PK ִo@oa,mimetypeapplication/epub+zipPKִo@iTunesMetadata.plist[ artistName Oracle Corporation book-info cover-image-hash 263653212 cover-image-path OEBPS/dcommon/oracle-logo.jpg package-file-hash 398663797 publisher-unique-id E20835-02 unique-id 47967981 genre Oracle Documentation itemName Oracle® Fusion Middleware User's Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition (Oracle Fusion Applications Edition), 11g Release 1 (11.1.1) releaseDate 2011-12-20T10:25:6Z year 2012 PK^UPKִo@META-INF/container.xml PKYuPKִo@OEBPS/index.htm Index

Index

A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  Y  Z 

A

ABS math function, about, D.4.1
access control lists, 13.21
accessibility
about, C.1
designing for, C.3
using objects to enhance, C.4
ACOS math function, about, D.4.2
acting for other users, 1.9, 1.10
action link menus
about, 10.2
adding to dashboard pages, 10.15, 10.17
editing on dashboard pages, 10.24
action links, 10.23
about, 10.2
adding to dashboard pages, 10.15, 10.16
editing on dashboard pages, 10.24
action parameters, 10.9
actions
about, 10.1
about adding, 10.5
about conditionally enabling, 10.10
about inline, 10.7
about named, 10.6
about running, A.4
adding to agents, 10.18
adding to analyses, 10.14
adding to dashboard pages, 10.15, 10.16, 10.17
adding to initiatives and objectives, 10.20
adding to KPIs, 10.19
and displaying information to users, 10.11
and parameters, 10.9
creating from existing actions, 10.21
creating named, 10.12
editing named, 10.22
editing on agents, 10.25
editing on analyses, 10.23
editing on dashboard pages, 10.24
editing on initiatives and objectives, 10.27
editing on KPIs, 10.26
executing named, 10.30
running in dashboards, A.5
saving inline to the catalog, 10.28, 10.29
specifying settings for, 10.13
types, 10.3
upgrading from previous releases, 10.8
adding
a list of briefing books to dashboard pages, 4.24.5
actions to agents, 10.18
actions to analyses, 10.14
actions to dashboard pages, 10.15, 10.16, 10.17
actions to initiatives and objectives, 10.20
actions to KPIs, 10.19
content to briefing books, 4.24.2
content to dashboards, 4.6.2
dashboard prompts to dashboards and dashboard pages, 6.14, 6.15
groups to analyses, 5.10.5
new pages to dashboards, 4.6.1
Oracle BI Publisher reports to dashboard pages, 4.7
prompts to analyses, 2.9
scorecard objects to dashboards, 12.40
views to results of analyses, 3.4
Agent editor, 8.4
agent subscriptions, customizing, 8.14
agents
about, 8.1
accessing and managing alerts, 8.18
adding actions, 10.18
and alerts, 8.2
and devices and delivery profiles, 8.16, 8.17
and displaying a list of subscriptions, 8.12
and how they work, 8.3
controlling access to, 8.5
creating, 8.8
creating from analyses, 2.12
creating from KPIs, 11.8
customizing subscriptions to, 8.14
editing actions, 10.25
saving, 8.10
subscribing to, 8.11
unsubscibing from, 8.13
using conditions in, 9.8, 9.13
using customization in, 8.7
using to deliver briefing books, 4.24.6
viewing summaries, 8.9
agents' schedules, disabling and enabling, 8.15
AGGREGATE AT aggregate function, about, D.2.1.1
aggregate functions
about, D.2.1, D.2.1, D.2.2
AGGREGATE AT, D.2.1.1
AVG, D.2.1.2
AVGDISTINCT, D.2.1.3
BOTTOMN, D.2.1.4
COUNT, D.2.1.5
COUNT (*), D.2.1.7
COUNTDISTINCT, D.2.1.6
MAX, D.2.1.8
MEDIAN, D.2.1.9
MIN, D.2.1.10
NTILE, D.2.1.11
PERCENTILE, D.2.1.12
RANK, D.2.1.13
STDDEV, D.2.1.14
STDDEV_POP, D.2.1.15
SUM, D.2.1.16
SUMDISTINCT, D.2.1.17
TOPN, D.2.1.18
AGO time series function, about, D.2.3.1
alerts
about, 8.2
accessing and managing, 8.18
subscribing to RSS Feed, 8.19
analyses
about, 2.1
adding actions, 10.14
adding groups, 5.10.5
adding prompts, 2.9
and logical SQL statements, 2.10
and no data results, 2.8.2
applying named filters to, 5.6
creating, 2.6
creating agents from, 2.12
creating using BI Composer, 14.3, 14.4
displaying the results, 2.8
editing, 2.13
editing actions, 10.23
editing using BI Composer, 14.3, 14.5
embedding in dashboards, 2.14
formatting columns, 7.2
generating from KPIs, 11.7
modifying data in table views, A.10
process for constructing, 2.5
saving, 2.11
specifying the criteria, 2.7
using as filters, 5.8
viewing using BI Composer, 14.6
Analysis editor, 2.4
applying
conditional formatting, 7.4
saved customizations, 4.16
applying formats to layers, 3.5.4.7
archiving
about, 13.29
objects, 13.30
ASCII string function, about, D.3.1
ASIN math function, about, D.4.3
assessment mappings, 12.22.1, 12.23, 12.23
assigning
ownership of objects, 13.27
permissions, 13.25
weights in scorecards, 12.24
ATAN math function, about, D.4.4
ATAN2 math function, about, D.4.5
attribute columns, 2.2.1
auto-complete for promps, 6.8
availability of BI Composer, 14.2
AVG aggregate function, about, D.2.1.2
AVGDISTINCT aggregate function, about, D.2.1.3

B

Balanced Scorecard, 12.2
Between SQL logical operator, about, D.1.4.1
BI Composer
about, 14.1
availability, 14.2
creating analyses, 14.3, 14.4
editing analyses, 14.3, 14.5
installing and configuring, C.5
viewing analyses, 14.6
BIT_LENGTH string function, about, D.3.2
bookmark links, 4.22.1
BOTTOMN aggregate function, about, D.2.1.4
briefing books
about, 4.24
adding a list of to dashboard pages, 4.24.5
adding content to, 4.24.2
downloading, 4.24.4
editing, 4.24.3
using agents to deliver, 4.24.6
business owners, 11.9, 12.43

C

calculated items
about, 5.10
creating, 5.10.3
editing, 5.10.4
nesting, 5.10.6
calendar date/time functions
about, D.5
CURRENT_DATE, D.5.1
CURRENT_TIME, D.5.2
CURRENT_TIMESTAMP, D.5.3
DAY_OF_QUARTER, D.5.4
DAYNAME, D.5.5
DAYOFMONTH, D.5.6
DAYOFWEEK, D.5.7
DAYOFYEAR, D.5.8
HOUR, D.5.9
MINUTE, D.5.10
MONTH, D.5.11
MONTH_OF_QUARTER, D.5.12
MONTHNAME, D.5.13
NOW, D.5.14
QUARTER_OF_YEAR, D.5.15
SECOND, D.5.16
TIMESTAMPADD, D.5.17
TIMESTAMPDIFF, D.5.18
WEEK_OF_QUARTER, D.5.19
WEEK_OF_YEAR, D.5.20
YEAR, D.5.21
CASE (If) conditional expression, about, D.1.5.2
CASE (Switch) conditional expression, about, D.1.5.1
CAST conversion function, about, D.6.1
catalog
See Oracle BI Presentation Catalog
cause & effect maps
about, 12.31
creating, 12.32
opening, 12.36
CEILING math function, about, D.4.6
certification, 1.14
changing
dashboard properties, 4.8
properties of objects, 4.9
channels, 3.19.1.3
CHAR string function, about, D.3.3
CHAR_LENGTH string function, about, D.3.4
character literals, about, D.1.6.1
clearing
customizations, 4.18
sorts, 3.9.3
code columns, 2.3
column filters
combining and grouping, 5.7
creating and editing SQL statements, 5.9
creating or editing, 5.4
column formulas, 2.7.1
column prompts
about, 6.2
and selection steps, 6.10
creating and editing, 6.9
column selector views, editing, 3.5.6
columns
about, 2.2
adding and rearranging in views, 3.5.9.2
and visual indications, 2.2.2
and write back, 3.6.3
code, 2.3
combining using the Set operation, 2.7.2
display, 2.3
double, 2.3
drilling in, 3.8.1
editing the formula, 2.7.1
formatting, 7.2
types of, 2.2.1
comments, 12.44, 12.45
components of map views, 3.5.4.3
compound layouts, 2.8.1
CONCAT string function, about, D.3.5
conditional expressions
about, D.1.5
CASE (If), about and syntax, D.1.5.2
CASE (Switch), about and syntax, D.1.5, D.1.5.1
conditional formatting, 7.4
conditionally enabling actions, 10.10
conditions
about, 9.1
about inline, 9.5
about named, 9.4
creating named, 9.7
editing named, 9.12
elements of, 9.3
specifying settings, 9.11
using, 9.2
using in agents, 9.8, 9.13
using in dashboard pages, 9.9, 9.10, 9.14, 9.15
configuring drilling, 3.8.2
contacting business owners, 11.9, 12.43
content
adding to briefing books, 4.24.2
adding to dashboards, 4.6.2
conversion functions
about, D.6
CAST, D.6.1
IFNULL, D.6.2
TO_DATETIME, D.6.3
VALUEOF, D.6.4
copying results, A.1
COS math function, about, D.4.7
cosmetic formatting, 7.3
COT math function, about, D.4.8
COUNT aggregate function, about, D.2.1.5
COUNT(*) aggregate function, about, D.2.1.7
COUNTDISTINCT aggregate function, about, D.2.1.6
creating
additional compound layouts, 2.8.1
agents, 8.8
agents from analyses, 2.12
agents from KPIs, 11.8
analyses, 2.6
analyses using BI Composer, 14.3, 14.4
column filters, 5.4
column prompts, 6.9
currency prompts, 6.12
dashboard template pages, 4.20
dashboards, 4.5
image prompts, 6.11
KPI watchlists, 11.13
KPIs, 11.6
links to dashboard pages, 4.22
map views, 3.5.4.5
named actions, 10.12
named conditions, 9.7
new actions from existing actions, 10.21
scorecards, 12.8
selection steps, 5.3.1
variable prompts, 6.13
currency prompts
about, 6.3
creating or editing, 6.12
CURRENT_DATE calendar date/time function, about, D.5.1
CURRENT_TIME calendar date/time function, about, D.5.2
CURRENT_TIMESTAMP calendar date/time function, about, D.5.3
custom date and time format strings, 7.5
custom views
about, 12.33
creating, 12.34, 12.34
opening, 12.36
customizations
clearing, 4.18
saving, 4.15
customizing views, 3.17

D

Dashboard builder, 4.3
dashboard pages
about creating links to, 4.22
adding a list of briefing books, 4.24.5
adding actions, 10.15, 10.16, 10.17
adding dashboard prompts, 6.14, 6.15
adding Oracle BI Publisher reports, 4.7
and saved customizations, 4.14
changing properties of objects, 4.9
creating links to, 4.23
deleting, 4.11
deleting objects, 4.10
displaying map views, 3.5.4.8
editing actions, 10.24
modifying data in table views, A.10
publishing, 4.21
using conditions in, 9.9, 9.10, 9.14, 9.15
working with map views, A.7
dashboard prompts
about, 6.1
adding dashboards and dashboard pages, 6.14, 6.15
dashboard template pages
about, 4.19
creating, 4.20
dashboards
about, 4.1
accessing Oracle BI Publisher reports, A.11
adding content, 4.6.2
adding dashboard prompts, 6.14, 6.15
adding new pages, 4.6.1
adding scorecard objects, 12.40
changing properties, 4.8
controlling the look of, 4.4
creating, 4.5
editing, 4.6
embedding analyses, 2.14
opening and using, 4.13
running actions, A.5
saving, 4.12
data
sorting, 3.9.2
sorting in views, 3.9
working with selections of, 5.3
database functions
about, D.7
EVALUATE, D.7.1
EVALUATE_AGGR, D.7.3
EVALUATE_ANALYTIC, D.7.2
EVALUATE_PREDICATE, D.7.4
DATABASE system function, about, D.8.2
DATE data type, changing to, D.6.1
datetime literals, about, D.1.6.2
DAY_OF_QUARTER calendar date/time function, about, D.5.4
DAYNAME calendar date/time function, about, D.5.5
DAYOFMONTH calendar date/time function, about, D.5.6
DAYOFWEEK calendar date/time function, about, D.5.7
DAYOFYEAR calendar date/time function, about, D.5.8
decimal literal, about, D.1.6.3.2
defining
assessment mappings for scorecards, 12.23
detail views, 3.20.2
master views, 3.20.1
sections sliders, 3.5.9.5
DEGREES math function, about, D.4.9
deleting
dashboard pages, 4.11
objects on dashboard pages, 4.10
scorecard objects, 12.39, 12.39
delivery profiles
about, 8.16
configuring, 8.17
designing for accessibility, C.3
detail views
about, 3.19.2
defining, 3.20.2
devices
about, 8.16
configuring, 8.17
dimensions, 11.4
direct database requests, 2.15
disabling agents' schedules, 8.15
display columns, 2.3
displaying
map views on dashboards, 3.5.4.8
results of analyses, 2.8
double columns
about, 2.3
and selections steps, 5.3.4
downloading briefing books, 4.24.4
drilling
configuring, 3.8.2
effects on filters and selection steps, 3.8.3
in columns, 3.8.1
in results, A.3
in views, 3.8
drop targets, 3.5.9.1

E

edit mode in the Scorecard editor, 12.7
editing
actions added to agents, 10.25
actions added to analyses, 10.23
actions added to initiatives and objectives, 10.27
actions added to KPIs, 10.26
actions on dashboard pages, 10.24
analyses, 2.13
analyses using BI Composer, 14.3, 14.5
briefing books, 4.24.3
column filters, 5.4
column prompts, 6.9
column selector views, 3.5.6
currency prompts, 6.12
dashboards, 4.6
gauges, 3.5.3
graphs, 3.5.2
image prompts, 6.11
KPI watchlists, 11.13
KPIs, 11.6
legend views, 3.5.8
map views, 3.5.4, 3.5.4.8
named actions, 10.22
named conditions, 9.12
narrative views, 3.5.5
pivot tables, 3.5.1
saved customizations, 4.17
scorecard objects, 12.38
selection steps, 5.3.2
tables, 3.5.1
variable prompts, 6.13
view selector views, 3.5.7
views, 3.5
elements of conditions, 9.3
embedding
analyses in dashboards, 2.14
enabling
actions conditionally, 10.10
agents' schedules, 8.15
EVALUATE database function, about, D.7.1
EVALUATE_AGGR database function, about, D.7.3
EVALUATE_ANALYTIC database function, about, D.7.2
EVALUATE_PREDICATE database function, about, D.7.4
EVALUATE_PREDICATE Function, 5.5
executing named actions, 10.30
EXP math function, about, D.4.10
exporting
reports, KPIs, and analysis prompts data, 13.16
results, A.1
expression literals
character literals, about and expressing, D.1.6
decimal, about and expressing, D.1.6.3.2
integers, about and expressing, D.1.6.3.1
EXTRACTBIT math function, about, D.4.11

F

filters
about, 5.2
and drilling, 3.8.3
applying named to analyses, 5.6
combining and grouping column, 5.7
creating and editing SQL statements, 5.9
using saved analyses, 5.8
floating point literal, about, D.1.6.3.3
FLOOR math function, about, D.4.12
format and layers in map views, 3.5.4.6
formatting
about, 7.1
applying conditional, 7.4
columns in analyses, 7.2
cosmetic, 7.3
custom date and time format strings, 7.5
formulas,editing, 2.7.1
FROM clause syntax, about, D.1.1.5
functions
EVALUATE_PREDICATE, 5.5
functions of map views, 3.5.4.1
funnel graphs, types of, 3.2.2

G

gauges
defining section sliders for, 3.5.9.5
editing, 3.5.3
types of, 3.2.3
generating analyses from KPIs, 11.7
glob syntax, E
global header, 1.7
graphs
defining section sliders for, 3.5.9.5
editing, 3.5.2
types of, 3.2.1
zooming and scrolling, A.8
GROUP BY clause
syntax, about, D.1.1.7
group objects, 5.3.3
groups
about, 5.10
adding to analyses, 5.10.5
creating, 5.10.3
editing, 5.10.4
nesting, 5.10.6

H

hidden dashboards
upgrading from previous releases, 13.3
hierarchical columns, 2.2.1
Home page, 1.6
HOUR calendar date/time function, about, D.5.9

I

IFNULL conversion function, about, D.6.2
image prompts
about, 6.3
creating or editing, 6.11
In SQL logical operator, about, D.1.4.1
initiatives
about, 12.20
adding actions to, 10.20
and performance assessment, 12.22
creating, 12.21
editing actions in, 10.27
opening, 12.36
inline actions
about, 10.7
saving to the catalog, 10.28, 10.29
inline conditions, 9.5
inline objects, 5.1
inline prompts, 6.1
INSERT string function, about, D.3.6
integers literals, about, D.1.6.3.1
integrating with Microsoft Office, B.1
interaction of prompts, 6.6
interactions in views, 3.7
Is Null SQL logical operator, about, D.1.4.1

