messaging engine when routing outbound messages. Some properties are set by the driver developer and do not normally require modification, while others can be modified by the administrator to change the routing behavior. Some properties such as SendingQueuesInfo are for advanced use and only require modification for advanced deployment topologies. For a complete description of these properties and available values, see the JavaDoc of DriverConfigPropertyNames.

Table 26-19 Common VoiceXML Properties

NameDescriptionMandatoryDefault Value

InstanceName

Instance name (for internal use only)

Yes

VoiceXML-Driver

Capability

Message sending and receiving capability

Yes

SEND

SupportedDeliveryTypes

Supported delivery types

Yes

VOICE

SupportedContentTypes

Supported content types

Yes

text/vxml, text/x-vxml

SupportedStatusTypes

Supported status types

No

DELIVERY_TO_GATEWAY_SUCCESS, DELIVERY_TO_GATEWAY_FAILURE

Cost

Cost

No

N/A

Speed

Speed

No

N/A

SupportedCarriers

Supported carriers

No

N/A

Supported Protocols

Supported protocols

No

N/A

SupportsCancel

Supports cancel operation on the message

No

False

SupportsReplace

Supports replace operation on the message

No

False

SupportsTracking

Supports tracking operation on the message

No

False

SupportsStatusPolling

Supports status polling operation on the message

No

False

SenderAddresses

Sender Addresses

No

N/A

DefaultSenderAddress

Default Sender Address

No

N/A

SendingQueuesInfo

Driver Sending Queue Info

Yes

OraSDPM/QueueConnectionFactory:OraSDPM/Queues/OraSDPMDriverDefSndQ1


26.4.1.7.3 VoiceXML Custom Properties

The VoiceXML Driver includes the custom properties shown in Table 26-20.

Table 26-20 Custom VoiceXML Properties

NameDescriptionMandatoryDefault Values

VoiceXMLOutboundServletURI

The URL of the VoiceXML gateway.

Yes

N/A

VoiceXMLOutboundServletUserName

The user name of the VoiceXML gateway.

No

N/A

VoiceXMLOutboundServletPassword

The password of the user of the VoiceXML gateway.

No

N/A

VoiceXMLOutboundServletDNIS

The number that should appear in the recipient's caller ID display.

No

N/A

VoiceXMLReceiveURL

The URL of this driver's servlet that handles incoming requests from the VoiceXML Gateway. The format is http://host:port/usermessagingdriver-voicexml/receive. The default behavior, if this property is not set, is to use the local container's HTTP listener host and port. The default behavior only works for the first driver instance. For additional instances, the context root is different and this property must be configured using the correct context root replacement for /sdpmessagingdriver-voicexml.

No

N/A



Note:

In a clustered (high-availability) environment with Oracle HTTP Server (OHS) configured, do not use the OHS port to configure the VoiceXML driver receive URLs. Using the OHS port to configure the VoiceXML driver receive URLs causes a conflict with the drivers.

Each VoiceXML driver must be configured with its own WLS server's port.


26.4.1.7.4 Client API MessageInfo Support

These properties are message delivery related which are specified through client API. Table 26-21 describes if the protocol or driver implementation honors such properties.

Table 26-21 Client API MessageInfo Support

NameDescriptionSupport

Expiration

Expiration means how long the message may exist until it expires.

False

Delay

Delay means the amount of time that must elapse before the message is sent.

False


26.4.1.8 Configuring the Worklist Driver

The Worklist driver enables notifications from all sources to be sent to users in the form of worklist tasks for integration into the users' WebCenter Portal Unified Worklist.


Note:

Worklist message tasks are accessible both through an Oracle WebCenter Portal that has been configured to search the BPEL connection to which the worklist message driver is sending messages, and through Oracle BPM Worklist. Oracle BPM Worklist also shows these message-based tasks as worklist items.


This integration is achieved by exposing a worklist channel (delivery type) to applications and end users. Messages sent through the user's worklist channel are processed by the worklist driver.


Note:

The worklist channel supports all rich text tags supported by the af:richTextEditor for the text/html content type. For more information about the Rich Text Editor, see <af:richTextEditor>.


The User Messaging Service API semantics are the same as those for existing channels such as IM or email. This driver handles sending messages only. The driver Application Archive (EAR) is located at: $ORACLE_HOME/communications/applications/sdpmessagingdriver-worklist.ear

You can install the Worklist Driver onto an Oracle WebLogic platform, or onto an IBM WebSphere platform. Choose the appropriate installation instructions below.

26.4.1.8.1 Install the Worklist Driver on the Oracle WebLogic Server Platform

To enable the messaging worklist feature, the WebLogic SOA domain must be extended using the extension template available at $ORACLE_HOME/common/templates/applications/oracle.ums.driver.worklist_template_11.1.1.jar.

To extend a SOA domain using the Oracle Fusion Middleware Configuration Wizard:

  1. Launch Oracle Fusion Middleware Configuration Wizard ($ORACLE_HOME/common/bin/config.sh or %ORACLE_HOME%\common\bin\config.cmd).

  2. Select the Extend an existing WebLogic domain option.

  3. Select the desired SOA domain directory.

  4. Select the Extend my domain using an existing extension template option.

  5. Click Browse, and navigate to $ORACLE_HOME/common/templates/applications

  6. Select oracle.ums.driver.worklist_template_11.1.1.jar

  7. Complete the remaining steps of the Oracle Fusion Middleware Configuration Wizard, and restart the SOA servers.


Note:

Special Considerations if the SOA managed server is on a remote computer: The oracle.ums.driver.worklist_template_11.1.1.jar extension template includes a SOA composite application (sca_sdpmessagingsca-worklist-composite_rev1.0.jar) that is copied to $DOMAIN_HOME/soa/autodeploy, and is auto-deployed by the SOA Infra runtime upon server restart. However, if the SOA Infra runtime is on a remote computer, and the domain is packed with the -managed=true option (the correct option to use), this directory is not included in the archive. Thus, the composite is not deployed upon restarting the SOA managed server.

To complete the installation, copy the contents of $DOMAIN_HOME/soa/autodeploy from the AdminServer computer to the corresponding location on the remote computer with the SOA managed server, and restart the SOA managed server. You may have to create the directory structure soa/autodeploy under $DOMAIN_HOME on the remote computer.


26.4.1.8.2 Install the Worklist Driver on IBM WebSphere Platform

To enable the messaging worklist feature, the WebSphere SOA cell must be extended using the extension template available at $ORACLE_HOME/common/templates/was/oracle.ums.driver.worklist_template_11.1.1.jar.

To extend a SOA cell using the Oracle Fusion Middleware Configuration Wizard:

  1. Set the environment variable CONFIG_JVM_ARGS with the value -DTemplateCatalog.enable.selectable.all=true. For example, in Linux bash shell: exportCONFIG_JVM_ARGS="-DTemplateCatalog.enable.selectable.all=true"
    At the Windows command prompt: set CONFIG_JVM_ARGS=-DTemplateCatalog.enable.selectable.all=true

  2. Launch Oracle Fusion Middleware Configuration Wizard ($ORACLE_HOME/common/bin/was_config.sh or %ORACLE_HOME%\common\bin\was_config.cmd).

  3. Click Select and Configure Existing Cell.

  4. Select the desired SOA cell and click Next.

  5. Select Oracle User Messaging Service Worklist Driver on the Add Products to Cell screen and click Next.

  6. Complete the remaining steps of the Oracle Fusion Middleware Configuration Wizard with default selections, and restart the SOA cell.

26.4.1.8.3 Common Properties

The common driver properties shown in Table 26-22 are indicative of the capabilities of this driver for use by the messaging engine when routing outbound messages. Some properties are set by the driver developer and do not normally require modification, while others can be modified by the administrator to change the routing behavior. Some properties such as SendingQueuesInfo are for advanced use and only require modification for advanced deployment topologies. For a complete description of these properties and available values, see the JavaDoc of DriverConfigPropertyNames.

Table 26-22 Common Worklist Properties

NameDescriptionMandatory?Default Value

InstanceName

Instance name (for internal use only)

Yes

Worklist-Driver

Capability

Message sending and receiving capability

Yes

SEND

SupportedDeliveryTypes

Supported delivery types

Yes

WORKLIST

SupportedContentTypes

Supported content types

Yes

text/plain, text/html

SupportedStatusTypes

Supported status types

No

DELIVERY_TO_GATEWAY_SUCCESS, DELIVERY_TO_GATEWAY_FAILURE

Cost

Cost

No

N/A

Speed

Speed

No

N/A

SupportedCarriers

SupportedCarriers

No

N/A

SupportedProtocols

SupportedProtocols

No

N/A

SupportsCancel

Supports cancel operation on the message

No

False

SupportsReplace

Supports replace operation on the message

No

False

SupportsTracking

Supports tracking operation on the message

No

False

SupportsStatusPolling

Supports status polling operation on the message

No

False

SenderAddresses

Sender addresses

No

N/A

DefaultSenderAddress

Default sender address

No

N/A

SendingQueuesInfo

Driver sending queue information

Yes

OraSDPM/QueueConnectionFactory:OraSDPM/Queues/OraSDPMDriverDefSndQ1


26.4.1.8.4 Custom Properties

The custom property shown in Table 26-23 is available.

Table 26-23 Custom Worklist Property

NameDescriptionMandatoryDefault Value

BPELConnectionURL

The URL of the BPEL server to connect to. The format is 'http://<bpel-host>:<bpel-port>'. The default behavior, if this property is not set, is to use the local container's HTTP connection URL.




26.4.1.8.5 Client API MessageInfo Support

Table 26-24 shows if the protocol or driver implementation honor the following message delivery-related properties that are specified through the client API.

Table 26-24 Client API MessageInfo Support

NameDescriptionSupport

Expiration

Expiration means how long the message may exist until it expires.

False

Delay

Delay means the amount of time that must elapse before the message is sent.

False


26.4.1.9 Configuring the Proxy Driver

The Proxy Driver acts as a Messaging Web Service client to a Fusion Middleware Messaging server hosted elsewhere in the intranet or Internet. It uses SOAP over HTTP (the Parlay X Multimedia Web Service protocol) to send messages and receive messages and return message delivery status. The ParlayX Web Service relays messages from one UMS instance to another. It can relay traffic from multiple instances in an Intranet to a terminating instance that has all of the protocol-specific drivers configured to an external gateway such as an SMSC, or to an SMTP or IMAP mail server.

26.4.1.9.1 Common Properties

Table 26-25 shows common driver properties that are indicative of the capabilities of this driver for use by the messaging engine when routing outbound messages. Some properties are set by the driver developer and do not normally require modification, while others can be modified by the administrator to change the routing behavior. Some properties such as SendingQueuesInfo are for advanced use and only require modification for advanced deployment topologies. For a complete description of these properties and available values, see the JavaDoc of DriverConfigPropertyNames.

Table 26-25 Common Proxy Properties

NameDescriptionMandatoryDefault Value

InstanceName

Instance name (for internal use only)

Yes

Proxy-Driver

Capability

Message sending and receiving capability

Yes

SEND

SupportedDeliveryTypes

Supported delivery types

Yes

EMAIL, SMS, VOICE, IM, WORKLIST

SupportedContentTypes

Supported content types

Yes

*


SupportedStatusTypes

Supported status types

No

DELIVERY_TO_GATEWAY_SUCCESS, DELIVERY_TO_GATEWAY_FAILURE

Cost

Cost

No

N/A

Speed

Speed

No

N/A

SupportedCarriers

Supported carriers

No

N/A

Supported Protocols

Supported protocols

No

N/A

SupportsCancel

Supports cancel operation on the message

No

False

SupportsReplace

Supports replace operation on the message

No

False

SupportsTracking

Supports tracking operation on the message

No

False

SupportsStatusPolling

Supports status polling operation on the message

No

False

SenderAddresses

Sender addresses

No

N/A

DefaultSenderAddress

Default sender address

No

N/A

SendingQueuesInfo

Driver sending queue information

Yes

OraSDPM/QueueConnectionFactory:OraSDPM/Queues/OraSDPMDriverDefSndQ1


26.4.1.9.2 Proxy Custom Properties

The Proxy Driver includes the custom properties shown in Table 26-26.

Table 26-26 Custom Proxy Properties

NameDescriptionMandatoryDefault Values

GatewayURL

The URL to the hosted 11g UMS Web Service gateway. The URL is in the following format:

http://<host>:<port>/sdpmessaging/parlayx/SendMessageService

Yes

N/A

Username

Username of the messaging gateway.

No

N/A

Password

The password of the username

No

N/A

Policies

Comma-delimited list of Oracle Web Services Manager WS-Security policies to be attached to proxy driver requests

No

N/A


26.4.1.9.3 Client API MessageInfo Support

These properties are message delivery related which are specified through client API. Table 26-27 describes if the protocol or driver implementation honors such properties.

Table 26-27 Client API MessageInfo Support

NameDescriptionSupport

Expiration

Expiration means how long the message may exist until it expires.

False

Delay

Delay means the amount of time that must elapse before the message is sent.

False


26.5 Configuring User Messaging Service Access to the LDAP User Profile

As part of the LDAP provider setup in a SOA deployment, you configure the "User Name Attribute" through the WebLogic Server Administration Console. If you configure that attribute with a value other than the default "cn" or if the user's email address is stored in an LDAP attribute which is different from "mail", you must make an additional configuration change in Oracle Platform Security Services (OPSS) for UMS to successfully access the user profile to obtain the list of communication channels provisioned in LDAP, such as business email.

For more information about Oracle Platform Security Services (OPSS), see Oracle Fusion Middleware Application Security Guide.

To configure access to the LDAP user profile:

  1. Modify the jps-config.xml file in the $DOMAIN_HOME/config/fmwconfig directory by adding a <property> element in the idstore.ldap serviceInstance section.

    • To use the value of the User Name Attribute while searching the back-end LDAP server for user profile, add the following element:

      <property name=”username.attr” value=”username_attribute_value”/>
      

      where username_attribute_value is the value of the User Name Attribute property in the LDAP provider configuration. For instance, if the value of the User Name Attribute is mail, add the following line:

      <property name=”username.attr” value=”mail”/> 
      

      The following sample code shows the above line inserted in the jps-config.xml file:

      <!-- JPS WLS LDAP Identity Store Service Instance --> 
        
      <serviceInstance name="idstore.ldap" provider="idstore.ldap.provider"> 
       
        <property name="idstore.config.provider"
      value="oracle.security.jps.wls.internal.idstore.WlsLdapIdStoreConfigProvide
      r"/> 
      
        <property name="CONNECTION_POOL_CLASS" 
      value="oracle.security.idm.providers.stdldap.JNDIPool"/> 
       
        <property name=”username.attr” value=”mail”/> 
       
      </serviceInstance>
       
      
    • If the LDAP attribute containing the user's business email addresses is something other the mail attribute, add the following element:

      <property name="PROPERTY_ATTRIBUTE_MAPPING" value="BUSINESS_EMAIL=attr_containing_email"/>
      

      where attr_containing_email is the attribute name in the LDAP provider that contains the user's email address. For instance, if the user attribute containing the email address is externalEmail, add the following line:

      <property name="PROPERTY_ATTRIBUTE_MAPPING" value="BUSINESS_EMAIL=externalEmail"/>  
      

      The following sample code shows the above line inserted in the jps-config.xml file:

      <!-- JPS WLS LDAP Identity Store Service Instance --> 
        
      <serviceInstance name="idstore.ldap" provider="idstore.ldap.provider">  
       
        <property name="idstore.config.provider"
      value="oracle.security.jps.wls.internal.idstore.WlsLdapIdStoreConfigProvide
      r"/>  
      
        <property name="CONNECTION_POOL_CLASS"
       value="oracle.security.idm.providers.stdldap.JNDIPool"/>  
       
        <property name="PROPERTY_ATTRIBUTE_MAPPING" value="BUSINESS_
      EMAIL=externalEmail"/> 
       
      </serviceInstance>
       
      

    Note:

    You may have other properties defined in the same section.


  2. Restart your domain.

26.6 Securing the Oracle User Messaging Service

The User Messaging Preferences User Interface and the Parlay X Web Services can be secured at the transport-level using Secure Sockets Layer (SSL). By default, all deployed web services are unsecured. Web Service Security should be enabled for any services that are deployed in a production environment.

UMS supports the use of Oracle Web Services Manager WS-Security policies to protect UMS web services. For more information about Oracle Web Services Manager, see "Using Oracle Web Service Security Policies", in Oracle Fusion Middleware Securing WebLogic Web Services for Oracle WebLogic Server.

The recommended security configuration for web services uses Security Assertion Markup Language (SAML) tokens to pass identities between web service clients and UMS. With SAML tokens, instead of the web service client passing a username and password to UMS, a trust relationship is established between the client and UMS because of exchanging certificates. Once this keystore configuration is in place, the web service client passes only the user identity, and vouches for the fact that it has authenticated the user appropriately.

The recommended policies to use for UMS web services are:

26.6.1 Web Service Security on Notification

The different web services include corresponding notification web services (MessageNotification, PresenceNotification) that run on the client side and receive notifications (message delivery status, message receipt, presence status change) when the appropriate event occurs.

This implementation does not provide for the use of Web Service security (WS-Security) by default during notification of the clients. That is, the server assumes that the notification web services running on the client side do not use WS-Security, and makes no attempt to authenticate itself when sending notifications. If you enable WS-Security on the client side, the notification from the server fails because the notification SOAP request is missing the required headers.

26.6.2 Enabling UMS Service Security

To enable a policy for a UMS web service, follow the steps in "Configuring Oracle WSM Security Policies in Administration Console" in Oracle Fusion Middleware Securing WebLogic Web Services for Oracle WebLogic Server, selecting policy oracle/wss11_saml_token_with_message_protection_service_policy. This configuration must be repeated for each service you want to secure.

26.6.3 Enabling Client Security

Web service client security must be enabled programmatically. When using the client libraries described in Parlay X Messaging Client API and Client Proxy Packages (in Oracle Fusion Middleware Developer's Guide for Oracle SOA Suite), WS-Security policy configuration is provided when a client object is constructed. The client constructors take an argument of type Map<String, Object>. In general when using SAML authentication, the key/value pairs (Table 26-28) should be added to the configuration map in addition to other required properties such as the endpoint address.

Table 26-28 Client Security Keys

KeyTypeTypical Value
oracle.sdp.parlayx.ParlayXConstants.POLICIES

String[]

oracle/wss11_saml_token_
with_message_protection_
client_policy
javax.xml.ws.BindingProvider.USERNAME_PROPERTY

String

<valid username> 
oracle.wsm.security.util.SecurityConstants.Conf
ig.KEYSTORE_RECIPIENT_ALIAS_PROPERTY

String

(optional) keystore alias for target service. See Client Aliases.


Example 26-1 Web Service Client Security

import oracle.sdp.parlayx.multimedia_messaging.send.SendMessageClient
 
...
 
Map<String, Object> config = new HashMap<String, Object>();
config.put(javax.xml.ws.BindingProvider.ENDPOINT_ADDRESS_PROPERTY, ums_url);
config.put(oracle.sdp.parlayx.ParlayXConstants.POLICIES, new String[]
 {"oracle/wss11_saml_token_with_message_protection_client_policy"});
config.put(javax.xml.ws.BindingProvider.USERNAME_PROPERTY, "test.user1");
 
SendMessageClient sendClient = new SendMessageClient(config);

26.6.4 Keystore Configuration

To use the recommended WS-Security policy, you must configure a keystore containing the public and private key information required by OWSM. Refer to "Configuring the Credential Store Using WLST" in Oracle Fusion Middleware Securing WebLogic Web Services for Oracle WebLogic Server for information on how to configure the keystore and corresponding credential store entries.

  • If both your web service client and UMS server are in the same domain, then they share a keystore and credential store.

  • If your web service client and UMS server are in different domains, then you must import the UMS public key into your client domain's keystore, and must import your client domain's public key into the UMS keystore.

26.6.5 Client Aliases

When using certain WS-Security policies such as the SAML policy recommended here, the client must use the server's public key to encrypt the web service request. However, there is generally only one keystore configured per domain. Therefore, if you have a domain in which there are web service clients that communicate with web services in multiple other domains, then you may be required to override the default keystore entry used by OWSM.

For example, if you have a domain in which application "A" is a web service client to a UMS web service, and application "B" is a web service client to a web service in another domain, then A's requests must be encrypted using the public key of the UMS domain, and B's requests must be encrypted using the public key of the other domain. You can accomplish this goal by overriding the keystore alias used by OWSM for each request:

  • Import (for example) the UMS public key with alias "ums_public_key", and the other public key with alias "other_public_key".

  • When creating an UMS web service client, specify the recipient keystore alias parameter, setting the key to oracle.wsm.security.util.SecurityConstants.Config.KEYSTORE_RECIPIENT_ALIAS_PROPERTY and the value to "ums_public_key" as shown in Example 26-2.

    Example 26-2 Client Aliases

    import oracle.sdp.parlayx.multimedia_messaging.send.SendMessageClient
     
    ...
     
    Map<String, Object> config = new HashMap<String, Object>();
    config.put(javax.xml.ws.BindingProvider.ENDPOINT_ADDRESS_PROPERTY, ums_url);
    config.put(oracle.sdp.parlayx.ParlayXConstants.POLICIES, new String[]
    {"oracle/wss11_saml_token_with_message_protection_client_policy"});
    config.put(javax.xml.ws.BindingProvider.USERNAME_PROPERTY, "test.user1");
    config.put(oracle.wsm.security.util.SecurityConstants.Config.KEYSTORE_RECIPIENT_
    ALIAS_PROPERTY, "ums_public_key")
    SendMessageClient sendClient = new SendMessageClient(config);
    
  • The other web service client similarly must override the keystore alias, but the exact mechanism may differ. For example if using a JAX-WS client stub directly, then you can add the override property to the JAX-WS request context. See "Policy Configuration Overrides for the Web Service Client" in Oracle Fusion Middleware Securing WebLogic Web Services for Oracle WebLogic Server for more details.

26.6.6 Securing JMS Resources

This (optional) procedure enables administrators to restrict access to the Oracle User Messaging Service's JMS resources (such as queues) for enhanced security.


Note:

This section details steps to follow to secure JMS Resources. If you are starting with a new installation (11g Release 1 11.1.1.3) of Oracle User Messaging Service, then follow these steps.

If you are not upgrading to 11g Release 1 11.1.1.3, then these instructions are not to be used.

If you previously created a domain in an earlier release and are upgrading, but have not already done so, then complete the steps in the latest Release Notes before proceeding.


To secure the JMS system resources, lock all JMS sub-deployments that start with the name UMSJMSSystemResource (there may be multiple automatically-created resources for UMS in a multi-server or cluster deployment) with the role OracleSystemRole. Do this using the Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console, or you may run a WLST script (available at $ORACLE_HOME/communications/bin/secure_jms_system_resource.py) as follows:

$ORACLE_HOME/common/bin/wlst.sh
$ORACLE_HOME/communications/bin/secure_jms_system_resource.py
--username=<admin_username> --password=<password>
--url=t3://<admin-host>:<admin-port> --jmsSystemResource
<UMSJMSSystemResource> --role OracleSystemRole

For example:

$ORACLE_HOME/common/bin/wlst.sh
$ORACLE_HOME/communications/bin/secure_jms_system_resource.py
--username=weblogic --password=<password> --url=t3://localhost:7001
--jmsSystemResource UMSJMSSystemResource --role OracleSystemRole

By default, the UMS system runs as the user OracleSystemUser for accessing JMS resources. If the user OracleSystemUser does not exist, or you secure the UMS JMS resources with any other role that some other user has been granted, you must override the default user identity used by the UMS system by specifying an alternate username for the following JVM system property when you start the container:

oracle.ums.system.user=<username>

For example, if the user is MySystemUser, you can pass the JVM system property on command line as: -Doracle.ums.system.user=MySystemUser

26.7 Troubleshooting Oracle User Messaging Service

To debug User Messaging Service, first check the server diagnostic logs. The logs may contain exception, error, or warning messages that provide details about incorrect behavior along with actions to remedy the problem. Table 26-29 describes additional methods for debugging common User Messaging Service problems.

Table 26-29 Troubleshooting UMS

SymptomPossible CausesSolutions

Notifications are not being sent from BPEL or Human Workflow components in SOA.

Notification Mode is set to NONE in SOA Workflow Notification configuration.

Change the Notification Mode setting to EMAIL or ALL using Oracle Fusion Middleware Control.

Email notification is not being sent.

The Outgoing (SMTP) Mail Server settings in the UMS Email Driver are incorrect.

Check the following settings in the UMS Email Driver using Oracle Fusion Middleware Control:

  • OutgoingMailServer

  • OutgoingMailServerPort

Note: Validate the values by using them in any email client for connecting to the SMTP server.


The SMTP server requires authentication or a secure connection (TLS or SSL).

Check the following settings in the UMS Email Driver using Oracle Fusion Middleware Control:

  • OutgoingUsername

  • OutgoingPassword

  • OutgoingMailServerSecurity

Notifications are not being sent because of error message: No matching drivers found for sender address = <address>

The UMS Driver for the appropriate channel is configured with a specific list of SenderAddresses, and the message sent by the application has set a non-matching Sender Address.

Note: UMS Server matches the outbound message's sender address, if set, against the available drivers' SenderAddresses to find a matching driver to use for delivering the message. If a driver has set one or more SenderAddresses, then the UMS Server only sends messages with the matching sender address to it.

  • Check the following settings in the appropriate UMS Driver using Oracle Fusion Middleware Control:

    SenderAddresses

    Note: The format for SenderAddresses is a comma-delimited list of <DeliveryType>:<Address>.

    For example:

    EMAIL:sender@example.com, EMAIL:sender@example2.com

  • Leave this property blank, if you want this driver to service outbound messages for all sender addresses for this channel (delivery type).

  • If there are multiple driver instances deployed for the same channel (delivery type) with different configurations, use the SenderAddresses to differentiate the driver instances. For example, one instance can be set with a value in SenderAddresses to only service outbound messages with that matching sender address, while the other instance can keep the SenderAddresses blank to service all outbound messages that do not specify any sender address or one that does not match that of the first driver instance.

  • SenderAddresses that are configured with the incorrect syntax (such as missing <DeliveryType>:) are ignored by the UMS Server for driver selection.

The email client inconsistently receives notifications.

The Incoming Mail Server settings in the UMS Email Driver are configured with the same email account to which notifications are being sent.

If the notification is sent to the same account, the UMS Email Driver may download and process the email before the email client can display it.

Use an exclusive email account for Incoming Mail Server settings. Check the following settings in the UMS Email Driver using Oracle Fusion Middleware Control:

  • IncomingMailIDs

  • IncomingUserIDs

SOA Human Workflow notifications are sent, but are not actionable.

The Actionable Email Address is not configured in SOA Workflow Notification Properties.

Set the Actionable Email Address in SOA Workflow Notification Properties with the address of the email account configured in the UMS Email Driver.


The Human Workflow task is not set to send actionable notifications.

Set the actionable attribute for the Human Workflow task in JDeveloper and redeploy the SOA composite application.

SOA Human Workflow actionable notifications are sent, but no action is taken after responding.

The Incoming Mail Server settings in the UMS Email Driver are incorrect.

Check the following settings in the UMS Email Driver using Oracle Fusion Middleware Control:

  • MailAccessProtocol (IMAP or POP3, in uppercase)

  • ReceiveFolder

  • IncomingMailServer

  • IncomingMailServerPort

  • IncomingMailServerSSL

  • IncomingMailServerSSL

  • IncomingUserIDs

  • IncomingUserPasswords

  • ImapAuthPlainDisable

Note: Validate the values by using them in any email client for connecting to an IMAP or POP3 server.


The mail access protocol is incorrect.

Check the following settings in the UMS Email Driver using Oracle Fusion Middleware Control:

  • MailAccessProtocol (IMAP or POP3, in uppercase)


The email server is SSL-enabled.

Check the following settings in the UMS Email Driver using Oracle Fusion Middleware Control:

  • IncomingMailServerSS


The receive folder name is incorrect.

Check the following settings in the UMS Email Driver using Oracle Fusion Middleware Control:

  • ReceiveFolder

Note: Some email servers may expect the value INBOX to be inbox or Inbox (that is, case-sensitive). Based on your email server, use an appropriate value.


A nondefault email client is configured for receiving notifications. When the user clicks the approval link, the default mail client page opens, which may send emails to a different email server.

Configure the default email client to receive actionable notifications.

SOA BPEL User Notification or Human Workflow notifications are sent to the correct delivery type (email, sms, and so on) but to the wrong address.

A self-provisioned messaging channel was created by the user in User Messaging Preferences for use in BPEL User Notification or Human Workflow use cases.

Note: The User Messaging Preferences UI allows the end user to create his or her own messaging channel for various use cases, but these are not to be used for BPEL User Notification and Human Workflow.

Do not use a self-provisioned messaging channel for BPEL User Notification or Human Workflow use cases (that is, do not set as Default channel, and do not use in a messaging filter for such use cases). BPEL User Notification and Human Workflow use User Messaging Preferences only for the delivery type preference, and the actual address is retrieved from the user profile in the identity management system.

Note: Addresses from the user profile in the identity management system are available through User Messaging Preferences using predefined channel names, such as Business Email, Business Mobile, Business Phone, Instant Messaging. Use these predefined messaging channels instead for BPEL User Notification and Human Workflow use cases.


PKHwqwPK}{@OEBPS/soacompapp_mang.htm  Managing SOA Composite Application Instances

8  Managing SOA Composite Application Instances

This chapter describes how to manage SOA composite application instances, including initiating a test instance of an application, monitoring and deleting instances, recovering from faults, and deleting rejected messages.

This chapter includes the following topics:


Note:

The procedures in this guide describe how to access Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control pages from the SOA Infrastructure menu, soa-infra icon in the navigator, SOA Composite menu, and SOA Partition menu. You can also access many pages from the Farm home page. For more information, see Section 2.2.6, "Navigating to the SOA Infrastructure or SOA Composite Application Home Page from the Farm Home Page."


8.1 Initiating a SOA Composite Application Test Instance

This section describes how to initiate a test instance of a deployed SOA composite application.

To initiate a SOA composite application test instance:

  1. Access this page through one of the following options:

    From the SOA Infrastructure Menu...From the SOA Folder in the Navigator...From the Composite Menu...
    1. Select Home.

    2. Select the Deployed Composites tab.

    3. In the Composite section, select a specific SOA composite application.

    4. At the top of the page, click Test.

    1. Under soa-infra, expand the partition.

    2. Select a specific SOA composite application.

    3. At the top of the page, click Test.

    1. Select Test Service > client.



    Note:

    The Test button is disabled in the following situations:

    • The SOA composite application revision is stopped or retired.

    • There are no web services available for the application. Only composites having services with web service bindings can be tested from this page.


  2. If the composite includes multiple services, the Test button has a drop-down list to select the service to test.

    The Test Web Service page for initiating an instance appears.

    This page provides many options for initiating an instance. At a minimum, you must specify the XML payload data to use in the Input Arguments section.

    The WSDL file and endpoint URL are populated automatically based on the service you selected to test. The endpoint URL is derived from the WSDL and can be overridden to invoke that service at a different location. If the service selected has multiple ports, a drop-down list is displayed. Otherwise, the port of the current service is displayed.