K

Key Performance Indicators
See KPIs
keyboard shortcuts, C.2
KPI details in scorecards, 12.35
KPI watchlists
about, 11.12
creating and editing, 11.13
opening, 12.36
KPIs
about, 11.1
about adding comments, 11.11
about overriding statuses, 11.10
about usage of, 11.3
adding actions, 10.19
and dimensions, 11.4
and evaluation, 11.2
contacting business owners, 11.9
creating an agent from, 11.8
creating and editing, 11.6
editing actions in, 10.26
generating analyses from, 11.7
opening, 11.5, 12.36

L

layers
about, 3.5.4.4
and formats, 3.5.4.6
applying formats to, 3.5.4.7
LEFT string function, about, D.3.7
legend views, editing, 3.5.8
LENGTH string function, about, D.3.8
level-based hierarchy, 2.2.1
Like SQL logical operator, about, D.1.4.1
linked views, A.9
linking views, 3.20
links
bookmark, 4.22.1
creating to dashboard pages, 4.23
prompted, 4.22.2
literals, in SQL, D.1.6
LOCATE string function, about, D.3.9
LOCATEN string function, about, D.3.10
LOG math function, about, D.4.13
LOG10 math function, about, D.4.14
logical operators, D.1.4.1
logical SQL statements, 2.10
Logical SQL, about, D
LOWER string function, about, D.3.11

M

map views
about layers, 3.5.4.4
and applying formats to layers, 3.5.4.7
components of, 3.5.4.3
creating, 3.5.4.5
editing, 3.5.4
editing and displaying on dashboard pages, 3.5.4.8
formats and layers in, 3.5.4.6
functions of, 3.5.4.1
terms used in, 3.5.4.2
working with on dashboard pages, A.7
master detail linking, 3.20
master views
about, 3.19.1
defining, 3.20.1
master-detail linking
about, 3.19
channels, 3.19.1.3
detail views, 3.19.2, 3.20.2
how it works, 3.19.3
master views, 3.19.1, 3.20.1
math functions
about, D.4
ABS, D.4.1
ACOS, D.4.2
ASIN, D.4.3
ATAN, D.4.4
ATAN2, D.4.5
CEILING, D.4.6
COS, D.4.7
COT, D.4.8
DEGREES, D.4.9
EXTRACTBIT, D.4.11
FLOOR, D.4.12
LOG, D.4.13
LOG10, D.4.14
MOD, D.4.15
PI, D.4.16
POWER, D.4.17
RADIANS, D.4.18
RAND, D.4.19
RANDFROMSEED, D.4.20
ROUND, D.4.21
SIGN, D.4.22
SIN, D.4.23
SQRT, D.4.24
TAN, D.4.25
TRUNCATE, D.4.26
mathematical operators, about, D.1.4.2
MAVG running aggregate function, about, D.2.2.1
MAX aggregate function, about, D.2.1.8
measure columns, 2.2.1
MEDIAN aggregate function, about, D.2.1.9
metadata information, 2.7.3
Microsoft, integrating with, B.1
MIN aggregate function, about, D.2.1.10
MINUTE calendar date/time function, about, D.5.10
mission statements
about, 12.12
defining, 12.12, 12.13
opening, 12.36
MOD math function, about, D.4.15
modes
for Scorecard, 12.7
for write back, 3.6.5
modifying the layout of data in views, 3.5.9
MONTH calendar date/time function, about, D.5.11
MONTH_OF_QUARTER calendar date/time function, about, D.5.12
MONTHNAME calendar date/time function, about, D.5.13
MSUM running aggregate function, about, D.2.2.2

N

named actions
about, 10.6
creating, 10.12
creating from existing actions, 10.21
editing, 10.22
executing, 10.30
named conditions
about, 9.4
creating, 9.7
editing, 9.12
named filters, applying to analyses, 5.6
named objects, 5.1
narrative views, editing, 3.5.5
NATURAL_JOIN keyword, using in SELECT_PHYSICAL statements, D.1.2.4
navigating Oracle BI Enterprise Edition, 1.5
nesting groups and calculated items, 5.10.6
no data results, 2.8.2
NOW calendar date/time function, about, D.5.14
NTILE aggregate function, about, D.2.1.11
numeric literals, about, D.1.6.3

O

objectives
about, 12.18
adding actions to, 10.20
and performance assessment, 12.22
creating, 12.19
editing actions in, 10.27
opening, 12.36
objects
accessing properties of, 13.17
archiving, 13.30
assigning ownership to, 13.27
assigning permissions to, 13.25
changing properties of, 4.9
deleting from dashboard pages, 4.10
inline, 5.1
named, 5.1
ownership of, 13.26
saving, 13.4
searching for, 13.6, 13.9
taking ownership of, 13.28
tasks for, 13.10
using to enhance accessibility, C.4
OCTET_LENGTH string function, about, D.3.12
opening
dashboards, 4.13
KPIs, 11.5
scorecard objects, 12.36
operators, in SQL, D.1.4
Oracle BI Enterprise Edition
and other products, 1.12
getting Help, 1.8
global header, 1.7
Home page, 1.6
introduction to, 1.1
navigating, 1.5
setting preferences for, 1.11
signing in, 1.3
signing out, 1.3
system requirements and certification, 1.14
Oracle BI Presentation Catalog
about, 1.2
searching, 13.6, 13.9
Oracle BI Publisher reports
accessing in dashboards, A.11
adding to dashboard pages, 4.7
Oracle Scorecard and Strategy Management
about, 12.1
troubleshooting, 12.46
ORDER BY clause syntax, D.1.1.8
overriding statuses, 11.10, 12.41, 12.42
ownership of objects, 13.26, 13.27, 13.28

P

parent-child hierarchy, 2.2.1
PERCENTILE aggregate function, about, D.2.1.12
performance assessment of initiatives and objectives, 12.22
PERIODROLLING time series function, about, D.2.3.2
permissions
about, 13.19
and access control lists, 13.21
and object assignments, 13.20
assigning, 13.25
availability by object type, 13.23
definitions, 13.22
recommendations for setting, 13.24
perspectives
about, 12.14
creating, 12.15
PI math function, about, D.4.16
pinned dimension values, 11.4
pivot tables, editing, 3.5.1
point of view area, 12.25
point of view controls, 12.26
POSITION string function, about, D.3.13
POWER math function, about, D.4.17
preferences, setting for Oracle BI Enterprise Edition, 1.11
presentation variables, 2.16.3, 2.19
previewing views, 3.15
print options for views, 3.14
printing
options, 3.14
views, 3.13
process for write back, 3.6.2
prompted links, 4.22.2
prompts
about column, 6.2
about dashboard, 6.1
about inline, 6.1
adding dashboard prompts to dashboards and dashboard pages, 6.14, 6.15
adding to analyses, 2.9
and selections steps, 6.10
and the order applied, 6.7
auto-complete, 6.8
creating and editing column, 6.9
creating or editing currency, 6.12
creating or editing image, 6.11
creating or editing variable, 6.13
interaction of, 6.6
types of, 6.3
types of user input options, 6.4
upgrading from previous releases, 6.5
properties
accessing object, 13.17
changing dashboard, 4.8
changing object, 4.9
publishing dashboard pages, 4.21

Q

QUARTER_OF_YEAR calendar date/time function, about, D.5.15

R

RADIANS math function, about, D.4.18
ragged hierarchy, 2.2.1
RAND math function, about, D.4.19
RANDFROMSEED math function, about, D.4.20
RANK aggregate function, about, D.2.1.13
RCOUNT running aggregate function, about, D.2.2.4
rearranging views, 3.12
referencing variables, 2.17
refreshing the results in views, 3.17
removing
views, 3.16
REPEAT string function, about, D.3.14
REPLACE string function, about, D.3.15
repository variables, 2.16.2
results
adding views to, 3.4
drilling in, A.3
exporting and copying, A.1
refreshing in views, 3.17
results of analyses, 2.8, 2.8.2
RIGHT string function, about, D.3.16
RMAX running aggregate function, about, D.2.2.5
RMIN running aggregate function, about, D.2.2.6
ROUND math function, about, D.4.21
RSS Feed, 8.19
RSUM running aggregate function, about, D.2.2.3
running actions in dashboards, A.5
running aggregate functions
about, D.2.2
MAVG, D.2.2.1
MSUM, D.2.2.2
RCOUNT, D.2.2.4
RMAX, D.2.2.5
RMIN, D.2.2.6
RSUM, D.2.2.3

S

saved customizations
about, 4.14
applying, 4.16
editing, 4.17
saving
agents, 8.10
analyses, 2.11
customizations, 4.15
dashboards, 4.12
inline actions to the catalog, 10.28, 10.29
objects, 13.4
objects as inline or named, 5.1
selection steps as a group object, 5.3.3
views, 3.10
Scorecard editor
about, 12.3
edit and view modes, 12.7
scorecard objects
about, 12.4
adding to dashboards, 12.40
contacting business owners of, 12.43
deleting, 12.39, 12.39
editing, 12.38
scorecards
about creating, 12.5
and assessment mappings, 12.22.1, 12.23
and assigning weights, 12.24
and comments, 12.44, 12.45
and overriding statuses, 12.41, 12.42
creating, 12.8
defining assessment mappings, 12.23
scrolling in graphs, A.8
search functionality, providing to end users, 13.8
searching
about, 13.5
glob syntax, E
results, 13.7
the Oracle BI Presentation Catalog, 13.6, 13.9
SECOND calendar date/time function, about, D.5.16
section sliders, 3.5.9.5, A.6
security, 13.18
SELECT statement
about and basic syntax, D.1.1
conditional expressions, D.1.5
GROUP BY clause syntax, D.1.1.7
mathematical operators, D.1.4.2
ORDER BY clause syntax, D.1.1.8
select list syntax, D.1.1.4
SQL logical operators, D.1.4.1
subquery support, D.1.1.3
usage notes, D.1.1.2
WHERE clause syntax, D.1.1.6
SELECT_PHYSICAL statement
about and basic syntax, D.1.2
aggregate functions not supported in, D.1.2.2
queries supported by, D.1.2.3
usage notes, D.1.2.5
using the NATURAL_JOIN keyword, D.1.2.4
selection steps
about, 5.2
and column prompts, 6.10
and drilling, 3.8.3
editing, 5.3.2
saving as a group object, 5.3.3
selections of data, working with, 5.3
selections steps
and double columns, 5.3.4
creating, 5.3.1
session variables, 2.16.1
Set operation for columns, 2.7.2
setting preferences for Oracle BI Enterprise Edition, 1.11
shortcuts, keyboard, C.2
siging in to Oracle BI Enterprise Edition, 1.3
SIGN math function, about, D.4.22
signing out of Oracle BI Enterprise Edition, 1.3
SIN math function, about, D.4.23
skip-level hierarchy, 2.2.1
sorting
clearing, 3.9.3
data in views, 3.9
values, A.2
sorting data, 3.9.2
SPACE string function, about, D.3.17
SQL functions
aggregate functions, about, D.2.1
calendar date/time functions, about, D.5
conversion functions, about, D.6
database functions, about, D.7
expressing literals, D.1.6
math functions, about, D.4
running aggregate functions, about, D.2.2
string functions, about, D.3
system functions, about, D.8
time series functions, about, D.2.3
SQL operators, D.1.4
SQL statements, 5.9
SQL syntax and semantics
conditional expressions, D.1.5
FROM clause syntax, about, D.1.1.5
GROUP BY clause syntax, about, D.1.1.7
including and setting variables, D.1.7
ORDER BY clause syntax, about, D.1.1.8
Select list syntax, D.1.1.4
Select statement, about and basic syntax, D.1.1
Select usage notes, D.1.1.2, D.1.1.3
SQL logical operators, D.1.4.1, D.1.4.2
WHERE clause syntax, about, D.1.1.6
SQRT math function, about, D.4.24
status overrides, 11.10, 12.41, 12.42
STDDEV aggregate function, about, D.2.1.14
STDDEV_POP aggregate function, about, D.2.1.15
strategy maps
about, 12.29
creating, 12.30
opening, 12.36
strategy trees
about, 12.27
creating, 12.28
opening, 12.36
string functions
about, D.3
ASCII, D.3.1
BIT_LENGTH, D.3.2
CHAR, D.3.3
CHAR_LENGTH, D.3.4
CONCAT, D.3.5
EXP, D.4.10
INSERT, D.3.6
LEFT, D.3.7
LENGTH, D.3.8
LOCATE, D.3.9
LOCATEN, D.3.10
LOWER, D.3.11
OCTET_LENGTH, D.3.12
POSITION, D.3.13
REPEAT, D.3.14
REPLACE, D.3.15
RIGHT, D.3.16
SPACE, D.3.17
SUBSTRING, D.3.18
TRIMBOTH, D.3.19
TRIMLEADING, D.3.20
TRIMTRAILING, D.3.21
UPPER, D.3.22
subject areas, 2.2
subscriptions
customizing agent, 8.14
to agents, 8.11
SUBSTRING string function, about, D.3.18
SUM aggregate function, about, D.2.1.16
SUMDISTINCT aggregate function, about, D.2.1.17
syntax for referencing variables, 2.18
system functions
about, D.8
DATABASE, D.8.2
USER, D.8.1
system requirements, 1.14

T

table views, modifying data, A.10
tables
and write back, 3.6.4
editing, 3.5.1
taking ownership of objects, 13.28
TAN math function, about, D.4.25
tasks for objects, 13.10
time series functions
about, D.2.3
AGO, D.2.3.1
PERIODROLLING, D.2.3.2
TODATE, D.2.3.3
TIMESTAMPADD calendar date/time function, about, D.5.17
TIMESTAMPDIFF calendar date/time function, about, D.5.18
TO_DATETIME conversion function, about, D.6.3
TODATE time series function, about, D.2.3.3
TOPN aggregate function, about, D.2.1.18
TRIMBOTH string function, about, D.3.19
TRIMLEADING string function, about, D.3.20
TRIMTRAILING string function, about, D.3.21
troubleshooting Oracle Scorecard and Strategy Management, 12.46
TRUNCATE math function, about, D.4.26
types
of actions, 10.3
of funnel graphs, 3.2.2
of gauges, 3.2.3
of graphs, 3.2.1
of prompts, 6.3
of user input options for prompts, 6.4
of views, 3.2

U

unsubscribing from agents, 8.13
upgrading
actions from previous releases, 10.8
hidden dashboards from previous releases, 13.3
prompts from previous releases, 6.5
UPPER string function, about, D.3.22
USER system function, about, D.8.1
users
acting for, 1.10
users, acting for, 1.9
using dashboards, 4.13

V

VALUEOF conversion function, about, D.6.4
variable prompts
about, 6.3
creating or editing, 6.13
variables
about, 2.16
including and setting in SQL, D.1.7
presentation, 2.16.3, 2.19
referencing, 2.17
repository, 2.16.2
session, 2.16.1
syntax for referencing, 2.18
view mode in the Scorecard editor, 12.7
view selector views, editing, 3.5.7
viewing
analyses using BI Composer, 14.6
metadata information, 2.7.3
summaries of agent settings, 8.9
views
about, 3.1
adding and rearranging columns in, 3.5.9.2
adding to results of analyses, 3.4
and drop targets, 3.5.9.1
and master-detail linking, 3.19
customizing, 3.17
detail, 3.19.2, 3.20.2
drilling in, 3.8
editing, 3.5
editing column selector, 3.5.6
editing gauge, 3.5.3
editing graph, 3.5.2
editing legend, 3.5.8
editing map, 3.5.4
editing narrative, 3.5.5
editing table and pivot table, 3.5.1
editing view selector, 3.5.7
interactions in, 3.7
linking in master-detail relationships, 3.20
master, 3.19.1, 3.20.1
modes for write back, 3.6.5
modifying the layout of data, 3.5.9
opening, 12.36
previewing, 3.15
printing, 3.13
rearranging, 3.12
refreshing the results in, 3.17
saving, 3.10
setting properties for view bodies and drop targets, 3.5.9.3
sorting data in, 3.9
types of, 3.2
working with linked, A.9
views, removing, 3.16
vision statements
about, 12.10
defining, 12.11
opening, 12.36

W

WEEK_OF_QUARTER calendar date/time function, about, D.5.19
WEEK_OF_YEAR calendar date/time function, about, D.5.20
weights, assigning in scorecards, 12.24
WHERE clause syntax, about, D.1.1.6
write back
adding to columns, 3.6.3
adding to table views, 3.6.4
modes in views, 3.6.5
performing, 3.6
process for, 3.6.2

Y

YEAR calendar date/time function, about, D.5.21

Z

zooming in graphs, A.8
PKUvvgvPKִo@OEBPS/appsql.htm Logical SQL Reference

D Logical SQL Reference

The Oracle BI Server accepts SQL SELECT statements from client tools. Additionally, the Administration Tool enables you to define logical columns with complex expressions. This appendix explains the syntax and semantics for the SELECT statement and for the expressions you can use in the Administration Tool to create derived columns.

This reference provides syntax and usage information for the Logical SQL statements understood by the Oracle BI Server. Oracle BI Server Logical SQL includes standard SQL, plus special functions (SQL extensions) like AGO, TODATE, EVALUATE, and others. Logical SQL queries resolve to Presentation layer objects.

The abstraction provided by the Presentation layer and Business Model and Mapping layer enables clients to query data with Logical SQL only, so that the interaction with actual physical sources is handled by the Oracle BI Server. The complexity of the multiple source languages needed to communicate with each data source type is hidden from users and clients.

In Answers, you can view the Logical SQL queries issued by Oracle BI Presentation Services for particular analyses by viewing the SQL Issued section of the Advanced tab of the Analysis editor. If you have the appropriate privileges, then you can also view SQL by displaying the Manage Sessions page in the Administration tab. Click View Log from the Manage Sessions page to see further details.

In Answers, there are also several places where you can issue Logical SQL. If you have the appropriate privileges, then you can use the Issue SQL page in the Administration tab to enter any SQL code to send to the Oracle BI Server. If an analysis does not contain hierarchical columns, member selections, or groups, then you can use the Advanced SQL Clauses fields in the Advanced tab of the Analysis editor. You can also enter SQL in the New Filter dialog.

Other clients, like Oracle BI Publisher, Oracle's Hyperion Interactive Reporting, Smart View, the Oracle BI Add-in for Microsoft Office, and Essbase, also provide their own interfaces to view and issue Logical SQL to the Oracle BI Server.

This appendix contains the following topics:

SQL Syntax and Semantics

This section explains SQL syntax and semantics. The following topics are included:

Syntax and Usage Notes for the SELECT Statement

The SELECT statement, or query specification, is the way to query a decision support system through the Oracle BI Server. A SELECT statement returns a table to the client that matches the query. It is a table in the sense that the results are in the form of rows and columns.

The SELECT statement is the basis for querying any structured query language (SQL) database. The Oracle BI Server accepts logical requests to query objects in a repository, and users (or query tools) make those logical requests with ordinary SQL SELECT statements. The server then translates the logical requests into physical queries against one or more data sources, combines the results to match the logical request, and returns the answer to the end user.

The SELECT statement in Logical SQL differs from standard SQL in that tables do not need to be joined. Any join conditions supplied in the query are ignored because the join conditions are predefined in the Oracle BI repository.

This section provides the basic syntax for the SELECT statement, as well as definitions for individual clauses. The syntax descriptions cover only basic syntax and features unique to the Oracle BI Server. For a more comprehensive description of SQL syntax, see a third-party reference book on SQL or a reference manual on SQL from your database vendors. For Oracle Database, see Oracle Database SQL Language Reference.

This section contains the following topics:

Basic Syntax for the SELECT Statement

Syntax for the SELECT statement is as follows:

SELECT [DISTINCT] select_list
FROM from_clause
[WHERE search_condition]
[GROUP BY column {, column}
     [HAVING search_condition]]
[ORDER BY column {, column}]

Where:

select_list is the list of columns specified in the request. See "SELECT List Syntax" for more information.

FROM from_clause is the list of tables in the request. Optionally includes certain join information for the request. See "FROM Clause Syntax" for more information.

WHERE search_condition specifies any combination of conditions to form a conditional test. A WHERE clause acts as a filter that lets you constrain a request to obtain results that answer a particular question. Together with the columns you select, filters determine what your results will contain. See "WHERE Clause Syntax" for more information.

GROUP BY column {, column} specifies a column (or alias) belonging to a table defined in the data source. See "GROUP BY Clause Syntax" for more information.

HAVING search_condition specifies any combination of conditions to form a conditional test. The syntax is identical to that for the WHERE clause.

ORDER BY column {, column} specifies the columns to order the results by. See "ORDER BY Clause Syntax" for more information.

Syntax and Usage Notes for SELECT_PHYSICAL

The SELECT_PHYSICAL command provides the functionality to directly query objects in the Physical layer of the metadata repository, and to nest such a statement within a query against the Business Model and Mapping layer or the Presentation layer.

Though a SELECT_PHYSICAL query bypasses the Presentation layer and the Business Model and Mapping layer, the Oracle BI Server still performs parsing, interpretation, and query generation on a SELECT_PHYSICAL query before passing it to the database.

A SELECT_PHYSICAL command can contain any element allowed in standard Oracle BI Server SQL with the following constraints:


Note:

SELECT_PHYSICAL statements are not cached.


You can set up an ODBC connection to the Oracle BI Server to be a dedicated physical connection over which all SELECT queries are treated as SELECT_PHYSICAL queries. To do this, select Route Requests To Physical Layer in the ODBC data source for the Oracle BI Server. See "Integrating Other Clients with Oracle Business Intelligence" in Oracle Fusion Middleware Integrator's Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition for more information.

SELECT_PHYSICAL statements are logged as Physical Request entries.

The topics in this section are the following:

Syntax for the SELECT_PHYSICAL Statement

Basic syntax for SELECT_PHYSICAL queries is equivalent to "Basic Syntax for the SELECT Statement" with the term SELECT_PHYSICAL replacing the word SELECT, namely:

SELECT_PHYSICAL [DISTINCT] select_list
FROM from_clause
[WHERE search_condition]
[GROUP BY column {, column}
     [HAVING search_condition]]
[ORDER BY column {, column}]

Notes:

The SELECT_PHYSICAL statement is close to the standard ANSI SQL SELECT statement. For example, you cannot omit the GROUP BY clause nor, where relevant, the HAVING clause in a SELECT_PHYSICAL aggregate query.


In SELECT_PHYSICAL queries, you must fully qualify the table names in the FROM list. Each fully qualified table name must match a table name in the physical layer of the repository.

A fully qualified table name consists of up to four components, database name, catalog name, schema name, and table name. Each component is surrounded by double quotes (") with a period (.) separator between components. For example, "SQL_DB"."My_Catalog"."My_Schema"."Customers" for a SQL Server table, and "FoodMart"..."Sales" for a cube table.

Refer to the corresponding topics in "Basic Syntax for the SELECT Statement" for more information about the different clauses and sub-clauses of the SELECT_PHYSICAL command.

Queries Supported by SELECT_PHYSICAL

The Oracle BI Server supports the use of SELECT_PHYSICAL for the following types of logical query:

  • Standard Non-Aggregate Queries

    Standard non-aggregate SELECT_PHYSICAL commands follow the same rules as standard non-aggregate SELECT commands. They can also include scalar functions, such as String, Math, and Calendar Date/Time functions. For example:

    SELECT_PHYSICAL productid, categoryid
    FROM "My_DB"."My_Schema"."products"
    WHERE categoryid > 5;
    
    SELECT_PHYSICAL LEFT(productname,10)
    FROM "My_DB"."My_Schema"."products"
    WHERE productname is not null;
    
  • Subqueries

    The Oracle BI Server supports the following types of query:

    • Queries where both the parent query and the subquery use SELECT_PHYSICAL

    • Parent query uses SELECT and subquery uses SELECT_PHYSICAL

    Subqueries are supported on both filters and on projections embedded in a Case statement.

    For example:

    SELECT_PHYSICAL *
    FROM "My_DB"."My_Schema"."products" 
    WHERE supplierid IN
     (SELECT_PHYSICAL supplierid 
      FROM "My_DB"."My_Schema"."suppliers");
    
    SELECT productid 
    FROM snowflakesales.product 
    WHERE categoryid IN
     (SELECT_PHYSICAL categoryid 
      FROM "My_DB"."My_Schema"."categories");
    
    SELECT CASE WHEN b.categoryid IN
     (SELECT_PHYSICAL a.categoryid 
      FROM "My_DB"."My_Schema"."products" a)
     THEN b.categoryid END 
    FROM categories b;
    
  • Queries with Derived Tables

    Both SELECT and SELECT_PHYSICAL queries can have derived tables in their FROM clause. The tables can be derived using either SELECT or SELECT_PHYSICAL. For example:

    SELECT_PHYSICAL COUNT(DISTINCT t.rto) 
    FROM
     (SELECT_PHYSICAL employeeid AS id, reportsto AS rto 
      FROM "My_DB"."My_Schema"."employees") t;
    
    SELECT productid, categoryid 
    FROM
     (SELECT_PHYSICAL productid, categoryid
      FROM "My_DB"."My_Schema"."products" a
      LEFT OUTER JOIN "My_DB"."My_Schema"."categories" b
      ON a.categoryid = b.categoryid);
     
    
    SELECT y.cid, sum(x.qty) 
    FROM
     (SELECT productid pid, categoryid cid, qtysold qty 
      FROM sales.product) x
     RIGHT OUTER JOIN 
     (SELECT_PHYSICAL CASE categoryid WHEN 1 THEN null ELSE categoryid END cid 
      FROM "My_DB"."My_Schema"."categories") y
     ON x.cid = y.cid
     GROUP BY y.cid;
    
  • Cross-Database Queries

    You can use SELECT_PHYSICAL to join tables in different databases. For example:

    SELECT_PHYSICAL a.productid, b.categoryid 
    FROM "My_DB"."My_Schema"."products" a
    FULL OUTER JOIN
    "My_DB2"."My_Schema"."categories" b
    ON a.categoryid = b.categoryid
    

Limiting and Offsetting Rows Returned

You can use the FETCH and OFFSET clauses to constrain the number of rows returned by the SELECT statement and to skip a specified number of rows from the beginning of the result set. Both clauses are optional and can be used together, or independently. The fetch and offset clauses are part of the SELECT statement and are placed at the end.

These clauses are useful for situations where you have a large result set (such as with a large dimension), and you want to present, for example, the first 100 rows to the user. The Oracle BI Server stops processing when the limit is reached, improving overall performance and conserving resources. In addition, the limit is pushed to the back-end database in many cases so that the database can optimize the query.

Technically, both clauses can be used without an ORDER BY clause, but the results would be non-deterministic. Because of this, both clauses should always be used with ORDER BY.

If OFFSET is not specified, the default value is 0, which means that results are returned starting from the first row. If FETCH is not specified, it means that there is no limitation on the number rows returned.

Both clauses are evaluated after the WHERE clause, aggregation, HAVING clause, window analytic function, and ORDER BY clause. Both clauses can be used with SELECT_PHYSICAL in addition to SELECT.

Syntax for OFFSET Clause 

OFFSET n ROW[S]

n is the number of rows you want to skip from the beginning of the result set. Note that n must be greater than zero.

Syntax for FETCH Clause 

FETCH FIRST | NEXT n ROW[S] ONLY

n is the number of rows you want to retrieve. Note that n must be greater than zero.

Typically, FIRST is used when the limit clause is used independently of the offset clause, while NEXT is used when the limit clause is used in conjunction with the offset clause.

Example 

SELECT employeeid, firstname, revenue 
FROM sales.employee
ORDER BY revenue desc
OFFSET 2 ROWS 
FETCH NEXT 4 ROWS ONLY

The following table lists the entire result set without the OFFSET and FETCH clauses. When the OFFSET and FETCH clauses are included, only the rows shown in bold are returned.

EmployeeidFirstNameRevenue

4

Margaret

250187.45

3

Janet

213051.30

1

Nancy

202143.71

2

Andrew

202143.71

7

Robert

177749.26

8

Laura

141295.99

9

Anne

133301.03

6

Michael

82964.00

5

Steven

78198.10


Operators

There are two types of operators: SQL logical operators, and mathematical operators.

Conditional Expressions

Expressions are building blocks for creating conditional expressions that convert a value from one form to another. Expressions include:

CASE (Switch)

This form of the CASE statement is also referred to as the CASE(Lookup) form. The value of expr1 is examined, then the WHEN expressions. If expr1 matches any WHEN expression, it assigns the value in the corresponding THEN expression.

If none of the WHEN expressions match, it assigns the default value specified in the ELSE expression. If no ELSE expression is specified, the system automatically adds an ELSE NULL.

If expr1 matches an expression in multiple WHEN clauses, only the expression following the first match is assigned.


Note:

In a CASE statement, AND has precedence over OR.


Syntax 

CASE expr1
     WHEN expr2 THEN expr3
     {WHEN expr... THEN expr...}
     ELSE expr
END 

Where:

CASE starts the CASE statement. Must be followed by an expression and one or more WHEN and THEN statements, an optional ELSE statement, and the END keyword.

WHEN specifies the condition to be satisfied.

THEN specifies the value to assign if the corresponding WHEN expression is satisfied.

ELSE specifies the value to assign if none of the WHEN conditions are satisfied. If omitted, ELSE NULL is assumed.

END ends the CASE statement.

Example 

CASE Score-par
  WHEN -5 THEN 'Birdie on Par 6'
  WHEN -4 THEN 'Must be Tiger'
  WHEN -3 THEN 'Three under par'
  WHEN -2 THEN 'Two under par'
  WHEN -1 THEN 'Birdie'
  WHEN 0 THEN 'Par'
  WHEN 1 THEN 'Bogey'
  WHEN 2 THEN 'Double Bogey'
  ELSE 'Triple Bogey or Worse'
END

In this example, the WHEN statements must reflect a strict equality. For example, a WHEN condition of WHEN < 0 THEN 'Under Par' is illegal because comparison operators are not allowed.

Expressing Literals

A literal is a nonnull value corresponding to a given data type. Literals are typically constant values, or in other words, they are values that are taken as they are. A literal value must comply with the data type that it represents.

SQL provides mechanisms for expressing literals in SQL statements. This following topics describe how to express each type of literal in SQL:

Aggregate, Running Aggregate, and Time Series Functions

This section contains information about aggregate functions, running aggregate functions, and time series functions:

Aggregate Functions

Aggregate functions perform operations on multiple values to create summary results.

Aggregate functions include:

Running Aggregate Functions

Running aggregate functions are similar to functional aggregates in that they take a set of records as input, but instead of outputting the single aggregate for the entire set of records, they output the aggregate based on records encountered so far.

This section describes the running aggregate functions supported by the Oracle BI Server. Functions include:

Time Series Functions

Time series functions operate on time-oriented dimensions. The time series functions calculate AGO, TODATE, and PERIODROLLING functions based on user supplied calendar tables, not on standard SQL date manipulation functions.

To use time series functions on a particular dimension, you have to designate the dimension as a Time dimension and set one or more keys at one or more levels as chronological keys. See Oracle Fusion Middleware Metadata Repository Builder's Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition for more information.

Functions include:

AGO

This function is a time series aggregation function that calculates the aggregated value from the current time back to a specified time period. For example, AGO can produce sales for every month of the current quarter and the corresponding quarter-ago sales.

Time series functions operate on members of time dimensions which are at or below the level of the function. Because of this, one or more columns that uniquely identify members at or below the given level must be projected in the query. Alternatively, you can apply a filter to the query that specifies a single member at or below the given level. See "About the AGO Function Level" for more information about the level of the function.

Multiple AGO functions can be nested if all the AGO functions have the same level argument. You can nest exactly one TODATE and multiple AGO functions if they each have the same level argument.

Syntax 

AGO(expr, [time_level], offset)

Where:

expr is an expression that references at least one measure column.

time_level is an optional argument that specifies the type of time period, such as quarter, month, or year.

In Answers, specify a presentation level from a presentation hierarchy for time_level.

offset is an integer literal that represents the time shift amount.

Example 

The following example returns last year's sales:

SELECT Year_ID, AGO(sales, year, 1)
About the AGO Function Level

It is recommended that you explicitly specify the level of the AGO function using the [time_level] argument.

If you do not explicitly specify the [time_level] argument, the default level is determined as follows:

  • If the measure used in the expression is a level-based measure in the time dimension (as set in the Administration Tool), then that same level is considered the default AGO level.

  • Otherwise, the grain of the measure used in the expression, as determined by the BY clause of the measure shown in the logical request, is the default Ago level.

    For example, the result of the query:

    SELECT year, AGO(sales, 1) WHERE quarter=1
    

    is the same as:

    SELECT year, AGO(sales, year_level, 1) WHERE quarter=1
    

You can see the default AGO level for a given query in the Logical Request section of the query log.

PERIODROLLING

This function computes the aggregate of a measure over the period starting x units of time and ending y units of time from the current time. For example, you can use PERIODROLLING to compute sales for a period that starts at a certain quarter before and ends at a certain quarter after the current quarter.

Time series functions operate on members of time dimensions which are at or below the level of the function. Because of this, one or more columns that uniquely identify members at or below the given level must be projected in the query. Alternatively, you can apply a filter to the query that specifies a single member at or below the given level. See "Determining the Level Used by the PERIODROLLING Function" for more information about the level of the function.

You cannot nest AGO and TODATE functions within a PERIODROLLING function. Also, you cannot nest PERIODROLLING, FIRST, and LAST functions.

If you embed other aggregate functions (like RANK, TOPN, PERCENTILE, FILTER, or RSUM) inside PERIODROLLING, the PERIODROLLING function is pushed inward. For example, PERIODROLLING(TOPN(measure)) is executed as TOPN(PERIODROLLING(measure)).