    Description of sca_test_payload.gif follows
    Description of the illustration sca_test_payload.gif

  3. Accept the default values for these fields or provide values appropriate to your test environment.

  4. If you change the WSDL file, click Parse WSDL to reload the WSDL file.

    If the WSDL URL does not contain the revision number, it is processed by the default composite application. For example, if there are two revisions of a composite application named HelloWorld, then the following endpoints are exposed by them:

    • http://host:port/soa-infra/services/default/HelloWorld!1.0/client

    • http://host:port/soa-infra/services/default/HelloWorld!2.0/client

    However, if the WSDL specified for web service invocation does not contain the revision details (for example, http://host:port/soa-infra/services/default/HelloWorld/client), it is processed by the composite revision that is set as default.

  5. Select the operation that you want to test from the Operation menu. The available operations are determined from the WSDL.

    To test a RESTful web service, select the GET or POST service port operation.

  6. If you want to edit the endpoint URL, click Edit Endpoint URL and make appropriate changes.

    The lower part of the Test Web Service page consists of the Request tab. This tab enables you to specify security, quality of service, HTTP transport, stress testing options, and XML input arguments:

    Description of sca_test_payload2.gif follows
    Description of the illustration sca_test_payload2.gif

    The Security section includes the following fields for passing security properties with messages.:

    FieldDescription

    WSS Username Token

    Inserts a WS-Security SOAP header. The Username field is required, and the Password field is optional.

    HTTP Basic Auth

    Inserts the username and password credentials in the HTTP transport header. Both the Username and Password fields are required.

    Custom Policy

    Uses a custom policy to authenticate the user (specifies the URI for the custom policy). The Username and Password fields are optional.

    None

    Select to not specify security credentials. This is the default selection.


    When testing RESTful Web services, because the SOAP protocol is not used, the only security options are HTTP Basic Authentication or None.

  7. Accept the default values for these fields or provide values appropriate to your test environment.

    The Quality of Service section includes the following fields. Oracle Fusion Middleware uses a policy-based model to manage web services. A policy applies behavior requirements to the delivery of messages. This section is not available when testing RESTful web services. For additional details about using the Test Web Service page, see Oracle Fusion Middleware Security and Administrator's Guide for Web Services.

    FieldDescription

    WS-RM

    Select one of the following options for testing WS-Reliable Messaging (RM) protocol policies. Reliable messaging policies support this protocol, which guarantees the end-to-end delivery of messages.

    • WSDL Default: Executes the default behavior of the WSDL. For example, if the WSDL contains a reference to a WS-RM policy, then the policy is enforced. If the WSDL does not contain a reference to a WS-RM policy, then reliable messaging is not tested.

    • None: No policy for WS-RM is tested even if the WSDL contains a reference to a policy.

    • Custom: Enforces a custom policy. Specify the URI of the custom policy in the Policy URI field. If a WS-RM policy is referenced in the WSDL, it is ignored, and the policy specified in the Policy URI field is used instead.

    MTOM

    Select one of the following options for testing Message Transmission Optimization Mechanism (MTOM) policies. MTOM policies ensure that attachments are in MTOM format, a format for efficiently sending binary data to and from web services.

    • WSDL Default: Executes the default behavior of the WSDL. For example, if the WSDL contains a reference to an MTOM policy, then the policy is enforced. If the WSDL does not contain a reference to an MTOM policy, then MTOM is not tested.

    • None: No policy for MTOM is tested, even if the WSDL contains a reference to a policy.

    • Custom: Enforces a custom policy. Specify the URI of the custom policy in the Policy URI field. If an MTOM policy is referenced in the WSDL, it is ignored, and the policy specified in the Policy URI field is used instead.

    WS-Addressing

    Select one of the following options for testing WS-Addressing policies. WS-Addressing policies verify that SOAP messages include WS-Addressing headers in conformance with the WS-Addressing specification.

    • WSDL Default: Executes the default behavior of the WSDL. For example, if the WSDL contains a reference to a WS-Addressing policy, then the policy is enforced. If the WSDL does not contain a reference to a WS-Addressing policy, then WS-Addressing is not tested.

    • None: No policy for WS-Addressing is tested even if the WSDL contains a reference to a policy.

    • Custom: Enforces a custom policy. Specify the URI of the custom policy in the Policy URI field. If a WS-Addressing policy is referenced in the WSDL, it is ignored, and the policy specified in the Policy URI field is used instead.


  8. Accept the default values for these fields or provide values appropriate to your test environment.

    The HTTP Transport Options section includes the following fields:

    FieldDescription

    Enable SOAP Action

    Specifies whether the WSDL soap:operation has a soapAction attribute. This flag is enabled if a soapAction attribute exists. If you do not want to send a request with the SOAP action HTTP header, then clear the checkbox.

    SOAP Action

    Displays the soapAction attribute of the WSDL soap:operation, if one exists. You may specify a different SOAP action in this text box.


    This section is not available when testing RESTful web services.

  9. Accept the default values for these fields or provide values appropriate to your test environment.

    The Additional Test Options section includes the following fields. This section provides a simple stress test that simultaneously invokes multiple instances.


    Note:

    This is not a real stress test tool. Therefore, do not enter huge values for both concurrent threads and the number of times to invoke the operation. Doing so can result in errors.


    FieldDescription

    Enable Stress Test

    Click Enable to create a simple stress test. With this enabled, no conversation ID is displayed.

    Concurrent Threads

    Enter the number of concurrent threads on which to send the invocations. The default is 5 threads.

    Loops per Thread

    Enter the number of times to invoke the operation. The default is 10 times.

    Delay in Milliseconds

    Specify the delay of milliseconds to wait between operation invocations. The default is 1000 milliseconds (1 second).


  10. Accept the default values for these fields or provide values appropriate to your test environment.

    The Input Arguments section includes the following fields for entering XML payload data.

    FieldDescription

    Tree View

    Displays a graphical interface of text fields in which to enter information. This field automatically generates the required headers and XML structure.

    XML View

    Displays the XML file format for inserting values. You can paste the raw XML payload of your message into this field.



    Note:

    If you are using Oracle Enterprise Manager Grid Control, you can save the payload you enter. This feature is not available with Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control.


  11. Click Test Web Service.

    The test results appear in the Response tab upon completion.

    Description of soaapp_testresult.gif follows
    Description of the illustration soaapp_testresult.gif


    Note:

    The Response tab does not display payload data if you are performing a stress test or are testing an asynchronous service.


  12. Click Launch Message Flow Trace to access the flow trace of the instance.

  13. To return to the composite home page, click the name of the composite that appears at the top of the page or select Home from the composite target menu.

  14. Return to the Dashboard page of the SOA composite application.

    The Recent Instances table lists recent SOA composite application instances. Each created instance has its own unique ID.

For more information, see the following sections:

8.1.1 Specifying RPC/Literal-Style WSDL Files on the Test Web Service Page

If you are specifying an RPC/literal-style WSDL file with a message defined by "element=" in the Test Web Service page in Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control, use the XML View option of the Input Arguments section to modify the SOAP message. The SOAP body should look as follows:

<soap:Body>
    <ns:initiate>
        <payload>
          <value xmlns="...">3</value>
        </payload>
    </ns:initiate>
</soap:Body> 

where initiate is the operation name, payload is the part name, and value is the element defined in the WSDL message/part.

8.2 Monitoring and Deleting SOA Composite Application Instances from the Application Home Page

Section 7.4, "Managing the State of Deployed SOA Composite Applications" describes how to manage the lifecycle state of SOA composite applications. You can also monitor and delete specific SOA composite application instances from the Instances page of the application home page.

To monitor and delete SOA composite application instances from the application home page:

  1. Access this page through one of the following options:

    From the SOA Infrastructure Menu...From the SOA Folder in the Navigator...
    1. Select Home.

    2. Select the Deployed Composites tab.

    3. Select a specific SOA composite application.

    1. Under soa-infra, expand the partition.

    2. Select a specific SOA composite application.


  2. Click the Instances tab.

    The Instances page displays the following details:

    • A utility for searching for a specific instance by specifying criteria and clicking Search.

    • SOA composite application instance ID, name, conversation ID, most recent known state of each instance since the last data refresh of the page (for example, completed successfully, running, unknown, and so on), instance start time, and a log file describing any faults. A unique instance ID is created whenever a new instance of a SOA composite application is initiated either automatically by an external consumer of the application, or manually by an administrator from the Test Web Service page.

      If a ? icon is displayed, the Capture Composite Instance State checkbox was not enabled on the SOA Infrastructure Common Properties dialog. Therefore, the instance state was not evaluated. Determining the composite instance state requires evaluating the states of the underlying component, Therefore, this can be disabled to improve performance.

    Description of soaapp_instance.gif follows
    Description of the illustration soaapp_instance.gif


    Note:

    It is possible to generate orphaned service component instances. These instances are generated without any associated composite application instances. The orphaned component instances are generated under the following circumstances:

    • The SOA Infrastructure audit level is set to Off or the composite audit level is set to Off. Even in such cases, the BPEL process service engine can generate instance data for the service components that are included in the SOA composite application.

    • The SOA Infrastructure audit level is set to Off. However, the BPEL process or Oracle Mediator service engine audit level is set to a value other than Off.

    • All the audit levels are set to Off, but some faults are generated in one of the service engines. In these cases, the component instance gets generated.

    To delete orphaned instances or large numbers of instances, use the purge script described in Section 9.3, "Deleting Large Numbers of Instances with the Purge Scripts." Selecting the Delete All Instance options in the Delete with Options dialog does not delete orphaned component instances.


    If composite sensors are included in your SOA composite application, the Instances tab has the following differences:

    • The Add Fields button appears next to Search and Reset in the search utility. This button enables you to add sensor values to your search criteria.

    • A Composite Sensors column appears in the Instances table. Click the sensor icon in that column to display the details about sensor values available in a given instance of the composite.

  3. From the Add Fields list, select composite sensors to add to the search criteria. In this example, four have been selected (CustomerDetails, NameSensor, Datesensor, and Yearsensor).

  4. Input specific values by which each sensor searches. Only the composite instances in which the sensor values match your specified criteria are returned.

    Description of soaapp_instance2.gif follows
    Description of the illustration soaapp_instance2.gif

    The Composite Sensors column indicates that this SOA composite application includes composite sensors.

    Description of soaapp_instance3.gif follows
    Description of the illustration soaapp_instance3.gif

  5. Click Reset to remove all composite sensor fields from the search criteria or click the Remove icon to the right of the field to remove an individual sensor.

  6. Select a specific instance to delete by clicking a row in the Instances table. To select multiple instances, press Ctrl-Click or Shift-Click for the rows you want to select.

  7. Select a specific action to perform.

    ActionDescription

    Filter By

    Specify criteria for displaying composite instance states:

    • Execution State

      Filter the display of instances by execution state (running, completed, terminated, or stale).

    • Fault State

      Filter the display of instances by fault state (with or without faults). You can further customize the faulted state by selecting to display faults requiring recovery or nonrecoverable faults. It you select Stale from the Execute State list, the Fault State list is disabled.

    • BPEL Recovery

      Filter the display of instances by whether a recovery action is required. By default, this filter excludes all messages and instances created in the last five minutes, and displays the rest. You can control the number of minutes with the excludeBpelMaxCreationTime key of the AuditConfig property in the System MBean Browser. This property is available in the More SOA Infra Advanced Configuration Properties section of the SOA Infrastructure Common Properties page. For more information, see Section 3.1, "Configuring SOA Infrastructure Properties."

    Delete Selected

    Deletes the selected instance.

    After deleting an instance, instance details are no longer available for review.

    Delete With Options

    Prompts you to first specify criteria for deleting the selected instance directly from the database.

    Use this option to delete running, rolled back instances. However, this option does not delete the associated invoke messages that are awaiting recovery. As a result, there are orphaned messages pending in BPEL message recovery. To delete these messages, go to the Recovery page of the BPEL process service engine.

    • Common Delete Options: Select a preset range of instances to delete from a list (for example, older than 24 hours).

    • Delete All Instances Of This Composite: Select to delete all instances of the composite. This option deletes the rejected messages associated and all component, service, and reference instances associated with the composite, including those not associated with any composite instance ID.

      Note: If this composite has thousands of instances to delete, do not use this option. Instead, use the purge script described in Section 9.3, "Deleting Large Numbers of Instances with the Purge Scripts."

    • Delete All Instances That Match These Criteria: Specify criteria for deleting instances, including the start and stop times, and instance state.

    Any selections you may have made in the Instances page (such as specifying and executing a search criteria) are ignored for this operation.

    To monitor the progress of instance deletion, you must check the log files. For information about log files, see Section 3.4, "Configuring Log Files."

    Abort

    Terminates the selected instance. However, instance details are still available for review.


  8. From the View list, select Columns > Partition to display the partition in which the instance of the SOA composite application revision is contained.

  9. From the View list, select Columns > ECID to display execution context IDs (ECIDs). An ECID enables you to track a message flow that crosses instances of different composites.

  10. In the Instances table, perform the following additional tasks:

    1. In the Instance ID column, click a specific instance ID to show the message flow through the various service components and binding components. If an instance ID is listed as unavailable, you can click the Unavailable link for details.

    2. In the State column, if an instance state is marked as Unknown, click it to display more details.

    3. If the Composite Sensors column is available, click a sensor icon to display details about composite sensors included in the instance, such as name, location, and value.

    4. In the Logs column, click a specific log to access the Log Messages page with filtered messages specific to that instance.


    Note:

    Multiple revisions of a SOA composite application that includes inbound JCA adapters are displayed as running. However, only the most recent revision (the default version) is considered active. All previous revisions are not considered active. This is because for inbound JCA adapters, there can only be one active revision of a SOA composite application at any time. The JCA adapter endpoints in all previous revisions are de-activated.


For more information, see the following sections:

8.2.1 Mismatch Between the Number of SOA Composite Application Instances and Service Component Instances

The number of SOA composite application instances may not always match the number of service component instances displayed in Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control.

A SOA composite application instance is first created when the composite is invoked. When the service components within the composite receive a subsequent invocation, a corresponding service component instance is created that refers to the composite instance ID previously created.

There can be scenarios under which the composite instance is created, but the underlining service component instance is not created. For example:

  • The composite instance is created, but the invocation has not yet reached the service component due to a system failure.

  • The composite instance is created, but the invocation fails payload validation and is rejected. In this case, invocation does not reach the underlining service components.

You can also have orphaned service component instances for which no SOA composite application instance has been created.

8.2.2 Instance States of Service Components and SOA Composite Applications

Assume you have a SOA composite application with multiple service components (for example, two BPEL process service components). If these service components are marked with the following instance states:

  • Instance state of one BPEL process is marked as completed.

  • Instance state of the other BPEL process is marked as faulted.

This results in the overall composite instance state being marked as faulted. This behavior differs from 11g Release 1 (11.1.1.2), in which the same scenario resulted in the overall composite instance state being marked as completed.

Assume you have a parent SOA composite application that calls a child SOA composite application, and a fault occurs in the child composite (and is handled by the parent composite). This results in the following instance states:

  • The instance state of the child composite is marked as faulted.

  • The instance state of the parent composite is marked as completed.

8.3 Monitoring and Deleting SOA Composite Application Instances at the SOA Infrastructure Level

Section 7.4, "Managing the State of Deployed SOA Composite Applications" described how to manage the lifecycle state of all instances of a specific SOA composite application. You can also monitor and delete any number of instances across all deployed SOA composite applications by using the Instances page of the SOA Infrastructure home page. This page lists all SOA composite application instances deployed to the SOA Infrastructure.

To monitor and delete SOA composite application instances at the SOA infrastructure level:

  1. Access this page through one of the following options:

    From the SOA Infrastructure Menu...From the SOA Folder in the Navigator...From the SOA Composite Menu...
    1. Select Home.

    1. Click soa-infra.

    1. Select SOA infrastructure.


  2. Click the Instances tab.

    The Instances page displays the following details:

    • A utility for searching for a specific instance by specifying criteria and clicking Search.

    • All SOA composite application instances in the SOA Infrastructure, including instance and conversation IDs, composite name and revision, SOA composite application instance state, and instance start time.

    Description of sca_instanceids.gif follows
    Description of the illustration sca_instanceids.gif

    You can also terminate and delete instances from this page.

  3. Select a specific instance by clicking a row in the Instances table. To select multiple instances, press Ctrl-Click or Shift-Click for the rows you want to select.

  4. Select a specific action to perform.

    ActionDescription

    Filter By

    Specify criteria for displaying composite instance states:

    • Execution State

      Filter the display of instances by execution state (running, completed, terminated, or stale).

    • Fault State

      Filter the display of instances by fault state (with or without faults). You can further customize the faulted states by selecting to display faults requiring recovery or nonrecoverable faults. It you select Stale from the Execute State list, the Fault State list is disabled.

    • BPEL Recovery

      Filter the display of instances by whether a recovery action is required. By default, this filter excludes all messages and instances created in the last five minutes, and displays the rest. You can control the number of minutes with the excludeBpelMaxCreationTime key of the AuditConfig property in the System MBean Browser. This property is available in the More SOA Infra Advanced Configuration Properties section of the SOA Infrastructure Common Properties page. For more information, see Section 3.1, "Configuring SOA Infrastructure Properties."

    Delete Selected

    Deletes the selected instance.

    Delete With Options

    Prompts you to first specify criteria for deleting the selected instance directly from the database.

    Use this option to delete running, rolled back instances. However, this option does not delete the associated invoke messages that are awaiting recovery. As a result, there are orphaned messages pending in BPEL message recovery. To delete these messages, go to the Recovery page of the BPEL process service engine.

    • Common Delete Options: Select a preset range of instances to delete from a list (for example, older than 24 hours).

    • Delete All Instances That Match These Criteria: Specify criteria for deleting instances, including the start and stop times, and instance state.

    Any instance state selections you made at the top of the Instances page are ignored for this operation.

    To monitor the progress of instance deletion, you must check the log files. For information about log files, see Section 3.4, "Configuring Log Files."

    Notes:

    Abort

    Terminates the selected instance. However, instance details are still available for review.

    Note: If you delete an instance with faults, those faults are no longer displayed in the Faults and Rejected Messages page. In addition, if a terminated instance (shown as aborted) had a fault, it is not added to the fault count.


  5. In the instances table, perform the following tasks:

    1. From the View list, select Columns > Partition to display the partition in which the instance of the SOA composite application revision is contained.

    2. From the View list, select Columns > ECID to display execution context IDs (ECIDs). An ECID enables you to track a message flow that crosses instances of different composites.

    3. In the Instance ID column, click a specific instance ID to show the message flow through the various service components and binding components. If the instance ID is unavailable, the message flow cannot be accessed. However, you can still click the link for details.

    4. In the Composite column, click a specific SOA composite application to access its home page.

    5. In the Instance State column, click the Recovery icon to access the Faults and Rejected Messages page with faults filtered based on the composite instance ID. There can be multiple faults for a composite instance ID.

    6. In the Logs column, click a specific log to access the Log Messages page with filtered messages specific to that instance.

8.4 Recovering from SOA Composite Application Faults at the SOA Infrastructure Level

You can monitor and perform individual and bulk fault recoveries for BPEL process and Oracle Mediator service components across any number of SOA composite applications. For BPEL process faults to be identified as recoverable, there must be a fault policy defined that is bound to the fault (through the fault-bindings.xml file) and which triggers the action ora-human-intervention. However, without defining any fault policies, the fault takes its standard course as either a recoverable or nonrecoverable fault. Examples of performing both individual and bulk recovery are provided in this section. Human task service component or human workflow service engine faults are recovered from Oracle BPM Worklist.

You can also perform a manual recovery of undelivered BPEL process invoke or callback messages. For more information, see Section 14.4, "Performing BPEL Process Service Engine Message Recovery."

To recover from SOA composite application faults at the SOA Infrastructure level:

  1. Access this page through one of the following options:

    From the SOA Infrastructure Menu...From the SOA Folder in the Navigator...From the SOA Composite Menu...
    1. Select Home.

    1. Click soa-infra.

    1. Select SOA Infrastructure.


  2. Click the Faults and Rejected Messages tab.

    The Faults and Rejected Messages page displays the following details for all SOA composite application faults:

    • A utility for searching for a specific fault by specifying criteria and clicking Search. Click the Help icon for details.

    • Options for selecting instance recovery actions (for example, retry, abort, replay, and others), deleting rejected messages, and performing bulk message recovery.

    • Faults and rejected messages, including the error message, whether you can recover from the fault, the time of the fault, if the fault message is classified as a rejected message (if so, a checkmark is displayed), the SOA composite application in which the fault occurred, the fault location, the instance ID, and a link to log files describing the fault.

    Description of sca_faultandmanage.gif follows
    Description of the illustration sca_faultandmanage.gif


    Note:

    You cannot search for human workflow error messages by entering details in the Error Message Contains field because these faults do not persist in the dehydration store.


    Faults identified as recoverable can be recovered.

  3. Select faults for recovery using one of the following options. Fault recovery selection at the SOA Infrastructure level matches the SOA composite application level and BPEL process and Oracle Mediator service component levels.

    For...Then...

    Single fault recovery

    There are three options from which to choose for single-fault recovery:

    1. Click the row of the fault that has been identified as recoverable. With the row highlighted, select a specific action from the Recovery Action list, as described in Step 4.

    2. In the Recovery column, click the Recover link to access the Faults page of the instance audit trail to perform fault recovery.

    3. In the Error Message column, click the message of a fault that has been identified as recoverable. This displays complete fault details, including the fault ID, fault time, fault location, fault type, and error message text. A Recover Now option is displayed for recoverable faults. Click Recover Now to access the Faults page of the instance audit trail to perform fault recovery.

    Bulk fault recovery

    There are two options from which to choose for bulk-fault recovery:

    1. Use Shift+Click or Control+Click to select specific faults in the rows.

      or

    2. From the Select menu, choose Select All Recoverable. Then use Shift+Click or Control+Click to deselect the faults to not include in the recovery operation.

      Then:

    3. Select an action from the Recovery Action list, as described in Step 4.

      Note: Only the actions applicable to all selected faults are available.

    Recovery of all faults

    1. From the Select menu, choose Select All Recoverable.

    2. Select an action from the Recovery Action list, as described in Step 4.

      Note: Only the actions applicable to all selected faults are available.


  4. Select an action from the Recovery Action list.

    ActionDescriptionAction is Available for...

    Retry

    Retries the instance directly. An example of a scenario in which to use this recovery action is when the fault occurred because the service provider was not reachable due to a network error. The network error is now resolved.

    BPEL process and Oracle Mediator

    Abort

    Terminates the entire instance.

    BPEL process and Oracle Mediator

    Replay

    Replays the entire scope again in which the fault occurred.

    BPEL process

    Rethrow

    Rethrows the current fault. BPEL fault handlers (catch branches) are used to handle the fault. By default, all exceptions are caught by the fault management framework unless an explicit rethrow fault policy is provided.

    BPEL process

    Continue

    Ignores the fault and continues processing (marks the faulted activity as a success).

    BPEL process



    Note:

    In most cases, fault policy actions are automatically executed. The only exception is if you defined a fault policy that uses the action ora-human-intervention. This action creates a recoverable fault that can be recovered from Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control.


  5. If you want to delete rejected messages for all composites in the SOA Infrastructure, see Section 8.6, "Deleting Rejected Messages at the SOA Infrastructure Level."

  6. If you want to perform a bulk recovery of messages, click Recover with Options.

    This displays the Recover with Options dialog for specifying criteria for recovering BPEL and Oracle Mediator messages of all composites directly from the database. Human workflow messages can be recovered manually from Oracle BPM Worklist. Business event and business rule messages cannot be recovered.

    Description of soaapp_recovwithopts.gif follows
    Description of the illustration soaapp_recovwithopts.gif

  7. Specify criteria. Retry and Abort are the only recovery actions permitted.


    Note:

    For bulk fault recovery at the SOA Infrastructure level, a check of the state of composites cannot be performed. If the state of a composite is set to off, a recovery of its faults cannot be performed. However, no error or warning message is displayed. Upon submission of the bulk fault recovery request, the server checks if the originating composite's state is set to off. That fact is then noted in the log, and the fault is skipped.

    You are also not notified when a fault has been skipped during recovery for any other reason (for example, an unsupported service engine, an unrecoverable fault, and so on).


  8. Click Recover. Depending upon the number of messages, recovery can take some time.

  9. Perform the following additional tasks from within the faults table:

    1. From the View list, select Columns > Fault ID to display the fault IDs for each error message. The fault ID is automatically generated and uniquely identifies a fault. The fault ID is also displayed when you click an error message.

    2. In the Composite column, click a specific SOA composite application to access its home page.

    3. In the Fault Location column, click a specific location to access the faults page for the location of the fault. The location can be a service, service component, or reference.

    4. In the Composite Instance ID column, click a specific ID to access the flow trace of the instance.

    5. In the Logs column, click a specific log to access the Log Messages page with filtered messages specific to that instance.

  10. See the following sections for examples of single and bulk fault recovery with BPEL processes and Oracle Mediator.

For more information about concepts and instructions on designing a fault policy, see the following documentation:

8.4.1 Examples of Fault Recovery for BPEL Processes

This section provides examples of how to define a fault policy that enables human intervention on a BPEL process fault and perform single and bulk fault recovery on a BPEL process service component.

In this example, you define a fault policy by specifying that a fault can be manually recovered through human intervention. If an invalid social security number is submitted from a loan broker BPEL process to a credit rating service, the credit rating service returns a negative credit fault. This human intervention action is defined with the ora-human-intervention action in the fault-policies.xml file. Without fault policies, BPEL instances do not generate recoverable faults (instead they are nonrecoverable); the ora-human-intervention action makes the fault recoverable.

<faultPolicies xmlns="http://schemas.oracle.com/bpel/faultpolicy">
<faultPolicy version="2.0.1"
           id="CRM_ServiceFaults"
           xmlns:env="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/soap/envelope/"
           xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema"
           xmlns="http://schemas.oracle.com/bpel/faultpolicy"
           xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance">
            <Conditions>
               <faultName xmlns:credit="http://services.otn.com" 
               name="credit:NegativeCredit">
               <!-- get this fault when SSN starts with 0-->
                  <condition>
                     <test>$fault.payload="Bankruptcy Report"</test>
                     <action ref="ora-human-intervention"/>
                  </condition>
               </faultName>
            </Conditions>
</faultPolicy>
</faultPolicies>

The fault-bindings.xml file associates the fault policies defined in the fault-policies.xml file with the CRM_ServiceFaults composite application.

<faultPolicyBindings version="2.0.1"
 xmlns="http://schemas.oracle.com/bpel/faultpolicy"
 xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance">
    <composite faultPolicy="CRM_ServiceFaults"/>
</faultPolicyBindings>

Because human intervention is defined as an action, you perform BPEL process fault recovery in Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control.

For more information about creating and designing fault-policies.xml and fault-bindings.xml files, see Oracle Fusion Middleware Developer's Guide for Oracle SOA Suite.

For information about BPEL process message recovery, see Section 14.4, "Performing BPEL Process Service Engine Message Recovery."

8.4.1.1 Example: Single Fault Recovery for BPEL Processes

This example assumes the following:

To perform single fault recovery for BPEL processes:

  1. From the SOA Infrastructure menu, select Home.

  2. Click the Faults and Rejected Messages tab.

  3. In the faults table, locate the fault that has been identified as recoverable. You can use the search utility to locate the specific fault.

  4. In the Recovery column, click Recover. If you first want to see details about the fault, click the error message. Then, click Recover Now.

    The Faults page for that BPEL process instance is displayed.

  5. In the Recovery column, click Recoverable.

    The page refreshes to display the fault recovery section at the bottom of the page.

    Description of sca_faults2.gif follows
    Description of the illustration sca_faults2.gif

  6. From the Recovery Action list, select Retry.

  7. Select None from the Chain Action Upon Successful Retry list. This list enables you to select Java callout recovery actions. For more information, see Oracle Fusion Middleware Developer's Guide for Oracle SOA Suite.

  8. Select a variable from the Variable list. The content of this variable is displayed in the Value field. For this example, the variable crInput is selected. This variable is used in an invoke activity and contains an incorrect social security number value.

  9. Enter the correct value in the Value field. For this example, the social security number is edited to begin with 1:

    <ssn xmlns="http://service.otn.com">123456789</ssn>
    
  10. Click Set Value, and click Yes when prompted to continue.

  11. Click Recover to recover from the fault, and then click Yes when prompted to continue.

    The page refreshes to indicate that no faults occurred.

8.4.1.2 Example: Bulk Fault Recovery for BPEL Processes

For the social security number example, selecting Retry is not an option for performing a bulk recovery, because the value for the social security number is incorrect and requires correction. An example of performing a bulk recovery with the Retry option is if the social security number is correct, but the system providing the credit rating service was temporarily unavailable and caused a composite reference fault. This prevents the messages from being delivered. Once the credit rating service is available again, selecting Retry attempts the invocation to the credit rating service through the composite reference again.

To perform bulk fault recovery for BPEL processes:

  1. Perform Step 1 and Step 2 of Section 8.4.1.1, "Example: Single Fault Recovery for BPEL Processes."

  2. In the search utility, enter criteria based on known fault parameters (for example, the time range, composite name, component type (BPEL process), and so on).

  3. If the search returns too many results, limit it by selecting the Show only recoverable faults checkbox.

  4. From the Select list, choose Select All Recoverable.

  5. From the Recovery Action list, select Abort.

    All selected faults are manually terminated.

8.4.2 Examples of Fault Recovery for BPMN Processes

This section provides examples of how to define a fault policy that enables human intervention on a BPMN process fault and perform single and bulk fault recovery on a BPMN process service component.


Note:

When a multi-instance process has met the conditions for its completion, it raises a nonrecoverable system fault (to cancel remaining instances). Although this fault appears in the Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control, you do not need to take any action. It appears simply to notify you that the multi-instance process was finalized because the condition was completed.


In this example, you define a fault policy specifying that a fault be manually recovered through human intervention. If an invalid social security number is submitted from a loan broker BPMN process to a credit rating service, the credit rating service returns a negative credit fault. This human intervention action is defined with the ora-human-intervention action in the fault-policies.xml file. Without fault policies, BPMN instances do not generate recoverable faults (instead they are nonrecoverable); the ora-human-intervention action makes the fault recoverable.

<faultPolicies xmlns="http://schemas.oracle.com/bpmn/faultpolicy">
<faultPolicy version="2.0.1"
           id="CRM_ServiceFaults"
           xmlns:env="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/soap/envelope/"
           xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema"
           xmlns="http://schemas.oracle.com/bpmn/faultpolicy"
           xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance">
            <Conditions>
               <faultName xmlns:credit="http://services.otn.com" 
               name="credit:NegativeCredit">
               <!-- get this fault when SSN starts with 0-->
                  <condition>
                     <test>$fault.payload="Bankruptcy Report"</test>
                     <action ref="ora-human-intervention"/>
                  </condition>
               </faultName>
            </Conditions>
</faultPolicy>
</faultPolicies>

The fault-bindings.xml file associates the fault policies defined in the fault-policies.xml file with the CRM_ServiceFaults composite.