Syntax 

PERIODROLLING(measure, x ,y [,hierarchy])

Where:

measure is the name of a measure column.

x is an integer that specifies the offset from the current time. Precede the integer with a minus sign (-) to indicate an offset into the past.

y specifies the number of time units over which the function will compute. To specify the current time, enter 0.

hierarchy is an optional argument that specifies the name of a hierarchy in a time dimension, such as yr, mon, day, that you want to use to compute the time window. This option is useful when there are multiple hierarchies in a time dimension, or when you want to distinguish between multiple time dimensions.

If you want to roll back or forward the maximum possible amount, use the keyword UNBOUND. For example, the function PERIODROLLING (measure, -UNBOUND, 0) sums over the period starting from the beginning of time until now.

You can combine PERIODROLLING and AGGREGATE AT functions to specify the level of the PERIODROLLING function explicitly. For example, if the query level is day but you want to find the sum of the previous and current months, use the following:

SELECT year, month, day, PERIODROLLING(AGGREGATE(sales AT month), -1)

Examples 

SELECT Month_ID, PERIODROLLING(monthly_sales, -1, 1)

SELECT Month_ID, PERIODROLLING(monthly_sales, -UNBOUND, 2)

SELECT Month_ID, PERIODROLLING(monthly_sales, -UNBOUND, UNBOUND)
Determining the Level Used by the PERIODROLLING Function

The unit of time (offset) used in the PERIODROLLING function is called the level of the function. This value is determined by the measure level of the measures in its first argument and the query level of the query to which the function belongs. The measure level for the measure can be set in the Administration Tool. If a measure level has been set for the measure used in the function, the measure level is used as the level of the function. The measure level is also called the storage grain of the function.

If a measure level has not been set in the Administration Tool, then the query level is used. The query level is also called the query grain of the function. In the following example, the query level is month, and the PERIODROLLING function computes the sum of the last, current, and next month for each city for the months of March and April:

SELECT year, month, country, city, PERIODROLLING(sales, -1, 1)
WHERE month in ('Mar', 'Apr') AND city = 'New York' 

When there are multiple hierarchies in the time dimension, you must specify the hierarchy argument in the PERIODROLLING function. For example:

SELECT year, fiscal_year, month, PERIODROLLING(sales, -1, 1, "fiscal_time_hierarchy")

In this example, the level of the PERIODROLLING function is fiscal_year.

String Functions

String functions perform various character manipulations, and they operate on character strings. Functions include:

Math Functions

The math functions perform mathematical operations. Functions include:

Calendar Date/Time Functions

The calendar date/time functions manipulate data of the data types DATE and DATETIME based on a calendar year. You must select these functions with another column; they cannot be selected alone. Functions include:

TIMESTAMPADD

This function adds a specified number of intervals to a specified timestamp, and returns a single timestamp.

In the simplest scenario, this function adds the specified integer value to the appropriate component of the timestamp, based on the interval. Adding a week translates to adding seven days, and adding a quarter translates to adding three months. A negative integer value results in a subtraction (such as going back in time).

An overflow of the specified component (such as more than 60 seconds, 24 hours, 12 months, and so on) necessitates adding an appropriate amount to the next component. For example, when adding to the day component of a timestamp, this function considers overflow and takes into account the number of days in a particular month (including leap years when February has 29 days).

When adding to the month component of a timestamp, this function verifies that the resulting timestamp has enough days for the day component. For example, adding 1 month to 2000-05-31 does not result in 2000-06-31 because June does not have 31 days. This function reduces the day component to the last day of the month, 2000-06-30 in this example.

A similar issue arises when adding to the year component of a timestamp having a month component of February and a day component of 29 (that is, last day of February in a leap year). If the resulting timestamp does not fall on a leap year, the function reduces the day component to 28.

These actions conform to the behavior of Microsoft SQL Server and the native OCI interface for Oracle Database.

Syntax 

TIMESTAMPADD(interval, intExpr, timestamp)

Where:

interval is the specified interval. Valid values are:

  • SQL_TSI_SECOND

  • SQL_TSI_MINUTE

  • SQL_TSI_HOUR

  • SQL_TSI_DAY

  • SQL_TSI_WEEK

  • SQL_TSI_MONTH

  • SQL_TSI_QUARTER

  • SQL_TSI_YEAR

intExpr is any expression that evaluates to an integer value.

timestamp is any valid timestamp. This value is used as the base in the calculation.

A null integer expression or a null timestamp passed to this function results in a null return value.

Examples 

The following query asks for the resulting timestamp when 3 days are added to 2000-02-27 14:30:00. Since February, 2000 is a leap year, the query returns a single timestamp of 2000-03-01 14:30:00.

SELECT TIMESTAMPADD(SQL_TSI_DAY, 3, TIMESTAMP'2000-02-27 14:30:00')
FROM Employee WHERE employeeid = 2;

The following query asks for the resulting timestamp when 7 months are added to 1999-07-31 0:0:0. The query returns a single timestamp of 2000-02-29 00:00:00. Notice the reduction of day component to 29 because of the shorter month of February.

SELECT TIMESTAMPADD(SQL_TSI_MONTH, 7, TIMESTAMP'1999-07-31 00:00:00')
FROM Employee WHERE employeeid = 2;

The following query asks for the resulting timestamp when 25 minutes are added to 2000-07-31 23:35:00. The query returns a single timestamp of 2000-08-01 00:00:00. Notice the propagation of overflow through the month component.

SELECT TIMESTAMPADD(SQL_TSI_MINUTE, 25, TIMESTAMP'2000-07-31 23:35:00')
FROM Employee WHERE employeeid = 2;

TIMESTAMPDIFF

This function returns the total number of specified intervals between two timestamps.

This function first determines the timestamp component that corresponds to the specified interval parameter, and then looks at the higher order components of both timestamps to calculate the total number of intervals for each timestamp. For example, if the specified interval corresponds to the month component, the function calculates the total number of months for each timestamp by adding the month component and twelve times the year component. Then the function subtracts the first timestamp's total number of intervals from the second timestamp's total number of intervals.


Note:

This section describes the TIMESTAMPDIFF behavior when the function is calculated in the Oracle BI Server. If this function is calculated in the data source, then the result might be different from the behavior described in this section. If the TIMESTAMPDIFF function result is different from the desired result, then you can disable TIMESTAMP_DIFF_SUPPORTED in the Features tab for the database object in the Administration Tool to ensure that the function is calculated in the Oracle BI Server. However, making this change might adversely affect performance.


The TIMESTAMPDIFF function rounds up to the next integer whenever fractional intervals represent a crossing of an interval boundary. For example, the difference in years between 1999-12-31 and 2000-01-01 is one year because the fractional year represents a crossing from one year to the next (such as 1999 to 2000). By contrast, the difference between 1999-01-01 and 1999-12-31 is zero years because the fractional interval falls entirely within a particular year (that is, 1999). Microsoft SQL Server exhibits the same rounding behavior, but IBM DB2 does not; it always rounds down.

When calculating the difference in weeks, the function calculates the difference in days and divides by seven before rounding. Additionally, the function takes into account how the parameter FIRST_DAY_OF_THE_WEEK has been configured in the NQSConfig.INI file. For example, with Sunday as the start of the week, the difference in weeks between 2000-07-06 (a Thursday) and 2000-07-10 (the following Monday) results in a value of 1 week. With Tuesday as the start of the week, however, the function would return zero weeks since the fractional interval falls entirely within a particular week. When calculating the difference in quarters, the function calculates the difference in months and divides by three before rounding.

The Oracle BI Server pushes down the TIMESTAMPADD and TIMESTAMPDIFF functions to Microsoft SQL Server, Oracle Database, IBM DB2, and ODBC databases by default.

Syntax 

TIMESTAMPDIFF(interval, timestamp1, timestamp2)

Where:

interval is the specified interval. Valid values are:

  • SQL_TSI_SECOND

  • SQL_TSI_MINUTE

  • SQL_TSI_HOUR

  • SQL_TSI_DAY

  • SQL_TSI_WEEK

  • SQL_TSI_MONTH

  • SQL_TSI_QUARTER

  • SQL_TSI_YEAR

timestamp1 and timestamp2 are any valid timestamps.

A null timestamp parameter passed to this function results in a null return value.

Example 

The following example query asks for a difference in days between timestamps 1998-07-31 23:35:00 and 2000-04-01 14:24:00. It returns a value of 610. Notice that the leap year in 2000 results in an additional day.

SELECT TIMESTAMPDIFF
(SQL_TSI_DAY, TIMESTAMP'1998-07-31 23:35:00',TIMESTAMP'2000-04-01 14:24:00')
FROM Employee WHERE employeeid = 2;

Conversion Functions

The conversion functions convert a value from one form to another. You can also use the VALUEOF function in a filter to reference the value of an Oracle BI system variable. Functions include:

CAST

This function changes the data type of an expression or a null literal to another data type. For example, you can cast a customer_name (a data type of Char or Varchar) or birthdate (a datetime literal). The following are the supported data types to which the value can be changed:

CHARACTER, VARCHAR, INTEGER, FLOAT, SMALLINT, DOUBLE PRECISION, DATE, TIME, TIMESTAMP, BIT, BIT VARYING

Depending on the source data type, some destination types are not supported. For example, if the source data type is a BIT string, the destination data type must be a character string or another BIT string.

Use CAST to change to a DATE data type. Do not use TO_DATE.

The following describes unique characteristics of the CHAR and VARCHAR data types:

  • Casting to a CHAR data type. You must use a size parameter. If you do not add a size parameter, a default of 30 is added. Syntax options appear in the following list:

    • The recommended syntax is:

      CAST(expr|NULL AS CHAR(n))
      

      For example:

      CAST(companyname AS CHAR(35))
      
    • You can also use the following syntax:

      CAST(expr|NULL AS data_type)
      

      For example:

      CAST(companyname AS CHAR)
      

      Note:

      If you use this syntax, the Oracle BI Server explicitly converts and stores as CAST(expr|NULL AS CHAR(30))


  • Casting to a VARCHAR data type. You must use a size parameter. If you omit the size parameter, you cannot can save the change.

Examples 

CAST(hiredate AS CHAR(40)) FROM employee

SELECT CAST(hiredate AS VARCHAR(40)), CAST(age AS double precision), CAST(hiredate AS timestamp), CAST(age AS integer) FROM employee

CAST("db"."."table"."col" AS date)

VALUEOF

Use the VALUEOF function to reference the value of a repository variable. Repository variables are defined using the Administration Tool. You can use the VALUEOF function both in Expression Builder in the Administration Tool, and when you edit the SQL statements for an analysis from the Advanced tab of the Analysis editor in Answers.

Syntax 

Variables should be used as arguments of the VALUEOF function. Refer to static repository variables by name. Note that variable names are case sensitive. For example, to use the value of a static repository variables named prime_begin and prime_end:

CASE WHEN "Hour" >= VALUEOF("prime_begin")AND "Hour" < VALUEOF("prime_end") THEN 'Prime Time' WHEN ... ELSE...END

You must refer to a dynamic repository variable by its fully qualified name. If you are using a dynamic repository variable, the names of the initialization block and the repository variable must be enclosed in double quotes ( " ), separated by a period, and contained within parentheses. For example, to use the value of a dynamic repository variable named REGION contained in an initialization block named Region Security, use the following syntax:

SalesSubjectArea.Customer.Region = VALUEOF("Region Security"."REGION")

The names of session variables must be preceded by NQ_SESSION, separated by a period, and contained within parentheses, including the NQ_SESSION portion. If the variable name contains a space, enclose the name in double quotes ( " ). For example, to use the value of a session variable named REGION, use the following syntax in Expression Builder or a filter:

"SalesSubjectArea"."Customer"."Region" = VALUEOF(NQ_SESSION.REGION)

Database Functions

Users and administrators can create requests by directly calling database functions from either Oracle BI Answers, or by using a logical column (in the logical table source) within the metadata repository. Key uses for these functions include the ability to pass through expressions to get advanced calculations, as well as the ability to access custom written fe9unctions or procedures on the underlying database.

Support for database functions does not currently extend across all multidimensional sources. Also, you cannot use these functions with XML data sources.

By default, support for the EVALUATE family of database functions is disabled. You must change the EVALUATE_SUPPORT_LEVEL parameter in NQSConfig.INI to enable support for the EVALUATE* functions. See Oracle Fusion Middleware System Administrator's Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition for more information.

Functions include:

EVALUATE

This function passes the specified database function with optional referenced columns as parameters to the back-end data source for evaluation. This function is intended for scalar calculations, and is useful when you want to use a specialized database function that is not supported by the Oracle BI Server, but that is understood by the underlying data source.

The embedded database function may require one or more columns. These columns are referenced by %1 ... %N within the function. The actual columns must be listed after the function.

The ability to use EVALUATE is disabled by default. To enable support for this function, change the EVALUATE_SUPPORT_LEVEL parameter in NQSConfig.INI. See Oracle Fusion Middleware System Administrator's Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition for more information.

Syntax 

EVALUATE('db_function(%1...%N)' [AS data_type] [, column1, columnN])

Where:

db_function is any valid database function understood by the underlying data source.

data_type is an optional parameter that specifies the data type of the return result. Use this parameter whenever the return data type cannot be reliably predicted from the input arguments. However, do not use this parameter for type casting; if the function needs to return a particular data type, add an explicit cast. You can typically omit this parameter when the database-specific function has a return type not supported by the Oracle BI Server, but is used to generate an intermediate result that does not need to be returned to the Oracle BI Server.

column1 through columnN is an optional, comma-delimited list of columns.

Examples 

This example shows an embedded database function.

SELECT EVALUATE('instr(%1, %2)', address, 'Foster City') FROM employees

Examples Using EVALUATE_AGGREGATE and EVALUATE to Leverage Unique Essbase Functions

The following examples use the EVALUATE_AGGREGATE and EVALUATE functions. Note that expressions are applied to columns in the logical table source that refers to the physical cube.Use EVALUATE_AGGREGATE to implement custom aggregations. For example, you may want to compare overall regional profit to profits for the top three products in the region. You can define a new measure to represent the profits for top three products resulting in the Logical SQL statement:

SELECT Region, Profit, EVALUATE_AGGREGATE('SUM(TopCount(%1.members, 3, %2), %3)',
Products, Profit, Profit) Top_3_prod_Profit FROM SampleBasic

The Oracle BI Server generates the following expression for the custom aggregation:

member [Measures].[MS1] AS 'SUM(Topcount([Product].Generations(6).members,3,[Measures].[Profit]),[Measures].[Profit])'

Use the EVALUATE function on projected dimensions to implement scalar functions that are computed post-aggregation. EVALUATE may change the grain of the query, if its definition makes explicit references to dimensions (or attributes) that are not in the query.

For example, if you would like to see the Profits for the top five products ranked by Sales sold in a Region, after creating the applicable measure, the resulting Logical SQL statement is as follows

SELECT Region, EVALUATE('TopCount(%1.members, 5, %2)' as VARCHAR(20), Products, Sales), Profits FROM SampleBasic

The Oracle BI Server generates the following expression to retrieve the top five products:

set [Evaluate0] as '{Topcount([Product].Generations(6).members,5,[Measures].[Sales]) }'

EVALUATE_ANALYTIC

This function passes the specified database analytic function with optional referenced columns as parameters to the back-end data source for evaluation.

The embedded database function may require one or more columns. These columns are referenced by %1 ... %N within the function. The actual columns must be listed after the function.

The ability to use EVALUATE_ANALYTIC is disabled by default. To enable support for this function, change the EVALUATE_SUPPORT_LEVEL parameter in NQSConfig.INI. See Oracle Fusion Middleware System Administrator's Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition for more information.

Syntax 

EVALUATE_ANALYTIC('db_function(%1...%N)' [AS data_type] [, column1, columnN])

Where:

db_function is any valid database analytic function understood by the underlying data source.

data_type is an optional parameter that specifies the data type of the return result. Use this parameter whenever the return data type cannot be reliably predicted from the input arguments. However, do not use this parameter for type casting; if the function needs to return a particular data type, add an explicit cast. You can typically omit this parameter when the database-specific analytic function has a return type not supported by the Oracle BI Server, but is used to generate an intermediate result that does not need to be returned to the Oracle BI Server.

column1 through columnN is an optional, comma-delimited list of columns.

Examples 

This example shows an embedded database analytic function.

EVALUATE_ANALYTIC('dense_rank() over(order by %1 )' AS INT,sales.revenue)

If the preceding example needs to return a double, then an explicit cast should be added, as follows:

CAST(EVALUATE_ANALYTIC('Rank(%1.dimension.currentmember, %2.members)',
"Foodmart93"."Time"."Month" as Double)

EVALUATE_AGGR

This function passes the specified database function with optional referenced columns as parameters to the back-end data source for evaluation. This function is intended for aggregate functions with a GROUP BY clause.

The embedded database function may require one or more columns. These columns are referenced by %1 ... %N within the function. The actual columns must be listed after the function.

The ability to use EVALUATE_AGGR is disabled by default. To enable support for this function, change the EVALUATE_SUPPORT_LEVEL parameter in NQSConfig.INI. See Oracle Fusion Middleware System Administrator's Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition for more information.

Syntax 

EVALUATE_AGGR('db_agg_function(%1...%N)' [AS data_type] [, column1, columnN)

Where:

db_agg_function is any valid aggregate database function understood by the underlying data source.

data_type is an optional parameter that specifies the data type of the return result. Use this parameter whenever the return data type cannot be reliably predicted from the input arguments. However, do not use this parameter for type casting; if the function needs to return a particular data type, add an explicit cast. You can typically omit this parameter when the database-specific function has a return type not supported by the Oracle BI Server, but is used to generate an intermediate result that does not need to be returned to the Oracle BI Server.

column1 through columnN is an optional, comma-delimited list of columns.

Example 

EVALUATE_AGGR('REGR_SLOPE(%1, %2)', sales.quantity, market.marketkey)

EVALUATE_PREDICATE

This function passes the specified database function with optional referenced columns as parameters to the back-end data source for evaluation. This function is intended for functions with a return type of Boolean.

The embedded database function may require one or more columns. These columns are referenced by %1 ... %N within the function. The actual columns must be listed after the function.

Note that EVALUATE_PREDICATE is not supported for use with Essbase data sources.

The ability to use EVALUATE_PREDICATE is disabled by default. To enable support for this function, change the EVALUATE_SUPPORT_LEVEL parameter in NQSConfig.INI. See Oracle Fusion Middleware System Administrator's Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition for more information.

Syntax 

EVALUATE_PREDICATE('db_function(%1...%N)', [, column1, columnN)

Where:

db_function is any valid database function with a return type of Boolean that is understood by the underlying data source.

column1 through columnN is an optional, comma-delimited list of columns.

If you want to model a database function for comparison purposes, you should not use EVALUATE_PREDICATE. Instead, use EVALUATE and put the comparison outside the function. For example, do not use EVALUATE_PREDICATE as follows:

EVALUATE_PREDICATE('dense_rank() over (order by 1% ) < 5', sales.revenue)

Instead, use EVALUATE, as follows:

EVALUATE('dense_rank() over (order by 1% ) ', sales.revenue) < 5

Example 

SELECT year, Sales AS DOUBLE,CAST(EVALUATE('OLAP_EXPRESSION(%1,''LAG(units_cube_
sales, 1, time, time LEVELREL time_levelrel)'')', OLAP_CALC) AS DOUBLE) FROM 
"Global".Time, "Global"."Facts - sales" WHERE EVALUATE_PREDICATE('OLAP_
CONDITION(%1, ''LIMIT time KEEP ''''1'''', ''''2'''', ''''3'''', ''''4'''' '') 
=1', OLAP_CALC) ORDER BY year;

System Functions

The system functions return values relating to the session. Functions include:

PKĐePKִo@OEBPS/getstart.htm Introducing Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition

1 Introducing Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition

This chapter provides a conceptual overview of Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition 11g Release 1 (11.1.1). This chapter contains the following topics:

Introduction to Oracle BI Enterprise Edition

Oracle BI Enterprise Edition (sometimes simply referred to as Oracle Business Intelligence) provides a full range of business intelligence capabilities that allow you to:

  • Collect up-to-date data from your organization

  • Present the data in easy-to-understand formats (such as tables and graphs)

  • Deliver data in a timely fashion to the employees in your organization

These capabilities enable your organization to make better decisions, take informed actions, and implement more-efficient business processes.

Figure 1-1 shows a dashboard that presents organizational data in easy-to-understand formats (tables, graphs, and so on).

In Oracle BI Enterprise Edition, you can work with:

Where Do I Store and Manage Oracle BI EE Objects?

You use the Oracle BI Presentation Catalog to store the objects, such as analyses, dashboards, and KPIs, that you and other users create using Oracle BI EE. Users have their own personal folder (My Folders), where they can store the objects that they create. The objects in a personal folder can be accessed only by the user who created and saved the content into that folder. Users can add sub-folders to their personal folders to organize their content in the way that is the most logical to them.

You can also store objects in shared folders where other users or groups can access the objects. A combination of business logic security, catalog object security, and data level security determines who can view data and objects, edit objects, and delete objects from the catalog. Your administrator creates and maintains the catalog's shared folder structure.

For more information, see "What is the Oracle BI Presentation Catalog?" and "Managing Objects in the Oracle BI Presentation Catalog". For information about setting up the catalog, see "Configuring and Managing the Oracle BI Presentation Catalog" in Oracle Fusion Middleware System Administrator's Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition.

Signing In to Oracle BI Enterprise Edition

To access Oracle BI EE, you use a URL, a user ID, and a password that have been provided by your organization.


Notes:

Oracle BI EE requires that the Web browser be set to accept cookies. It uses a cookie to track a user's signed-in session.

You might not be prompted to enter values in all fields of the Sign In page (as described in the following procedure), if you have already signed on using single sign-on (SSO).


To sign in to Oracle BI Enterprise Edition:

  1. In the address field of a browser, enter the URL that was provided by your organization.

    The "Sign In page" is displayed. Figure 1-2 shows the Sign In page.

  2. Enter your user ID and password.

  3. Select the Accessibility Mode box if you want content for Oracle BI EE to be rendered in a browser in a way that facilitates the use of a screen reader.

    If you select this box, then the "BI Composer wizard" in accessibility mode will be used as the analysis editor (rather than the "Analysis editor"). For more information on BI Composer, see "Using BI Composer to Work with Analyses". For more information on the Analysis editor, see "What Is the Analysis Editor?"

    For more information on accessibility, see Appendix C, "Accessibility Features."

  4. Select the language in which you want to work.

    You can change the default entry for this box by selecting another language in the User Interface Language field in the "My Account dialog: Preferences tab". For more information, see "Setting Preferences".


    Note:

    On Windows, if you select the Install files for complex script and right-to-left languages (including Thai) option on the Languages tab of the Regional and Language Options dialog, Hebrew fonts display in the wrong direction, that is left to right rather than right to left.

    The workaround is to deselect the Install files for complex script and right-to-left languages (including Thai) option as follows:

    1. In the Control Panel, click the Regional & Language Options button to display the Regional and Language Options dialog.

    2. Click the Languages tab.

    3. Deselect the Install files for complex script and right-to-left languages (including Thai) option.

    4. Click OK.


  5. Click Sign In. One of the following pages (depending on what has been configured for you) is displayed:

    A dashboard (whether My Dashboard or one specific to your job function) typically contains analyses and other information for your area of responsibility. Figure 1-1 shows an example of a dashboard.

    You can now navigate Oracle BI EE. For information, see "Navigating Oracle BI Enterprise Edition".


    Tip:

    Once you have signed in, you can select the dashboard to be displayed when you sign in thereafter. For information, see "Setting Preferences".


Signing Out of Oracle BI Enterprise Edition


Note:

Do not close the browser window to sign out of Oracle BI EE.


To sign out of Oracle BI EE:

  1. In the global header, click Sign Out.

Navigating Oracle BI Enterprise Edition

After signing in to Oracle BI EE (as described in "Signing In to Oracle BI Enterprise Edition"), you are presented with one of the following pages, depending on what has been configured for you:

This page is your starting point for working in Oracle BI EE. As you work, you can use the global header and the Home page as the primary ways to navigate Oracle BI EE:

After you have accessed the starting point of a task, the interface then presents you with the page, dialog, or editor that you use to perform the task.

What Is the Oracle BI EE Home Page?

The Home page provides a starting point for performing tasks in Oracle BI EE. The Home page is divided into sections that allow you to quickly begin a specific task, locate an object, or access technical documentation. It also includes sections (for example, Recent and Favorites) that allow you to quickly access objects that you have recently viewed, created, or updated, and objects that are accessed the most often by the users assigned to the groups to which you belong.

Figure 1-3 shows an example of a Home page.

For specific information about each area on the Home page, see "Home page".

Depending on what has been configured as your starting page, you might be presented with the Home page when you sign in to Oracle BI EE.

Otherwise, you can always navigate to the Home page by clicking the Home page link in the global header. For information on the global header, see "What Is the Oracle BI EE Global Header?"

What Is the Oracle BI EE Global Header?

The global header provides quick access to commonly used functions and is always available from the user interface. For example, you can use the global header to begin a new task, search the Oracle BI Presentation Catalog, access the product documentation, or view a different object, without having to return to the Home page. The global header also includes the Home page link so that you can quickly access the Home page from other pages. Note that the functionality available on the global header is determined by privileges.

Your administrator can customize the global header by changing the order in which the links display or by adding links to internal or external locations such as Google or OTN. For more information, see "Providing Custom Links in Presentation Services" in Oracle Fusion Middleware System Administrator's Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition

Figure 1-4 shows the global header.

The global header includes the following components:

Where Can I Get Help or More Information?

Oracle BI EE provides direct access to guides, context-sensitive help, and libraries that contain conceptual and procedural information to help you understand Oracle BI EE.

Specifically, you can access:

About Acting for Other Users

The Act As functionality enables you to act for another user in Oracle BI EE. This functionality is useful, for example, when you must work on another user's dashboard or content, or when IT support staff wants to troubleshoot another user's account.

To use the Act As functionality, the administrator must enable you to act for another user. For information, see "Enabling Users to Act for Others" in Oracle Fusion Middleware Security Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition.

When the administrator authorizes you to act for anoFther user, the administrator can grant you full access or restricted access to another user's account:

You can view a list of the users with access to your account by opening the "My Account Dialog: Delegated Users tab". This tab displays a list of the names of the users that have been given access to your account.

For information on acting for another user, see "Acting for Other Users".

Acting for Other Users

You can act for another user, if you have been authorized to do so. For more information, see "About Acting for Other Users".

To act as another user:

  1. In the global header, click Signed In As username, then select Act As.

    The "Act As dialog" displays.

  2. Select a user's ID from the list or enter the ID in the box (if available), and click OK.

    The user's default dashboard is displayed. From this dashboard you can view or modify content, depending upon the access type (full or restricted) that you were granted by the administrator.

  3. To return to your account, display the Act As dialog, click Stop, then click OK.

Setting Preferences

You and end users can set personal preferences for Oracle BI EE. Using the "My Account dialog", and depending on your privileges, you can:

To set preferences:

  1. In the global header, click Signed In As username and select My Account.

    The "My Account dialog" is displayed.

  2. Complete the appropriate settings.

  3. Click OK to save your changes.

How Does Oracle BI EE Interact with Other Products?

Oracle BI EE interacts in various ways with other products. This section contains the following topics:

Integration of Oracle BI EE with Oracle BI Publisher


Note:

This guide assumes that Oracle BI EE and BI Publisher have been installed and configured to run as fully integrated components at your organization. If this is not the case, then some mentions of BI Publisher in this guide might not be applicable to you.

For information on running BI Publisher, see Oracle Fusion Middleware User's Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Publisher.


BI Publisher enables you to create highly formatted reports that are suitable for printing. BI Publisher reports are built on top of BI Publisher data models. A BI Publisher data model can consist of data sets from a wide range of sources, such as subject areas from the BI Server or analyses, SQL queries against relational databases, MDX queries against Essbase or other OLAP sources, LDAP, Web Services, Microsoft Excel, HTTP feeds, or XML files. BI Publisher supports a wide range of layout types, so you can create the full range of documents that your organization might need. Within Oracle BI EE, you can view, create, edit, and schedule BI Publisher reports and can include them in dashboard pages.

As part of Release 11g, Oracle BI EE includes a fully integrated BI Publisher. All the BI Publisher functionality appears seamlessly within the Oracle BI EE application, and all reports and related objects are created within Oracle BI EE and saved to the Oracle BI Presentation Catalog.

When using the integrated environment, you see that the following areas are affected by the integration:

For more information about creating a BI Publisher report, see Oracle Fusion Middleware Report Designer's Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Publisher. For more information about scheduling a BI Publisher report, see Oracle Fusion Middleware User's Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Publisher.

Integration of Oracle BI EE with Oracle Enterprise Performance Management System

Oracle BI EE offers the following integration with Oracle Enterprise Performance Management System:

Interaction of Oracle BI EE with Oracle BI Applications

Oracle Business Intelligence Applications are pre-built business intelligence solutions that are available for Oracle applications such as Oracle E-Business Suite, JD Edwards, Peoplesoft, and Siebel. Oracle Business Intelligence Applications are built on Oracle BI EE.

Oracle BI Applications consist of industry-specific dashboards and analyses that are built using industry best practices to address key functional areas within an organization. Dashboards and analyses are tailored for each end user's role in an organization.

Typically, Oracle BI Applications are integrated with and accessible from other operational applications, such as Oracle's Siebel CRM applications, to provide business metrics in analyses in the context of an organization's business function and industry. Oracle BI Applications include Extract Transform Load (ETL) routines to extract, transform, and load data into the Oracle Business Analytics Warehouse. Oracle BI Applications also contain metadata that maps to the Oracle Business Analytics Warehouse and a transactional database, and define key measures and metrics for all levels of the organization. These measures and metrics are available to content designers in Oracle Business Intelligence.

Interaction of Oracle BI EE and Oracle Fusion Applications

Oracle Fusion Applications can consume content that is created in Oracle BI EE. This means that users can have access to Oracle BI EE objects that are contextually relevant to their current work area, such as analyses and dashboards. Users also can launch Oracle BI EE as a tool.

Integration with Microsoft Office

Oracle BI EE offers a set of add-ins to Microsoft Office that can be downloaded and installed to enable integration between components of Oracle Business Intelligence and Microsoft Office. The Getting Started section of the Oracle BI EE "Home page" provides links to install the following add-in components:

Topics of Interest in Other Guides

Some topics that might be of interest to content designers and administrators are covered in other guides. Table 1-1 lists these topics, and indicates where to go for more information.

System Requirements and Certification

Refer to the system requirements and certification documentation for information about hardware and software requirements, platforms, databases, and other information. Both of these documents are available on Oracle Technology Network (OTN).

The system requirements document covers information such as hardware and software requirements, minimum disk space and memory requirements, and required system libraries, packages, or patches:

http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/middleware/ias/downloads/fusion-requirements-100147.html

The certification document covers supported installation types, platforms, operating systems, databases, JDKs, and third-party products:

http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/middleware/ias/downloads/fusion-certification-100350.html

PKpnPKִo@ OEBPS/toc.htm Table of Contents

Contents

Title and Copyright Information

Preface

New Features for Oracle Business Intelligence Users

1 Introducing Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition

2 Creating Analyses

3 Adding Views for Display in Dashboards

4 Building and Using Dashboards

5 Filtering and Selecting Data for Analyses

6 Prompting in Dashboards and Analyses

7 Formatting Analyses, Views, and Dashboard Pages

8 Delivering Content

9 Working with Conditions

10 Working with Actions

11 Using KPIs and KPI Watchlists

12 Scorecarding

13 Managing Objects in the Oracle BI Presentation Catalog

14 Using BI Composer to Work with Analyses

A Basic Information to Tell Your Users

B Integrating with Microsoft Office

C Accessibility Features

D Logical SQL Reference

E User Interface Reference

Glossary

Index

PKQLIIPKִo@OEBPS/scorecard.htm Scorecarding

12 Scorecarding

This chapter describes scorecards and explains how to work with them. It contains the following topics:

What is Oracle Scorecard and Strategy Management?

Oracle Scorecard and Strategy Management is a performance management tool that lets you describe and communicate your business strategy. You can drive and assess your corporate strategy and performance from the top of your organization down, or from the bottom up.

Oracle Scorecard and Strategy Management also enables you to either align your objectives and initiatives with traditional balanced scorecard perspectives, or to create your own to reflect your fundamental business competencies. For more information on a balanced scorecard, see "What is a Balanced Scorecard?"

Use Oracle Scorecard and Strategy Management to:


Note:

Because you use KPIs in scorecards to measure progress and performance over time, best practice is to include appropriate time dimensions when defining KPIs to be used within scorecards. For information on time dimensions, see your administrator.


What is a Balanced Scorecard?

Traditionally, companies focus heavily on financially driven strategies without sufficiently considering other contributing perspectives, such as Customer, Internal Processes, and Learning and Growth. Because financial goals are usually backward looking, tending to be defined in terms of growth over historic numbers, they do not account for future market conditions or leverage objectives.

Oracle Scorecard and Strategy Management provides four default perspectives that you can use to define strategies that holistically include all relevant perspectives and to define strategy structures that ensure stability and success in all perspectives.

The four default perspectives, which are in support of the balanced scorecard methodology devised by Dr. Robert Kaplan and Dr. David Norton, are:

  • Financial —Used to identify financial measures that help to answer this question: "How do we look to our shareholders?"

  • Customer — Used to identify measures that help to answer this question: "How do customers see us?"

  • Internal Process — Used to identify measures that help to answer this question: "At what processes must we excel?"

  • Learning and Growth — Used to identify measures that help to answer this question: "How can we continue to improve and create value?"

You can customize the perspectives provided or create your own to best align objectives, key initiatives, and KPIs with your business competencies.

For more information on Oracle Scorecard and Strategy Management, see "What is Oracle Scorecard and Strategy Management?"

What is the Scorecard Editor?

The "Scorecard editor" lets you create a scorecard of your entire organization or of individual departments. It consists of numerous panes and tabs:

What are Scorecard Objects?

Scorecard objects are items that you create or arrange to:

How Do I Create a Scorecard?

To create a scorecard, you perform the following tasks. It is recommended that you perform each task in order.