<faultPolicyBindings version="2.0.1"
 xmlns="http://schemas.oracle.com/bpmn/faultpolicy"
 xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance">
    <composite faultPolicy="CRM_ServiceFaults"/>
</faultPolicyBindings>

Because human intervention is defined as an action, you perform BPMN process fault recovery in Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control.

For more information about creating and designing fault-policies.xml and fault-bindings.xml files, see Oracle Fusion Middleware Developer's Guide for Oracle SOA Suite.

8.4.2.1 Example: Single Fault Recovery for BPMN Processes

This example assumes the following:

To perform single fault recovery for BPMN processes:

  1. From the SOA Infrastructure menu, select Home.

  2. Click the Faults and Rejected Messages tab.

  3. In the faults table, locate the fault that has been identified as recoverable. You can use the search utility to locate the specific fault.

  4. In the Recovery column, click Recover. If you first want to see details about the fault, click the error message. Then, click Recover Now.

    The Faults page for that BPMN process instance is displayed.

  5. In the Recovery column, click Recoverable.

    The page refreshes to display the fault recovery section at the bottom of the page.

    Description of sca_faults2.gif follows
    Description of the illustration sca_faults2.gif

  6. From the Recovery Action list, select Retry.

  7. From the Chain Action Upon Successful Retry list, select None. This list enables you to select Java callout recovery actions. For more information, see Oracle Fusion Middleware Developer's Guide for Oracle SOA Suite.

  8. From the Variable list, select a variable. The content of this variable is displayed in the Value field. For this example, the variable crInput is selected. This variable is used in an invoke activity and contains an incorrect social security number value.

  9. In the Value field, enter the correct value. For this example, the social security number is edited to begin with 1:

    <ssn xmlns="http://service.otn.com">123456789</ssn>
    
  10. Click Set Value, and click Yes when prompted to continue.

  11. Click Recover to recover from the fault, then click Yes when prompted to continue.

    The page refreshes to indicate that no faults occurred.

8.4.2.2 Example: Bulk Fault Recovery for BPMN Processes

For the social security number example, selecting Retry is not an option for performing a bulk recovery because the value for the social security number is incorrect and requires correction. An example of performing a bulk recovery with the Retry option is if the social security number is correct, but the system providing the credit rating service was temporarily unavailable and caused a composite reference fault. This prevents the messages from being delivered. Once the credit rating service is available again, selecting Retry re-attempts the invocation to the credit rating service through the composite reference.

To perform bulk fault recovery for BPMN processes:

  1. Perform Steps 1 through 2 of Section 8.4.2.1, "Example: Single Fault Recovery for BPMN Processes."

  2. In the search utility, enter criteria based on known fault parameters (for example, the time range, composite name, component type (BPMN process), and so on).

  3. If the search returns too many results, limit it by selecting the Show only recoverable faults checkbox.

  4. From the Select list, choose Select All Recoverable.

  5. From the Recovery Action list, select Abort.

    All selected faults are manually terminated.

8.4.3 Examples of Fault Recovery for Oracle Mediator

This section provides an example of how to perform single and bulk fault recovery on an Oracle Mediator service component.

In this example, a service binding component for an inbound Siebel adapter submits a payload message to Oracle Mediator for transformation. The processed payload message is then delivered to a reference binding component for an outbound file adapter. However, the outbound directory into which to write the payload message is not configured with write permissions. This causes a fault to occur. The fault policy defined during design time specifies that the fault be manually recovered through human intervention. Three retries are attempted, as defined with the retryCount attribute. The condition and action are defined as follows in the fault-policies.xml file.

Recoverable Oracle Mediator faults do not require a fault policy (though it is one way to make faults recoverable, as described through an ora-human-intervention action). Any parallel routing rule that receives a remote fault from the outbound endpoint also creates a recoverable fault (in this specific example, the fault policy is not required if the Oracle Mediator uses a parallel routing rule to invoke the outbound file adapter).

<faultPolicies xmlns="http://schemas.oracle.com/bpel/faultpolicy">
<faultPolicy version="2.0.1"
           id="ConnectionFaults"
           xmlns:env="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/soap/envelope/"
           xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema"
           xmlns="http://schemas.oracle.com/bpel/faultpolicy"
           xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance">
              <Conditions>
                <faultName xmlns:medns="http://schemas.oracle.com/mediator/faults"
                name="medns:mediatorFault">
                   <condition>
                      <test>contains($fault.mediatorErrorCode, "TYPE_FATAL_
                         MESH")</test>
                      <action ref="ora-retry"/>
                   </condition>
                </faultName>
              </Conditions>
. . .
. . .      <Action id="ora-retry">
        <retry>
          <retryCount>3</retryCount>
          <retryInterval>5</retryInterval>
          <retryFailureAction ref="ora-human-intervention"/>
          <retrySuccessAction ref="ora-terminate"/>
        </retry>
      </Action>
   </Actions>
</faultPolicy>
</faultPolicies>

Processing is set to retry 3 times before terminating.

The fault policies are associated with the ConnectionFaults composite application in the fault-bindings.xml file:

<faultPolicyBindings version="2.0.1" xmlns="http://schemas.oracle.com/bpel/fault
policy" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance">
        <composite faultPolicy="ConnectionFaults"/>
</faultPolicyBindings>

8.4.3.1 Example: Single Fault Recovery for Oracle Mediator

For this example, the sap output directory is made read-only. An inbound file adapter retrieves the sender.xml file from the siebel directory and the message is routed through Oracle Mediator to an outbound file adapter reference for placing a file in the sap directory.

To perform single fault recovery for Oracle Mediator:

  1. Change the directory permissions at the operating system command prompt.

    chmod 000 sap
    cp sender.xml siebel/
    
  2. From the SOA Infrastructure menu, select Home.

  3. Click the Faults and Rejected Messages tab.

    Three faults appear, based on three retries being attempted. In this case, you see three retries only because the fault policy on the Oracle Mediator interaction with the outbound file adapter defines three retries. Without the fault policy, there is only one fault (no automated retries).

  4. Click the specific instance ID in the Composite Instance ID column.

    The Flow Trace appears. The faults table at the top of the page displays the fault messages. If you want to see where the faulted Oracle Mediator instance is located in the overall message flow, select the fault in the faults table. This highlights the associated instance in the trace table. You can then click the instance to access its audit trail to see more details about the faulted flow.


    Note:

    Steps 4 through 10 represent one way to recover this single fault. The fault can also be recovered directly from the Oracle Mediator faults page through the Recovery Action list.


  5. Locate the Oracle Mediator component instance fault you want to recover in the Faults table and click Recover in the Recovery column.

  6. Select Sender from the Payload Part list.

    The payload is automatically displayed in the Payload field. If necessary, payload modifications can be performed in this field. For this example, payload modification is not necessary.

  7. Change the sap directory to be writable at the operating system command prompt.

    chmod 777 sap
    
  8. Return to the Faults tab and click the Refresh icon in the upper right corner of the page.

  9. Click Retry.

  10. Click Yes when prompted to resubmit the selected fault for recovery.

    The page refreshes to indicate that no faults occurred.

  11. Click the Audit Trail tab.

    The final message indicates that manual recovery was successful and the message payload was written to the sap directory.

    Description of bp_flt29.gif follows
    Description of the illustration bp_flt29.gif

8.4.3.2 Example: Bulk Fault Recovery for Oracle Mediator

Assume the sap directory to which to write the sender.xml payload message is again configured with read-only permissions at the operating system command prompt. Three copies of the sender.xml file are placed in the siebel directory of the service binding component for the inbound Siebel adapter. This creates three instances.

chmod 000 sap
cp sender.xml siebel/
cp sender.xml siebel/
cp sender.xml siebel/

To perform bulk fault recovery for Oracle Mediator:

  1. Change the sap directory to be writable.

  2. From the SOA Infrastructure menu, select Home.

  3. Click the Faults and Rejected Messages tab.

  4. In the search utility, enter criteria based on known fault parameters (for example, the time range, composite name, and so on).

  5. If the search returns too many results, limit it by selecting the Show only recoverable faults checkbox.

  6. Change the sap directory to be writable at the operating system command prompt.

    chmod 777 sap
    
  7. Select all the faults to be recovered.

  8. Select Retry from the Recovery Action list.

  9. Select Yes when prompted to perform fault recovery.

  10. Click the Audit Trail tab.

    The final message indicates that manual recovery was successful and the message payload was successfully written to the sap directory.

8.5 Recovering from SOA Composite Application Faults in the Application Home Page

You can monitor and perform individual and bulk fault recoveries in a SOA composite application. For BPEL process faults to be identified as recoverable, there must be a fault policy defined that is bound to the fault (through the fault-bindings.xml file) and which triggers the action ora-human-intervention. However, without defining any fault policies, the fault takes its standard course as either a recoverable or nonrecoverable fault. Human workflow faults can also be recovered, but not directly from Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control. Instead, the audit trail provides a link to the Oracle BPM Worklist, from which the fault can be addressed.

To recover from SOA composite application faults in the application home page:

  1. Access this page through one of the following options:

    From the SOA Infrastructure Menu...From the SOA Folder in the Navigator...
    1. Select Home.

    2. Select Deployed Composites.

    3. In the Composite section, select a specific SOA composite application.

    1. Under soa-infra, expand the partition.

    2. Select a specific SOA composite application.


  2. Click the Faults and Rejected Messages tab.

    The Faults and Rejected Messages page displays the following details for the selected SOA composite application:

    • A utility for searching for a specific fault by specifying criteria and clicking Search. Click the Help icon for details.

    • Options for selecting instance recovery actions (for example, retry, abort, replay, and others), deleting rejected messages, and performing bulk message recovery.

    • Faults and rejected messages in SOA composite application instances, including the error message, whether you can recover from the fault, the time of the fault, if the fault message is classified as a rejected message (if so, a checkmark is displayed), the fault location, the composite instance ID, and links to log files that describe the fault.

    Description of sca_soaapp_search.gif follows
    Description of the illustration sca_soaapp_search.gif


    Note:

    You cannot search for human workflow error messages by entering details in the Error Message Contains field because these faults do not persist in the dehydration store.


    Faults identified as recoverable can be recovered.

  3. Select faults for recovery. As with fault recovery at the SOA Infrastructure level and BPEL process and Oracle Mediator service component levels, you can perform single fault recovery, bulk fault recovery, and recovery of all faults. See Step 3 of Section 8.4, "Recovering from SOA Composite Application Faults at the SOA Infrastructure Level" for instructions on selecting faults to perform these types of recovery.

  4. Select an action from the Recovery Action list.

    ActionDescriptionAction is Available for...

    Retry

    Retries the instance directly. An example of a scenario in which to use this recovery action is when the fault occurred because the service provider was not reachable due to a network error. The network error is now resolved.

    BPEL process and Oracle Mediator

    Abort

    Terminates the entire instance.

    BPEL process and Oracle Mediator

    Replay

    Replays the entire scope again in which the fault occurred.

    BPEL process

    Rethrow

    Rethrows the current fault. BPEL fault handlers (catch branches) are used to handle the fault. By default, all exceptions are caught by the fault management framework unless an explicit rethrow fault policy is provided.

    BPEL process

    Continue

    Ignores the fault and continues processing (marks the faulted activity as a success).

    BPEL process



    Note:

    In most cases, fault policy actions are automatically executed. The only exception is if you defined a fault policy that uses the action ora-human-intervention. This action creates a recoverable fault that can be recovered from Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control.


  5. If you want to delete rejected messages for the current SOA composite application, see Section 8.7, "Deleting Rejected Messages from the Application Home Page."

  6. If you want to perform a bulk recovery of messages, click Recover with Options.

    This displays the Recover with Options dialog for specifying criteria for recovering BPEL and Oracle Mediator messages of the current composite directly from the database. Human workflow messages can be recovered manually from Oracle BPM Worklist. Business event and business rule messages cannot be recovered.

    Description of soaapp_recovwithopts.gif follows
    Description of the illustration soaapp_recovwithopts.gif

  7. Specify criteria. Retry and Abort are the only recovery actions permitted.


    Note:

    For bulk fault recovery at the SOA composite application level, a check of the state of the composite is performed. If the state of the composite is set to off, a message is displayed warning you that a recovery cannot be performed.

    You are not notified when a fault has been skipped during recovery for any reason (for example, an unsupported service engine, an unrecoverable fault, and so on).


  8. Click Recover. Depending upon the number of messages, recovery can take some time.

  9. Perform the following additional monitoring tasks from within the faults table:

    1. From the View list, select Columns > Fault ID to display the fault IDs for each error message. The fault ID is automatically generated and uniquely identifies a fault. The fault ID is also displayed when you click an error message.

    2. In the Fault Location column, click a specific location to access the faults page for the location of the fault. The location can be a service, component, or reference.

    3. In the Component Instance ID column, click a specific service component ID to access task details about the instance (for example, the current state of a task). Rejected messages do not have a component instance ID.

    4. In the Logs column, click a specific log to access the Log Messages page with filtered messages specific to that instance.

For more information, see the following sections:

8.6 Deleting Rejected Messages at the SOA Infrastructure Level

You can delete rejected messages for all composites in the SOA Infrastructure directly from the database by specifying a criteria in the Delete: Rejected Messages dialog.

To delete rejected messages for all composites at the SOA Infrastructure level:

  1. Access this page through one of the following options:

    From the SOA Infrastructure Menu...From the SOA Folder in the Navigator...From the SOA Composite Menu...
    1. Select Home.

    1. Click soa-infra.

    1. Select SOA Infrastructure.


  2. Click the Faults and Rejected Messages tab.

    The Faults and Rejected Messages page displays the following details for all SOA composite application faults:

    • A utility for searching for a specific fault by specifying criteria and clicking Search. Click the Help icon for details.

    • Options for selecting instance recovery actions (for example, retry, abort, replay, and others), deleting rejected messages, and performing bulk message recovery.

    • Faults and rejected messages, including the error message, whether you can recover from the fault, the time of the fault, if the fault message is classified as a rejected message (if so, a checkmark is displayed), the SOA composite application in which the fault occurred, the fault location, the instance ID, and a link to log files describing the fault.

    Description of sca_faultandmanage.gif follows
    Description of the illustration sca_faultandmanage.gif

  3. Click Delete Rejected Messages.


    Note:

    Oracle recommends that you run the purge scripts to delete composite instances in production environments. The purge scripts have better performance and scalability. Only use the Delete Rejected Messages option to manage exceptions not covered by the purge scripts. For more information about the purge scripts, see Section 9.3, "Deleting Large Numbers of Instances with the Purge Scripts."


    This displays the Delete: Rejected Messages dialog for specifying criteria for deleting rejected messages of all the composites directly from the database.

    Description of bp_delrejmess.gif follows
    Description of the illustration bp_delrejmess.gif

  4. Specify criteria and click Delete.

For information about recovering from faults at the SOA Infrastructure level, see Section 8.4, "Recovering from SOA Composite Application Faults at the SOA Infrastructure Level."

8.7 Deleting Rejected Messages from the Application Home Page

You can delete rejected messages for the current SOA composite application directly from the database by specifying a criteria in the Delete: Rejected Messages dialog.

To delete rejected messages for the current SOA composite application:

  1. Access this page through one of the following options:

    From the SOA Infrastructure Menu...From the SOA Folder in the Navigator...
    1. Select Home.

    2. Select Deployed Composites.

    3. In the Composite section, select a specific SOA composite application.

    1. Under soa-infra, expand the partition.

    2. Select a specific SOA composite application.


  2. Click the Faults and Rejected Messages tab.

    The Faults and Rejected Messages page displays the following details for all SOA composite application faults:

    • A utility for searching for a specific fault by specifying criteria and clicking Search. Click the Help icon for details.

    • Options for selecting instance recovery actions (for example, retry, abort, replay, and others), deleting rejected messages, and performing bulk message recovery.

    • Faults and rejected messages, including the error message, whether you can recover from the fault, the time of the fault, if the fault message is classified as a rejected message (if so, a checkmark is displayed), the SOA composite application in which the fault occurred, the fault location, the instance ID, and a link to log files describing the fault.

    Description of sca_soaapp_search.gif follows
    Description of the illustration sca_soaapp_search.gif

  3. Click Delete Rejected Messages.


    Note:

    Oracle recommends that you run the purge scripts to delete composite instances in production environments. The purge scripts have better performance and scalability. Only use the Delete Rejected Messages option to manage exceptions not covered by the purge scripts. For more information about the purge scripts, see Section 9.3, "Deleting Large Numbers of Instances with the Purge Scripts."


    This displays the Delete: Rejected Messages dialog for specifying criteria for deleting rejected messages of the current composite directly from the database.

    Description of bp_delrejmess.gif follows
    Description of the illustration bp_delrejmess.gif

  4. Specify criteria and click Delete.

For information about recovering from faults in the SOA composite application home page, see Section 8.5, "Recovering from SOA Composite Application Faults in the Application Home Page."

PKPK}{@OEBPS/hwf_mon.htm Monitoring Human Workflow Service Components and Engines

21 Monitoring Human Workflow Service Components and Engines

This chapter describes how to monitor human task service components and the human workflow service engine, including monitoring workflow service component and service engine instances and faults, viewing task status, monitoring active requests and operation statistics, and monitoring deployed human workflows.

This chapter includes the following topics:

For more information, see the following sections:

21.1 Monitoring Recent Human Task Service Component Instances and Faults

You can monitor recent instances and faults for human task service components. Each service component in a SOA composite application has its own instance ID. These IDs are different from the overall instance ID of the SOA composite application of which each service component is a part.

To monitor human task service component instances and faults:

  1. Access this page through one of the following options:

    From the SOA Infrastructure Menu...From the SOA Folder in the Navigator...
    1. Select Home.

    2. Select the Deployed Composites tab.

    3. In the Composite section, select a specific SOA composite application.

    1. Under soa-infra, select a specific SOA composite application.


  2. Select the human task service component in the Component Metrics table.

    The upper part of the Dashboard page displays the following details:

    • Recent instances of the human task service component, including the instance ID of the service component, the state of the instance (for example, completed or running), the instance start time, the last modification time, and links to log files describing the instances.

    • Recent faults in the human task service component, including the error message, whether the fault is recoverable, the time at which the fault occurred, the instance ID of the human task service component, and links to log files describing the faults.

    Description of hwf_comp_dash_upper.gif follows
    Description of the illustration hwf_comp_dash_upper.gif

  3. In the Recent Instances section, perform the following tasks:

    1. In the Instance ID column, click an instance ID for a service component to monitor the current status of a task on which approval actions are being taken.

    2. In the Logs column, click a specific log to access the Log Messages page with filtered messages specific to that instance.

    3. Click Show All below the section to access the Instances page of the service component.

  4. In the Recent Faults section, perform the following tasks:

    1. In the Error Message column, click an error message to display complete information about the fault. If the fault is identified as recoverable, click the Recover Now link to perform fault recovery.

    2. In the Recovery column, click a fault identified as Recoverable to perform fault recovery at the component instance level.

    3. In the Logs column, click a specific log to access the Log Messages page with filtered messages specific to that instance.

    4. Click Show All below the section to access the Faults page of the service component.

    The lower part of the Dashboard page displays the following details:

    • A graphical representation of business outcomes.

    • Assignees that take the longest time to respond to and act upon tasks.

    • The number of successful, faulted, and instantiated instances processed per minute. Click Table View to display throughput details for the last five minutes, including the throughput for successful instances, the total faults throughput, and the instance throughput.

    • The notification channels used for task approval in the human task service component.

    Description of hwf_comp_dash_lower.gif follows
    Description of the illustration hwf_comp_dash_lower.gif

For more information, see Section 1.2.3, "Introduction to SOA Composite Application Instances" and Oracle Fusion Middleware Administrator's Guide for details about viewing and searching log files.

21.2 Viewing the Status of Human Workflow Tasks

You can monitor the current status of human workflow tasks being acted upon by participants.

To view the status of human workflow tasks:

  1. Access this page through one of the following options:

    From the SOA Infrastructure Menu...From the SOA Folder in the Navigator...
    1. Select Home.

    2. Select the Deployed Composites tab.

    3. In the Composite section, select a specific SOA composite application.

    1. Under soa-infra, select a specific SOA composite application.


  2. Select the human task service component in the Component Metrics table.

    The Dashboard page appears.

    Description of hwf_comp_dash_upper.gif follows
    Description of the illustration hwf_comp_dash_upper.gif

  3. In the Instance ID column, click an instance ID of a service component to monitor the current status of a task on which approval actions are being taken.

    The Task Details page displays the following details:

    • Task details about the selected service component instance ID (task number), including the current state (for example, assigned), task outcome (if completed), task priority, creation date, updated date, expiration date, and task assignee.

    • A flow of the current status of a task (for example, assigned or approved).

    Description of hwf_mon_taskdetails.gif follows
    Description of the illustration hwf_mon_taskdetails.gif

    As the task is acted upon by participants, the flow is updated.

    Description of hwf_mon_taskdetails2.gif follows
    Description of the illustration hwf_mon_taskdetails2.gif

  4. In the upper right-hand corner of the page, click Worklist Application to access the login page for Oracle BPM Worklist.

For more information, see Section 1.2.3, "Introduction to SOA Composite Application Instances."

21.3 Monitoring Human Task Service Component Instances

You can monitor human task service component instances. Each service component has its own unique instance ID. This ID is in addition to the instance ID of the overall SOA composite application of which this service component is a part.


Note:

Human workflow invocations from the BPEL service engine use different transactions than BPEL processes. Therefore, if a BPEL transaction is rolled back for any reason, the workflow task instances are still created.


To monitor human task service component instances:

  1. Access this page through one of the following options:

    From the SOA Infrastructure Menu...From the SOA Folder in the Navigator...
    1. Select Home.

    2. Select the Deployed Composites tab.

    3. In the Composite section, select a specific SOA composite application.

    1. Under soa-infra, select a specific SOA composite application.


  2. Select the human task service component in the Component Metrics table.

  3. Click Instances.

    The Instances page displays the following details:

    • A utility for searching for a specific human task service component instance by specifying criteria and clicking Search.

    • Instances, including the instance ID of the service component, the state of the instance (for example, completed successfully or faulted), the instance start time, the last modification time, and links to log files describing the instance.

    Description of hwf_comp_instances.gif follows
    Description of the illustration hwf_comp_instances.gif

  4. In the Instance ID column, click a specific ID for a service component to monitor the current status of a task on which approval actions are being taken.

  5. In the Logs column, click a specific log to access the Log Messages page with filtered messages specific to that instance.

For more information, see Section 1.2.3, "Introduction to SOA Composite Application Instances" and Oracle Fusion Middleware Administrator's Guide for details about viewing and searching log files.

21.4 Monitoring Human Workflow Service Engine Recent Instances and Faults

You can monitor instances and faults of all human task service component instances running in the human workflow service engine. These human task service components can be part of separate SOA composite applications.

To monitor human workflow service engine instances and faults:

  1. Access this page through one of the following options:

    From the SOA Infrastructure Menu...From the SOA Folder in the Navigator...
    1. Select Service Engines > Human Workflow.

    1. Right-click soa-infra.

    2. Select Service Engines > Human Workflow.


  2. Click Dashboard.

    The upper part of the Dashboard page displays the following details:

    • Recent instances of all human task service components running in the human workflow service engine, including the instance ID of the service component, the service component, the SOA composite application of which the service component is a part, the state of the instance (for example, completed, running, or faulted), the instance start time, and the last modification time.

    • Service components, including the service component name, SOA composite application, state of the service component, and total, running, and faulted instances.

    Description of hwf_se_dash_upper.gif follows
    Description of the illustration hwf_se_dash_upper.gif

  3. In the Recent Instances section, perform the following tasks:

    1. In the Instance ID column, click an instance ID for a service component to monitor the current status of a task on which approval actions are being taken.

    2. In the Component column, click a specific service component to access its home page.

    3. In the Composite column, click a specific SOA composite application to access its home page.

    4. In the Logs column, click a specific log to access the Log Messages page with filtered messages specific to that instance.

    5. Click Show All below the section to access the Instances page of the service engine.

  4. In the Components section, perform the following tasks:

    1. In the Name column, click a specific service component to access its home page.

    2. In the Composite columns, click a specific SOA composite application to access its home page.

    3. Click Show All below the section to access the Deployed Components page of the service engine.

    The lower part of the Dashboard page displays the following details:

    • Recent faults, including the error message, the time at which the fault occurred, the SOA composite application, the service component, and the service component instance ID.

    • Task assignees who take the longest time to act upon a task and who have the highest backlog of pending tasks to which to respond.

    Description of hwf_se_dash_lower.gif follows
    Description of the illustration hwf_se_dash_lower.gif

  5. In the Recent Faults section, perform the following additional tasks:

    1. In the Error Message column, click an error message to display complete information about the fault. If the fault is identified as recoverable, click the Recover Now link to perform fault recovery. Clicking this link invokes the human workflow audit trail page for the instance. The audit trail page has a link to Oracle BPM Worklist called Go to Worklist Application, where you can go to recover from the fault. This link does not take you directly to the fault; you must manually locate the fault.

    2. In the Recovery column, click a fault identified as Recoverable to perform fault recovery at the component instance level.

    3. In the Logs column, click a specific log to access the Log Messages page with filtered messages specific to that instance.

    4. Click Show All below the section to access the Faults page of the service engine.

21.5 Monitoring Human Workflow Service Engine Active Requests and Operation Statistics

You can view details about active requests in the human workflow service engine and operational statistics. such as service used, operations performed, and active and completed requests.

To monitor human workflow service engine active requests and operation statistics:

  1. Access this page through one of the following options:

    From the SOA Infrastructure Menu...From the SOA Folder in the Navigator...
    1. Select Service Engines > Human Workflow.

    1. Right-click soa-infra.

    2. Select Service Engines > Human Workflow.


  2. Click Statistics.

    The Statistics page displays the following details:

    • Active requests in the service engine. Use this graph to get an idea of the current service engine load. Only under extreme load conditions is there data shown in the graph. This is because most requests are processed instantaneously by the service engine. The data is collected by a Dynamic Monitoring Service (DMS) state sensor. Once the requests are processed by the service engine, the count goes to zero. This action enables you to know the current load on the service engine (for example, if it is too high).

    • Average request message processing time in the service engine since the last startup of the SOA Infrastructure. Use this graph to check service engine performance. While the processing time is calculated based on the last startup of the SOA Infrastructure, the data that is displayed in the graph is gathered only from the time at which you first accessed this page. The graph does not continue calculating and displaying data if you have not accessed this page. The DMS phase event sensor calculates the average request processing time and provides the processing time data.

    • Operation statistics about human workflow services used in the service engine, including the human workflow service used, the operation performed by the service, the number of active and completed requests, the count, and the average processing time.

    Description of hwf_se_stats.gif follows
    Description of the illustration hwf_se_stats.gif

    For more information, see the following documentation:

21.6 Monitoring Human Workflow Service Engine Instances

You can monitor all human task service component instances running in the service engine. These human task service components can be part of separate SOA composite applications.

To monitor human workflow service engine instances:

  1. Access this page through one of the following options:

    From the SOA Infrastructure Menu...From the SOA Folder in the Navigator...
    1. Select Service Engines > Human Workflow.

    1. Right-click soa-infra.

    2. Select Service Engines > Human Workflow.


  2. Click Instances.

    The Instances page displays the following details:

    • A utility for searching for a specific instance by specifying criteria and clicking Search.

    • Instances, including the instance ID of the service component, the service component, the SOA composite application of which the service component is a part, the state of the instance (for example, completed, running, or faulted), the instance start time, the last modification time, and links to log files that describe the instance.

    Description of hwf_se_instances.gif follows
    Description of the illustration hwf_se_instances.gif

  3. In the Instances section, perform the following additional tasks:

    1. In the Instance ID column, click an instance ID for a service component to monitor the current status of a task on which approval actions are being taken.

    2. In the Component column, click a specific service component to access its home page.

    3. In the Composite column, click a specific SOA composite application to access its home page.

    4. In the Logs column, click a specific log to access the Log Messages page with filtered messages specific to that instance.

For more information, see Section 1.2.3, "Introduction to SOA Composite Application Instances" and Oracle Fusion Middleware Administrator's Guide for details about viewing and searching log files.

21.7 Monitoring Deployed Human Workflows in the Service Engine

You can monitor all deployed SOA composite applications with human task service components running in the service engine.

To monitor deployed human workflows in service engines:

  1. Access this page through one of the following options:

    From the SOA Infrastructure Menu...From the SOA Folder in the Navigator...
    1. Select Service Engines > Human Workflow.

    1. Right-click soa-infra.

    2. Select Service Engines > Human Workflow.


  2. Click Deployed Components.

    The Deployed Components page displays the following details:

    • A utility for searching for a specific deployed SOA composite application by specifying the full name and clicking Search.

    • Details about deployed human task service components running in this service engine, including the service component name, the SOA composite application, the current status, and the number of total, faulted, and running instances.

    Description of hwf_se_deployedcomps1.gif follows
    Description of the illustration hwf_se_deployedcomps1.g}if

  3. In the Name column, click a specific service component to access its home page.

  4. In the Composite column, click a specific SOA composite application to access its home page.

PKvbC}PK}{@OEBPS/part_bam.htm8   Administering Oracle Business Activity Monitoring

Part IX

  Administering Oracle Business Activity Monitoring

This part describes how to administer Oracle Business Activity Monitoring.

This part includes the following chapters:

PKP=8PK}{@ OEBPS/toc.htm Table of Contents

Contents

Title and Copyright Information

Preface

What's New in This Guide for Release 11.1.1.6.x

Part I Introduction to Oracle SOA Suite and Oracle Business Process Management Suite

1 Introduction and Concepts

Part II Getting Started with Administration

2 Getting Started with Administering Oracle SOA Suite and Oracle BPM Suite

Part III Administering the SOA Infrastructure

3 Configuring the SOA Infrastructure

4 Monitoring the SOA Infrastructure

Part IV Administering SOA Composite Applications and Instances

5 Securing SOA Composite Applications

6 Monitoring SOA Composite Applications

7 Deploying and Managing SOA Composite Applications

8  Managing SOA Composite Application Instances

9 Managing Database Growth

10 Programmatically Managing SOA Composite Applications

11 Diagnosing Problems with SOA Composite Applications

Part V Administering BPEL Process Service Components and Engines

12 Configuring BPEL Process Service Components and Engines

13 Monitoring BPEL Process Service Components and Engines

14 Managing BPEL Process Service Components and Engines

Part VI Administering Oracle Mediator Service Components and Engines

15 Configuring Oracle Mediator Service Components and Engines

16 Monitoring Oracle Mediator Service Components and Engines

17 Managing Oracle Mediator Service Components and Engines

18 Managing Cross-References

Part VII Administering Decision Service Components and Business Rules Service Engines

19 Monitoring Decision Service Components and Engines

Part VIII  Administering Human Task Service Components and Human Workflow Service Engines

20 Configuring Human Workflow Service Components and Engines

21 Monitoring Human Workflow Service Components and Engines

22 Managing Human Workflow Service Components and Engines

Part IX   Administering Oracle Business Activity Monitoring

23 Configuring Oracle Business Activity Monitoring

24 Monitoring Oracle Business Activity Monitoring

25 Managing Oracle Business Activity Monitoring

Part X Administering Oracle User Messaging Service

26 Configuring Oracle User Messaging Service

27 Monitoring Oracle User Messaging Service

28 Managing Oracle User Messaging Service

Part XI Administering Oracle JCA Adapters

29 Configuring Oracle JCA Adapters

30 Monitoring Oracle JCA Adapters

Part XII Administering Oracle B2B

31 Configuring Oracle B2B

32 Monitoring Oracle B2B

Part XIII Administering Business Events

33 Managing Business Events

Part XIV Administering Binding Components

34 Configuring Service and Reference Binding Components

35 Monitoring Service and Reference Binding Components

36 Managing Service and Reference Binding Components

Part XV Administering Oracle BPMN Process Service Components and Engines

37 Configuring Oracle BPMN Process Service Components and Engines

38 Monitoring BPMN Process Service Components and Engines

39 Managing Oracle BPMN Service Components and Engines

Part XVI Appendixes

A Demo User Community

B Troubleshooting Oracle SOA Suite and Oracle BPM Suite

C Oracle Enterprise Manager Roles

Index

PK. JJPK}{@OEBPS/img_text/bam_web_home.htm Description of the illustration bam_web_home.gif

The image shows the Oracle BAM Web application home page in Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control Console. The left side of the page shows the navigation pane. The right side of the page shows Oracle BAM Report Server statistics.