  1. Create a new scorecard to contain the scorecard objects that you must represent, evaluate, present, and analyze your corporate strategy, such as objectives, initiatives, perspectives, and so on. See "Creating Scorecards".

  2. Create perspectives to represent your key business competencies (Financial or Research and Development, for example) that you can use to align initiatives and objectives. See "What Are Perspectives?" and "Creating Custom Perspectives".

  3. Create the KPIs that gather core business data (Product Sales, for example) and specify the KPI targets, target ranges, and actions. See "What Are Key Performance Indicators (KPIs)?" and "Creating or Editing KPIs".

  4. Create the KPI watchlists that you want to use to monitor KPIs. See "What Are KPI Watchlists?"

  5. Create and arrange the objectives (goals or desired outcomes) for your entire organization, or for a department. This includes assigning the KPIs that measure the progress and performance of objectives. Note that the top-level objective (that is, the root objective) in the Strategy pane represents the entity (your entire organization or a department) that you are scorecarding. See "What Are Objectives?" and "Creating Objectives".

  6. Create and arrange the initiatives required to meet objectives. You also can assign KPIs to initiatives. See "What Are Initiatives?" and "Creating Initiatives".

  7. Weight individual objectives and initiatives to specify how they impact the overall performance of the entity that you are scorecarding. See "Understanding Initiative or Objective Performance Assessment" and "Assigning Weights to Child Objectives, Initiatives and KPIs".

  8. Set assessment mappings. See "Defining Assessment Mappings for Scorecards".

  9. If appropriate, override the status of KPIs, initiatives, and objectives. See "Working with Status Overrides".

  10. Depict relationships between objectives using strategy maps, cause & effect maps, strategy trees, and custom views.

    See "What Are Strategy Maps?", "Creating Strategy Maps", "What Are Cause & Effect Maps?", "Creating Cause & Effect Maps", "What Are Strategy Trees?","Creating Strategy Trees", "What Are Custom Views?", and "Creating Custom Views".

  11. Use comments (also know as annotations) to associate explanatory text with the values of KPIs, objectives, or initiatives for a specific set of dimension values. See "About Comments".

  12. Add scorecard views to dashboards. See "Adding Scorecard Objects to Dashboards".

  13. Create agents from KPIs. (Agents enable you to automate your business processes.) See "Creating an Agent From a KPI".

  14. Optionally define the mission and vision statements that translate your corporate direction into over-arching strategic themes and thrusts that you later support by creating objectives. See "What Are Mission Statements?", "Defining Mission Statements", "What Are Vision Statements?", and "Defining Vision Statements".

What Privileges and Permissions Are Required for Scorecards?

The ability to perform certain tasks within Oracle Scorecard and Strategy Management (such as viewing scorecards or creating scorecards) is controlled by privileges. The privileges that are specific to Scorecard include:

  • Access to Scorecard

  • Create/Edit Scorecards

  • View Scorecards

  • Create/Edit Objectives

  • Create/Edit Initiatives

  • Create Views

  • Create/Edit Causes And Effects Linkages

  • Create/Edit Perspectives

  • Add Annotations

  • Override Status (note that only the business owner of a KPI can override the status for that KPI)

  • Create/Edit KPIs

  • Add Scorecard Views To Dashboards

In addition to the scorecard privileges, these privileges might also be required:

  • Access To Delivers

  • Access to Answers

  • Create Agents

  • Create Navigate Actions

  • Create Invoke Actions

  • User Population - Can List Users

  • User Population - Can List Groups

  • Create Conditions

Privileges are managed by the administrator. For information about privileges, see Oracle Fusion Middleware Security Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition.

To alter the permissions of the Scorecard or elements within it (that is, which users have access to it), you need Full Control permission on the scorecard.

For information about permissions, see Chapter 13, "Managing Objects in the Oracle BI Presentation Catalog."

Using the Edit and View Modes in the Scorecard Editor

The "Scorecard editor" has two modes:

In addition, the information that you can access and the tasks that you can perform in these mode depends on the following:

For information on privileges and permissions, see "What Privileges and Permissions Are Required for Scorecards?"

Creating Scorecards

To create a scorecard:

  1. In the global header, click New and then select Scorecard.

    The "New Scorecard dialog" is displayed.

  2. Specify a name for the scorecard.

  3. (optional) Specify a description of the scorecard.

  4. Select the location in which to save the scorecard.

  5. Specify whether to use the default Balanced Scorecard perspectives.

  6. Click OK. The new scorecard is created. You can now perform the remaining tasks for creating a scorecard, as described in "How Do I Create a Scorecard?"

Opening or Editing Scorecards

To open or edit a scorecard:

  1. In the global header, click Catalog to display the "Catalog page".

  2. Navigate to the scorecard that you want to open or edit and click one of the following links:

    For more information on the view and edit modes, see "Using the Edit and View Modes in the Scorecard Editor".

  3. Make the desired changes.

  4. Save the scorecard.

What Are Vision Statements?

A vision statement is a short statement that describes what your organization wants to become sometime in the future. For example, it might be to become the most successful business in the South America Polypropylene Market. (A vision statement is optional.)

Often, from this statement, you define the key goals and priorities that form your mission statement. For more information, see "What Are Mission Statements?"

For information on defining a vision statement, see "Defining Vision Statements".

Defining Vision Statements

To define a vision statement:

  1. Edit the scorecard for which you want to define a vision statement. For information, see "Opening or Editing Scorecards".

  2. In the "Scorecard Documents pane", click the Create Object toolbar button and then select Vision.

    The "Vision tab: Document tab" is displayed.

  3. Enter and format the vision statement. You can apply such formatting options as bold, italic, underlining, indents, justification, and font size changes.

  4. Click the "Vision tab: Details tab".

  5. Assign the business owner and specify related documents, as appropriate. See "Related Documents area".

  6. Click Save to display the "Save As dialog". In the Save As dialog, you can rename the vision statement rather than use the default name.

What Are Mission Statements?

A mission statement specifies the key business goals and priorities that are required to achieve your vision. (A mission statement is optional.)

For information on defining a mission statement, see "Defining Mission Statements".

You define your vision in a vision statement. For more information on vision statements, see "What Are Vision Statements?"

Defining Mission Statements

To define a mission statement:

  1. Edit the scorecard for which you want to define a mission statement. For information, see "Opening or Editing Scorecards".

  2. In the "Scorecard Documents pane", click the Create Object toolbar button and then select Mission.

    The "Mission tab: Document tab" is displayed.

  3. Enter and format the mission statement. You can apply such formatting options such as bold, italic, underlining, indents, justification, and font size changes.

  4. Click the "Mission tab: Details tab".

  5. Assign the business owner and specify related documents, as appropriate. See "Related Documents area".

  6. Click Save to display the "Save As dialog". In the Save As dialog, you can rename the mission statement rather than use the default name.

What Are Perspectives?

Perspectives are categories in your organization with which to associate initiatives, objectives, and KPIs. A perspective can represent a key stakeholder (such as a customer, employee, or shareholder/financial) or a key competency area (such as time, cost, or quality).

You associate an initiative and objective with a perspective when you create or edit it. See "Creating Initiatives" and "Creating Objectives". You associated a KPI with a perspective when you edit the details of the KPI. See "Working with KPI Details".

For example, when you create an objective called Improved Client Response Time you might associate it with the Customer perspective as the objective sustains and supports customer-related operations.

There are four standard perspectives that are defined by the Balanced Scorecard Methodology:

In addition, you can create custom perspectives for your scorecard.

For information on creating custom perspectives, see "Creating Custom Perspectives".

Creating Custom Perspectives

When you create a scorecard, you specify whether you want to use the default perspectives that are defined by the Balanced Scorecard Methodology (using the Use Default Perspectives? check box. If you:

  • Do not use the default perspectives, then you must create your own custom perspectives.

  • Do use the default perspectives, then you can create one or more custom perspectives to use along with the default perspectives.

To create custom perspectives:

  1. Edit the scorecard for which you want to create a custom perspective. For information, see "Opening or Editing Scorecards".

  2. In the "Perspectives pane", click the New Perspective toolbar button.

    The "Scorecard editor: Perspective tab" is displayed.

  3. In the Perspective Name field, enter the name of the perspective.

  4. (optional) In the Description field, enter a description of the perspective.

  5. Click the Set User button to display the "Select Business Owner dialog", where you select the business owner. (By default, the business owner is the creator of the scorecard.)

  6. In the Focus area, specify whether the focus of the perspective is financial or internal facing.

  7. Add related documents, as appropriate. See "Related Documents area".

  8. Click Save.

    The perspective displays in the "Perspectives pane".

You can now associate initiatives, objectives, and KPIs with this custom perspective. You associate an initiative and objective with a perspective when you create or edit the initiative or objective. See "Creating Initiatives" and "Creating Objectives". You associated a KPI with a perspective when you edit the details of the KPI. See "Working with KPI Details".

What Are Key Performance Indicators (KPIs)?

A KPI represents the result of a business measure (for example, Product Sales or Operational Costs) evaluated against a target for that measure. You can use KPIs to assess the progress of the objectives and initiatives that form levels of organizational strategy.

You can create KPIs that you need:

  • Within a scorecard. This enables you to create the KPIs as you are creating or editing the scorecard.

  • Outside a scorecard. This enables you to create the KPIs in advance of creating or editing a scorecard.

For information on KPIs and how to create them, see Chapter 11, "Using KPIs and KPI Watchlists."



What Are KPI Watchlists?

A KPI watchlist is a set of KPIs whose performance you want to monitor.

You can create KPI watchlists:

  • Within a scorecard. You create a KPI watchlist within a scorecard to help you view and investigate the progress of the objectives and initiatives. Watchlists that you create within scorecard are saved as part of the scorecard.

  • Outside a scorecard. This enables you to create a KPI watchlist in advance of creating or editing a scorecard. Watchlists that you create outside a scorecard are saved as standalone objects in the Oracle BI Presentation Catalog.

For information on KPI watchlists and how to create them, see Chapter 11, "Using KPIs and KPI Watchlists."

What Are Objectives?

Objectives are the required or desired outcomes that form your corporate strategy. You can create an objective for:

  • An entire organization, for example, Oracle Corporation

  • A department, for example, Sales department

When you create an objective, you assign it one or more KPIs that are to be used to measure its progress and performance. For example, you can measure the progress and performance of an objective named Improved Customer Satisfaction by assigning it the following KPIs:

  • Average Customer Survey Satisfaction Score

  • Number of Customer Complaints KPIs

For more information on KPIs, see Chapter 11, "Using KPIs and KPI Watchlists."

Within a scorecard, you also create the initiatives that are required to meet the objectives. For more information on initiatives, see "What Are Initiatives?"

Objectives that you create are displayed hierarchically in the "Strategy pane". The root objective represents the entity that you are scorecarding, that is the entire organization or a department. The KPIs that are assigned to assess the performance of objectives are displayed below the objectives in the Strategy pane.

The Strategy pane also shows the statuses of objectives and KPIs using the appropriate colors and icons that you specified for assessment mappings. For more information on assessment mappings, see "Defining Assessment Mappings for Scorecards".

For information on creating objectives, see Creating Objectives.

Creating Objectives

You can create one or more objectives. Objectives that you create should be measurable using KPIs and strategically relevant.

For more information about objectives, see "What Are Objectives?"

To create an objective:

  1. Edit the scorecard for which you want to create an objective. For information, see "Opening or Editing Scorecards".

  2. In the "Strategy pane":

    • If the objective that you want to create can be independently achieved, then select the root objective.

    • If the objective that you want to create is required to meet a higher-level objective, then select the higher-level objective.

  3. Click the Create Objective toolbar button or right-click and select Create Objective.

    The "Scorecard editor: Objective Details tab" is displayed.

  4. Highlight the default objective name in the top left corner and enter a new name for the objective.

  5. In the Description field, enter a description of the objective.

  6. Specify the analytic information (including the KPIs to be used to measure the progress and performance of the objective) by completing the "Analytics pane". For information, see "Completing the Analytics Pane for Objectives or Initiatives".

  7. Specify the collaboration information by completing the "Collaboration pane" as follows:

    1. (optional) Add comments by clicking the Add Comment button to display the "Add Comment dialog". See "About Comments".

    2. Specify the business owner that users can contact by clicking the Set User button to display the "Select Business Owner dialog". (By default, the business owner is the creator of the scorecard.)

    3. (optional) Add related documents by clicking the New Row button to display the "New Related Document dialog". Also see "Related Documents area".

  8. Add related items by completing the "Related Items pane" as follows:

    1. Add one or more objectives that impact or support (that is, help achieve or hinder progress on) this objective. To do so, drag the objective from the Strategy pane and drop it in the Causes table.

      The "Causal Linkage dialog" is displayed, where you specify how closely the objectives are related and whether changes to the values in this causal objective have a direct or inverse impact on this objective.

      For example, for an Increased Client References objective, you might drag and drop the following objectives that could cause (or help or hinder) it: Decreased Client Response Time and Increase Customer Issue Resolutions.

    2. Add one or more initiatives (that is, the tasks that are required to meet the objective). To add an initiative, drag it from the "Initiatives pane" and drop it in the Initiatives Driving This Objective table.

      The"Initiative Linkage dialog", where you specify how closely the initiative and the objective are related and whether changes to the values in this initiative have a direct or inverse impact on this objective.

    3. Add one or more objectives that this objective impacts or supports. To do so, drag the objective from the Strategy pane and drop it in the Effects table.

      The "Causal Linkage dialog" is displayed, where you specify how closely the objectives are related and whether changes to the values in this causal objective have a direct or inverse impact on this objective.

  9. Click Save.

Completing the Analytics Pane for Objectives or Initiatives

When you create an objective or initiative, you must specify the analytics for the objective or initiative by completing the "Analytics pane".

To complete the Analytics pane:

  1. In the Perspective box, select the perspective with which the objective or initiative is to be aligned.

  2. In the Assessment Rule box, select the rule to be used to assess the overall performance of the initiative or objective. For example, select Worst case to specify that the status of the worst performing child KPI or objective is to be used.

  3. (for an objective only) In the Leading/Lagging box, indicate whether the performance of the objective drives other objectives, or is affected by the performance of other objectives or other data or processes.

  4. (for an initiative only) In the Priority box, select the priority that indicates the importance and urgency of an initiative.

  5. (for an initiative only) Specify the start date, due date, and completion date.

  6. In the Action Link area, add any action links that you want to provide to users to let them take actions that are relevant for the status of the objective or initiative. For information, see "Adding Actions to Initiatives and Objectives in Scorecards". Also see "What Are Actions?"

  7. In the Objectives & KPIs or Initiatives & KPIs table, add the KPIs to be used to measure the progress and performance of the objective or initiative.


    Note:

    If no KPIs have been defined, or you want to define another KPI to meet your needs, then you can create the KPI from within the Scorecard editor. For information, see "Creating or Editing KPIs".



    Tip:

    You can modify the columns that are displayed in the Objectives & KPIs or Initiatives & KPIs table. To do so, select View then Show More Columns to display the "Show More Columns dialog", where you can add or remove columns.


    To add a KPI:

    1. Click Objects in the Objectives & KPIs or Initiatives & KPIs table and then select Add KPI.

      Alternatively, you can drag the KPI from the "Catalog pane for Scorecard" or from the "Scorecard Documents pane" (if the KPI has been saved to the current scorecard folder) and drop it in the table.

      The "Add KPI dialog" is displayed.

    2. If the KPI is dimensioned, then for each dimension, specify a value, select Use Variable and specify the variable, or select Use Point-of-View to use the value selected in the point of view area. For more information on the point of view area, see "About the Point of View Area".

    3. In the Label field, enter the name to be displayed for the KPI in the "Strategy pane".

    4. Click OK.


    Note:

    A KPI that you have added to the Strategy pane or Initiatives pane obtains many of its properties from the base KPI as it was originally defined in the KPI editor. You can override some of the base KPI's properties to customize them for use within Scorecard. The KPI properties that you can override are the label, description, business owner, and dimension pinnings. You also can assign a perspective and an indicator type. For information on overriding KPI properties, see "Working with KPI Details".


What Are Initiatives?

Initiatives are time-specific tasks or projects that are necessary to achieve objectives. As such, you can use initiatives that support objectives as milestones as they reflect progress toward strategy targets. For example to implement an objective called Improve Customer Satisfaction, you might create these initiatives:

  • Create online feedback forum

  • Form response team

Generally, an initiative supports multiple objectives.

When you create an initiative, you assign it KPIs that are to be used to measure its progress. For more information on KPIs, see Chapter 11, "Using KPIs and KPI Watchlists."

Initiatives that you create are displayed hierarchically in the "Initiatives pane". The root initiative represents all the initiatives that you implement to achieve objectives and goals. The KPIs that are assigned to an initiative are displayed below the initiative in the Initiatives pane.

The Initiatives pane also shows the statuses of initiatives and KPIs using the appropriate colors and icons that you specified for assessment mappings. For more information on assessment mappings, see "Defining Assessment Mappings for Scorecards".

For information on creating initiatives, see Creating Initiatives.

Creating Initiatives

You can create one or more initiatives. Initiatives that you create should be measurable using KPIs and strategically relevant.

For more information about initiatives, see "What Are Initiatives?"