PK\PK}{@%OEBPS/img_text/sca_faultandmanage.htm{ Description of the illustration sca_faultandmanage.gif

The image shows four tabs at the top from left to right: Dashboard, Deployed Composites, Instances, and Faults and Rejected Messages (selected). Below this is the Search section, with fields for Error Message Contains, Fault ID, Name, Fault Time From, Fault Time To, Composite Instance ID, and Composite Name. Search and Reset buttons appear on the right side of the page.

Below this is the Show only re cove able faults checkbox and the Fault Types list. All Faults is selected in this list.

Below this are the Select list, View list, Recovery Actions list, and Delete Rejected Messages button. Below this is a table with the following columns: Error Message, Recovery, Fault Time, Composite, Fault Location, Composite Instance ID, and Logs.

PK;PK}{@ OEBPS/img_text/bc_properties.htmw Description of the illustration bc_properties.gif

The image shows the web service page displaying the following tabs: Dashboard, Policies, Faults and Rejected Messages, and Properties. The Properties tab is selected and shows the following fields: REST Enabled, WSDL Enabled, Metadata Exchange Enabled, Endpoint Test Enabled, Logging Level, Schema Validation, Atomic Transaction Version, Atomic Transaction Flow Option, Maximum Request Size, and Unit of Maximum Request Size. The Apply and Revert buttons appear at the top right of the tab.

PKr2|wPK}{@ OEBPS/img_text/sca_logconfig.htmy Description of the illustration sca_logconfig.gif

The image shows the Logs Levels page. There are two tabs that display at the top from left to right: Log levels (selected) and Log Files. Below this is a description of what you can accomplish on this page. Below this is a View list, with Runtime Loggers selected. Below this is a Search list with All Categories selected. Below this is a table with the following columns from left to right: Logger Name, Oracle Diagnostic Logging Level (Java Level), Log File, and Persistent Log Level State.

PK~yPK}{@ OEBPS/img_text/bpel_foreach1.htm= Description of the illustration bpel_foreach1.gif

This image shows an audit trail with an if condition.

PKz@PK}{@OEBPS/img_text/sca_policy.htmc Description of the illustration sca_policy.gif

The image shows the following buttons at the top from left to right: Active, Retire, Shut Down, Test, and Settings. Below this are four tabs from left to right: Dashboard, Instances, Faults and Rejected Messages, Unit Tests, and Policies (selected). Below this are the View list and Attach/Detach To list. Below this is a table with the following columns from left to right: Policy Name, Attached To, Policy Reference Status, Category, Total Violations, and Authentication.

PKhXhcPK}{@ OEBPS/img_text/bpmn_instance.htm Description of the illustration bpmn_instance.png

This graphic shows an instance page. There are three tabs: Audit trail, Flow, and Faults. The Audit Trail page is selected. It contains the following columns: Activity, Loop Count Event, Date, and Copy. These columns are explained in the text.

PKdS=PK}{@'OEBPS/img_text/busevent_subscribers.htm| Description of the illustration busevent_subscribers.gif

The image shows the Subscriptions page. The following tabs appear at the top from left to right: Events, Subscriptions (selected), and Faults. Below this is the Search section, with fields for Subscription Type, Event Namespace, Event Name, Subscriber, Consistency Level, and XPath Filter. The Search and Reset buttons display on the right. Below this is the Database Subscriptions section. This section includes the View drop-down list, Create Database Agent icon, Edit Database Agent icon, Delete Database Agent icon, and Manage Database Agents button.

Below this is a table with the following columns from left to right: Event Name, Namespace, Subscription - Database Agent, XPath Filter, Consistency Level, and Failed Deliveries. Below this is the Component Subscriptions section. This section includes a View drop-down list and a table with the following columns from left to right: Event Name, Namespace, Subscription Component, Composite, XPath Filter, Consistency Level, and Failed Deliveries.

PK PK}{@$OEBPS/img_text/sca_deployedcomps.htm\ Description of the illustration sca_deployedcomps.gif

The image shows four tabs at the top from left to right: Dashboard, Deployed Composites (selected), Instances, and Faults and Rejected Messages. Below this is the Search field. Search and Reset buttons appear on the right side of the page. Below this are the View, Start Up, Activate, Set As Default, Deploy, Undeploy, and Redeploy buttons. Below this is a table with the following columns: Composite, Partition, Status, Mode, Instances, Faults, and Deployed.

PK."a\PK}{@'OEBPS/img_text/bam_admin_menu_mbean.htmw Description of the illustration bam_admin_menu_mbean.gif

The image shows the BAM Server menu with the following menu items: Home, Monitoring, Control, Logs, BAM Server Properties, Security, System MBean Browser, and General Information. The System MBean Browser menu item is selected.

PK|wPK}{@OEBPS/img_text/hwf_ums.htmv Description of the illustration hwf_ums.gif

The image shows the Email Driver Properties page. In the upper left section is the Common Configuration section, which includes a Supported Delivery Types label, Capability label, Cost drop-down list, Speed drop-down list, Sender Addresses field, and Default Sender Address field. To the right are the Supported Protocols field, Supported Carriers field, Supported Content Types label, Supported Status Types label, and Sending Queues Info label.

Below this section is the Driver-Specific Configuration section, which includes a table with the following columns from left to right: Name, Description, Mandatory, Encoded Credential, and Value. Two properties that you can set in the Value column are displaying in the Name column: MailAccessProtocol and RetryLimit.

PKFPK}{@&OEBPS/img_text/bam_wls_connpoolnew.htmT Description of the illustration bam_wls_connpoolnew.gif

The image shows the Outbound Connection Groups with the oracle.bam.adapter.adc.soap.SOAPConnectionFactory radio button selected. The Back, Next, Finish, and Cancel buttons appear at the bottom.

PKxYTPK}{@&OEBPS/img_text/bam_config_web_menu.htme Description of the illustration bam_config_web_menu.gif

The images shows the BAM Web drop-down menu for the Oracle BAM Web Properties page in Fusion Middleware Control. The following menu items are available: Home, Monitoring, Control, Logs, BAM Web Properties (selected), System MBean Browser, and General Information.

PKvMPK}{@OEBPS/img_text/em_test.htm4 Description of the illustration em_test.gif

This figure displays how to invoke a test instance of the composite.

PKm`pPK}{@ OEBPS/img_text/bam_log_files.htm4 Description of the illustration bam_log_files.gif

The image shows the Log Files page showing the available logs for Oracle BAM as a table with the following columns: Name, Directory, Log Type, Last Modified, and Size.

PK94PK}{@OEBPS/img_text/ns_wsadmin.htm Description of the illustration ns_wsadmin.gif

This image shows the Port Name section in the lower right corner of the page. The specific port name has been selected from the list of ports.

PKt>vPK}{@OEBPS/img_text/ns_up.htm0 Description of the illustration ns_up.gif

The image shows the User Messaging Preferences screen displaying the following tabs: Messaging Channels and Messaging Filters. The Messaging Filters tab is selected. The first area of the tab shows the following fields: Filter Name and Description. The second area of the tab shows the Condition as a table with the following columns: Attribute, Operator, Value, Value2 (if required), and Delete.

The third area of the tab shows the Action as a table with the following columns: Channel, Address, Up, Down, and Delete. The OK and Cancel buttons appear at the top right of the tab.

PKWgPK}{@OEBPS/img_text/ns_geninfo.htmR Description of the illustration ns_geninfo.gif

The image shows the General Information dialog box displaying the following fields: Target Name, Version, Oracle Home, and Host. The OK and Cancel buttons appear at the bottom right of the dialog box.

PK[WRPK}{@&OEBPS/img_text/med_reseq_instances.htm Description of the illustration med_reseq_instances.gif

This image shows the Instances page for a Mediator Component with resequenced messages displayed.

PK PK}{@OEBPS/img_text/bam_ums_nav.htmZ Description of the illustration bam_ums_nav.gif

The image shows the Farm_base_domain node expanded to show the following nodes: Application Deployments, SOA, WebLogic Domain, BAM, Metadata Repositories, and User Messaging Service. The User Messaging Service node is expanded and the usermessagingdriver-email sub-node is selected.

PKp,PK}{@OEBPS/img_text/b2b_mon4.htm Description of the illustration b2b_mon4.gif

The image shows the Dashboard page for the B2B_Send_ebMS_PO (B2B) reference binding component. The following areas are displayed: Instances and Faults, which is a graph showing time on the x-axis (12:59 PM through 01:19) and number of messages on the y-axis (0 through 40); Top 5 Recently Active Trading Partners; and Recent Faults. The fields in these areas are described in the surrounding text.

PKS}/PK}{@ OEBPS/img_text/soainfra_apps.htmX Description of the illustration soainfra_apps.gif

The image shows four tabs at the top from left to right: Dashboard, Deployed Composites, Instances, and Faults and Rejected Messages. Below this is the Search field. Search and Reset buttons appear on the right side of the page. Below this are the View, Start Up, Activate, Set As Default, Deploy, Undeploy, and Redeploy buttons. Below this is a table with the following columns: Composite, Partition, Status, Mode, Instances, Faulted Instances, and Deployed.

PKR|>,]XPK}{@%OEBPS/img_text/bam_dist_list_edit.htm, Description of the illustration bam_dist_list_edit.gif

The image shows the Oracle BAM Administrator Distribution List management page. The left side of the page shows a list of Distribution Lists. The right side of the page shows the distribution list information for myDistList including the Distribution List Name, Distribution List Members, and Last Modified date and time.

PK~PK}{@,OEBPS/img_text/bam_admin_object_reassign.htm? Description of the illustration bam_admin_object_reassign.gif

The image shows the Oracle BAM Administrator displaying example user information, and the mouse is positioned over the Reassign Ownership link at the top of the page.

PK.D?PK}{@)OEBPS/img_text/bam_wls_connpoolexpand.htmN Description of the illustration bam_wls_connpoolexpand.gif

The image shows the Outbound Connection Pool Configuration Table and the oracle.bam.adapter.adc.soap.SOAPConnectionFactory. The New and Delete buttons appear above and below the table.

PK6SNPK}{@OEBPS/img_text/sca_services.htmK Description of the illustration sca_services.gif

The image shows the two tabs at the top from left to right: Services (selected) and References. Below this is a View list. Below this is a table consisting of the following columns from left to right: Service, Type, Composite, Partition, Total Messages, Average Processing Time (sec), and Faults.

PK]WPK}{@ OEBPS/img_text/bp_delrejmess.htmS Description of the illustration bp_delrejmess.gif

The image shows the Delete: Rejected Messages dialog. Below this is a description of the page. Below this is the Common Delete Options radio button (selected). Below this is the Preset Batches list, with a value of Older than 24 Hours selected. Below this is the Delete All radio button. This deletes all rejected messages of this composite.

Below this is a Delete All Rejected Messages That Match These Criteria radio button. Below this are fields for Start Time From and Start Time To. In the lower right are Delete and Cancel buttons.

PKPK}{@+OEBPS/img_text/soaadmin_createpartition.htm" Description of the illustration soaadmin_createpartition.gif

This image shows the Create New SOA Partition dialog. The Name field is displayed. Help, Create, and Cancel buttons display at the bottom.

PK|!]'"PK}{@ OEBPS/img_text/med_resq_grp3.htm- Description of the illustration med_resq_grp3.gif

This image shows a fault message for an Oracle Mediator component with resequenced messages. In this case, the resequencer group is faulted with a system error.

PKA2-PK}{@#OEBPS/img_text/soaapp_instance2.htm Description of the illustration soaapp_instance2.gif

The image shows the following tabs from left to right: Dashboard, Instances (selected), Faults and Rejected Messages, Unit Tests, and Policies. Below this is a Search section, with fields for Instance ID, Name, Conversation ID, Start Time From, Start Time To, CustomerDetails, NameSensor, Datesensor, and Yearsensor. Search and Reset buttons and the Add Fields list appear on the right.

PKPK}{@OEBPS/img_text/ns_fourteen.htm Description of the illustration ns_fourteen.gif

The image shows the Performance Summary for the usermessagingserver as a graph. The Show Metric Palette button appears above the graph.

PK!4PK}{@"OEBPS/img_text/bam_start_login.htmv Description of the illustration bam_start_login.gif

The image shows the Oracle BAM start page with login fields displayed. In the Sign In box there are two fields: User name and Password. A Go button is located to the right of the Password field for submitting the credentials to the Oracle BAM Server.

PK"hePK}{@#OEBPS/img_text/rules1_comp_dash.htm Description of the illustration rules1_comp_dash.gif

The image shows the OracleRules1 (Decision Service Component) page which displays the following tabs: Dashboard, Instances, Faults and Policies. The Dashboard tab is selected. The first section of the page shows the Recent Instances as a table with the following columns: Instance ID, State, Start Date, Last Modified Date, and Logs. The second section of the page shows the Recent Faults as a table with the following columns: Error Message, Fault Time, Component Instance ID, and Logs.

The final section of the page shows the Instance Rate per Min (Real-Time Data). The top right of the page shows the Related Links drop-down menu.

PK.h;PK}{@*OEBPS/img_text/bam_admin_menu_distlist.htmK Description of the illustration bam_admin_menu_distlist.gif

The image shows the Oracle BAM Administrator function drop-down list displaying the following items: User management, Roles management, and Distribution List management (selected).

PKYPKPK}{@$OEBPS/img_text/med_comphome_inst.htmZ Description of the illustration med_comphome_inst.gif

The image shows the Instances tab of the Mediator Component Home page. The Search section lets you enter the following details to search for particular Mediator instances: Instance ID, Start Time From, Start Time To, Modified Date From, Modified Date To, and State. The View section displays the following information for the instances meeting the specified criteria, from left to right: Instance ID, State, Start Date, Last Modified Date, Source, and Logs.

PK_ZPK}{@ OEBPS/img_text/sca_deployapp.htm  Description of the illustration sca_deployapp.gif

The image shows the deployed Java EE applications under the Application Deployments folder. The Internal Applications and Resource Adapters subfolders have also been expanded. Internal Applications displays the components such as Oracle B2B. Resource Adapters displays the JCA Adapters. Other applications such as worklistapp display at the top level Application Deployments folder.

PKkQ PK}{@OEBPS/img_text/soaag001.htm Description of the illustration soaag001.eps

The image shows the organizational hierarchy of the demo users. The image is described in the table immediately above the image.

PKM=s PK}{@OEBPS/img_text/ns_fifteen.htm Description of the illustration ns_fifteen.gif

The image shows the Metrics Palette expanded to show the options for the usermessagingserver.

PKWbPK}{@*OEBPS/img_text/soaadmin_hwf_notifprops.htm Description of the illustration soaadmin_hwf_notifprops.gif

The image shows the Workflow Notification Properties screen. The first area of the screen shows the Notification Mode drop-down list with NONE chosen. The second area of the screen shows the Notification Service with the following fields: Email From Address, Email Actionable Address, and Email Reply To Address. The Apply and Revert buttons appear at the top right of the screen.

PK}t6PK}{@-OEBPS/img_text/wlconsole_providers_create.htmy Description of the illustration wlconsole_providers_create.gif

The image shows the Create a New Authentication Provider page. The first area of the page. The first area shows the Name field. The second area shows the Type drop-down list. Above and below the two fields are the OK and Cancel buttons.

PK8^PK}{@OEBPS/img_text/b2b_console.htmL Description of the illustration b2b_console.gif

The image shows the B2B Infrastructure (SOA Binding) page, with a drop-down list of Related Links. The links are SOA Infra Home, B2B Server Properties, B2B Console, and WebLogic Server Console.

PK`QLPK}{@OEBPS/img_text/ns_dep1.htmI Description of the illustration ns_dep1.gif

The image shows the Oracle Enterprise Manager Select Archive screen. The first area of the screen shows the Archive and Exploded Directory settings with the following radio button selected: Archive or exploded directory is on the server where Enterprise Manager is running. The second area of the screen shows the Deployment Plan settings with the following radio button selected: Deployment plan is on the server where Enterprise Manager is running.

PKrfNIPK}{@'OEBPS/img_text/bpmn_dashboard_upper.htm Description of the illustration bpmn_dashboard_upper.gif

The upper half of the Dashboard page. This illustration is described in the text.

PKBwxPK}{@ OEBPS/img_text/bpel_comp_sen.htm9 Description of the illustration bpel_comp_sen.gif

The image shows the Sensor Values page. At the top are the following tabs from left to right: Audit Trail, Flow, Sensor Values (selected), and Faults. Below this is the Activity Sensors section, which includes a table with the following columns from left to right: Sensor and Activity. Below this is the Variable Sensors section, which includes a table with the following columns from left to right: Sensor and Variable.

Below this is the Fault Sensors section, which includes a table with the following columns from left to right: Sensor and Fault. Below this is the Sensor Values section, which includes a table with the following columns from left to right: Sensor and Value.

PKD][>9PK}{@$OEBPS/img_text/hwf_comp_policies.htmz Description of the illustration hwf_comp_policies.gif

The image shows the Policies page. At the top are the following tabs from left to right: Dashboard, Instances, Faults, Policies (selected), and Administration. Below this is the View drop-down list and Attach/Detach button. Below this is a table with the following columns from left to right: Policy Name, Policy Reference Status, Category, Total Violations, Authentication, Authorization, and Confidentiality. These last three columns are part of a larger column header entitled Security Violations.

PKZԊPK}{@*OEBPS/img_text/bam_wls_connpoolnewjndi.htm Description of the illustration bam_wls_connpoolnewjndi.gif

The image shows the JNDI Name field. The Back, Next, Finish, and Cancel buttons appear at the bottom.

PK\PK}{@&OEBPS/img_text/bam_log_menu_config.htm, Description of the illustration bam_log_menu_config.gif

The image shows the context menu for the OracleBamWeb node. The following menu items are available: Home, Monitoring, Control, Logs, BAM Web Properties, System MBean Browser, and General Information. The Logs menu item is expanded to show the following sub-menu items: View Log Messages and Log Configuration (selected).

PK#3PK}{@$OEBPS/img_text/med_comphome_pol1.htm Description of the illustration med_comphome_pol1.gif

The image shows the Policies tab of the Mediator Component Home page. You can view the following details of the policies associated with a Mediator component, from left to right: Policy Name, Policy Reference Status, Category, Authentication, Security Violations, and Integrity.

You can also attach or detach policies from this page by clicking Attach/Detach to the right of the View menu.

PK!PK}{@OEBPS/img_text/bam_startup.htmF Description of the illustration bam_startup.gif

The image shows Oracle BAM Server context menu showing the following menu items: Home, Monitoring, Control, Logs, BAM Server Properties, Security, System MBean Browser, and General Information. The Control menu item is expanded and shows the following sub-menu items: Start Up and Shut Down (selected).

PKLPK}{@!OEBPS/img_text/sca_deployapp2.htmI Description of the illustration sca_deployapp2.gif

The image shows a deployed Java EE application. The Summary section appears in the upper left section. Below this is the General section with details about the state and the location of the deployment. Below this is the Servlets and JSPs section with details about active sessions, request processing times, and requests per minute. Below this is the Work Manager section with details about requests per minute and pending requests. Below this is the Entry Points section. This section includes subsections about Web Modules and Web Services.

The Web Modules section includes columns for Name and Test Point. The Web Services section includes columns for Service Name, Port, and Test. In the upper right part of the page is the Modules section, which includes details about Module Name and Module Type. Below this is the Response and Load section, which includes a graph describing request processing times (in milliseconds) and requests per minute.

PK,ýNIPK}{@#OEBPS/img_text/sca_createwatch3.htm$ Description of the illustration sca_createwatch3.gif

This image shows the Watches and Notifications tabs at the top. The watches tab is selected. Below this is the Customize this table section. Below this is the title Watches. Below this are the New and Delete buttons. Below this is a table with the following columns: Name, Type, Enabled, and Alarm Type. This table lists all the currently-defined watches. Below this table are the New and Delete buttons.

PKY)$PK}{@&OEBPS/img_text/rules1_engine_stats.htm4 Description of the illustration rules1_engine_stats.gif

The image shows the Business Rules Engine page which displays the following tabs: Dashboard, Statistics, Instances, Faults, and Deployed Components. The Statistics tab is selected. The first section of the page shows the Average Request Processing Time as a graph. The second section of the page shows the Business Rules Cache Statistics as a table with the following columns: Cache Name, Object Count, and Object Access Count.

The third section of the page shows the Business Rules Operation Statistics as a table with the following columns: Operation Name, Count, and Average (in milliseconds). The Related Links drop-down menu appears at the top right of the page.

PK|94PK}{@(OEBPS/img_text/odsm_select_group_tab.htms Description of the illustration odsm_select_group_tab.gif

The image shows the information screen for a group, and includes the Group, Attributes, Subtree Access, and Local Access tabs. The Group tab is selected. The first area of the screen shows the following non-editable fields: Distinguished Name, Created by, Created at, Modified by, and Modified at. The Group tab shows the following fields: Owner, Description, and Members. Each field shows plus and minus buttons. At the top right of the screen are the Apply and Revert buttons.

PKwbxsPK}{@ OEBPS/img_text/med_resq_grp4.htm Description of the illustration med_resq_grp4.gif

This image shows the Mediator Resequencing Group dialog, which indicates the status of the group.

PK3IPK}{@%OEBPS/img_text/bpel_dashboard_low.htm= Description of the illustration bpel_dashboard_low.gif

The image shows the Dashboard page of the BPEL service engine. The following tabs display at the top from left to right: Dashboard (selected), Statistics, Instances, Faults, Deployed Components, and Recovery. Below this and to the right is the Recent Instances and Faults for the last 10 minutes.

Below this is the Components section, which includes a table with the following columns from left to right: Name, Composite, Status, Total Instances, Running Instances, and Faulted Instances - Non Recoverable).

Below this is the Recent Faults section.

PK*PK}{@!OEBPS/img_text/bp_compsensor1.htm< Description of the illustration bp_compsensor1.gif

The image shows the Flow Trace page. Below this is the Faults section (currently closed). Below this is the Sensors section, which includes a table that consists of the following columns from left to right: Composite Instances, Name, Value, Location, and Action. Below this is the Trace section, which includes a table that consists of the following columns from left to right: Instance, Type, State, Time, and Composite Instance.

PKG A<PK}{@$OEBPS/img_text/soaapp_dash_upper.htm& Description of the illustration soaapp_dash_upper.gif

The image shows the following buttons at the top from left to right: Active, Retire, Shut Down, Test, and Settings. Below this are the following tabs from left to right: Dashboard, Instances, Faults and Rejected Messages, Unit Tests, and Policies.

Below this and to the right is the Recent Instances and Faults for the last 10 minutes message. Below this is the Recent Instances section. which includes a Show Only Running Instances checkbox, and a table consisting of the following columns from left to right: Instance ID, Name, Conversation ID, State, and Start Time.

Below this is the Recent Faults and Rejected Messages section, which includes a Show only system faults checkbox, and a table with the following columns from left to right: Error Message, Recovery, Fault Time, Fault Location, Composite Instance ID, and Logs.

PK~"PK}{@OEBPS/img_text/bc_pubuddi.htm* Description of the illustration bc_pubuddi.gif

This image shows the Services tab (selected) and the References tab. Below this are the Actions list and View list. The Publish To UDDI option is being selected from the Actions list. Below this is a table with the following columns from left to right: name, Type, Composite, Partition, Total Messages, and Average Processing Time.

PK\dPK}{@#OEBPS/img_text/bam_server_eetab.htmG Description of the illustration bam_server_eetab.gif

The image shows the Oracle BAM Server page displaying the following tabs: Active Data Cache, Event Engine, Report Cache, and Enterprise Message Sources. The Event Engine tab is selected and the page shows the following information: General, Rule Fire Rate Per Second, and Processing Queues Sizes.

PK%,HPK}{@!OEBPS/img_text/sca_sensordis3.htm1 Description of the illustration sca_sensordis3.gif

This image is described in the text immediately above the image.

PK3tPK}{@!OEBPS/img_text/med_rout_stats.htm" Description of the illustration med_rout_stats.gif

The image shows the Routing Statistics section of the Dashboard tab of the Mediator Component Home page. It displays the following data: Number of Successfully Processed Messages, Number of Faulted Messages, Number of Incoming Messages, Average Processing Time for Successful Messages, and Average Processing Time for Faulted Messages.

PKCPK}{@!OEBPS/img_text/soaapp_policy3.htmX Description of the illustration soaapp_policy3.gif

The image shows the OK, Validate, and Cancel buttons in the upper right corner. Below this is the Attached Policies table, with the following columns left to right: Policy Name, Category, Enabled, Description, and View Full Description. The attached policies display in this table.

PK^PK}{@OEBPS/img_text/entirecomp.htm+ Description of the illustration entirecomp.gif

The image shows a graphical representation of a SOA composite application.

PK-PK}{@!OEBPS/img_text/bpmn_instances.htmF Description of the illustration bpmn_instances.gif

This illustration is described in the text.

PKM}XPK}{@"OEBPS/img_text/em_audit_level3.htm+ Description of the illustration em_audit_level3.gif

This figure displays how to set the audit levels for a SOA composite.

PK v{PK}{@OEBPS/img_text/ns_logme.htm) Description of the illustration ns_logme.gif

The image shows the Log Messages screen for usermessagingdriver-xmpp. The first area of the screen shows the Search settings including the following fields: Date Range, Time Interval (Start Date, End Date, Start Time, End Time), Message Types (Incident Error, Error, Warning, Notification, Trace, and Unknown), and Maximum Rows Displayed. The first area also shows the Search and Add Fields buttons.

The second area of the screen shows the log messages as a table with the following columns: Incident Errors, Errors, Warnings, Notifications, Traces, Unknowns, and Log File. The Broaden Target Scope drop-down menu and Log Files button appear at the top of the screen.

PKOۃu.)PK}{@ OEBPS/img_text/sca_unittest3.htmW Description of the illustration sca_unittest3.gif

The image shows the Assertion details for Simple Assertions section. The Show failure only checkbox appears. Below this is a table with the following columns from left to right: Composite Instance, Location, Type, Status, Expected Value, Actual Value, Description, and Error Message.

PKtI}PK}{@*OEBPS/img_text/odsm_select_dnpath_user.htmx Description of the illustration odsm_select_dnpath_user.gif

The image shows the Select Distinguished Name (DN) Path dialog box. The dialog box shows an expanded hierarchy of distinguished names with the cn=Users entry selected. At the bottom right of the dialog box are the Select and Cancel buttons.

PK,PK}{@'OEBPS/img_text/hwf_comp_instanceids.htm\ Description of the illustration hwf_comp_instanceids.gif

The image shows a human workflow component. At the top are the following tabs from left to right: Dashboard, Instances, Faults, Policies, and Administration. Below this is a Search section, with fields for Instance ID, Start Time From, Start Time To, Modified Date From, and Modified Date To. A State list also appears.

Below this is a table with the following columns from left to right: Instance ID, State, Start Date, Last Modified Date, and Logs.

PK\7a\PK}{@%OEBPS/img_text/med_reseq_inst_det.htm Description of the illustration med_reseq_inst_det.gif

This image shows the Faults page for an Oracle Mediator component instance with resequenced messages.

PK)PK}{@&OEBPS/img_text/soaadmin_deployment.htm6 Description of the illustration soaadmin_deployment.gif

This image is described in the text immediately above.

PK 7=PK}{@$OEBPS/img_text/hwf_se_dash_upper.htm/ Description of the illustration hwf_se_dash_upper.gif

The image shows the Dashboard page. The following tabs display at the top from left to right: Dashboard (selected), Statistics, Instances, Faults, Deployed Components, and Notification Management. Below this is the Recent Instances section, which includes a Show Only Running Instances checkbox, and a table with the following columns from left to right: Instance ID, Component, Composite, State, Start Date, Last Modified Date, and Logs.

Below this is the Components section, which includes a table with the following columns from left to right: Name, Composite, Status, Total Instances, Running Instances, and Faulted Instances - Recoverable and Non Recoverable.

PK4/PK}{@!OEBPS/img_text/sca_sensordis8.htm1 Description of the illustration sca_sensordis8.gif

This image is described in the text immediately above the image.

PK:PK}{@'OEBPS/img_text/bam_wls_connpoolprop.htm; Description of the illustration bam_wls_connpoolprop.gif

The image shows the Settings for oracle.bam.adapter.adc.soap.SOAPConnectionFactory page displaying the following tabs: General, Properties, Transaction, Authentication, Connection Pool, and Logging. The Properties tab is selected and the page shows the Outbound Connection Properties as a table with the following columns: Property Name, Property Type, and Property Value. The Save button appears above and below the table.

PK8@;PK}{@OEBPS/img_text/bam_em_nav.htm Description of the illustration bam_em_nav.gif

The image shows Oracle BAM nodes in the BAM folder in the Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control navigation tree.

PK' PK}{@)OEBPS/img_text/bam_wls_credmap_locate.htm Description of the illustration bam_wls_credmap_locate.gif

The image shows the Credential Mappings tab selected in the Settings for OracleBamAdapter page.

PK\`PK}{@"OEBPS/img_text/med_flow_faults.htm Description of the illustration med_flow_faults.gif

The image shows detailed information for a non-recoverable fault on the Instance Details page for a Mediator service component.

PKg,PK}{@"OEBPS/img_text/med_srveng_stat.htmc Description of the illustration med_srveng_stat.gif

The image shows the Request Breakdown section of the Statistics tab of the Mediator Component Home page. You can click the Help icon on the top right corner of the section to know more details about this section.

PK4hcPK}{@*OEBPS/img_text/bpel_activity_time_dist.htm< Description of the illustration bpel_activity_time_dist.gif

This image shows the Activity Time Distribution table, which includes, from left to right, the Name column, Count column, and the Average Execution Time (ms) column.

PK6G`A<PK}{@!OEBPS/img_text/bp_compsensor3.htmI Description of the illustration bp_compsensor3.gif

The image shows the Flow Trace page. The Faults section includes a table that consists of the following columns from left to right: Error Message, Recovery, Fault Time, Fault Location, and Composite Instance.

Below this is the Sensors section (currently closed). Below this is the Trace section, which includes a table that consists of the following columns from left to right: Instance, Type, Usage, State, Time, and Composite Instance.

PKӭNIPK}{@$OEBPS/img_text/hwf_se_dash_lower.htmQ Description of the illustration hwf_se_dash_lower.gif

The image shows the Recent Faults section, which includes a Show only system faults checkbox, and a table with the following columns from left to right: Error Message, Recovery, Fault Time, Composite, Component, Component Instance ID, and Logs.

Below this is the Users with Highest Backlog section, which includes a table with the following columns from left to right: Assignee, Average Time on Task (hour), Mean Deviation, and Pending Tasks.

PK4\VQPK}{@OEBPS/img_text/rules1_logs4.htm Description of the illustration rules1_logs4.gif

The image shows the Log Configuration page displaying the following tabs: Log Levels and Log Files. The Log Levels tab is selected. The page shows the Runtime Loggers as a table with the following columns: Logger Name, Oracle Diagnostic Logging Level (Java Level), and Log File. The Apply and Revert buttons appear at the top right of the page.

PKW &PK}{@&OEBPS/img_text/soaadmin_partition3.htmQ Description of the illustration soaadmin_partition3.gif

This image shows the home page of a partition. The Composite Control and Deployment lists appear at the top. In the upper right is the Search field. Below this is a table with the following columns: Composite, Status, Mode, Instances Total, Instances Faulted, and Last Modified Date.

PKFγPK}{@)OEBPS/img_text/bam_wls_credmap_select.htm Description of the illustration bam_wls_credmap_select.gif

The image shows the eis/bam/rmi instance selected in the Outbound Connection Pool list.

PKPK}{@)OEBPS/img_text/rules1_engine_instance.htm6 Description of the illustration rules1_engine_instance.gif

The image shows the Business Rules Engine page which displays the following tabs: Dashboard, Statistics, Instances, Faults, and Deployed Components. The Instances tab is selected. The first section of the page shows the Search settings and includes the following fields: Instance ID, Start Time From, Start Time To, Modified Date From, Modified Date To, and State (a drop-down list). The first section also shows the Search and Reset buttons.

The second section of the page shows the search results as a table with the following columns: Instance ID, Component, Composite, State, and Start Date. The Related Links drop-down menu appears at the top right of the page.

PK };6PK}{@&OEBPS/img_text/soaadmin_partition4.htm Description of the illustration soaadmin_partition4.gif

This image shows the Manage Partitions page. A Search field is displayed in the upper right corner. Below this are the View list, Create Partitions button, Delete Partitions button, Composite Control list, and Deployment list.

Below this is a table with the following columns from left to right: SOA Partition, Active, Composites Retired, View, Instances Total, and Instances Faulted.

PKjz0PK}{@*OEBPS/img_text/bam_admin_object_select.htm Description of the illustration bam_admin_object_select.gif

The image shows the Select Names dialog opened to display a list of the Oracle BAM users to whom the objects can be assigned.

PK^ PK}{@"OEBPS/img_text/soaadmin_fetch7.html Description of the illustration soaadmin_fetch7.gif

This image shows the Number of Instances message. The Composite Name field displays the SOA composite application name and revision. The Number of Instances field shows displays the number of instances. The Recalculate button appears in the lower right corner.

PK'PK}{@OEBPS/img_text/hwf_se_stats.htmh Description of the illustration hwf_se_stats.gif

The image shows the Statistics page of the human workflow service engine. The following tabs display at the top from left to right: Dashboard, Statistics (selected), Instances, Faults, Deployed Components, and Notification Management. Below this are the Active Requests and Average Request Processing Time graphs. Below this is the Operation Statistics section, which includes a table with the following columns from left to right: Service Name, Operation Name, Active Requests, Completed Requests, Count, and Average (ms).

PK4PK}{@,OEBPS/img_text/bam_wls_connpoolnew_https.htm} Description of the illustration bam_wls_connpoolnew_https.gif

The image shows the Outbound Connection Pool Configuration Table with the oracle.bam.adapter.adc.soap.SOAPConnectionFactory item expanded to show eis/bam/https and eis/bam/soap. The New and Delete buttons appear above the table.

PKk}PK}{@ OEBPS/img_text/bc_dashboard3.htm[ Description of the illustration bc_dashboard3.gif

The image shows the Dashboard page. The following tabs display at the top from left to right: Dashboard (selected), Policies, Faults and Rejected Messages, and Properties. Below this is the Instances and Faults graph, which shows the total number of outgoing messages and faults since server startup. Below this is the Recent Faults and Rejected Messages section, which includes a Show only system faults checkbox and a table that includes the following columns from left to right: Error Message, Fault Time, and Composite Instance ID.

PKW$PK}{@'OEBPS/img_text/bpel_dashboard_upper.htm; Description of the illustration bpel_dashboard_upper.gif

The image shows the Dashboard page. The following tabs display at the top from left to right: Dashboard (selected), Statistics, Instances, Faults, Deployed Components, and Recovery. Below this is the Recent Instances section, which includes a Show Only Running Instances checkbox, and a table with the following columns from left to right: Instance ID, Component, Composite, State, Start Date, Last Modified Date, and Logs.

PKVD@;PK}{@'OEBPS/img_text/bam_em_policies_list.htm9 Description of the illustration bam_em_policies_list.gif

The image shows the Application Policies page for oracle-bam(11.1.1). The Search area shows the data as a table with the following columns: Principal and Permission.

PKs27>9PK}{@ OEBPS/img_text/bam_dist_list.htmo Description of the illustration bam_dist_list.gif

The image shows the Oracle BAM Administrator Distribution List management page. The left side of the page shows a list of Distribution Lists. The right side of the page shows the Distribution List Name field. The Create and Cancel buttons are below the field.

PK!OPK}{@OEBPS/img_text/ns_loglevels.htmH Description of the illustration ns_loglevels.gif

The image shows the Oracle Enterprise Manager. The left side of the screen shows the navigation pane with the usermessagingserver node selected. The right side of the screen shows the Log Configuration displaying the following tabs: Log Levels and Log Files. The Log Levels tab is selected and shows the search information as a table with the following columns: Logger Name, Oracle Diagnostic Logging Level (Java Level), Log File, and Persistent Log Level State.

The Apply and Revert buttons appear at the top right of the Log Configuration display.

PKgؼPK}{@#OEBPS/img_text/wlconsole_groups.htm( Description of the illustration wlconsole_groups.gif

The image shows the Settings for myrealm page displaying the following tabs: Users and Groups. The Groups tab is selected. The page shows a list of groups, with each entry showing the name, the description, and the provider. A checkbox appears to the left of each entry. Above and below the list are the New and Delete buttons.

PKuJPK}{@ OEBPS/img_text/rules1_engine.htmE Description of the illustration rules1_engine.gif

The image shows the Business Rules Engine page which displays the following tabs: Dashboard, Statistics, Instances, Faults, and Deployed Components. The Dashboard tab is selected. The first section of the page shows the Recent Instances as a table with the following columns: Instance ID, Component, Composite, State, Start Date, Last Modified Date, and Logs. The second section of the page shows the Components as a table with the following columns: Name, Composite, Status, Total Instances, Running Instances, and Faulted Instances (Recoverable and Non Recoverable).

The final section of the page shows the Recent Faults as a table with the following fields: Error Message, Fault Time Composite, Component, Component Instance ID, and Logs. The top right of the page shows the Related Links drop-down menu.

PK&PK}{@'OEBPS/img_text/soainfra_requestproc.htm) Description of the illustration soainfra_requestproc.gif

The image shows the Request Processing page. At the top is the Service Engines section, which includes a table consisting of the following columns from left to right: Name, Average Request Processing Time - Synchronous (ms), Average Request Processing Time - Asynchronous (ms), Active Requests, Requests Processed, and Faults.

Below this is the Service Infrastructure section, which includes a table consisting of the same columns as the Service Engines. Below this is the Binding Components section, which includes a table consisting of the following columns from left to right: Name, Average Request Processing Time (ms), Requests Processed, and Errors.

PKtE.)PK}{@#OEBPS/img_text/bam_wls_connpool.html Description of the illustration bam_wls_connpool.gif

The image shows the Outbound Connection Pool Configuration Table with the oracle.bam.adapter.adc.soap.SOAPConnectionFactory item expanded to show eis/bam/soap. The New and Delete buttons appear above and below the table.

PKzqlPK}{@$OEBPS/img_text/bpel_se_servcomps.htm: Description of the illustration bpel_se_servcomps.gif

The image shows the BPEL service engine. At the top are the following tabs from left to right: Dashboard, Statistics, Instances (selected), Faults, Deployed Composites, and Recovery.

Below this is a Search section, with fields for Instance ID, Start Time From, Start Time To, Modified Date From, Modified Date To, and Component. A State list also appears. Search and Reset buttons appear below this.

Below this is a table with the following columns from left to right: Instance ID, Component, Composite, State, Start Date, Last Modified Date, and Logs.

PK&SPK}{@&OEBPS/img_text/sca_related_topics2.htmX Description of the illustration sca_related_topics2.gif

The image shows the Faults tab for the ValidationRequestProcess BPEL component. The Related Links drop-down menu is expanded and shows the following menu items: SOA Infra Home and BPEL Engine Home.

PK@l]XPK}{@ OEBPS/img_text/bam_wls_trust.htmA Description of the illustration bam_wls_trust.gif

graphic described in previous and following text.

PKʩYPK}{@!OEBPS/img_text/sca_servicekey.htm" Description of the illustration sca_servicekey.gif

This image shows from left to right the Dashboard, Policies, Faults, and Properties (selected) tabs. Below this are the General section and HTTP Basic Authentication section. Below this are the HTTP Chunking section and HTTP Proxy section. Below this is the HTTP Timeout section. Each section includes fields of appropriate properties.

PKtPK}{@#OEBPS/img_text/hwf_se_instances.htm Description of the illustration hwf_se_instances.gif

The image shows the Instances page of the human workflow service engine. The following tabs display at the top from left to right: Dashboard, Statistics, Instances (selected), Faults, Deployed Components, and Notification Management. Below this is the Search section, with fields for Instance ID, Start Time From, Start Time To, Modified Date From, Modified Date To, and State. The Search and Reset buttons display to the right.

Below this is the View drop-down list and a table with the following columns from left to right: Instance ID, Component, Composite, State, Start Date, Last Modified Date, and Logs.

PKËPK}{@$OEBPS/img_text/soaapp_dash_lower.htm, Description of the illustration soaapp_dash_lower.gif

The image shows the Component Metrics table, which includes the following columns from left to right: Name, Component Type, Total Instances, Running Instances, Recoverable Faulted Instances, and Non Recoverable Fault Instances. Below this is the Services and References table, which includes the following columns from left to right: Name, Type, Usage, Faults, Total Messages, and Average Processing Time (sec).

PK L1,PK}{@%OEBPS/img_text/soaapp_fullscreen2.htm- Description of the illustration soaapp_fullscreen2.gif

The image shows the Component Metrics table, which includes the following columns from left to right: Name, Component Type, Total Instances, Running Instances, Recoverable Faulted Instances, and Non Recoverable Fault Instances. Below this is the Services and References table, which includes the following columns from left to right: Name, Type, Usage, Faults, Total Messages, and Average Processing Time (sec).

PK2-PK}{@!OEBPS/img_text/bpmn_se_faults.htmF Description of the illustration bpmn_se_faults.gif

This illustration is described in the text.

PKuPK}{@OEBPS/img_text/em_confirm.htmI Description of the illustration em_confirm.gif

The figure displays the Confirmation dialog.

PKGPK}{@&OEBPS/img_text/hwf_comp_dash_upper.htm- Description of the illustration hwf_comp_dash_upper.gif

The image shows the Dashboard page. At the top are the following tabs from left to right: Dashboard (selected), Instances, Faults, Policies, and Administration. Below this is the Recent Instances section, which includes a Show Only Running Instances checkbox and a table that consists of the following columns from left to right: Instance ID, State, Start Date, Last Modified Date, and Logs. Below this is the Show All link. Below this is the Recent Faults section, which includes a Show only system faults checkbox and a table that consists of the following columns from left to right: Error Message, Recovery, Fault Time, Component Instance ID, Activity, and Logs.

PK 2-PK}{@OEBPS/img_text/sca_logfiles.htm? Description of the illustration sca_logfiles.gif

The image shows the Log Files tab. A description of what you can do on this page appears below this tab. Below this are the Create, Create Like, Edit Configuration, and View Configuration buttons. Below this is a table with the following columns: Handler Name, Log Path, Log File Format, and Rotation Policy.

PK$wPK}{@(OEBPS/img_text/bpmn_se_deployedcomps.htm? Description of the illustration bpmn_se_deployedcomps.gif

This illustration is described in the text.

PK7pPK}{@#OEBPS/img_text/bpel_comp_policy.htmt Description of the illustration bpel_comp_policy.gif

The image shows the Policies page. At the top are the following tabs from left to right: Dashboard, Instances, Faults, and Policies (selected). Below this is the View drop-down list and Attach/Detach button. Below this is a table with the following columns from left to right: Policy Name, Policy Reference Status, Category, Total Violations, Authentication, Authorization, and Confidentiality. These last three columns are part of a larger column header entitled Security Violations.

PK6_ytPK}{@#OEBPS/img_text/bpmn_compsensor3.htmq Description of the illustration bpmn_compsensor3.png

Flow Trace page showing a runtime trail of a message flow identified by an execution context ID (ECID) that is displayed in the upper right corner of the page. There are two main sections: one for Faults, the other for Trace.

PKkMvqPK}{@#OEBPS/img_text/b2b_mon_binding1.htmr Description of the illustration b2b_mon_binding1.gif

The image shows the soainfra node in the navigation pane, with the following subnodes: Application Deployments, SOA, WebLogic Domain, Metadata Repositories, and User Messaging Service. The SOA node is expanded to show the soa-infra(soa_server1) subnode.

PKY1nPK}{@)OEBPS/img_text/wlconsole_users_groups.htm$ Description of the illustration wlconsole_users_groups.gif

The image shows the Settings for myrealm page displaying the following tabs: Users and Groups. The Users tab is selected. The page shows a list of users, with each entry showing the name, the description, and the provider. A checkbox appears to the left of each entry. Above and below the list are the New and Delete buttons.

PKN4PK}{@OEBPS/img_text/b2b_mon2.htmj Description of the illustration b2b_mon2.gif

The image shows the Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control page. The navigation pane on the left shows the Farm_soainfra node expanded with the following subnodes: Application Deployments, Internal Applications, Resource Adapters, SOA, WebLogic Domain, WebLogic Repositories, and User Messaging Service. The SOA node is expanded to show the Project_ebMS_PO [1.0] subnode.

The Project_ebMS_PO [1.0] page on the right shows the following tabs: Dashboard, Instances, Faults and Rejected Messages, Unit Tests, and Policies. The Dashboard tab is selected. The first section of the Dashboard page shows the Recent Instances as a table, and includes the following columns: Instance ID, Conversation ID, Faults, and Start.

The second section of the Dashboard page shows the Recent Faults and Rejected Messages as a table, and includes the following columns: Error Message, Recovery, Fault Time, Fault Location, Composite Instance ID, and Logs. The third section of the Dashboard page shows the Component Metrics as a table, and includes the following columns: Name, Component Type, Running Instances, and Total Instances. The fourth section shows the Services and References table with the following columns: Name, Type, Faults, Total Messages, Average Processing Time (secs).

PK8%`PK}{@&OEBPS/img_text/hwf_comp_dash_lower.htm. Description of the illustration hwf_comp_dash_lower.gif

The image shows the Dashboard page. At the top are the following tabs from left to right: Dashboard (selected), Instances, Faults, Policies. Below this is the Business Outcomes graph, which shows rejections and approvals. To the right is the Highest Time Consuming Assignees, which includes a table with the following columns from left to right: Assignee, Average Time on Task (sec), and Main Deviation.

Below these sections is the Instance Rate per Min (Real-Time Data) graph, which shows instance throughput details. Below this section is the Notifications section, which includes a table with the following columns from left to right: Channel Used and Count.

PKRb3.PK}{@#OEBPS/img_text/bpel_comp_faults.htmP Description of the illustration bpel_comp_faults.gif

The image shows the Faults page. At the top are the following tabs from left to right: Dashboard, Instances, Faults (selected), and Policies. Below this is the Search section, with fields for Error Message Contains, Fault ID, Fault Time From, Fault Time To, Composite Instance ID, and Component Instance ID. To the right are the Search and Reset buttons.

Below this is the Show only recoverable faults checkbox and the Fault Type drop-down list, in which All Faults is selected. Below this are the Select, View, and Recovery Actions drop-down lists. Below this is a table with the following columns from left to right: Error Message, Recovery, Fault Time, Component Instance ID, Activity, and Logs.

PKHKUPPK}{@OEBPS/img_text/soaag_dt_001.htmc Description of the illustration soaag_dt_001.eps

This image shows four boxes at the top, from left to right: BPEL Engine, Database, JTA, and Cache. Vertical lines are attached to the bottoms of each box. Below the boxes are several horizontal lines. There is a horizontal line labeled JPA with an arrow pointing from the BPEL Engine box to the Database box. There is a horizontal line labeled alterCompletion with an arrow pointing from the JTA box to the BPEL Engine box. There is a horizontal line labeled put with an arrow pointing from the BPEL Engine box to the Cache box.

PK +PK}{@OEBPS/img_text/rules1_logs3.htm Description of the illustration rules1_logs3.gif

The image shows the context menu in the navigation pane displaying the following menu items: Home, Monitoring, Control, Logs, SOA Deployment, Service Engines, Bindings, Services and References, Business Events, SOA Administration, Security, Administration, and General Information. The Logs menu item is expanded and shows the following sub-menu items: View Log Messages and Log Configuration.

PK_PK}{@!OEBPS/img_text/soainfra_menu2.htmP Description of the illustration soainfra_menu2.gif

The image shows the SOA Infrastructure drop-down menu displaying the following menu items: Home, Monitoring, Logs, SOA Deployment, Manage Partitions, Service Engines, Bindings, Services and References, Business Events, SOA Administration, Security, Administration, and General Information.

PK<PK}{@OEBPS/img_text/ns_dep3.htm~ Description of the illustration ns_dep3.gif

The image shows the Oracle Enterprise Manager Deployment Settings screen. The first area of the screen shows the Deployment Settings and includes the following fields: Archive Type, Archive Location, Deployment Plan, Deployment Target, Application Name, Version, Context Root, and Deployment Mode. The second area of the screen shows the Deployment Tasks as a table with the following columns: Name, Go To Task, and Description. The Cancel, Back and Deploy buttons appear at the top right of the screen.

PK$a~PK}{@!OEBPS/img_text/hwf_wlist_port.htm\ Description of the illustration hwf_wlist_port.gif

The image shows the System MBean Browser. On the left is the navigational tree. On the right is the ServerURL property. A description of this property is provided, as well as a field for changing the value.

PK~ Description of the illustration rules1_engine_deploy.gif

The image shows the Business Rules Engine page which displays the following tabs: Dashboard, Statistics, Instances, Faults, and Deployed Components. The Deployed Components tab is selected. The first section of the page shows the Search settings and includes the following fields: Name and Composite Name. The first section also shows the Search and Reset buttons.

The second section of the page shows the search results as a table with the following columns: Name, Composite, Status, Total Instances, Running Instances, and faulted Instances (Recoverable and Non Recoverable). The Related Links drop-down menu appears at the top right of the page.

PKUr'"PK}{@'OEBPS/img_text/hwf_mon_taskdetails2.htm& Description of the illustration hwf_mon_taskdetails2.gif

The image shows the Task Details section. The first area of the section shows the following fields: Task Number, State, Outcome, Priority, Creator, Created Date, Updated Date, Expiration Date, Assignees, and Acquired By. The second area of the field shows onMessage expanded to show Initiated, Outcome Updated, and Completed.

PKx9PK}{@OEBPS/img_text/bc_pubuddi2.htm2 Description of the illustration bc_pubuddi2.gif

This image is described in the table immediately above this image.

PKQPK}{@.OEBPS/img_text/bpel_instancedetails_faults.htmP Description of the illustration bpel_instancedetails_faults.gif

The image shows the Faults page. The following tabs display at the top from left to right: Audit Trail, Flow, Sensor Values, and Faults (selected). Below this is a table consisting of the following columns from left to right: Error Message, Recovery, Fault Time, and Activity.

PKuPPK}{@%OEBPS/img_text/hwf_comp_instances.htmr Description of the illustration hwf_comp_instances.gif

The image shows the Instances page. At the top are the following tabs from left to right: Dashboard, Instances (selected), Faults, Policies, and Administration. Below this is the Search section, with fields for Instance ID, Start Time From, Start Time To, Modified Date From, Modified Date To, and State.

Below this is the View drop-down list. Below this is a table with the following columns from left to right: Instance ID, State, Start Date, Last Modified Date, and Logs.

PKڻwrPK}{@!OEBPS/img_text/bpel_se_faults.htmk Description of the illustration bpel_se_faults.gif

The image shows the Faults page. At the top are the following tabs from left to right: Dashboard, Statistics, Instances, Faults (selected), Deployed Composites, and Recovery. Below this is the Search section, with fields for Error Message Contains, Fault ID, Fault Time From, Fault Time To, Composite Instance ID, and Component Instance ID. To the right are the Search and Reset buttons. Below this is the Show only recoverable faults checkbox and Fault Type drop-down list, in which All Faults is selected. Below this are the Select, View, and Recovery Actions drop-down lists. Below this is a table with the following columns from left to right: Error Message, Recovery, Fault Time, Composite, Component, and Component Instance ID.

PKОpkPK}{@#OEBPS/img_text/bpel_stats_lower.htm{ Description of the illustration bpel_stats_lower.gif

The image shows the Request Breakdown section, which includes a table with the following columns from left to right: Name, Count, Min Request Processing Time (ms), Max Request Processing Time (ms), and Avg Request Processing Time (ms).

PKR<{PK}{@(OEBPS/img_text/bam_em_policies_roles.htm@ Description of the illustration bam_em_policies_roles.gif

The image shows the Application Roles page displaying the Search data as a table with the following columns: Role Name and Members. The Report Architect entry is selected.

PKE@PK}{@"OEBPS/img_text/bam_metric_help.htm1 Description of the illustration bam_metric_help.gif

The image shows the Metrics context menu showing Help selected.

PKڢtPK}{@#OEBPS/img_text/busevent_events2.htmR Description of the illustration busevent_events2.gif

The image shows the Create Database Subscription dialog box. The first area of the dialog box shows the Event information including the following fields: Event Namespace and Event Name. The second area of the dialog box shows the Agent information with the Database Agent field. The third area of the dialog box shows the Subscription Properties with the following fields: Consistency Level and XPath Filter. The Help, Subscribe, and Cancel buttons appear at the bottom of the dialog box.

This dialog box does not appear for EDN - JMS.

PKqPK}{@$OEBPS/img_text/bam_em_nav_server.htm Description of the illustration bam_em_nav_server.gif

The image shows the Oracle BAM nodes in the Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control navigation tree. The Farm_soabam node is expanded to show the following nodes: Application Deployments, WebLogic Domain, BAM, Metadata Repositories, and User Messaging Service. The BAM node is further expanded to show the OracleBamServer and OracleBamWeb nodes.

PK =PK}{@&OEBPS/img_text/bam_wls_credmap_eis.htmr Description of the illustration bam_wls_credmap_eis.gif

The image shows the Create a New Security Credential Mapping page. The first area of the page shows the Back, Next, Finish, and Cancel buttons. The second area of the page shows the following fields: EIS User Name, EIS Password, and Confirm Password.

PKбPK}{@*OEBPS/img_text/wlconsole_providers_set.htm Description of the illustration wlconsole_providers_set.gif

The image shows the Settings for the authentication provider page displaying the following tabs: Common and Provider Specific. The Common tab is selected. The main area of the page shows the following fields: Name (non-editable), Description (non-editable), Version (non-editable), and the Control Flag drop-down list. Above and below the four areas is the Save button.

PK2!x PK}{@OEBPS/img_text/ns_mca.htmw Description of the illustration ns_mca.gif

The image shows the Messaging Client Applications screen for usermessagingserver, displaying the data as a table with the following columns: Name, Version, Client Type, Listener End Point, and Receiving Queues. The De-register button appears above the table.

PK PPK}{@!OEBPS/img_text/bpel_instances.htm Description of the illustration bpel_instances.gif

The image shows the Instances page of the BPEL service engine. The following tabs display at the top from left to right: Dashboard, Statistics, Instances (selected), Faults, Deployed Components, and Recovery. Below this is the Search section, with fields for Instance ID, Start Time From, Start Time To, Modified Date From, Modified Date To, State, and Component. The Search and Reset buttons display to the right. Below this is the View drop-down list and a table with the following columns from left to right: Instance ID, Component, Composite, State, Start Date, Last Modified Date, and Logs.

PKjH<PK}{@#OEBPS/img_text/sca_createwatch2.htmS Description of the illustration sca_createwatch2.gif

This image shows the Create Watch section. The Back, Next, Finish, and Cancel buttons appear at the top. Below this is the Configure Watch Notifications section. This includes a Notifications Available section and a Chosen section. Between these two sections are >, >>, <, and << buttons. The Chosen section is displaying a notification named FMW-DFW notification. Below these two sections are Back, Next, Finish, and Cancel buttons.

PKqXSPK}{@ OEBPS/img_text/sca_unittest2.htmO Description of the illustration sca_unittest2.gif

The image shows the following buttons at the top from left to right: Active, Retire, Shut Down, Test, and Settings. Below this are four tabs from left to right: Dashboard, Instances, Faults and Rejected Messages, Unit Tests (selected), and Policies. Below this is the Search section, with fields for Test Run Name, Test Run ID, Composite Instance ID, Start Time, and End Time. The Search and Reset buttons appear in the lower right corner of this section.

Below this are the Test Cases and Test Runs (selected) sub-tabs. Below this is a table with the following columns left to right: Test Run Name, Test Run ID, Start Time, End Time, Status, and Success Rate.

Below this is the Results of Test Run section. In this section are statistics for Total, Running, Passed, Failed, Unknown, and Success Rate. A Refresh Test Status button appears to the right. Below this is a table consisting of the following columns: Test suits and test cases, and Status.

PKTOPK}{@ OEBPS/img_text/ns_listdriver.htm: Description of the illustration ns_listdriver.gif

The image shows the Oracle Enterprise Manager. The left side of the screen shows the navigation pane with the usermessagingserver node selected. The right side of the screen shows the System MBean Browser. The left side of the System MBean Browser shows a navigation pane with the ComponentAdministration bean selected. The right side of the System MBean Browser shows the listDriverInstances operation details and return values.

PKs?:PK}{@$OEBPS/img_text/bam_wls_adapprop1.htm Description of the illustration bam_wls_adapprop1.gif

The image shows a portion of the settings for OracleBamAdapter page. The Properties sub-tab is selected.

PK\.PK}{@)OEBPS/img_text/soaadmin_common_props2.htm` Description of the illustration soaadmin_common_props2.gif

This graphic shows the Advanced properties separated into the following sub-areas: Data Sources and Web Service Binding Properties. The Data Sources sub-area shows the following information: Server Data Source JNDI, Server Transaction Data Source JNDI, and the Nonfatal Connection Retry Count field. The Web Service Binding Properties sub-area shows the following fields: Oracle SSL Ciphers, Oracle Wallet Password, Use chunking (a checkbox), and Chunk Size.

PK e`PK}{@!OEBPS/img_text/bam_log_config.htm! Description of the illustration bam_log_config.gif

The image shows the Log Configuration page displaying the following tabs: Log Levels and Log Files. The Log Levels tab is selected and the page shows the Runtime Loggers with the Logger Name and Oracle Diagnostic Logging Level (Java Level). The Oracle Diagnostic Logging Level drop-down list is selected showing the selection of levels.

PK/PK}{@OEBPS/img_text/bp_flt29.htmS Description of the illustration bp_flt29.gif

The image shows onMessage expanded to show onCase "SAP.Write" highlighting four errors, all displaying the following error message: "Error during invoking 1-way operation "Write" on target service "SAP".

PK5XSPK}{@!OEBPS/img_text/sca_sensordis5.htm1 Description of the illustration sca_sensordis5.gif

This image is described in the text immediately above the image.

PKMdPK}{@"OEBPS/img_text/hw_se_notifman2.htm Description of the illustration hw_se_notifman2.gif

The image shows the Incoming Notifications section, which includes a Search section with fields for Sender, Date From, Channel, Recipient, and Date To. Below this are the Select and View drop-down lists, the Mark as Spam button, Not Spam button, and Delete button. Below this is a table with the following columns from left to right: Message ID, Channel, Sender, Recipient, Status, Content, and Time.

PK$PK}{@$OEBPS/img_text/bam_config_server.htm+ Description of the illustration bam_config_server.gif

The image shows the Oracle BAM Server Properties page in Fusion Middleware Control. The first area of the page shows the Data Source JNDI field. The second area of the page shows the Advanced settings including the following fields: Application URL, Viewset Sharing, Report Cache Persistence Manager, ODI User, ODI Password, ODI Work Repository Name, ODI Agent Host, ODI Agent Port, and Outbound Email account.

PKﮣ0+PK}{@"OEBPS/img_text/soaapp_instance.htmv Description of the illustration soaapp_instance.gif

The image shows the following tabs from left to right: Dashboard, Instances (selected), Faults and Rejected Messages, Unit Tests, and Policies. Below this is a Search section, with fields for Instance ID, Name, ECID, Conversation ID, Start Time From, and Start Time To. Search and Reset buttons appear on the right.

Below this is the Filter By section, with the Execution State and Fault State lists, and the BPEL Recovery checkbox.

Below this is the Show menu, with a value of Any selected. Below this are the View list, and Delete Selected, Delete with Options, and Abort buttons.

Below this is a table with the following columns from left to right: Instance ID, Name, Conversation ID, Instance State, Start Time, and Logs.

PK*{vPK}{@OEBPS/img_text/sca_menu2.htmU Description of the illustration sca_menu2.gif

The image shows the SOA Infrastructure drop-down menu displaying the following menu items: Home, Monitoring, Logs, SOA Deployment, Manage Partitions, Service Engines, Bindings, Services and References, Business Events, SOA Administration, Security, Administration, and General Information.

PKJ$PK}{@'OEBPS/img_text/rules1_engine_faults.htmh Description of the illustration rules1_engine_faults.gif

The image shows the Business Rules Engine page which displays the following tabs: Dashboard, Statistics, Instances, Faults, and Deployed Components. The Faults tab is selected. The first section of the page shows the Search settings and includes the following fields: Error Message Contains, Fault ID, Fault Time From, Fault Time To, Composite Instance ID, Component Instance ID, and Fault Type (a drop-down list). The first area also shows the Search and Reset buttons.

The second section of the page shows the search results as a table with the following columns: Error Message, Fault Time, Composite, Component, Component Instance ID, and Logs. The Related Links drop-down menu appears at the top right of the page.