To create an initiative:

  1. Edit the scorecard for which you want to create an initiative. For information, see "Opening or Editing Scorecards".

  2. In the "Initiatives pane":

    • If the initiative that you want to create can be independently implemented, then select the root initiative.

    • If the initiative that you want to create is required to meet a higher-level initiative, then select the higher-level initiative.

  3. Click the Create Initiative toolbar button or right-click and select Create Initiative.

    The "Scorecard editor: Initiative Details tab" is displayed.

  4. Highlight the default initiative name in the top left corner of the tab and enter a new name for the initiative.

  5. In the Description field, enter a description of the initiative.

  6. Specify the analytic information (including the KPIs to be used to measure the progress of the initiative) by completing the "Analytics pane". For information, see "Completing the Analytics Pane for Objectives or Initiatives".

  7. Specify the collaboration information by completing the "Collaboration pane" as follows:

    1. (optional) Add comments by clicking the Add Comment button to display the "Add Comment dialog". See "About Comments".

    2. Specify the business owner that users can contact by clicking the Set User button to display the "Select Business Owner dialog". (By default, the business owner is the creator of the scorecard.)

    3. (optional) Add related documents by clicking the New Row button in the Related Documents toolbar to display the "New Related Document dialog". Also see "Related Documents area".

    4. (optional) Add the key resources by clicking the New Row button in the Key Resources toolbar to display the "Key Resource dialog".

  8. In the "Related Items pane", add one or more objectives that require this initiative in order to succeed.

    To add an objective, drag the objective from the "Strategy pane" and drop it in the Objectives for this Initiative table.

    The"Initiative Linkage dialog" is displayed, where you specify how closely the initiative and the objective are related and whether changes to the values in this initiative have a direct or inverse impact on this objective.

  9. Click Save.

Understanding Initiative or Objective Performance Assessment

Oracle Business Intelligence assesses the performance of an initiative or objective by aggregating the assessments of its children. In the process, it uses:

For examples of performance assessments, see "Example of Determining the Performance Assessment for an Objective Based on Child Objectives" and "Example of Determining the Performance Assessment for an Objective Based on a Child KPI".

Example of Determining the Performance Assessment for an Objective Based on Child Objectives

Suppose the following about an objective named Improve Financial Results:

In this case, the performance assessment of the Improve Financial Results objective would the status and score of the child with the worst status and score, that is, Increase Sales, which has a scorecard status of Critical and a score of 0.

Defining Assessment Mappings for Scorecards

You use the "Settings dialog: Assessment Mappings tab" to define the assessment mappings for a scorecard.

For more information on initiative and objective performance assessment, see "Understanding Initiative or Objective Performance Assessment".

To define assessment mappings:

  1. Edit the scorecard for which you want to define assessment mappings. For information, see "Opening or Editing Scorecards".

  2. Click the Scorecard Settings toolbar button in the Scorecard editor.

    The "Settings dialog: Assessment Mappings tab" is displayed.

  3. In the Score Threshold fields, enter the numeric values that set the boundaries for the assessment ranges.

    For example, you might enter 33 and 66 to set the boundaries for three assessment ranges — Critical, Warning, and OK. Any KPI score from 0 to 33 would fall in the Critical assessment range, any KPI score from 34 to 66 would fall in the Warning assessment range, and any KPI score from 66 to 100 would fall in the OK assessment range.

  4. In the Assessment Range boxes, specify the name of each assessment range (for example, Critical) and, for each range, specify the icon and the color to be used to represent the range.

  5. Click OK.

Assigning Weights to Child Objectives, Initiatives and KPIs

You assign weights to the child objectives, initiatives, and KPIs of an objective or initiative to indicate how much it affects the performance of its parent objective.

To assign weights to child objectives, initiatives, and KPIs, the Assessment Rule for the parent objective or initiative must be set to Weighted.

For more information on objective and initiative performance assessment, see "Understanding Initiative or Objective Performance Assessment".

To assign weights to child objectives, initiatives and KPIs of an objective or initiative:

  1. Edit the scorecard that contains the parent objective or initiative of the objectives, initiatives, and KPIs to which you want to assign weights. For information, see "Opening or Editing Scorecards".

  2. Open the parent objective or initiative. To do so, double-click the objective in the in the "Strategy pane" or the initiative in the "Initiatives pane".

  3. In the Objectives & KPIs or Initiatives and KPIs table of the "Analytics pane", enter a weight for each child objective, initiative, or KPI.

    For example, in a root objective called My Company Scorecard, you might assign the following weights to its four child objectives:

    • Improve Financial Results: 70%

    • Improve Quality: 10%

    • Improve Employee Training: 10%

    • Improve Turnaround Time: 10%

  4. Click Save.

About the Point of View Area

The point of view area of the "Scorecard editor" displays controls for the dimensions of KPIs that are used in the Scorecard to measure the progress and performance of initiatives and objectives. For more information on KPI dimensions, see "What Are Dimensions and Pinned Dimension Values?"

Controls are displayed for each KPI dimension that is referenced in a scorecard with the exception of those that you explicitly prevent from being displayed. If the same dimension is referenced in more than one KPI, then a control can be shared by the KPIs. (For more information on how to set up the controls in the point of view area, see "Setting Up the Point of View Controls".)

Each control includes a label and a down-arrow button that displays a list of the dimension values from which you can select. The label is either the database name for the dimension (by default), a user-friendly label, if specified for the control, or a specific value, if the dimension is pinned to a value.

You use this area to temporarily pin (that is, set values) for the dimensions. When you pin a dimension, the data in the scorecard is filtered to give you a new point of view (that is, a new view of the data). This enables you to focus on specific data of interest to you, such as the area of business for which you are responsible.

The point of view area settings are temporary and are not persisted when the scorecard is saved. To persist pinnings, you can use the:

The Scorecard editor also contains the Back and Forward buttons that enable you to move forward or backward through your point of view history to select a previous point of view or the point of view with which you started.

To temporarily pin a dimension:

  1. Click the down-arrow button to the right of the dimension and select a value. The data is filtered and a new point of view is displayed.

Setting Up the Point of View Controls

You use the "Settings dialog: Dimension Settings tab" to set up the controls for dimensions in the point of view area of a scorecard.

Specifically, you can specify:

For more information on the point of view, see "About the Point of View Area".

To set up the point of view controls:

  1. Edit the scorecard for which you want to set up the point of view controls. For information, see "Opening or Editing Scorecards".

  2. Click the Scorecard Settings toolbar button in the Scorecard editor.

    The "Settings dialog: Assessment Mappings tab" is displayed.

  3. Click the Dimension Settings tab.

  4. Set up the controls for each dimension as desired. To set up the control for a dimension:

    1. Select the dimension and then click the Edit Row button to display the "Edit Dimension Settings dialog".

    2. Specify the settings that you want.

    3. Click OK.

  5. Click OK.

What Are Strategy Trees?

A strategy tree shows an objective and its supporting child objectives and KPIs hierarchically. It also provides supporting information for the objective, such as business owner and related documents.

A strategy tree lets you easily explore and navigate:

  • The strategy for an entire scorecard (that is, the root objective) for example, ABC Corporation

  • The strategy for an individual objective, for example, Decrease Support Turnaround.

There are two types of diagrams for a strategy tree:

For information on creating a strategy tree, see "Creating Strategy Trees".

Understanding a Contribution Wheel Diagram

You use a contribution wheel diagram to view an objective and its supporting child objectives and KPIs hierarchically in a circular diagram called a contribution wheel diagram. The contribution wheel diagram makes it easy to see the contribution (or impact) a specific objective or KPI has on a parent objective. It contains the following components:

Figure 12-4 shows an example of a contribution wheel diagram.

Creating Strategy Trees

You can create a strategy tree for the entire scorecard or for a specific objective as follows:

To create a strategy tree:

  1. If you want to:

    • Create and save a strategy tree for an entire scorecard or for a specific objective, edit the scorecard in which you want to create the strategy tree. For information, see "Opening or Editing Scorecards".

    • Create but not save a temporary, read-only strategy tree only for a specific objective, open the scorecard. For information, see "Opening or Editing Scorecards".

  2. To create a strategy tree for:

    • The entire scorecard (the root objective), in the "Scorecard Documents pane", click the New Object toolbar button and select Create Strategy Tree.

    • For a specific objective, in the "Strategy pane", right-click the objective and then select View Strategy Tree.

    The "Strategy Tree tab: Diagram tab" is displayed, showing the objective and its supporting child objectives and KPIs hierarchically in a diagram.

  3. In a strategy tree diagram, to:

    • Display options that enable you to work with a node, click the Options button (on the right side of the node) to display the "Node Options Menu".

    • Display additional performance data for a KPI, such as target value or variance, click the down arrow at the bottom center of the node. To collapse this data, click the up arrow.

    • Expand or collapse a node, click the plus (+) or minus (-) icon beneath the node.

    • Zoom in and out of the diagram, use the toolbar buttons on the "Scorecard editor: Strategy Tree tab".

    • Work with comments:

      • Hover the mouse pointer over the Comment button in the upper-right corner of a node to display the "Status window", where you can read the comments that were previously added, add another comment, or reply to a comment.

      • Click the Options button on the right side of the node to which you want to add a comment and select Add Comment from the "Node Options Menu". The "New Comment dialog" is displayed, where you can add a comment or read any comments that were previously added.

      See "About Comments" and "Working with Comments".

    • Work with status overrides on nodes for which you are the business owner:

      • Hover the mouse over the red asterisk (if available) in a node to display the "Status window", where you can view the overrides that were previously applied or apply another override.

      • Click the Options button on the right side of the node to which you want to apply the status override and select Override Status from the "Node Options Menu". The "Status Override dialog" is displayed, where you apply another override or view any overrides that were previously applied.

      See "About Status Overrides" and "Working with Status Overrides".

    • Change the type of diagram to a contribution wheel diagram, right-click in the background outside the tree and select View as Wheel Diagram or click the Wheel Diagram Type toolbar button in the "Scorecard editor: Strategy Tree tab".

  4. In a contribution wheel diagram, to:

    • Display information specific to a node (such as the weight assigned to it in its parent's assessment rule), hover the mouse over the node.

    • Display options that allow you to work with a node, right-click the node to display the "Node Options Menu". For example, you can change the focus of the wheel using the Focus on Node and Focus up to Node options.

    • Change the focus of the wheel down to a descendant, double-click the descendant node.

    • Zoom in and out of the diagram or set properties for the strategy tree, use the toolbar buttons on the "Scorecard editor: Strategy Tree tab".

    • Drill to the next level or collapse a level, hover the mouse over the concentric rings on the outer border of the wheel and click the Drill to next level or Collapse Level triangle.

    • Expand or collapse a node or group of nodes that appear as slivers (that is, appear very thin) in the diagram, click the Expand Section triangle or the Collapse Section triangle that displays when you hover over it. You can expand only slivers in the second concentric circle around the center and farther out.

    • Work with comments (if any), click the Comment button in a node to display the "Status window", where you can read the comments that previously have been added, add another comment, or reply to a comment. See "About Comments".

    • Work with status overrides (if any), click the white dashed line around the border of a node to display the "Status window", where you can view the overrides that previously have been applied or apply another override. See "About Status Overrides".

    • Change the type of diagram to a strategy tree diagram, right-click in the background outside the wheel and select View as Tree Diagram or click the Tree Diagram Type toolbar button in the "Scorecard editor: Strategy Tree tab".

  5. To set properties that control the appearance of the diagrams, click the Properties toolbar button on the Scorecard editor: Strategy Tree tab.

    The Strategy Tree View Properties dialog is displayed.

  6. Specify the property settings to achieve the desired appearance, and then click OK.

  7. Click the "Strategy Tree tab: Details tab".

  8. Specify a description, assign the business owner, and specify related documents, as appropriate. (By default, the business owner is the creator of the scorecard.)

  9. Click Save to display the "Save As dialog". In the Save As dialog, you can rename the strategy tree rather than use the default name.

What Are Strategy Maps?

A strategy map shows how the objectives that have been defined for a scorecard and the KPIs that measure their progress are aligned by perspectives. It also indicates cause and effect relationships between objectives and other objectives or KPIs with connecting lines. You create cause and effect relationships when you create (or edit) an objective (see "Creating Objectives") or work with KPI details (see "Working with KPI Details"). You also can create cause and effect relationships in a strategy map.

Figure 12-5 shows an example of a strategy map.

You can create multiple strategy maps to represent the strategy of different areas of your organization.

You can create strategy maps in Edit mode only. For more information about the Edit and View modes, see "Using the Edit and View Modes in the Scorecard Editor".

For information on creating strategy maps, see "Creating Strategy Maps".

Creating Strategy Maps

To create a strategy map:

  1. Edit the scorecard in which you want to create the strategy map. For information, see "Opening or Editing Scorecards".

  2. In the "Scorecard Documents pane", click the New Object toolbar button and select Create Strategy Map.

    The Strategy Map tab: Diagram tab is displayed.

  3. Build the map as follows:

    • Add objectives and KPIs that measure their progress by dragging them from the "Strategy pane" and dropping them in the diagram as follows:

      • If the objective or KPI is aligned with a specific perspective, then drop it anywhere in the diagram. It is displayed automatically in the section for the perspective to which the objective or KPI is associated.

        You align an objective or KPI with a perspective when you create (or edit) the objective or KPI. See "Creating Objectives". For more information on perspectives, see "What Are Perspectives?"

      • If the objective or KPI is not associated with a perspective, then you drop it in the section for the perspective to which the objective or KPI is to be associated. Note that this does not permanently assign the perspective to this objective or KPI.

    • (optional) Add the direct cause and effect objects for the selected node (that is, the representation of an objective or KPI) to the diagram by right-clicking and selecting Add Related Strategy Nodes.

    • Add cause and effect relationships, as needed.

      To add a cause and effect relationship, click the Draw A Casual Linkage Between Two Objectives button on the Scorecard editor: Strategy Map tab toolbar, select one of the nodes, and then select the second node. A line connecting the nodes is displayed.

    If you want to delete a node from the map, then right-click the node and select Remove From Diagram.

  4. To:

    • Display options that enable you to work with a node, click the Options button (on the right side of the node) to display the "Node Options Menu".

    • Edit a causal linkage, right-click the linkage line and select Edit Causal Linkage. The "Causal Linkage dialog" is displayed.

    • Delete a causal linkage, right-click the linkage line and select Delete Causal Linkage.

    • Display additional performance data for the KPI, such as target value or variance, click the down arrow at the bottom center of the representation. To collapse this data, click the up arrow.

    • Zoom in and out of the diagram, use the toolbar buttons on the "Scorecard editor: Strategy Map tab".

    • Work with comments:

      • Hover the mouse pointer over the Comment button in the upper-right corner of a node to display the "Status window", where you can read the comments that were previously added, add another comment, or reply to a comment.

      • Click the Options button on the right side of the node to which you want to add a comment and select Add Comment from the "Node Options Menu". The "New Comment dialog" is displayed, where you can add a comment or read any comments that were previously added.

      See "About Comments" and "Working with Comments".

    • Work with status overrides on nodes for which you are the business owner:

      • Hover the mouse over the red asterisk (if available) in a node to display the "Status window", where you can view the overrides that were previously applied or apply another override.

      • Click the Options button on the right side of the node to which you want to apply the status override and select Override Status from the "Node Options Menu". The "Status Override dialog" is displayed, where you apply another override or view any overrides that were previously applied.

      See "About Status Overrides" and "Working with Status Overrides".

  5. Click the "Strategy Map tab: Details tab".

  6. Specify a description, assign the business owner, and specify related documents, as appropriate. (By default, the business owner is the creator of the scorecard.)

  7. Click Save to display the "Save As dialog". In the Save As dialog, you can rename the strategy map rather than use the default name.

What Are Cause & Effect Maps?

A cause & effect map lets you illustrate the cause and effect relationships of an objective or KPI that is listed in the "Strategy pane". (Note that cause & effect maps are diagrams that are used in scorecard and are not related to map views that are described in Chapter 3, "Adding Views for Display in Dashboards.")

Figure 12-6 shows an example of a cause & effect map.

You create cause and effect relationships for:

A cause and effect map also indicates the proportionality (that is, whether changes in performance or value in the cause and effect relationship are directly proportional (direct) or inversely proportional (inverse) and strength (strong, moderate, or weak) of cause & effect relationships using symbols.

A cause & effect map helps you to better understand the implications of future strategic changes.

You can create a cause & effect map in either Edit or View mode:

For information on creating cause & effect maps, see "Creating Cause & Effect Maps".

Creating Cause & Effect Maps

You can create a cause & effect map for any objective or KPI that is listed in the "Strategy pane". For more information on cause & effect maps, see "What Are Cause & Effect Maps?"

To create a cause & effect map:

  1. If you want to:

    • Create and save a cause & effect map, edit the scorecard in which you want to create the cause & effect map. For information, see "Opening or Editing Scorecards".

    • Create but not save a temporary, read-only cause & effect map, open the scorecard in which you want to create the cause & effect map. For information, see "Opening or Editing Scorecards".

  2. In the "Strategy pane", right-click the objective or KPI and then select View Cause & Effect Map.

    The "Cause & Effect Map tab: Diagram tab" is displayed.