PKymhPK}{@!OEBPS/img_text/soaapp_policy4.htmb Description of the illustration soaapp_policy4.gif

The image shows the following buttons at the top from left to right: Active, Retire, Shut Down, Test, and Settings. Below this are four tabs from left to right: Dashboard, Instances, Faults and Rejected Messages, Unit Tests, and Policies (selected). Below this are the View list and Attach/Death To list. Below this is a table with the following columns from left to right: Policy Name, Attached To, Policy Reference Status, Category, Total Violations, and Authentication. The currently attached policies display in this table.

PK> 7PK}{@OEBPS/img_text/ns_twelve.htm' Description of the illustration ns_twelve.gif

The image shows the View Log File screen for the soa_server1-diagnostic.log file. The first area of the screen shows the Download button. The second area of the screen shows the following fields: Date Range, Start Date, and End Date. The second area also shows the Search button.

The third area of the screen shows the search results as a table with the following columns: Time, Message Type, Message ID, and Message. The fourth area of the screen shows the error message details including the following fields: Message ID, Message Level, ECID, Relationship ID, Component, and Message.

PKYS0PK}{@"OEBPS/img_text/hwf_se_notifman.htm* Description of the illustration hwf_se_notifman.gif

The image shows the Notification Management page. At the top are the following tabs from left to right: Dashboard, Statistics, Instances, Faults, Deployed Components, and Notification Management (selected). Below this is the Outgoing Notifications section, which includes a Search section with fields (when expanded) for Channel, Date From, Recipient, Status, and Date To.

Below this are the Select and View drop-down lists, the Resend button, Resend All Similar Notifications button, View Bad Addresses button, and Delete button. Below this is a table with the following columns from left to right: Source ID, Source Type, Channel, Recipient, Status, and Time.

PKz/*PK}{@$OEBPS/img_text/sca_compositelist.htmZ Description of the illustration sca_compositelist.gif

The image shows the SOA Composite drop-down menu displaying the following menu items: Home, Monitoring, SOA Deployment, Export, Test Service, Unit Tests, Policies, SOA Infrastructure, SOA Infrastructure Common Properties, Service/Reference Properties, and General Information.

PK{LPK}{@%OEBPS/img_text/bpel_recoveryecid2.htm1 Description of the illustration bpel_recoveryecid2.gif

The image shows the BPEL Message Recovery Required message and icon displayed in the Trace table. The Show Details button displays to the right of the message.

PK# {61PK}{@!OEBPS/img_text/b2b_composite2.htm; Description of the illustration b2b_composite2.gif

The image shows the Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control. The navigation pane on the left shows the soa_soainfra node expanded with the following subnodes: Application Deployments, SOA Composite Deployments, and Fusion Middleware.

The Fusion Middleware node is expanded to show the soa-infra(server_soa) subnode, which is selected. The B2B_EDI_X12 [1.0] page on the right shows the following tabs: Dashboard, Instances, Faults and Rejected Messages, Unit Tests, and Policies. The Instances tab is selected. The first section of the Instances page shows the Search criteria, and includes the following fields: Instance ID, Conversation ID, Start Time From, and Start Time To. The first section also shows the Search and Reset buttons.

The second section of the Instances page shows the search results as a table, and includes the following columns: Instance ID, Conversation ID, State, Faults, Start Time, and Logs.

PK@;PK}{@!OEBPS/img_text/gs_soahomepage.htm Description of the illustration gs_soahomepage.gif

The image shows the home page of the SOA Infrastructure. At the top are the following tabs from left to right: Dashboard, Deployed Composites, Instances, and Faults and Rejected Messages. Below this and to the right is the Recent Instances and Faults for the last ten minutes message. Below this is the Recent Instances section. which includes a Show Only Running Instances checkbox, and a table consisting of the following columns from left to right: Instance ID, Composite, and Start Time.

To the right is the Deployed Composites table consisting of the following columns from left to right: Composite, Status, Mode, and Faulted Instances. Below this is the Recent Faults and Rejected Messages section, which includes a Show only system faults checkbox, and a table with the following columns from left to right: Error Message, Recovery, Fault Time, Composite, Fault Location, and Composite Instance ID.

PKj"PK}{@OEBPS/img_text/ns_five.htmM Description of the illustration ns_five.gif

The image shows the Log Messages screen for usermessagingserver. The first area of the screen shows the Search settings including the following fields: Date Range, Start Date, End Date, Message Types (Incident Error, Error, Warning, Notification, Trace, and Unknown), and Message. The first area also shows the Search and Add Fields buttons.

The second area of the screen shows the log messages as a table with the following columns: Time, Message Type, Message ID, Message, and Log File. The third area of the screen shows message details including the following fields: Message ID, Message Level, Relationship ID, Argument 1, Component, Module, Message, Host, Host IP Address, User, Thread ID, and ECID.

The Broaden Target Scope drop-down menu and Log Files button appear at the top of the screen.

PKշPK}{@.OEBPS/img_text/soaadmin_hwf_taskservpropsu.htmA Description of the illustration soaadmin_hwf_taskservpropsu.gif

The image shows the Workflow Task Service Properties screen. The first area of the screen shows the following fields: Actionable Email Account, Workflow Service Session Timeout (in minutes), and Workflow Custom Classpath URL. The second area of the screen shows the Dynamic Assignment nd Task Escalation Functions as a table with the following columns: Function Name and Classpath.

The final area of the screen shows the Parameters as a table with the following columns: Name and Value.

Below this is the Advanced section (unexpanded).

PKGDPK}{@OEBPS/img_text/soaag_dt_002.htm Description of the illustration soaag_dt_002.eps

This image shows three boxes at the top, from left to right: BPEL Engine, Cache, and Database. Vertical lines are attached to the bottoms of each box. Below the boxes are several horizontal lines. There is a horizontal line labeled put with an arrow pointing from the BPEL Engine box to the Cache box. There is a horizontal line labeled object found: JPA- read version attribute with an arrow pointing from the BPEL Engine box to the Database box. There is a horizontal line labeled object NOT found or version did not match JPA - send Object with an arrow pointing from the BPEL Engine box to the Database box.

PK<6PK}{@!OEBPS/img_text/bam_ums_driver.htmF Description of the illustration bam_ums_driver.gif

The image shows the Driver-Specific Configuration section displaying the information as a table with the following columns: Name, Description, Mandatory, Encoded Credential, and Value.

PKP~LKFPK}{@#OEBPS/img_text/bpmn_payload_xml.htmL Description of the illustration bpmn_payload_xml.png

Payload XML page as described above

PKPK}{@(OEBPS/img_text/hwf_se_deployedcomps1.htm Description of the illustration hwf_se_deployedcomps1.gif

The image shows the Deployed Composites page of the human workflow service engine. The following tabs display at the top from left to right: Dashboard, Statistics, Instances, Faults, Deployed Components (selected), and Notification Management. Below this is the Search section with fields for Name and Composite Name. To the right are the Search and Reset buttons. Below this is the View drop-down list.

Below this is a table with the following columns from left to right: Name, Composite, Status, Total Instances, Running Instances, Faulted Instances - Recoverable, and Faulted Instances - Non Recoverable.

PKmPK}{@"OEBPS/img_text/soaadmin_fetch3.htm4 Description of the illustration soaadmin_fetch3.gif

This image shows the Number of Instances (for the last 10 minutes) section. The following information has been found: the composite name and the number of instances.

PK>`94PK}{@OEBPS/img_text/ns_msgcust.htmN Description of the illustration ns_msgcust.gif

The image shows the Message Status screen for the usermessagingserver. The first area of the screen shows the Search Message Status and includes the following fields: Maximum Messages Displayed, Operation, Overall and Status. The first area also shows the Search and Reset buttons, as well as the Add Fields drop-down menu.

The second area of the screen shows the search results as a table with the following columns: Message ID (Recipient), Recipient, Operation, Overall Status, and Timestamp. The Resend button appears at the top of the table.

PKAPK}{@#OEBPS/img_text/busevent_events3.htm Description of the illustration busevent_events3.gif

The image shows the DB Subscriptions icons, from left to right, Create, Edit, and Delete.

PKPK}{@%OEBPS/img_text/sca_related_topics.htmu Description of the illustration sca_related_topics.gif

The image shows the Dashboard tab displaying the Recent Instances. The Related Links drop-down menu is expanded and shows the following menu items: SOA Infra Home, BPEL Properties, WebLogic Server Console, and BPEL Engine Logs.

PKdoBzuPK}{@&OEBPS/img_text/odsm_oid_attributes.htmZ Description of the illustration odsm_oid_attributes.gif

The image shows the Oracle Directory Services Manager, displaying the following tabs: Home, Data Browser, Schema, Security, and Advanced. The Data Browser tab is selected. The left pane of the tab shows the Data Tree hierarchy with the cn=oid1 node selected. The right pane shows the Attributes tab displaying the following fields: orclsslPort, orclsslVersion, orclsslWalletURL, orclsslinteropmode, orclstatsflag, orclstatslevel, and orclstatsperiodicity.

PKu#_ZPK}{@#OEBPS/img_text/busevent_events1.htm Description of the illustration busevent_events1.gif

The image shows the Business Events page. The following tabs appear at the top from left to right: Events, Subscriptions, and Faults. Below this is the Search field. Below this is the View drop-down list, and Subscribe, Test, and Show Event Definition buttons. Below this is a table with the following columns: Namespaces and Events, Subscriptions, and Failed Deliveries.

PK4PK}{@*OEBPS/img_text/soaapp_lower_helloworld.htm2 Description of the illustration soaapp_lower_helloworld.gif

The image shows the Component Metrics table, which includes the following columns from left to right: Name, Component Type, Total Instances, Running Instances, Recoverable Faulted Instances, and Non Recoverable Fault Instances. Below this is the Services and References table, which includes the following columns from left to right: Name, Type, Usage, Faults, Total Messages, and Average Processing Time (sec).

PKi72PK}{@OEBPS/img_text/b2b_trace1.htmK Description of the illustration b2b_trace1.gif

The image shows a trace diagram with an Oracle B2B Binding component, a Mediator component, and a File Adapter. The first area of the page shows the list of Faults, with no faults found. The second area of the page shows the Trace, and includes the Show Instance IDs checkbox and the Instance list.

PK0LPK}{@"OEBPS/img_text/soaadmin_fetch6.htmw Description of the illustration soaadmin_fetch6.gif

This image shows the Number of Instances message. The Running Instances field displays the number of running instances. The Total Instances field shows displays the total number of instances. The Recalculate button appears in the lower right corner.

PKvWPK}{@%OEBPS/img_text/em_test_trace_prod.htm Description of the illustration em_test_trace_prod.gif

This figure displays the rule execution trace report with the trace level set as Production.

PK7dPK}{@'OEBPS/img_text/bam_wls_connpooltabs.htm  Description of the illustration bam_wls_connpooltabs.gif

The image shows a portion of the Settings for oracle-bam-adapter page. The Outbound Connection Pools sub-tab is selected.

PK@ PK}{@!OEBPS/img_text/soaapp_policy1.htm9 Description of the illustration soaapp_policy1.gif

The image shows the Attach/Detach drop-down list expanded to show the following list items: CreditRatingRules, AutoLoanProcess, LoanApproval, LoanAdvisorRules, and client.

PK36>9PK}{@!OEBPS/img_text/sca_helloworld.htm{ Description of the illustration sca_helloworld.gif

The image shows the following buttons at the top from left to right: Active, Retire, Shut Down, Test, and Settings. Below this are the following tabs from left to right: Dashboard (selected), Instances, Faults and Rejected Messages, Unit Tests, and Policies. Below this is the Recent Instances section. which includes a Show Only Running Instances checkbox, and a table consisting of the following columns from left to right: Instance ID, Name, Conversation ID, Instance State, and Start Time.

Below this is the Recent Faults and Rejected Messages section, which includes a Show only system faults checkbox, and a table with the following columns from left to right: Error Message, Recovery, Fault Time, Fault Location, Composite Instance ID, and Logs.

PK4PK}{@"OEBPS/img_text/bpel_comp_flow1.htm| Description of the illustration bpel_comp_flow1.gif

The image shows the Flow page. The following tabs display at the top from left to right: Audit Trail, Flow (selected), Sensor Values, and Faults. Below this is a graphical representation of all the activities in the BPEL process, top to bottom.

PK6IPK}{@!OEBPS/img_text/med_depl_comps.htm@ Description of the illustration med_depl_comps.gif

The image shows the Instances page of the Mediator service engine. The following tabs display at the top from left to right: Dashboard, Statistics, Instances, Faults, and Deployed Components (selected). Below this is the Search section with fields for Name and Composite Name. To the right are the Search and Reset buttons. Below this is the View drop-down list. Below this is a table with the following columns from left to right: Name, Composite, Status, Total Instances, Running Instances, Faulted Instances Recoverable and Faulted Instances Non Recoverable.

PK)X<PK}{@'OEBPS/img_text/bam_log_files_server.htm0 Description of the illustration bam_log_files_server.gif

The image shows specific messages in the bam_server1.log file, displayed as a table with the following columns: Time, Message Type, Message ID, and Message.

PKN50PK}{@(OEBPS/img_text/bam_dist_list_add_mem.htm< Description of the illustration bam_dist_list_add_mem.gif

The image shows the Oracle BAM Administrator Distribution List management page. The left side of the page shows a list of Distribution Lists. The right side of the page shows the Distribution List Name field and the Select Members list. The Save and Cancel buttons appear below the Select Members list.

PKd.PK}{@ OEBPS/img_text/hwf_plugnotif.htm+ Description of the illustration hwf_plugnotif.gif

The image shows the System MBean Browser navigator on the left. On the right is the setCustomNSDriverPropertyValue operation displaying the following fields: MBean Name, Operation Name, Description, and Return Type. The right side of the screen also shows the Parameters as a table with the following columns: Name, Description, Type, and Value. The Invoke and Return buttons appear at the top right of the screen.

PKx^v0+PK}{@&OEBPS/img_text/soaadmin_bpel_props.htm{ Description of the illustration soaadmin_bpel_props.gif

The image shows the BPEL Service Engine Properties and includes the following fields: Audit Level (a drop-down list), Audit Trail Threshold (Byte), Large Document Threshold (Byte), Dispatcher System Threads, Dispatcher Invoke Threads, Dispatcher Engine Threads, Payload Validation (a checkbox), and Disable BPEL Monitors and Sensors checkbox. Below this is the More BPEL Configuration Properties link. The Related Links drop-down menu and Apply and Revert buttons appear at the top right.

PK8{PK}{@'OEBPS/img_text/bam_wls_credmap_list.htmB Description of the illustration bam_wls_credmap_list.gif

The image shows the Credential Mappings table with the following columns: WLS User, EIS User, and Outbound Connection Pool. The New and Delete buttons appear above the table.

PK5xGBPK}{@!OEBPS/img_text/sca_sensordis4.htm1 Description of the illustration sca_sensordis4.gif

This image is described in the text immediately above the image.

PK}PK}{@"OEBPS/img_text/med_reseq_fault.htm Description of the illustration med_reseq_fault.gif

This image shows the Faults page for an Oracle Mediator component instance with resequenced messages.

PKQPK}{@$OEBPS/img_text/bpel_recoveryecid.htm= Description of the illustration bpel_recoveryecid.gif

This image shows the Warning message that is displayed when you click Show Details or the recovery icon. The contents of this message are described in the surrounding text.

PK]x*B=PK}{@#OEBPS/img_text/bpel_stats_upper.htm) Description of the illustration bpel_stats_upper.gif

The image shows the Statistics page of the BPEL service engine. The following tabs display at the top from left to right: Dashboard, Statistics (selected), Instances, Faults, Deployed Components, and Recovery. Below this are the Pending Requests and Active Requests graphs. Below this is the Thread Statistics section, which includes a table with the following columns from left to right: Name and Statistics.

PK,.)PK}{@OEBPS/img_text/ns_dep4.htm  Description of the illustration ns_dep4.gif

The image shows the Deployment Completed dialog box. The first area of the dialog box shows the Summary and includes the following fields: Version, Deployed Archive Location, Archive Type, Deployment Mode, Deployment Target, Application States, and Context Root. The second area of the dialog box shows the Progress Messages. The Close button appears at the bottom right of the dialog box.

PK.J  PK}{@,OEBPS/img_text/bam_em_policies_roles_add.htm> Description of the illustration bam_em_policies_roles_add.gif

The image shows the Edit Application Role: Report Architect page. The first area of the page shows the General information and includes the following fields: Application, Role Name, Display Name, and Description. The second area of the page shows the Members and Roles as a table with the following columns: Name and Type.

The final area of the page shows the Users as a table, with the Add User button highlighted.

PKhMC>PK}{@"OEBPS/img_text/ns_configdriver.htm Description of the illustration ns_configdriver.gif

The image shows the Email Driver Properties page for usermessagingdriver-email. The first area of page shows the Common Configuration and includes the following fields: Supported Delivery Types, Capability, Cost, Speed, Sender Addresses, Default Sender Address, Supported Protocols, Supported Carriers, Supported Content Types, Supported Status Types, and Sending Queues Info.

The second area of the page shows the Driver-Specific Configuration as a table with the following columns: Name, Description, Mandatory, Encoded Credential, and Value. The Apply and Revert buttons appear at the top right of the page.

PK PK}{@#OEBPS/img_text/sca_createwatch1.htm& Description of the illustration sca_createwatch1.gif

This image shows the Create Watch page. Below the title are Back, Next, Finish, and Cancel buttons. Below this is the Configure Watch Rule Expressions section. Below this is the Current Watch Rule field, which displays a watch rule. To the right of this section is the Edit button. Below this is the Expression section, with buttons for Add Expression, Combine, Uncombine, Move Up, Move Down, Remove, and Negate. Below this is a checkbox for the rule that is appearing in the Current Watch Rule field. Below this are buttons for Add Expression, Combine, Uncombine, Move Up, Move Down, Remove, and Negate. Below this are the Back, Next, Finish, and Cancel buttons

PKz+&PK}{@(OEBPS/img_text/bam_wls_domstructmenu.htm^ Description of the illustration bam_wls_domstructmenu.gif

The image shows the Domain Structure menu expanded to show the following items: Environment, Deployments, Services, Security Realms, Interoperability, and Diagnostics. The Deployments item is selected.

PKc^PK}{@OEBPS/img_text/soa_localopt.htm[ Description of the illustration soa_localopt.gif

This image shows the Trace section. At the top is the Show Instance IDs checkbox. Below this is a table with the following columns from left to right: Instance, Type, Usage, St, Time, and Composite Instance.

PKp`[PK}{@)OEBPS/img_text/bam_config_server_menu.htm} Description of the illustration bam_config_server_menu.gif

The image shows the Oracle BAM Server menu in Fusion Middleware Control. The following menu items are available: Home, Monitoring, Control, Logs, BAM Server Properties (selected), Security, System MBean Browser, and General Information.

PK)PK}{@"OEBPS/img_text/sca_instanceids.htm; Description of the illustration sca_instanceids.gif

The image shows four tabs at the top from left to right: Dashboard, Deployed Composites, Instances (selected), and Faults and Rejected Messages. Below this is the Search section, with fields for Instance ID, Name, ECID, Conversation ID, Start Time From, and Start Time To. Search and Reset buttons appear on the right side of the page.

Below this is the Filter By section, with the Execution State and Fault State lists, and the BPEL Recovery checkbox.

Below this are the View list, and Delete Selected, Delete with Options, and Abort buttons. Below this is a table with the following columns: Instance ID, Composite, Name, Conversation ID, Instance State, and Start Time.

PK=@;PK}{@(OEBPS/img_text/bpel_se_deployedcomps.htm3 Description of the illustration bpel_se_deployedcomps.gif

The image shows the Instances page of the BPEL service engine. The following tabs display at the top from left to right: Dashboard, Statistics, Instances, Faults, Deployed Components (selected), and Recovery. Below this is the Search section with fields for Name and Composite Name. To the right are the Search and Reset buttons. Below this is the View drop-down list. Below this is a table with the following columns from left to right: Name, Composite, Status, Total Instances, Running Instances, Faulted Instances Recoverable and Faulted Instances Non Recoverable.

PKq'PK}{@+OEBPS/img_text/bam_webservices_counters.htm Description of the illustration bam_webservices_counters.gif

The image shows the Oracle BAM web services counters, available through the links in the JEE Web Services page. The JEE Web Services page shows a table with the following columns: Name, Application, Port Name, and Invocation count.

PKήPK}{@"OEBPS/img_text/med_engine_dash.htm  Description of the illustration med_engine_dash.gif

The image shows the Dashboard tab of the Mediator Engine home page on Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control.

PKYV? PK}{@*OEBPS/img_text/soaapp_upper_helloworld.htmH Description of the illustration soaapp_upper_helloworld.gif

The image shows the home page of a SOA composite application. The following buttons appear at the top from left to right: Active, Retire, Shut Down, Test, and Settings. Below this are the following tabs from left to right: Dashboard, Instances, Faults and Rejected Messages, Unit Tests, and Policies. Below this is the Recent Instances section. which includes a Show Only Running Instances checkbox, and a table consisting of the following columns from left to right: Instance ID, Name, Conversation ID, Instance State, and Start Time.

Below this is the Recent Faults and Rejected Messages section, which includes a Show only system faults checkbox, and a table with the following columns from left to right: Error Message, Recovery, Fault Time, Fault Location, Composite Instance ID, and Logs.

PKTfPK}{@#OEBPS/img_text/sca_test_payload.htm Description of the illustration sca_test_payload.gif

The image shows the top of the Test Web Service page. At the far right is the Test Web Service button. Below this is a description of the page. Below this is the WSDL field. To the right of this is the Parse WSDL button. Below this is the Service label, the Port label, the Operation list, the Endpoint URL field, and the Edit Endpoint URL checkbox. Below this are the Request and Response tabs.

PKL PK}{@*OEBPS/img_text/bpel_com_dash_instances.htm] Description of the illustration bpel_com_dash_instances.gif

The image shows the Instances page. At the top are the following tabs from left to right: Dashboard, Instances (selected), Faults, and Policies. Below this is the Search section, with fields for Instance ID, Start Time From, Start Time To, Modified Date From, Modified Date To, and State.

Below this is the View list. Below this is a table with the following columns from left to right: Instance ID, State, Start Date, Last Modified Date, and Logs.

PK~b]PK}{@!OEBPS/img_text/hwf_comp_admin.htm Description of the illustration hwf_comp_admin.gif

The image shows the Administration page. At the top are the following tabs from left to right: Dashboard, Instances, Faults, Policies, and Administration (selected). Below this is the View drop-down list, Add URI button, and Remove button. Below this is a table with the following columns from left to right: Application Name, Host Name, HTTP Port, HTTPS Port, and URI.

PKǒ4PK}{@(OEBPS/img_text/bam_wls_adapterdeploy.htm8 Description of the illustration bam_wls_adapterdeploy.gif

The image shows the Deployments table with the OracleBamAdapter link selected. The Install, Update, Delete, Start, and Stop buttons appear at the top of the table.

PK|gd=8PK}{@"OEBPS/img_text/gs_soahomepage3.htm Description of the illustration gs_soahomepage3.gif

The image shows the Service Engines table, which includes the following columns from left to right: Name, Number of Components, and Faults.

PKrPK}{@-OEBPS/img_text/bam_em_policies_roles_user.htmm Description of the illustration bam_em_policies_roles_user.gif

The image shows the Add User dialog displaying the Search settings as the following two lists: Available Users and Selected Users. The Move, Move All, Remove, and Remove All buttons appear between the two lists.

PKrmPK}{@OEBPS/img_text/sca_deploy.htmf Description of the illustration sca_deploy.gif

The image shows the Select Archive page. At the top is the Archive or Exploded Directory section, in which you can select an archive that is on the machine where this web browser is running or select an archive or exploded directory on the server on which Enterprise Manager is running. Below this is the Configuration Plan section, in which you can select to not include a configuration plan, select a plan on the machine where this web browser is running or select a plan on the server on which Enterprise Manager is running.

PKZPK}{@!OEBPS/img_text/sca_sensordis7.htm1 Description of the illustration sca_sensordis7.gif

This image is described in the text immediately above the image.

PK-PK}{@OEBPS/img_text/rules1_logs1.htm Description of the illustration rules1_logs1.gif

The image shows the context menu in the navigation pane displaying the following menu items: Home, Monitoring, Control, Logs, SOA Deployment, Service Engines, Bindings, Services and References, Business Events, SOA Administration, Security, Administration, and General Information. The Logs menu item is expanded and shows the following sub-menu items: View Log Messages and Log Configuration.

PKPK}{@ OEBPS/img_text/soaapp_export.htm- Description of the illustration soaapp_export.gif

This image is described in the text immediately following this image.

PKzXPK}{@OEBPS/img_text/ns_configdrv.html Description of the illustration ns_configdrv.gif

The image shows the Associated Drivers screen displaying the following tabs: Local and All. The Local tab is selected and shows the data as a table with the following columns: Name, Driver Type, Status, and Configure Driver.

PKeգqlPK}{@%OEBPS/img_text/bpmn_dashboard_low.htmB Description of the illustration bpmn_dashboard_low.gif

This illustration is described in the text.

PK3 PK}{@&OEBPS/img_text/bam_admin_menu_user.htm Description of the illustration bam_admin_menu_user.gif

The image shows the Oracle BAM Administrator application showing the function list open and User management option selected.

PKGs^PK}{@ OEBPS/img_text/em_test_input.htm Description of the illustration em_test_input.gif

This figure displays how to enter input parameters for testing the decision trace in a SOA composite.

PKYPK}{@+OEBPS/img_text/wlconsole_providers_auth.htmM Description of the illustration wlconsole_providers_auth.gif

The image shows the Authentication Providers page. The page shows a list of authentication providers, with each entry showing the name, the description, and the version. A checkbox appears to the left of each entry. Above and below the list are the New, Delete, and Reorder buttons.

PK"PK}{@OEBPS/img_text/bam_em_mbean.htms Description of the illustration bam_em_mbean.gif

The image shows the Application Defined MBeans page. The Attributes tab is selected and the page shows a table with the following columns: Name, Description, Access, and Value. The Apply button appears at the top right of the page.

PK{xsPK}{@'OEBPS/img_text/bam_wls_credmap_user.htm8 Description of the illustration bam_wls_credmap_user.gif

The image shows the Create a New Security Credential Mapping page with the following options for the WebLogic Server User: User for creating initial connections, Default User, Unauthenticated WLS User (selected), and Configured User Name. The Back, Next, Finish, and Cancel buttons appear above the options.

PK]PK}{@!OEBPS/img_text/med_rout_stat2.htmt Description of the illustration med_rout_stat2.gif

The image shows the Route Target section of the Dashboard tab of the Mediator Component Home page. It displays the following details of route targets, from left to right: Name, Average Processing Time, and Average Invocation Time.

PK\ytPK}{@'OEBPS/img_text/soaapp_recovwithopts.htmv Description of the illustration soaapp_recovwithopts.gif

This image shows the Recover with Options dialog. At the top is the Common Recovery Action list. Retry is selected. Below this is the Common Recovery Options radio button. Below this is the Preset Batches list. Older than 24 Hours is the selected option. Below this is the Recover All radio button. Below this is the Recover All Recoverable Faults that Match These Criteria radio button. Within this section are the Fault Time From, Fault Time To, and Error Message Contains fields.

PK/{vPK}{@'OEBPS/img_text/bpel_comp_dash_lower.htmZ Description of the illustration bpel_comp_dash_lower.gif

The image shows the instance rate per min (Real-Time Data) section. On the left is the Instance Rate per Min (Real-Time Data) graph, which shows the throughput of instances in the last five minutes.

PK"F_ZPK}{@!OEBPS/img_text/b2b_flow_trace.htm4 Description of the illustration b2b_flow_trace.gif

Flow Trace page showing Oracle B2B Faults and Trace messages.

PKlPK}{@$OEBPS/img_text/sca_soaapp_search.htm` Description of the illustration sca_soaapp_search.gif

The image shows the following tabs at the top from left to right: Dashboard, Instances, Faults and Rejected Messages (selected), Unit Tests, and Policies. Below this is the Search section, with fields for Error Message Contains, Fault ID, Name, Fault Time From, Fault Time To, and Composite Instance ID. Search and Reset buttons appear on the right side of the page.

Below this is the Show only recoveable faults checkbox and the Fault Types list. All Faults is selected in this list.

Below this are the Select list, View list, Recovery Actions list, Delete Rejected Messages button, and Recover With Options button. Below this is a table with the following columns: Error Message, Recovery, Fault Time, Rejected Message, Fault Location, Composite Instance ID, and Logs.

PKrޤPK}{@&OEBPS/img_text/sca_weblogicconsole.htmp Description of the illustration sca_weblogicconsole.gif

The image shows the Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console. On the left side from top to bottom is the Change Center, the Domain Structure (with entries for Environment, Deployments, Services, Security Realms, Interoperability, and Diagnostics), the How Do I section (with documentation links), and the System Status section. On the right side of the page are the Configuration, Monitoring, Control, Security, Web Service Security, and Notes tabs. Below this are the General, JTA, EJBs, Web Applications, Logging, and Log Filters tabs. Below this is the Save button. Below this are properties that you can define: Enable Administration Port, Production Mode, and Enable Cluster Constraints. Descriptions are provided for each.

PKyEupPK}{@$OEBPS/img_text/med_comphome_pol2.htm Description of the illustration med_comphome_pol2.gif

The image shows the Attach/Detach Policies page that appears when you click Attach/Detach on the Policies tab of the Mediator Component Home page. This page displays the following details, from left to right: Name, Category, Enabled, Description, and View Full Description.

Use the Attach or Detach buttons appearing below to attach or detach a policy according to your need.

PK=^!BPK}{@!OEBPS/img_text/med_flow_trace.htm Description of the illustration med_flow_trace.gif

The image shows the Audit Trail tab for the instance details of a Mediator service component instance.

PKtPK}{@&OEBPS/img_text/bam_em_server_chart.htm1 Description of the illustration bam_em_server_chart.gif

The image shows the Client Requests in Progress as a graph.

PKä8PK}{@ OEBPS/img_text/med_inst_rate.htm6 Description of the illustration med_inst_rate.gif

The image shows the Instance Rate per Min (Real-Time Data) section of the Dashboard tab of the Mediator Component Home page. This section displays a graph that shows real-time data for successful, faulted, and incoming instances in the last five minutes. Click Table View to get a tabular representation of the data.

PK#EPK}{@#OEBPS/img_text/bam_metric_graph.htm9 Description of the illustration bam_metric_graph.gif

The image shows the Performance Summary page for OracleBamServer showing graphs of Active Data Sessions, Outgoing Message Rate (per sec), and Events Fire Rate (per sec).

PKӁc>9PK}{@OEBPS/img_text/sca_faults2.htmI Description of the illustration sca_faults2.gif

The image shows the Recovery Action section. In the upper left is a list with the value of Retry selected. To the right is the After Successful Retry label. A value of None is selected in the list. Below this and to the left is the Variable list. No value is selected. Below this is the Value field.

PKQ7PK}{@OEBPS/img_text/sca_menu3.htm~ Description of the illustration sca_menu3.gif

The image shows the farm home page. The navigational menu appears on the left. On the right is the Deployments section, which shows a deployments graph, and a deployment table with the following columns from left to right: Name, Status, and Target.

PK*mPK}{@&OEBPS/img_text/soaadmin_bpmn_props.htm Description of the illustration soaadmin_bpmn_props.gif

The image shows the BPMN Service Engine Properties and includes the following fields: Audit Trail Threshold (Byte), Large Document Threshold (Byte), Dispatcher System Threads, Dispatcher Invoke Threads, Dispatcher Engine Threads, Payload Validation (a checkbox), and Audit Level (a drop-down list). The Related Links drop-down menu and Apply and Revert buttons appear at the top right.

PKxSPK}{@!OEBPS/img_text/soaapp_policy2.htm Description of the illustration soaapp_policy2.gif

The image shows the OK, Validate, and Cancel buttons in the upper right corner. Below this is the Attached Policies table, with the following columns left to right: Policy Name, Category, Enabled, Description, and View Full Description. Attached policies appear in this table.

Below this table are the Attach and Detach buttons. Below this is the Available Policies section. A Search list is displayed below this. The value of Policy Category is selected. Below this is a table with the following columns from left to right: Policy Name, Category, Enabled, Description, and View Full Description.

PK6[PK}{@%OEBPS/img_text/b2b_config_mbeans3.htmt Description of the illustration b2b_config_mbeans3.gif

The image shows the Operations page for the b2b MBean. The following operations (links) are listed: addProperty, getProperty, getPropertyComment, getPropertyValue, remove, setProperty, setPropertyComment, and setPropertyValue.

PK( MytPK}{@!OEBPS/img_text/bam_config_web.htm: Description of the illustration bam_config_web.gif

The image shows the Oracle BAM Web Properties page in Fusion Middleware Control displaying the following fields: Application URL, Report Loading Indicator, and Server Name.

PKv?:PK}{@'OEBPS/img_text/bpmn_comp_dash_upper.htm@ Description of the illustration bpmn_comp_dash_upper.gif

This illustration is described in the text.

PKlPK}{@$OEBPS/img_text/sca_test_payload2.htmD Description of the illustration sca_test_payload2.gif

The image shows the Request and Response tabs. The Request tab is selected. The first area of the tab shows the Security settings and includes the following radio buttons: WSS Username Token, HTTP Basic Auth, Custom Policy, and None (selected). The second area of the tab shows the Quality of Service settings and includes the following fields: WS-RM with WSDL Default, None, and Custom radio buttons and Policy URI text field; MTOM with WSDL Default, None, and Custom radio buttons and Policy URI text field; WS-Addressing with WSDL Default, None, and Custom radio buttons and Policy URI text field.

The third area of the tab shows the HTTP Transport Options and includes the following fields: Enable SOAP Action (a checkbox) and SOAP Action. The fourth area of the tab shows the Additional Test Options and includes the following fields: Enable Stress Test (a checkbox), Concurrent Threads, Loops per Thread, and Delay in Milliseconds. The final area of the tab shows the Input Arguments and includes a drop-down list along with Name, Type, and Value fields.

PK oMPK}{@OEBPS/img_text/bpel_if.htmN Description of the illustration bpel_if.gif

This image shows the defined if condition.

PKjPK}{@!OEBPS/img_text/bam_log_viewer.htm Description of the illustration bam_log_viewer.gif

The image shows the Log Messages page showing all message types selected and a few Warning messages in the table.

PKǰ'PK}{@+OEBPS/img_text/bam_wls_connpoolprop_rmi.htmy Description of the illustration bam_wls_connpoolprop_rmi.gif

The image shows the Settings for oracle.bam.adapter.adc.soap.SOAPConnectionFactory page displaying the following tabs: General, Properties, Transaction, Authentication, Connection Pool, and Logging. The Properties tab is selected and the page shows the Outbound Connection Properties as a table with the following columns: Property Name, Property Type, and Property Value. The Property Value for the HostName property is selected. The Save button appears above and below the table.

PK^T~yPK}{@,OEBPS/img_text/soaadmin_createpartition2.htm Description of the illustration soaadmin_createpartition2.gif

This image shows the partitions in the navigator and in the Manage Partitions page.

PK&ycPK}{@OEBPS/img_text/ns_login.htm Description of the illustration ns_login.gif

The image shows the Oracle Enterprise Manager navigation pane with the User Messaging Server node expanded.

PK mPK}{@*OEBPS/img_text/bpmn_com_dash_instances.htm= Description of the illustration bpmn_com_dash_instances.gif

This illustration is described in the text.

PKKڤsPK}{@"OEBPS/img_text/busevent_faults.htm2 Description of the illustration busevent_faults.gif

The image shows the Faults page. The following tabs appear at the top from left to right: Events, Subscriptions, and Faults (selected). Below this is the Search section, Below this is the Search section, with fields for Error Message Contains, Fault ID, Fault Time From, Fault Time To, Subscription Type, Event Namespace, Event Name, and Subscriber.

The Search and Reset buttons display on the right. Below this is the Select drop-down list, View drop-down list, Retry button, and Abort button. Below this is a table with the following columns from left to right: Error Message, Recovery, Fault Time, Event Namespace, Event Name, Subscriber Name, and Subscription Type.

PK72PK}{@(OEBPS/img_text/soaadmin_common_props.htm Description of the illustration soaadmin_common_props.gif

The image shows the SOA Infrastructure Common Properties screen. The first area shows the following fields: Audit Level (a drop-down list), Capture Composite Instance State (a checkbox), and Payload Validation (a checkbox). The second area of the screen shows the UDDI Registry Properties and includes the following fields: Inquiry URL, User, and Password. The third area of the screen shows the Server URLs and includes the following fields: Callback Server URL and Server URL. The fourth area shows the Display Data Counts section with the Disable fetching of instance and fault count metrics. Each metric can still be retrieved on demand checkbox and the Restrict Display on Instances and Faults to the last time_period checkbox.

The bottom area of the screen shows the Advanced properties.

The top right of the screen shows the Related Links drop-down menu and the Apply and Revert buttons.

PK/S`$PK}{@'OEBPS/img_text/bam_em_policies_menu.htmW Description of the illustration bam_em_policies_menu.gif

The image shows Fusion Middleware Control. The left side of the page shows the navigation pane with OracleBamServer selected. The right side of the page shows the BAM Server drop-down menu with the following menu items: Home, Monitoring, Control, Logs, BAM Server Properties, Security, System MBean Browser, and General Information. The Security menu item is expanded and shows the following sub-menu items: Application Policies and Application Roles.

PK\WPK}{@#OEBPS/img_text/med_srveng_fault.htm+ Description of the illustration med_srveng_fault.gif

The image shows the Faults tab of the Mediator Service Engine Home page. The Search section lets you enter the following details to search for particular faults that occurred to different Mediator components ran by the Mediator Service Engine, from left to right: Error Message Contains, Fault ID, Fault Time from, Fault Time to, Composite Instance ID, and Component Instance ID.

Below the Search section, the Show Only Recoverable Faults checkbox enables you to view only those faults on which you can perform recovery actions. The Fault Type list enables you to choose the type of the fault.

Below is the View section that displays the following details of all the faults meeting the particular criteria, from left to right: Error Message, Recovery, Fault Type, Composite, Component, Component Instance ID, Case, and Logs.

PKsnPK}{@OEBPS/img_text/ns_dep2.htm| Description of the illustration ns_dep2.gif

The image shows the Oracle Enterprise Manager Select Target screen. The screen shows the data as a table with the following columns: Select, Name, Type, and Deployed Applications. The Cancel, Back and Next buttons appear at the top right of the screen.

PK'PK}{@#OEBPS/img_text/rules1_dashboard.htm_ Description of the illustration rules1_dashboard.gif

The image shows the following tabs: Dashboard, Instances, Faults and Rejected Messages, Unit Tests, and Policies. The Dashboard tab is selected. The first section of the page shows the Recent Instances as a table with the following columns: Instance ID, Name, Conversation ID, State, and Start Time. The second section of the page shows the Recent Faults and Rejected Messages as a table with the following columns: Error Message, Recovery, Fault Time, Fault Location, Composite Instance ID, and Logs.

The third section of the page shows the Component Metrics as a table with the following fields: Name, Component Type, Total Instances, Running Instances, and Faulted Instances (Recoverable and Non Recoverable). The top right of the page shows the Related Links drop-down menu.

PKzlPK}{@)OEBPS/img_text/em_test_trace_dec_comp.htm  Description of the illustration em_test_trace_dec_comp.gif

This figure displays how to open the instance details page for viewing the details of the Decision Service Component.

PK9 PK}{@ OEBPS/img_text/sca_sensordis.htm Description of the illustration sca_sensordis.gif

This image shows the Enable/Disable BPEL Monitors and Sensors option being selected.

PK[ PK}{@!OEBPS/img_text/bam_em_refresh.htm Description of the illustration bam_em_refresh.gif

The image shows the Refresh icon in upper right corner of Fusion Middleware Control Console.

PK#'PK}{@!OEBPS/img_text/med_inst_det2n.htmq Description of the illustration med_inst_det2n.gif

The image shows the Faults tab of the Mediator Instance Details page of a Mediator component instance, where a fault occurred. It displays the following details of a fault, from left to right: Message, Recovery, Time, and Case.

PKpuvqPK}{@&OEBPS/img_text/hwf_mon_taskdetails.htmU Description of the illustration hwf_mon_taskdetails.gif

The image shows the Task Details section displaying the following fields: Task Number, State, Outcome, Priority, Creator, Created Date, Updated Date, Expiration Date, Assignees, and Acquired By.

PK57ZUPK}{@!OEBPS/img_text/sca_references.htmG Description of the illustration sca_references.gif

The image shows the two tabs at the top from left to right: Services and References (selected). Below this is a View list. Below this is a table consisting of the following columns from left to right: Reference, Type, Composite, Partition, Total Messages, Average Processing Time (sec), and Faults.

PKuPK}{@%OEBPS/img_text/bam_server_ems_tab.htmT Description of the illustration bam_server_ems_tab.gif

The image shows the Oracle BAM Server page displaying the following tabs: Active Data Cache, Event Engine, Report Cache, and Enterprise Message Sources. The Enterprise Message Sources tab is selected and the page shows the following information: Messages and Operations Per Second.

PKZPK}{@"OEBPS/img_text/bam_metric_menu.htmZ Description of the illustration bam_metric_menu.gif

The image shows the BAM Web drop-down menu. The following menu items are available: Home, Monitoring, Control, Logs, BAM Web Properties, System MBean Browser, and General Information. The Monitoring menu item is expanded to show the Performance Summary sub-menu item (selected).

PKhPK}{@%OEBPS/img_text/sca_partitionmenu2.htm; Description of the illustration sca_partitionmenu2.gif

This image shows the cursor selecting a partition.

PKޔPK}{@OEBPS/img_text/sca_unittest.htmu Description of the illustration sca_unittest.gif

The image shows the following buttons at the top from left to right: Active, Retire, Shut Down, Test, and Settings. Below this are four tabs from left to right: Dashboard, Instances, Faults and Rejected Messages, Unit Tests (selected), and Policies. Below this are the Test Cases (selected) and Test Runs sub-tabs. Below this is a table with the following columns from left to right: Name, Description and Select (which is a checkbox). In the Name column are two folders: SimpleAssertions and SimpleEmulations.

PKYPK}{@ OEBPS/img_text/med_comp_main.htmc Description of the illustration med_comp_main.gif

The image shows the Dashboard tab of the Mediator Component home page. This section displays information about the recent instances of the Mediator component, including a list of recent instances, a list of recent faults, routing statistics, and instance rate per minute.

PKyRdˡPK}{@ OEBPS/img_text/med_resq_grp2.htm Description of the illustration med_resq_grp2.gif

This image shows a timed-out message for an Oracle Mediator component with resequenced messages. In this case, the resequencer group is timed out.

PKJNp$PK}{@OEBPS/img_text/bc_direct.htmv Description of the illustration bc_direct.gif

The image shows the Dashboard page. The following tabs display at the top from left to right: Dashboard (selected) and Faults and Rejected Messages. Below this is the Instances and Faults graph, which shows the total number of incoming messages and faults since server startup. Below this is the Recent Faults and Rejected Messages section, which includes a Show only system faults checkbox and a table that includes the following columns from left to right: Error Message, Fault Time, and Composite Instance ID.

PKoPK}{@OEBPS/img_text/bc_policies2.htm@ Description of the illustration bc_policies2.gif

This image shows the following tabs at the top from left to right: Dashboard, Policies, Faults and Rejected Messages (selected), and Properties. Below this is the Attach/Detach icon and Disable icon. Below this is a table with the following columns: Policy Name, Category, Policy Reference Status, Total Violations, Authentication, Authorization, and Confidentiality. Below this is the Security Configuration Details section. Which includes Apply and Revert buttons on the upper right side, and a table with the following columns: Name, Value, and Original Value.

PKp:}PK}{@)OEBPS/img_text/bpel_instancefaultrec2.htmt Description of the illustration bpel_instancefaultrec2.gif

The image shows the Recovery Action list with a value of Retry selected. Below this is the Variable list with a value of crInput selected. To the right of this is the Set Value button. Below this is the Value field in which you can enter values.

PKOyPK}{@.OEBPS/img_text/wlconsole_providers_reorder.htmW Description of the illustration wlconsole_providers_reorder.gif

The image shows the Reorder Authentication Providers page. The main area of the page shows the list of available authentication providers. To the right of the list, an up arrow and a down arrow is shown. Above and below the principal area are the OK and Cancel buttons.

PKPK}{@ OEBPS/img_text/med_instances.htm Description of the illustration med_instances.gif

The image shows the Instances page of the Mediator service engine. The following tabs display at the top from left to right: Dashboard, Statistics, Instances (selected), Faults, and Deployed Components. Below this is the Search section, with fields for Instance ID, Start Time From, Start Time To, Modified Date From, Modified Date To, State, and Component. The Search and Reset buttons display to the right. Below this is the View drop-down list and a table with the following columns from left to right: Instance ID, Component, Composite, State, Start Date, Last Modified Date, Source, and Logs.

PK PK}{@)OEBPS/img_text/em_test_msg_flow_trace.htm Description of the illustration em_test_msg_flow_trace.gif

This figure displays how to launch the Flow Trace page to view the decision flow trace.

PKPK}{@'OEBPS/img_text/bpel_comp_dash_upper.htm$ Description of the illustration bpel_comp_dash_upper.gif

The image shows the Dashboard page. At the top are the following tabs from left to right: Dashboard (selected), Instances, Faults, and Policies. Below this is the Recent Instances section, which includes a Show Only Running Instances checkbox and a table that consists of the following columns from left to right: Instance ID, State, Start Date, Last Modified Date, and Logs. Below this is the Show All link.

Below this is the Recent Faults section, which includes a Show only system faults checkbox and a table that consists of the following columns from left to right: Error Message, Recovery, Fault Time, Component Instance ID, Activity, and Logs.

PK[[)$PK}{@$OEBPS/img_text/soaapp_testresult.htm Description of the illustration soaapp_testresult.gif

The image shows the top of the Test Web Service page. At the far right is the Test Web Service button. Below this is a description of the page. Below this is the WSDL field. To the right of this is the Parse WSDL button. Below this is the Service label, the Port label, the Operation list, the Endpoint URL field, and the Edit Endpoint URL checkbox.

Below this are the Request and Response (selected) tabs. Below this is the Test Status label, the Response Time (ms) label, the Tree View list, and the Launch Message Flow Trace link. Below this is a table with the following columns from left to right: Name, Type, and Value.

PK9^ PK}{@$OEBPS/img_text/bam_server_rc_tab.htmp Description of the illustration bam_server_rc_tab.gif

The image shows the Oracle BAM Server page displaying the following tabs: Active Data Cache, Event Engine, Report Cache, and Enterprise Message Sources. The Report Cache tab is selected and the page shows the following information: General and View Sets.

PKMXPK}{@#OEBPS/img_text/ns_unregisdriver.htm? Description of the illustration ns_unregisdriver.gif

The image shows the Oracle Enterprise Manager. The left side of the screen shows the navigation pane with the usermessagingserver node selected. The right side of the screen shows the System MBean Browser. The left side of the System MBean Browser shows a navigation pane with the ComponentAdministration bean selected. The right side of the System MBean Browser shows the unregisterDriverInstance operation details and parameters.

PKRRD?PK}{@ OEBPS/img_text/bpel_foreach2.htmB Description of the illustration bpel_foreach2.gif

This image shows the flow of a BPEL 2.0 process.

PKPK}{@$OEBPS/img_text/sca_partitionmenu.htm, Description of the illustration sca_partitionmenu.gif

This image is described in the text immediately below the graphic.

PKiPK}{@'OEBPS/img_text/bpel_comp_audittrail.htm> Description of the illustration bpel_comp_audittrail.gif

The image shows the Audit Trail page. The following tabs display at the top from left to right: Audit Trail (selected), Flow, Sensor Values, and Faults. Below this and to the right are the Audit Level Settings and View Raw XML links. Below this is the audit trail of each activity in the BPEL process.

PKY-PK}{@#OEBPS/img_text/bc_delrejectmess.htmU Description of the illustration bc_delrejectmess.gif

The image shows the Delete: Rejected Messages dialog. Below this is a description of the page. Below this is the Common Delete Options radio button (selected). Below this is the Preset Batches list, with a value of Older than 24 Hours selected. Below this is the Delete All radio button. This deletes all rejected messages of this composite. Below this is a Delete All Rejected Messages That Match These Criteria radio button. Below this are fields for Start Time From, and Start Time To. In the lower right are Delete and Cancel buttons.

PKZtPK}{@,OEBPS/img_text/odsm_select_dnpath_domain.htmu Description of the illustration odsm_select_dnpath_domain.gif

The image shows the Select Distinguished Name (DN) Path dialog box. The dialog box shows an expanded hierarchy of distinguished names with the dc=oracle entry selected. At the bottom right of the dialog box are the Select and Cancel buttons.

PK7SCPK}{@!OEBPS/img_text/bc_properties2.htm< Description of the illustration bc_properties2.gif

The image shows the web service page displaying the following tabs: Dashboard, Policies, Faults, and Properties. The Properties tab is selected and shows the following fields: Append, PhysicalDirectory, FileNamingConvention, and NumberMessages. The Apply and Revert buttons appear at the top right of the tab.

PKP`6PK}{@"OEBPS/img_text/soaadmin_fetch2.htm Description of the illustration soaadmin_fetch2.gif

This image shows the following tabs at the top from left to right: Dashboard, Deployed Composites, Instances, and Faults and Rejected Messages.

In the upper right is the Recent Instances and Faults for the last 10 minutes message.

Below this on the left side is the Recent Composite Instances section. In this section are the Show Only Running Instances checkbox, and the Number of Running Instances checkbox. Below this is a table with the following columns: Instance ID, Composite, and Start Time. To the right is the Deployed Composites section, which includes a table with the following columns: Composite, Status, Mode, Instances, and Faulted Instances. An entry in the Instances tab is selected. A message is displaying that says the following: Click to calculate the number of instances for this composite (You may experience a delay).

PK|;PK}{@$OEBPS/img_text/soaapp_fullscreen.htmo Description of the illustration soaapp_fullscreen.gif

The image shows the following buttons at the top from left to right: Active, Retire, Shut Down, Test, and Settings. Below this are the following tabs from left to right: Dashboard, Instances, Faults and Rejected Messages, Unit Tests, and Policies. Below this is the Recent Instances section. which includes a Show Only Running Instances checkbox, Number of Instances link, and a table consisting of the following columns from left to right: Instance ID, Name, Conversation ID, Instance State, and Start Time. Below this is the Recent Faults and Rejected Messages section, which includes a Show only system faults checkbox, and a table with the following columns from left to right: Error Message, Recovery, Fault Time, Fault Location, Composite Instance ID, and Logs.

PKF *gPK}{@OEBPS/img_text/ns_assoc_drv.htms Description of the illustration ns_assoc_drv.gif

The image shows the Associated Drivers section of the Oracle Enterprise Manager displaying the following tabs: Local and All. The All tab is selected and shows the data as a table with the following columns: Name, Driver Type, Status, and Configure Driver.

PKhPK}{@'OEBPS/img_text/bam_web_reportserver.htmD Description of the illustration bam_web_reportserver.gif

The image shows the BAM Web Statistics Report Server page. The first area of the page shows the Connections and includes the following fields: Open Connections, Message Rate (per second), and Message Rate Per Connection (second). The second area of the page shows the Reports and includes the Open Reports field. The final area of the page shows the View Sets and includes the following fields: Open and Average Open Time (seconds).

PKJO1IDPK}{@*OEBPS/img_text/bam_em_policies_preseed.htm Description of the illustration bam_em_policies_preseed.gif

The image shows the Edit Application Role: Report Architect page with pre-seeded BamReportArchitects group in the Roles list.

PKPK}{@ OEBPS/img_text/bpel_se_recov.htm Description of the illustration bpel_se_recov.gif

The image shows the Recovery page. At the top are the following tabs from left to right: Dashboard, Statistics, Instances, Faults, Deployed Composites, and Recovery (selected). Below this is the Search section, with fields for Type, Duration, Message State, Composite Name, Component Name, and ECID. To the right are the Search and Reset buttons.

Below this are the Select drop-down list, View drop-down list, Recover button, Mark Cancelled button, and Reset button. Below this is a table with the following columns from left to right: Conversation ID, Recover, Component, Composite, and Time.

PKW|,4PK}{@(OEBPS/img_text/bp_bpel_message_recov.htma Description of the illustration bp_bpel_message_recov.gif

This image shows the BPEL Message Recovery Required message. To the right of this is the Show Details button, the Go to BPEL Recovery Console link, the Set Time Threshold button, and Disable Alert button.

PK?KfaPK}{@%OEBPS/img_text/sca_selectinstance.htm Description of the illustration sca_selectinstance.gif

The image shows that to select a composite, you must click to the left of the name.

PK[)PK}{@OEBPS/img_text/rules1_logs2.htm Description of the illustration rules1_logs2.gif

The image shows the Log Messages page. The first section of the page shows the search settings and includes the following drop-down lists: Date Range and Hours. The first area also shows the following checkboxes: Message Types, Incident Error, Error, Warning, Notification, Trace, and Unknown. The first area further shows the following fields: Message, Composite Name, Component Name, Component Instance ID, and Composite Instance ID. The Search and Add Fields buttons appear at the bottom of the first area.

The second section shows the search results as a table with the following columns: Time, Message Type, Message ID, and Message.

PKۘPK}{@ OEBPS/img_text/med_cross_ref.htm+ Description of the illustration med_cross_ref.gif

The image shows the Cross References screen. The first area of the screen shows the Select Tables and Columns section and includes the following radio buttons: All tables and Select a table and columns. The section also shows the Tables list and Columns checkboxes. The second area of the screen shows the Select Values section and includes the following radio buttons: All, Marked for delete, and Updated between.

PKC0+PK}{@OEBPS/img_text/soase_jd_028.htm  Description of the illustration soase_jd_028.gif

The image shows the UMS architecture diagram connecting the WebLogic Server Web Center Instance and WebLogic Server SOA Instance.

PK PK}{@OEBPS/img_text/sca_soamenu2.htmn Description of the illustration sca_soamenu2.gif

The image shows the navigation tree with the SOA node expanded and the soa-infra (soa_server1) node further expanded to show the child nodes. Running SOA composite applications display under the default partition of soa-infra.

PK[snPK}{@"OEBPS/img_text/soaadmin_fetch8.htm] Description of the illustration soaadmin_fetch8.gif

This image shows the Number of Instances (for the last 10 minutes) message. The Running Instances field displays the number of running instances. The Total Instances field shows displays the total number of instances. The Recalculate button appears in the lower right corner.

PKUWݣPK}{@.OEBPS/img_text/soaadmin_hwf_taskservpropsl.htm Description of the illustration soaadmin_hwf_taskservpropsl.gif

The image shows the Advanced section of the Workflow Task Service Properties screen displaying the following fields: Worklist Application URL, Pushback Assignee, and Portal Realm Mapping. The section also shows the Task Auto Release Configuration as a table with the following columns: Priority, Default Duration, and Percentage of Expiration.

PKmPK}{@OEBPS/img_text/ns_seven.htm Description of the illustration ns_seven.gif

The image shows the View Log File screen for the soa_server1-diagnostic.log file. The first area of the screen shows the Download button. The second area of the screen shows the following fields: Date Range, Start Date, and End Date. The second area also shows the Search button.

The third area of the screen shows the search results as a table with the following columns: Time, Message Type, Message ID, and Message. The fourth area of the screen shows the message details including the following fields: Message Level, ECID, Relationship ID, Component, Module, Message, Host, Host IP Address, User, and Thread ID.

PKLPK}{@&OEBPS/img_text/med_reseq_inst_det2.htm Description of the illustration med_reseq_inst_det2.gif

This image shows the details of a fault message for an Oracle Mediator component with resequenced messages.

PK2!^PK}{@OEBPS/img_text/ns_emone.htm] Description of the illustration ns_emone.gif

The image shows the Oracle Enterprise Manager. The left side of the screen shows the navigation pane with the usermessagingdriver-email node selected. The right side of the screen shows Message Latency as a graph.

PKk%b]PK}{@OEBPS/img_text/ns_msgstatus.htmL Description of the illustration ns_msgstatus.gif

The image shows the Message Status screen for the usermessagingserver. The first area of the screen shows the Search Message Status and includes the following fields: Maximum Messages Displayed, Operation, Overall and Status. The first area also shows the Search and Reset buttons, as well as the Add Fields drop-down menu.

The second area of the screen shows the search results as a table with the following columns: Message ID (Recipient), Recipient, Operation, Overall Status, and Timestamp. The Resend button appears at the top of the table.

PK݉PK}{@!OEBPS/img_text/bam_start_page.htm@ Description of the illustration bam_start_page.gif

The image shows the Oracle BAM start page displaying buttons for launching Oracle BAM Active Viewer, Oracle BAM Active Studio, Oracle BAM Architect, and Oracle BAM Administrator.

PKW"VE@PK}{@(OEBPS/img_text/bam_web_openconngraph.htm: Description of the illustration bam_web_openconngraph.gif

The image shows the Open Connections as a graph.

PKCPK}{@"OEBPS/img_text/bpel_comp_flow2.htm| Description of the illustration bpel_comp_flow2.gif

The image shows the Activity Details alert displaying the invokeCR error message with the following text: 'Faulted while invoking operation "process" on provider "CreditRatingService"'. The Close button appears at the bottom right of the alert.

PK7jDPK}{@OEBPS/img_text/bc_dashboard.htm\ Description of the illustration bc_dashboard.gif

The image shows the Dashboard page. The following tabs display at the top from left to right: Dashboard (selected), Policies, Faults and Rejected Messages, and Properties. Below this is the Instances and Faults graph, which shows the total number of incoming messages and faults since server startup. Below this is the Recent Faults and Rejected Messages section, which includes a Show only system faults checkbox and a table that includes the following columns from left to right: Error Message, Fault Time, and Composite Instance ID.

PK.PK}{@%OEBPS/img_text/bam_metric_pallete.htm( Description of the illustration bam_metric_pallete.gif

The image shows the fully-expanded Metric Palette for Oracle BAM Web.

PKPK}{@#OEBPS/img_text/bpmn_comp_faults.htmD Description of the illustration bpmn_comp_faults.gif

This illustration is described in the text.

PKţPK}{@#OEBPS/img_text/sca_createwatch4.htm+ Description of the illustration sca_createwatch4.gif

This image shows the Create Watch page. Below the title are Back, Next, Finish, and Cancel buttons. Below this is the Add Expression section. The Select an MBean Type from the following list radio button is selected. Below this is the MBean Type list. Below this is the Enter a custom MBean Type radio button. Below this is the Custom MBean types field. Below this are the Back, Next, Finish, and Cancel buttons

PK0+PK}{@+OEBPS/img_text/soaadmin_deletepartition.htmJ Description of the illustration soaadmin_deletepartition.gif

This image shows the Delete SOA Partition dialog. A table with the following columns appears: Composite, Status, Mode, Instances Total, Instances Faulted, and Last Modified Date.

PKOJPK}{@#OEBPS/img_text/soaapp_instance3.htm  Description of the illustration soaapp_instance3.gif

This image shows from left to right the Instance ID, Name, Conversion ID, State, Composite Sensors, and Start Time columns.

PK;X PK}{@"OEBPS/img_text/gs_soahomepage2.htm Description of the illustration gs_soahomepage2.gif

The image shows the Composite Instances and Faults graph, which shows the total number of instance and faults since the last server startup.

PKZ PK}{@%OEBPS/img_text/bam_dist_list_cont.htmU Description of the illustration bam_dist_list_cont.gif

The image shows the Oracle BAM Administrator Distribution List management page. The left side of the page shows a list of Distribution Lists. The right side of the page shows the Continue button.

PK Description of the illustration b2b_config_attr2.gif

The image shows the Operation: setProperty page. A table lists parameters with the following names: key, value, and comment. The key is the name of the property. The value is the value of the property, and the comment is a comment about the property. All are of type java.lang.String. The Value field for key shows b2b.payloadObfuscation. The Value field for value shows true. The Value field for comment is empty.

PKÜ\3.PK}{@OEBPS/img_text/bam_ums_menu.htmd Description of the illustration bam_ums_menu.gif

The image shows the User Message Email Driver drop-down menu with the following menu items: Home, Control, Logs, Performance Summary, Email Driver Properties (selected), System MBean Browser, and General Information.

PKidPK}{@ OEBPS/img_text/med_resq_grp1.htm. Description of the illustration med_resq_grp1.gif

This image shows a fault message for an Oracle Mediator component with resequenced messages. In this case, the resequencer group is faulted with a message error.

PKR63.PK}{@%OEBPS/img_text/bam_server_adc_tab.htm Description of the illustration bam_server_adc_tab.gif

The image shows the Oracle BAM Server page displaying the following tabs: Active Data Cache, Event Engine, Report Cache, and Enterprise Message Sources. The Active Data Cache tab is selected and the page shows the following information: View Sets, Threads, Operations Per Second, Average BatchSize for Operations, and Total Transactions.

PKznPPK}{@OEBPS/img_text/med_prop_n.htm Description of the illustration med_prop_n.gif

The image shows the Mediator Service Engine Properties page. You can set value for the following properties displayed from top to bottom on the page: Audit Level, Metrics Level, Parallel Worker Threads, Parallel maximum Rows Retrieved, Parallel Locker Thread Sleep, Error Locker Thread Sleep, Parameters, Container ID Refresh Time, and Container ID Lease Timeout.

PK+BPK}{@OEBPS/img_text/ns_three.htm Description of the illustration ns_three.gif

The image shows the Log Configuration displaying the following tabs: Log Levels and Log Files. The Log Levels tab is selected and shows the search information as a table with the following columns: Logger Name, Oracle Diagnostic Logging Level (Java Level), and Log File. The Oracle Diagnostic Logging Level drop-down list is expanded and shows the possible logging levels.

PK9PK}{@OEBPS/img_text/bc_pubuddi3.htm2 Description of the illustration bc_pubuddi3.gif

This image is described in the table immediately below this image.

PK99PK}{@)OEBPS/img_text/odsm_select_person_tab.htmo Description of the illustration odsm_select_person_tab.gif

The image shows the information screen for a user, and includes the Person, Attributes, Subtree Access, and Local Access tabs. The Person tab is selected. The first area of the screen shows the following (non-editable) fields: Distinguished Name, Created by, Created at, Modified by, and Modified at. The first area of the Person tab shows the Basic User Information and includes the following fields: User Name, First Name, Last Name, Title, Manager, Employee Number, Email Address, and Upload Photo (with a Browse button). The second area of the Person tab show part of the Contact Information and includes the following fields: Postal Address, Home Postal Address, Telephone Number, and Mobile. At the top right of the screen are the Apply and Revert buttons.

PKxi? PK}{@$OEBPS/img_text/em_test_trace_dev.htm Description of the illustration em_test_trace_dev.gif

This figure displays the rule execution trace for the Decision Service Component.

PK1PK}{@-OEBPS/img_text/bam_wls_connpoolprop_https.htmw Description of the illustration bam_wls_connpoolprop_https.gif

The image shows the Outbound Connection Properties as a table with the following columns: Property Name, Property Type, and Property Value. The Property Value for the HostName property is selected. The Save button appears above the table.

PK7PK}{@OEBPS/img_text/busevent_def.htmg Description of the illustration busevent_def.gif

The image shows the XML Definition: OrderReceivedEvent dialog box showing the Event Definition (EDL). The OK button appears at the bottom right of the dialog box. The dialog box is identical for both EDN-DB and EDN-JMS.

PKŬlgPK}{@"OEBPS/img_text/soaadmin_fetch1.htmL Description of the illustration soaadmin_fetch1.gif

This image shows the following tabs at the top from left to right: Dashboard, Deployed Composites, Instances, and Faults and Rejected Messages.

Below this is the Recent Composite Instances section. In this section are the Show Only Running Instances checkbox, and the Running and Total counts. Below this is a table with the following columns: Instance ID, Composite, and Start Time. To the right is the Deployed Composites section, which includes a table with the following columns: Composite, Status, Mode, Instances, and Faulted Instances.

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The image shows the Policies page. The following tabs display at the top of the page: Dashboard, Policies (selected), Faults and Rejected Messages, and Properties tabs.

Below this is a table with the following columns from left to right: Policy Name, Policy Set, Category, Total Violations, Authentication, Authorization, and Confidentiality. These last three columns fall under a main header of Security Violations.

Below this is the Directly Attached Policies table. Below this is the Attach/Detach button. Below this are the following columns, from left to right, of the Directly Attached Policies table: Policy Name, Category, Policy Reference Status, Total Violations, Authentication, Authorization, and Confidentiality. These last three columns fall under a main header of Security Violations.

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The image shows the System MBean Browser with the Application Defined MBeans expanded (several levels) to show the BAMCommonConfig, BAMServerConfig, and BAMWebConfig beans.

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The image shows the Faults tab of the Mediator Component Home page. The Search section lets you enter the following details to search for particular faults occurring to the Mediator instances: Error Message Contains, Fault ID, Fault Time From, Fault Time To, Composite Instance ID, and Component Instance ID. Below this section is the Show only recoverable faults check box that lets you see only recoverable faults, if selected. Right to this check box is the Fault Type list that lets you select the fault type. The View section displays the following details of all the faults meeting the particular criteria, from left to right: Error Message, Recovery, Fault Time, Component Instance ID, Case, and Logs.

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The image shows the Faults and Rejected Messages page. The following tabs display at the top from left to right: Dashboard, Policies, Faults and Rejected Messages (selected), and Properties. Below this is the Search section with fields for Error Message Contains, Fault ID, Fault Time From, Fault Time To, and Composite Instance ID. The Search and Reset buttons appear to the right. Below this is the Fault Type drop-down list, with All Faults as the selected value. Below this is the View drop-down list and the Delete Rejected Messages button. Below this is a table with the following columns left to right: Error Message, Fault Time, Rejected Message, and Composite Instance ID.

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The image shows the Faults page. At the top are the following tabs from left to right: Dashboard, Instances, Faults (selected), Policies, and Administration. Below this is the Search section, with fields for Fault ID, Fault Time From, Fault Time To, Composite Instance ID, and Component Instance ID. To the right are the Search and Reset buttons.

Below this is the Show only recoverable faults checkbox and the Fault Type drop-down list, in which All Faults is selected. Below this are the Select and View drop-down lists. Below this is a table with the following columns from left to right: Error Message, Recovery, Fault Time, Component Instance ID, and Logs.

PKl-/*PK}{@OEBPS/img_text/bam_log_menu.htm9 Description of the illustration bam_log_menu.gif

The image shows the context menu for the OracleBamWeb node, showing the following menu items: Home, Monitoring, Control, Logs, BAM Web Properties, System MBean Browser, and General Information. The Logs menu item is expanded to show the following sub-menu items: View Log Messages (selected) and Log Configuration.

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The image shows the Outbound Connection Pool Configuration Table with the oracle.bam.adapter.adc.soap.SOAPConnectionFactory item expanded to show eis/bam/soap (selected) and eis/bam/soap1013 sub-nodes. The New and Delete buttons appear below the table.

PKdmPK}{@(OEBPS/img_text/soaadmin_comp_control.htm4 Description of the illustration soaadmin_comp_control.gif

This image is described in the text immediately above.

PKToPK}{@ OEBPS/img_text/hwf_se_faults.htmZ Description of the illustration hwf_se_faults.gif

The image shows the Faults page. At the top are the following tabs from left to right: Dashboard, Statistics, Instances, Faults (selected), Deployed Composites, and Notification Management. Below this is the Search section, with fields for Fault ID, Fault Time From, Fault Time To, Composite Instance ID, and Component Instance ID. To the right are the Search and Reset buttons.

Below this is the Show only recoverable faults checkbox and Fault Type drop-down list, in which All Faults is selected. Below this are the Select and View drop-down lists. Below this is a table with the following columns from left to right: Error Message, Recovery, Fault Time, Composite, Component, Component Instance ID, and Logs.

PK)_ZPK}{@OEBPS/bp_mang.htm Managing BPEL Process Service Components and Engines

14 Managing BPEL Process Service Components and Engines

This chapter describes how to manage BPEL process service components and service engines, including recovering from service component and service engine faults, managing service component policies, performing BPEL process message recovery, and storing instance and callback message data in Oracle Coherence cache.

This chapter includes the following topics:

For more information, see the following sections:

14.1 Recovering from BPEL Process Service Component Faults

You can monitor and perform individual and bulk fault recoveries for BPEL process service components that are identified as recoverable. For BPEL process faults to be identified as recoverable, there must be a fault policy defined that is bound to the fault (through the fault-bindings.xml file) and which triggers the action ora-human-intervention. However, without defining any fault policies, the fault takes its standard course as either a recoverable or nonrecoverable fault.

To recover from BPEL process service component faults:

  1. Access this page through one of the following options:

    From the SOA Infrastructure Menu...From the SOA Folder in the Navigator...
    1. Select Home.

    2. Select the Deployed Composites tab.

    3. In the Composite section, select a specific SOA composite application.

    1. Under soa-infra, expand the partition.

    2. Select a specific SOA composite application.


  2. Select the BPEL process service component in the Component Metrics section.

  3. Click Faults.

    The Faults page displays the following details:

    • A utility for searching for a specific fault by specifying criteria and clicking Search. Click the Help icon for details.

    • Faults that occurred in the service component, including the fault ID, error message, whether you can recover from the fault, time at which the fault occurred, service component instance ID, activity in which the fault occurred, and a link to a log file describing the fault.

    Description of bpel_comp_faults.gif follows
    Description of the illustration bpel_comp_faults.gif

    BPEL process service component faults identified as recoverable can be recovered.

  4. Select faults for recovery using one of the following methods. Fault recovery selection at the BPEL process service component level equals the SOA Infrastructure level, SOA composite application level, and Oracle Mediator service component level.

    For...Then...

    Single fault recovery

    There are three options from which to choose for single-fault recovery:

    1. Click the row of the fault that has been identified as recoverable. With the row highlighted, select a specific action from the Recovery Action list, as described in Step 6.

    2. In the Recovery column, click the Recover link to access the Faults page of the instance audit trail to perform fault recovery.

    3. In the Error Message column, click the message of a fault that has been identified as recoverable. This displays complete fault details, including the fault ID, fault time, fault location, fault type, and error message text. A Recover Now option is displayed for recoverable faults. Click Recover Now to access the Faults page of the instance audit trail to perform fault recovery.

    Bulk fault recovery

    There are two options from which to choose for bulk-fault recovery:

    1. Use Shift+Click or Control+Click to select specific faults in the rows.

      or

    2. From the Select menu, choose Select All Recoverable. Then use Shift+Click or Control+Click to deselect the faults to not include in the recovery operation.

      Then:

    3. Select an action from the Recovery Action list, as described in Step 6.

      Note: Only the actions applicable to all selected faults are available.

    Recovery of all faults

    1. From the Select menu, choose Select All Recoverable.

    2. Select an action from the Recovery Action list, as described in Step 6.

      Note: Only the actions applicable to all selected faults are available.



    Note:

    In most cases, fault policy actions are automatically executed. The only exception is if you defined a fault policy that uses the action ora-human-intervention. This action creates a recoverable fault that can be recovered from Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control.


  5. Select an action from the Recovery Action list.

    ActionDescription

    Retry

    Retries the instance directly. An example of a scenario in which to use this recovery action is when the fault occurred because the service provider was not reachable due to a network error. The network error is now resolved.

    Abort

    Terminates the entire instance.

    Replay

    Replays the entire scope activity again in which the fault occurred.

    Rethrow

    Rethrows the current fault. BPEL fault handlers (catch branches) are used to handle the fault. By default, all exceptions are caught by the fault management framework unless an explicit rethrow fault policy is provided.

    Continue

    Ignores the fault and continues processing (marks the faulted activity as a success).


  6. Perform the following additional monitoring tasks from within the faults table:

    1. Click the Show only recoverable faults checkbox to display only faults from which you can recover.

    2. From the Fault Type list, select to display all faults, system faults, business faults, or Oracle Web Services Manager (OWSM) faults in the faults table. Click the Help icon for a description of these fault types.

    3. From the View list, select Columns > Fault ID to display the fault IDs for each error message. The fault ID is automatically generated and uniquely identifies a fault. The fault ID is also displayed when you click an error message.

    4. In the Component Instance ID column, click a specific service component ID to access task details about the instance (for example, the current state of a task). Rejected messages do not have a component instance ID.

    5. In the Logs column, click a link to access the Log Messages page with filtered messages specific to that instance.

For more information, see the following documentation:

14.2 Managing BPEL Process Service Component Policies

You can attach and detach policies to and from BPEL process service components in currently deployed SOA composite applications. Policies apply security to the delivery of messages. Oracle Fusion Middleware uses a policy-based model to manage web services.


Note:

Before attaching policies, see Oracle Fusion Middleware Security and Administrator's Guide for Web Services for definitions of available policies and details about which ones to use in your environment.


To manage BPEL process service component policies:

  1. Access this page through one of the following options:

    From the SOA Infrastructure Menu...From the SOA Folder in the Navigator...
    1. Select Home.

    2. Select the Deployed Composites tab.

    3. In the Composite section, select a specific SOA composite application.

    1. Under soa-infra, expand the partition.

    2. Select a specific SOA composite application.


  2. Select the BPEL process service component in the Component Metrics section.

  3. Click Policies.

    The Policies page enables you to attach and detach policies to and from BPEL process service components. The Policies section displays the attached policy name, the policy reference status (enabled or disabled) that you can toggle, the category (Management, Reliable Messaging, MTOM Attachment, Security, or WS-Addressing), the violations, and the authentication, authorization, confidentiality, and integrity failures since the SOA Infrastructure was last restarted.

    Description of bpel_comp_policy.gif follows
    Description of the illustration bpel_comp_policy.gif

  4. Click Attach/Detach.

    If multiple components are available, you are prompted to select the service or component for which to perform the attachment or detachment.

  5. Select the service or component to which to attach or detach a policy.

    This invokes a dialog for attaching or detaching policies.

    Policies currently attached appear in the Attached Policies section. Additional policies available for attachment appear in the Available Policies section.

  6. Select to attach policies appropriate to your environment.

  7. Click Attach.

  8. When you are finished attaching policies, click Validate.

  9. If an error message appears, make the necessary corrections until you no longer have any validation errors.

  10. Click OK.

    The attached policy is displayed in the policies table.

For more information, see the following documentation:

14.3 Recovering from BPEL Process Service Engine Faults

You can monitor and perform individual and bulk recoveries of faults occurring in BPEL process service engines that are identified as recoverable. All BPEL process service component faults, regardless of the SOA composite application instance of which they are a part, can be viewed in the BPEL process service engine. For BPEL process faults to be identified as recoverable, there must be a fault policy defined that is bound to the fault (through the fault-bindings.xml file) and which triggers the action ora-human-intervention. However, without defining any fault policies, the fault takes its standard course as either a recoverable or nonrecoverable fault.

To recover from BPEL process service engine faults:

  1. Access this page through one of the following options:

    From the SOA Infrastructure Menu...From the SOA Folder in the Navigator...
    1. Select Service Engines > BPEL.

    1. Right-click soa-infra.

    2. Select Service Engines > BPEL.


  2. Click Faults.

    The Faults page displays the following details:

    • A utility for searching for a specific fault by specifying criteria and clicking Search. Click the Help icon for details.

    • Faults that occurred in the service engine, including the fault ID, the error message, whether you can recover from the fault, the time at which the fault occurred, the SOA composite application and service component in which the fault occurred, and the service component instance ID.

    Description of bpel_se_faults.gif follows
    Description of the illustration bpel_se_faults.gif

    BPEL process service engine faults identified as recoverable can be recovered.

  3. Select faults for recovery using one of the following options. As with fault recovery at the SOA Infrastructure level, SOA composite application level, and Oracle Mediator service component level, you can perform single fault recovery, bulk fault recovery, and recovery of all faults. See Step 5 of Section 14.1, "Recovering from BPEL Process Service Component Faults" for instructions on selecting faults to perform these types of recovery.


    Note:

    In most cases, fault policy actions are automatically executed. The only exception is if you defined a fault policy that uses the action ora-human-intervention. This action creates a recoverable fault that can be recovered from Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control.


  4. Select an action from the Recovery Action list.

    ActionDescription

    Retry

    Retries the instance with an option to provide a retry success action. An example of a scenario in which to use this recovery action is when the fault occurred because the service provider was not reachable due to a network error. The network error is now resolved.

    Abort

    Terminates the entire instance.

    Replay

    Replays the entire scope activity again in which the fault occurred.

    Rethrow

    Rethrows the current fault. BPEL fault handlers (catch branches) are used to handle the fault. By default, all exceptions are caught by the fault management framework unless an explicit rethrow fault policy is provided.

    Continue

    Ignores the fault and continues processing (marks the faulted activity as a success).


  5. Perform the following additional monitoring tasks from within the faults table:

    1. Click the Show only recoverable faults checkbox to only display faults from which you can recover.

    2. From the Fault Type list, select to display all faults, system faults, business faults, or OWSM faults in the faults table. Click the Help icon for a description of these fault types.

    3. From the View list, select Columns > Fault ID to display the fault IDs for each error message. The fault ID is automatically generated and uniquely identifies a fault. The fault ID is also displayed when you click an error message.

    4. In the Composite column, click a specific SOA composite application to access its home page.

    5. In the Component column, click a specific service component to access its home page.

    6. In the Component Instance ID column, click a specific service component ID to access task details about the instance (for example, the current state of a task). Rejected messages do not have a component instance ID.

For more information, see the following sections:

14.4 Performing BPEL Process Service Engine Message Recovery

You can perform a manual recovery of undelivered invoke or callback messages due to a transaction rollback in the process instance. Recovery of invoke messages applies to asynchronous BPEL processes only. Synchronous BPEL processes return an error to the calling client and are not recoverable from the Recovery page. Recoverable activities are activities that failed and can be recovered. For example, if you are using the file adapter to initiate an asynchronous BPEL process and your system fails while the instance is processing, you can manually perform recovery when the server restarts to ensure that all message records are recovered.

You can also manage messages that have failed automatic recovery attempts by the BPEL process service engine. To ensure that automatic recovery of these messages is not attempted multiple times, these messages are placed in the exhausted state. You can then perform one of the following actions on these messages:

  • Return them to the automatic recovery queue

  • Never attempt a recovery on them again

  • Attempt to recover them immediately

For example, assume you have a BPEL process that writes to a database adapter. If the database is down, these messages are sent to a recovery queue. Automatic recovery of these messages fails while the database is down. Such messages are marked with the exhausted state so that automatic recovery is not attempted on them again. When the database begins running again, you can reset these messages (return them to the automatic recovery queue) so that an automatic recovery is attempted on them again.

To perform BPEL process service engine message recovery:

  1. Access this page through one of the following options:

    From the SOA Infrastructure Menu...From the SOA Folder in the Navigator...
    1. Select Service Engines > BPEL.

    1. Right-click soa-infra.

    2. Select Service Engines > BPEL.


  2. Click Recovery.

    The Recovery page displays the following details:

    • A Refresh Alarm Table button for resynchronizing lost, in-memory, Quartz-scheduled jobs in the database. For example, assume a timer on a wait activity or on an onAlarm bran"t݋ch of a pick activity was initiated, but the transaction was rolled back. You can resynchronize these jobs with the BPEL instances residing in the wait activity/onAlarm branch in the database.

    • A utility for searching for a specific message failure by specifying criteria and clicking Search. Click the Help icon for details.

      You can enter the execution context ID (ECID) value in the ECID field. The ECID value enables you to track a message flow that crosses instances of different composite applications. If there are BPEL process messages requiring recovery and the AuditConfig property in the System MBean Browser is set to All (the default value), the following message is displayed in the Trace table of the Flow Trace page:

      BPEL Message Recovery Required
      

      Clicking Show Details or the recovery icon that appears next to this message displays a Warning dialog with information about the number of invoke, callback, and activity recoverable message types and the ECID value. You can copy the ECID value from the Warning dialog, paste it into the ECID field, and select the recoverable message type from the Type list as part of creating your search criteria on the Recovery page.

      For more information, see Section 13.1, "Monitoring the Audit Trail and Process Flow of a BPEL Process Service Component."


      Note:

      Oracle recommends that you add an index on the DLV_MESSAGE.ECID column of the DLV_MESSAGE table to improve SQL query performance when searching messages for a specific ECID value. This is because if there are too many entries in the DLV_MESSAGE table, the search query may be slow and may also overload the database. For information on adding an index, see Chapter "Creating Indexes" of the Oracle Database Administrator's Guide.


    • Message failures in the service engine, including the conversation ID, whether you can recover from the message failure, the service component and composite application in which the failure occurred, and the time at which the fault occurred. Depending on the state, you can recover these messages immediately, cancel these messages, or reset these messages for automatic recovery.

    Description of bpel_se_recov.gif follows
    Description of the illustration bpel_se_recov.gif


    Notes:

    • You can recover callback messages in resolved and undelivered states. These messages can be displayed for recovery when you execute search criteria in which you select Callback from the Type list and either Resolved or Undelivered from the Message State list. When a callback message first enters the BPEL process service engine, its state is undelivered. When this message is resolved to the target BPEL process instance either through matching a conversation ID or a correlation, the state is switched to resolved. In both of these states, the messages have not yet been consumed. Messages in these two states can be recovered (redelivered into the BPEL process service engine for consumption). In other situations, the callback messages can become stranded in both of these states. Messages in these states can also be recovered. However, there is no guarantee that stranded callback messages always remain in an undelivered state.

    • If you select Invoke from the Type list and Undelivered from the Message State list, and then click Recover, a recovery is performed. However, the Last Modified Date column remains empty for this instance on the Dashboard page of the Oracle BPEL Process Manager service component or service engine. This is the expected behavior. The last modified date is not displayed because the initial Oracle BPEL Process Manager instance (for example, bpel:70004) is created by the first invocation (that is, it is created, but has not yet been modified). The recovery of the undelivered invocation message always creates a new instance (for example, bpel:70005). The previously created instance (bpel:70004) is not used and remains permanently in the same status (the Last Modified Date column is empty). This information is provided for auditing purposes only.

    • The Message States list is applicable only to callback and invoke message type recovery, and not for activity message type recovery.


  3. Select a fault in the table.

  4. Select one of the following options:

    ActionDescription

    Recover

    Retries the message in which the fault occurred.

    If you select messages in the exhausted state and click this button, an attempt is made to recover them immediately. Should this recovery attempt also fail, the message is returned to the exhausted state. You must then select the message and click Reset to return the message to the automatic recovery queue.

    If an asynchronous BPEL process encounters a transaction rollback scenario because of any underlying exception error, it rolls back to the last dehydration activity. If this is a new instance, and a receive activity was the first dehydration activity, the BPEL process service engine creates a recoverable invoke. When you click Recover to recover the invoke, the service engine creates a new instance. This instance may run to completion with no exception error. However, you continue to see the older instance identified as faulted.

    Mark Cancelled

    Marks the message so it is never delivered. If you select messages in the exhausted state and click this button, recovery is never attempted on them.

    Note: The Recover and Mark Cancelled buttons are enabled in the following situations:

    • For users with the administrator or operator role. These buttons are disabled for users with the monitor role.

    • In the context of a recoverable message. You must select a recoverable message for these buttons to be enabled.

    For more information about roles, see Appendix C, "Roles and Privileges."

    Reset

    Select to reset exhausted messages to the undelivered state. This returns the message to the automatic recovery queue. The messages that are displayed in the exhausted state disappear from the messages table. If you select Undelivered from the Message State list and click Search, these messages are displayed. Callback messages in the exhausted state can also be reset to the resolved state and still remain recoverable.


    Once a message is submitted for recovery, the BPEL process service engine may take time to complete the action. This typically takes less than several seconds. During this time, the message remains visible in the Recovery page. Duplicate attempts to recover the same message in that period are ignored. Refresh the page every few seconds to receive the latest recovery status.


    Note:

    If you define a fault policy in a BPEL process with an ora-retry action and a fault occurs, the BPEL process attempts to recover from the fault the number of times you specified with the retryCount parameter. After this period, the process continues to be in a running state. The status of an activity in the process that has not completed (such as an invoke or receive) shows as pending a manual recovery. This is the expected behavior.


    For information about configuring the maximum number of times to attempt an invoke and callback message recovery, see Section 12.4, "Configuring Automatic Recovery Attempts for Invoke and Callback Messages."

14.5 Storing Instance and Callback Message Data in Oracle Coherence Distributed Cache on Oracle Exalogic Platforms

With BPEL processes, a potential performance issue is the number of database interactions required per instance. This factor is the main reason for synchronous transient flows outperforming asynchronous durable flows. You can design around this issue by utilizing synchronous transient flows in situations where low response times are required. However, you may be unable to design this type of flow for business reasons.

If you are running Oracle SOA Suite 11g Release 1 11.1.1.6 on an Oracle Exalogic platform, you can use the distributed cache feature of Oracle Coherence to store instance and callback message data from BPEL processes. This eliminates database reads, thereby reducing the number of database interactions.

Oracle Coherence is a component of Oracle Fusion Middleware that enables organizations to scale mission-critical applications by providing access to frequently used data. Oracle Coherence includes a distributed cache feature that provides scalability for both read and write access. Data is automatically, dynamically, and transparently partitioned across nodes. The distribution algorithm minimizes network traffic and avoids service pauses by incrementally shifting data.

Oracle Exalogic is an integrated hardware and software system designed to provide a platform for a range of application types and varied workloads. Oracle Exalogic is intended for large-scale, performance-sensitive, mission-critical application deployments.


Note:

If your environment is not using Oracle Exalogic, Oracle Coherence distributed cache is not available.


The potential performance gains of using a distributed cache for BPEL processes are as follows:

  • Eliminates the read required for messages (invoke and callback) from the database after initial delivery

  • Eliminates the read required for cube instances after a dehydration point

For more information about Oracle Coherence, see the Oracle Coherence Getting Started Guide and Oracle Coherence Developer's Guide.

For more information about Oracle Exalogic, see the Oracle Exalogic Machine Owner's Guide.

14.5.1 Introduction to the Oracle Coherence Caching Architecture

During dehydration, instance objects are stored in the database using the Java Persistence API (JPA) in a container-managed Enterprise JavaBeans (EJB) transaction. The BPEL process service engine registers the transaction afterCompletion listener for post-transaction processing. Instance objects modified during a transaction are tracked and made available to the afterCompletion listener, which updates the cache. Figure 14-1 provides details about the dehydration process.

Figure 14-1 Dehydration Process

Description of Figure 14-1 follows
Description of "Figure 14-1 Dehydration Process"

During rehydration, instance objects are read from cache. JTA implementations do not provide XA guarantees for transaction completion notification, and cache eviction may delete the object from cache. JTA implementations account for these two scenarios and address the issues of cache not returning an object or returning an older version of the object. Figure 14-2 provides details about the rehydration process.

Figure 14-2 Rehydration Process

Description of Figure 14-2 follows
Description of "Figure 14-2 Rehydration Process"

If the instance object is not found in cache, it is loaded from the database. In this scenario, cache does not provide any benefits. However, if you configure the correct amount of cache for your environment, this is not common. The correct cache size varies based on your environment. Therefore, Oracle Coherence configuration must be available and you should be able to configure it.

To identify object staleness, the CACHE_VERSION column in the database table is queried and compared to the corresponding cacheVersion object attribute. If the comparison fails, instance objects are loaded from the database. In this scenario, cache provides no benefit. However, this is a rare occurrence.

Cache lookup usually provides a valid object. In this scenario, performance gain for dehydration and rehydration using cache over direct writes (the default) equals the following:

(database read time + relational to object mapping) minus (Object serialization +
reading from serialized form + Coherence network overhead + query to
database for reading CACHE_VERSION)

It also reduces activity on the database server.

If Oracle Coherence cache is not available due to a network issue, the BPEL process service engine continues to work. If there are no errors, business process instances continue to progress. The BPEL process service engine checks for the availability of cache, resuming its usage when it is back online. While cache is unavailable, warning messages are logged and you may notice a decrease in performance.

14.5.2 Running with Default SOA Cluster Nodes and Coherence Cache Grid Nodes

BPEL process caches are not created on an Oracle SOA Suite cluster node. You must start the BPEL cache servers, which host the BPEL caches, by following the instructions in Section 14.5.5, "Starting the BPEL Process Cache Servers." Start at least four servers to observe an increase in performance.There is no requirement for ordering of an Oracle SOA Suite cluster and BPEL cache servers. The BPEL process service engine continues to function without BPEL cache servers, even when the qualityOfService property is set to CacheEnabled in Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control.

For more information about Oracle Coherence, see the Oracle Coherence Getting Started Guide and Oracle Coherence Developer's Guide.

14.5.3 Configuring Oracle Coherence Caching

The System MBean Browser property QualityOfService enables you to configure Oracle Coherence for dehydration. You must configure this property on all nodes in the SOA cluster.

To configure Oracle Coherence for dehydration:

  1. Access this page through one of the following options:

    From the SOA Infrastructure Menu...From the SOA Folder in the Navigator...
    1. Select SOA Administration > BPEL Properties.

    1. Right-click soa-infra.

    2. Select SOA Administration > BPEL Properties.


    The BPEL Service Engine Properties page is displayed.

  2. Click More BPEL Configuration Properties.

  3. In the Attributes tab, click QualityOfService.

  4. In the Value field, enter a value appropriate to your environment. This change does not require a SOA Infrastructure restart.

    Table 14-1 qualityOfService Values

    ValueDescription

    DirectWrite

    No cache is used for dehydration and rehydration. Read and write operations are done to the database. This is the default setting.

    CacheEnabled

    During dehydration, the instance data is stored in the database using an XA data source connection; the placement of objects into cache is part of post-transaction processing.

    During rehydration, data is fetched from the cache. If the data is not found (for example, the BPEL process cache servers are not available) or the version is stale, data is read from the database.


  5. Click Apply.

14.5.4 Configuring the Storage of Multiple Audit Trail Messages in One Transaction

For asynchronous flows, performance gains can be achieved by storing multiple audit messages in one transaction. To improve performance, you can store multiple audit trail messages (across instances) in a single transaction by setting the System MBean browser property AsynchAuditBatchSize in Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control.

Setting this property to an appropriate value reduces audit trail transaction commits. Instead, a commit is only performed when a specified limit is reached.

To configure the storage of multiple audit messages in one transaction:

  1. Access this page through one of the following options:

    From the SOA Infrastructure Menu...From the SOA Folder in the Navigator...
    1. Select SOA Administration > BPEL Properties.

    1. Right-click soa-infra.

    2. Select SOA Administration > BPEL Properties.


    The BPEL Service Engine Properties page is displayed.

  2. Click More BPEL Configuration Properties.

  3. In the Attributes tab, click AsynchAuditBatchSize.

  4. In the Value field, enter a value appropriate to your environment. The default value of -1 indicates that there is no audit trail message batching. Each audit message is persisted in its own transaction.

    The recommended value range is 5 to 25. For example, if you set this property to 8, this indicates that when eight audit trail messages have accumulated, a transaction is created with these messages and committed to the dehydration store.

    This parameter only impacts Oracle Exalogic environments. For other environments, it is not operational.

    This change does not require a SOA Infrastructure restart.

  5. Click Apply.

14.5.5 Starting the BPEL Process Cache Servers

You must run the start-bpel-cache.sh. script to start the BPEL process cache servers. This script must be run on UNIX platforms. This script is independent of the SOA cluster. It can be on the same node as the SOA cluster nodes or on a completely different host. The only requirement is network connectivity. The Oracle SOA Suite nodes must be reachable from the host on which the BPEL process cache servers are installed.

This script joins an Oracle SOA Suite cluster with a multicast, default address and port. These values match with the corresponding values in the $FMW_HOME/user_projects/domains/domain_name/bin/setDomainEnv.sh or setDomainEnv.bat file.

If you choose multicast for a cluster, but use a different address and port, you can override it in the bpelCacheEnv.sh file by using an environment variable or setting a shell variable. Use the same values for SOA managed servers (setDomainEnv.sh or setDomainEnv.bat).

The default cache configuration for the Oracle SOA Suite cluster must be unicast, and not multicast. For more information about this recommended cache configuration for Oracle SOA Suite clusters for Oracle Coherence, see the Oracle Fusion Middleware High Availability Guide or Oracle Fusion Middleware Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle SOA Suite for details.

To start the BPEL process cache servers:

  1. Go to the $FMW_HOME/SOA_ORACLE_HOME/bin directory.

  2. Open the start-bpel-cache.sh file.

  3. Follow the instructions inside this file to create the bpelCacheEnv.sh file and configure various environment variables.

    Environment/shell variable names and value formats are described in the initial notes section of the start-bpel-cache.sh file.

  4. Ensure that you first set the QualityOfService property to CacheEnabled in Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control, as described in Section 14.5.3, "Configuring Oracle Coherence Caching."

  5. Go to the $FMW_HOME/SOA_ORACLE_HOME/bin directory.

  6. Run the following script:

    start-bpel-cache.sh
    
PK]JB,"PK}{@OEBPS/ad_config.htm Configuring Oracle JCA Adapters