  3. To:

    • Display options that enable you to work with a node, right-click the node or click the Options button (on the right side of the node) to display the "Node Options Menu".

    • Display additional performance data for a KPI, such as target value or variance, click the down arrow at the bottom center of the node. To collapse this data, click the up arrow.

    • Edit a causal linkage, right-click the linkage line and select Edit Causal Linkage. The "Causal Linkage dialog" is displayed.

    • Delete a causal linkage, right-click the linkage line and select Delete Causal Linkage.

    • Zoom in and out of the diagram or to set preferences, use the toolbar buttons on the "Scorecard editor: Cause & Effect Map tab".

    • Work with comments:

      • Hover the mouse pointer over the Comment button in the upper-right corner of a node to display the "Status window", where you can read the comments that were previously added, add another comment, or reply to a comment.

      • Click the Options button on the right side of the node to which you want to add a comment and select Add Comment from the "Node Options Menu". The "New Comment dialog" is displayed, where you can add a comment or read any comments that were previously added.

      See "About Comments" and "Working with Comments".

    • Work with status overrides on nodes for which you are the business owner:

      • Hover the mouse over the red asterisk (if available) in a node to display the "Status window", where you can view the overrides that were previously applied or apply another override.

      • Click the Options button on the right side of the node to which you want to apply the status override and select Override Status from the "Node Options Menu". The "Status Override dialog" is displayed, where you apply another override or view any overrides that were previously applied.

      See "About Status Overrides" and "Working with Status Overrides".

  4. To specify how cause and effect relationships are to be displayed on the cause & effect map, click the Cause & Effect Map Preferences toolbar button on the Scorecard editor: Cause & Effect Map tab.

    The Cause & Effect Map Preferences dialog: General tab is displayed.

  5. Specify how you want cause and effect relationships displayed and then click OK.

  6. Click the Cause & Effect Map tab: Details tab.

  7. Specify a description, assign the business owner, and specify related documents, as appropriate. (By default, the business owner is the creator of the scorecard.)

  8. Click Save to display the "Save As dialog". In the Save As dialog, you can rename the cause & effect map rather than use the default name.

What Are Custom Views?

A custom view lets you show a customized view of your business and strategy data. For example, you might present information about objectives and KPIs on a background image of your choice, such as your company logo.

You can create custom views in Edit mode only. For more information about the Edit and View modes, see "Using the Edit and View Modes in the Scorecard Editor".

For information on creating custom views, see "Creating Custom Views".

Creating Custom Views

To create a custom view:

  1. Edit the scorecard in which you want to create the custom view. For information, see "Opening or Editing Scorecards".

  2. In the "Scorecard Documents pane", click the New Object toolbar button and select Create Custom View.

    The Custom View tab: Diagram tab is displayed.

  3. Drag objectives and KPIs from the "Strategy pane" and drop them on the diagram.

  4. Specify how you want each objective or KPI to be displayed on the diagram. For each objective or KPI, select it on the diagram and specify whether you want it displayed as:

    • Its full version. To do so, click the Full toolbar button.

    • Its simple version. To do so, click the Simple toolbar button.

    • One of its properties. To do so, click the Property toolbar button and select the property.

  5. (optional) Specify a background image, a background color, or both by clicking the Properties toolbar button to display the "Custom View Properties dialog".

  6. To:

    • Display options that enable you to work with a node, click the Options button (on the right side of the node) to display the "Node Options Menu".

    • Display additional performance data for the KPI, such as target value or variance, click the down arrow at the bottom center of the node. To collapse this data, click the up arrow.

    • Zoom in and zoom out of the diagram, use the toolbar buttons on the "Scorecard editor: Custom View tab".

    • Work with comments:

      • Hover the mouse pointer over the Comment button in the upper-right corner of a node to display the "Status window", where you can read the comments that were previously added, add another comment, or reply to a comment.

      • Click the Options button on the right side of the node to which you want to add a comment and select Add Comment from the "Node Options Menu". The "New Comment dialog" is displayed, where you can add a comment or read any comments that were previously added.

      See "About Comments" and "Working with Comments".

    • Work with status overrides on nodes for which you are the business owner:

      • Hover the mouse over the red asterisk (if available) in a node to display the "Status window", where you can view the overrides that were previously applied or apply another override.

      • Click the Options button on the right side of the node to which you want to apply the status override and select Override Status from the "Node Options Menu". The "Status Override dialog" is displayed, where you apply another override or view any overrides that were previously applied.

      See "About Status Overrides" and "Working with Status Overrides".

  7. Click the Custom View tab: Details tab.

  8. Specify a description, assign the business owner, and specify related documents, as appropriate. (By default, the business owner is the creator of the scorecard.)

  9. Click Save to display the "Save As dialog". In the Save As dialog, you can rename the cause & effect map rather than use the default name.

Working with KPI Details

When you create initiatives and objectives, you can assign KPIs to them to measure their progress and performance. You can work with these KPIs within a Scorecard using the "Scorecard editor: KPI Details tab".

Specifically, you can:

To work with KPI details:

  1. Edit the scorecard that contains the KPI. For information, see "Opening or Editing Scorecards".

  2. If the KPI is assigned to an:

    The Scorecard editor: KPI Details tab is displayed.

  3. Perform any of the following tasks:

    • Override one of the following items:

      • Label, using the Label field

      • Description, using the Description field

      • Business Owner, using the Business Owner field in the "Collaboration pane"

    • Pin dimensions using the Dimensionality area in the "Analytics pane".

    • Run actions that are associated with the KPI, using the action links in the Actions area of the Analytics pane.

    • Associate the KPI with a perspective, using the Perspective field in the Analytics pane.

    • Specify the indicator type, using the Indicator Type field in the Analytics pane.

    • View, add, or reply to comments, using the Collaboration pane. For more information on comments, see "About Comments".

    • View documents that provide supporting information to the KPI, using the Related Documents area in the Collaboration pane.

    • Identify objectives that cause or effect the KPI, using the "Related Items pane".

  4. If you made any changes, then click Save.

Opening Scorecard Objects

To open a scorecard object:

  1. Open or edit the scorecard that contains the object. For information, see "Opening or Editing Scorecards".

  2. To open:

    Alternatively, you can select the object and click the Open button on the tab toolbar or right-click the initiative or objective and select the Open option.

Viewing Overview Information

You can view summary information for initiatives, objectives, or KPIs.

To view overview information:

  1. Open or edit the scorecard. For information, see "Opening or Editing Scorecards".

    The "Scorecard editor: Overview tab" is displayed. It shows summary information for the root objective, which represents the entity that you are scorecarding, that is, the entire organization or a department.

  2. To show summary information for:

Editing Scorecard Objects

You can edit scorecard objects in the "Scorecard editor".

(You also can edit scorecard objects from the "Catalog page". For information, see "Managing Objects in the Oracle BI Presentation Catalog".)

To edit a scorecard object in the Scorecard editor:

  1. Edit the scorecard that contains the scorecard object that you want to edit. For information, see "Opening or Editing Scorecards".

  2. Double-click the object. For example, to edit an objective, double-click it in the "Strategy pane", or, to edit a strategy map, double-click it in the Scorecard Documents pane.

    Note, for a strategy tree, you can edit only the details of a strategy tree, not the diagram.

  3. Make your changes.

  4. Click Save.

Deleting Scorecard Objects

You can delete scorecard objects from the "Scorecard editor".

(You also can delete scorecard objects from the "Catalog page". For information, see "Managing Objects in the Oracle BI Presentation Catalog".)


Caution:

Before deleting an initiative, ensure that it has been completed or is no longer required to achieve an objective. Before deleting an objective, examine any child objectives or other objectives with which it is linked to ensure that its removal does not negatively impact these objectives.


To delete a scorecard object from the Scorecard editor:

  1. Edit the scorecard that contains the scorecard object that you want to delete. For information, see "Opening or Editing Scorecards".

  2. Right-click the object and select Delete. For example, to delete a Strategy Map, right-click it in the "Scorecard Documents pane" and select Delete.

  3. In the confirmation dialog, confirm that you want to delete the object.

Adding Scorecard Objects to Dashboards

You can add the following scorecard objects to dashboards:

For information on adding a scorecard object to a dashboard, see Adding Content to Dashboards.

About Status Overrides

You can override the statuses of initiatives, objectives, or KPIs that measure the performance of initiatives and objectives. To override a status, you must be the business owner of the initiative, objective, or KPI. You can also cancel an override.


Note:

Before you can work with status overrides, your administrator must enable this feature. For more information, see "Configuring the Repository for Oracle Scorecard and Strategy Management" in Oracle Fusion Middleware Metadata Repository Builder's Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition


You can work with status overrides in many places in a scorecard. For example, you can apply a status override to an objective in the "Scorecard editor: Objective Details tab". You can also apply a status override to an objective in a view, KPI watchlist, or perspective in which its referenced.

A status override is associated with:

For how to work with status overrides, see "Working with Status Overrides".

Working with Status Overrides

You can work with status overrides in many places in a scorecard, including in the:

As you work with status overrides, remember that a status override is associated with a specific point of view. For more information on the point of view, see "About the Point of View Area".

For more information about status overrides, see "About Status Overrides".

Working with Status Overrides in the Analytics Pane, Performance Pane, Details Tab, Perspective Tab, or Breakdown tab

You can work with status overrides in the:

  • "Analytics pane" of the "Scorecard editor: Initiative Details tab" and the "Scorecard editor: Objective Details tab", where you can view status overrides and override cancellations that were previously applied, and apply new overrides and override cancellations to the initiatives or objectives, and KPIs that support and measure the performance of a particular initiative or objective.

  • In the Details tab of a view, where you can view status overrides and override cancellations that were previously applied, and apply status overrides and override cancellations to initiatives, objectives, and KPIs displayed in the view.

  • "KPI Watchlist editor: Performance tab", where you can view status overrides and override cancellations that were previously applied, and apply new overrides and override cancellations to the KPIs in the watchlist.

  • "Scorecard editor: Perspective tab", where you can view status overrides and override cancellations that were previously applied, and apply status overrides and override cancellations to initiatives, objectives, and KPIs associated with a perspective.

  • "Scorecard editor: Breakdown tab", where you can view status overrides and override cancellations that were previously applied, and apply status overrides and override cancellations to initiatives, objectives, and KPIs that are listed in the Breakdown table

To work with status overrides in the Analytics pane, Performance pane, the Details tab, Perspective tab, or Breakdown tab:

  1. Open or edit the scorecard. See "Opening or Editing Scorecards".

  2. Open the object in which you want to work with status overrides and navigate to the appropriate pane or tab. For how to open an object, see "Opening Scorecard Objects".

  3. Ensure that the values that are displayed in the point of view area reflect the desired context for the status override. (For example, you might want to override the status of a KPI for the Eastern region.)

  4. To override a status or to cancel an override:

    1. In the Initiative and KPIs table, Objectives & KPIs table, Objectives, Initiatives & KPIs table, or New KPI Watchlist table (depending on the pane or tab in which you are working), right-click the Status cell in which you want to override the status or cancel an override and select Override Status. The "Status Override dialog" is displayed.

    2. Complete the Status Override dialog and click OK.

  5. To view status overrides or override cancellations that were previously applied to an object, hover the mouse pointer over the red asterisk to the right of the status symbol.

    The "Status window" is displayed. From this window, you can:

    • View status overrides or override cancellations that were previously applied.

    • Display the Status Override dialog to apply a new override or to cancel an override by clicking New Override.

    • Pin the window so that it stays open by clicking the Pin button.

Working with Status Overrides in the Diagram Tab of a View

You can work with status overrides in the Diagram tab of a view, where you can view status overrides and override cancellations that were previously applied, and apply new overrides and override cancellations to objectives and KPIs that are displayed in the view. For example, you can work with status overrides in the "Strategy Tree tab: Diagram tab".

To work with status overrides in the Diagram tab of a view:

  1. Open or edit the scorecard. See "Opening or Editing Scorecards".

  2. Open the view in which you want to work with status overrides and navigate to the Diagram tab. For how to open an object, see "Opening Scorecard Objects".

  3. Ensure that the values that are displayed in the point of view area reflect the desired context for the status override. (For example, you might want to override the status of a KPI for the Eastern region.)

  4. To apply a new status override:

    1. Click the Options button on the right side of the node to which you want to apply the status override and select Override Status from the "Node Options Menu". The "Status Override dialog" is displayed.

    2. Complete the Status Override dialog and click OK.

  5. To view status overrides that were previously applied to an object, hover the mouse pointer over the red asterisk to the right of the status symbol.

    The "Status window" is displayed. From this window, you can:

    • View status overrides that were previously applied.

    • Display the Status Override dialog to apply a new override by clicking New Override.

    • Pin the window so that it stays open by clicking the Pin button.

Contacting Business Owners

You can send a message to the business owner of a scorecard object. The business owner is the person who is responsible for managing and improving the business value and performance of a scorecard object. (The business owner might or might not be the same as the person who creates the scorecard or creates the KPI.) You specify the business owner of an object when you create it.

You use the Contact Owner button or menu option to contact the business owner. This button is available in many places in a scorecard, for example, in the toolbar of most tabs, such as the "Scorecard editor: Objective Details tab".

Oracle BI EE uses an agent and the delivery devices and profiles that the business owner specified in the "My Account dialog: Delivery Options tab" to determine where to deliver the message (for example, e-mail, phone, or pager).

To contact a business owner:

  1. Click the Contact Owner button or menu option. The "Contact Owner dialog" is displayed.

  2. In the Subject field, enter a the subject of the message.

  3. In the Priority field, select the priority of the message.

  4. In the Message field, enter the message that you want to send to the business owner.

  5. Click Send.

About Comments

Comments (also known as annotations) enable you to discuss changes in performance and progress for an initiative, objective, or KPI for a specific set of dimension values (that is, for a specific point of view).

You can add, view, and reply to comments in many places in a scorecard. For example, you can add a comment directly to an objective in the "Scorecard editor: Objective Details tab". You can also add a comment to an objective in a view, KPI watchlist, or perspective in which its referenced.

A comment is associated with:

For how to work with comments, see "Working with Comments".

Working with Comments

You can work with comments in many places in a scorecard, including in the:


Note:

Before you can add comments to an initiative or objective, the initiative or objective must have at least one KPI assigned to it.


As you work with comments, remember that a comment is associated with a specific point of view. For more information on the point of view, see "About the Point of View Area".

For more information about comments, see "About Comments".

Working with Comments in the Collaboration pane

You can work with comments in the "Collaboration pane" of the "Scorecard editor: Initiative Details tab", "Scorecard editor: Objective Details tab", and "Scorecard editor: KPI Details tab", where you can view, add, or reply to comments for that particular initiative, objective, or KPI.

To work with comments in the Collaboration pane:

  1. Open or edit the scorecard. See "Opening or Editing Scorecards".

  2. Open the initiative, objective, or KPI and navigate to the Collaboration pane. For how to open an object, see "Opening Scorecard Objects".

  3. Ensure that the values that are displayed in the point of view area reflect the desired context for the comment. (For example, you might want to comment on a KPI status for the Eastern region.)

  4. Do one of the following:

  5. Enter the subject of your comment (for a new comment only) and the text of your comment.

  6. Click OK.

Working with Comments in the Analytics Pane, Performance Pane, Details Tab, Perspective Tab, or Breakdown Tab

You can work with comments in the:

To work with comments in the Analytics pane, Performance pane, the Details tab, Perspective tab or Breakdown tab:

  1. Open or edit the scorecard. See "Opening or Editing Scorecards".

  2. Open the object in which you want to work with comments and navigate to the appropriate pane or tab. For how to open an object, see "Opening Scorecard Objects".

  3. Ensure that the values that are displayed in the point of view area reflect the desired context for the comment. (For example, you might want to comment on a KPI status for the Eastern region.)

  4. To add a new comment:

    1. In the Initiative and KPIs table, Objectives & KPIs table, Objectives, Initiatives & KPIs table, or New KPI Watchlist (depending on the pane or tab in which you are working), right-click the Status cell to which you want to add the comment and select Add Comment. The "Add Comment dialog" is displayed.

    2. Complete the Add Comment dialog and click OK.

  5. To work with the comments that were previously added to an object, hover the mouse pointer over the Blue triangle in the upper-right corner of the cell in the Status column or, for a KPI, one of its columns.

    The "Status window" is displayed. From this window, you can:

    • Read the comments that were previously added.

    • Display the "New Comment dialog" to add a new comment by clicking New Comment.

    • Display the "Reply dialog" to reply to a comment by clicking the Reply link.

    • Pin the window so that it stays open by clicking the Pin button.

Working with Comments in the Diagram Tab of a View

You can work with comments in the Diagram tab of a view, where you can view, add, and reply to comments for objectives and KPIs that are displayed in the view. For example, you can work with comments in the "Strategy Tree tab: Diagram tab".


Note:

You can also work with comments in this same way when a view is rendered as a diagram in a dashboard.


To work with comments in the Diagram tab of a view:

  1. Open or edit the scorecard. See "Opening or Editing Scorecards".

  2. Open the view in which you want to work with comments and navigate to the Diagram tab. For how to open an object, see "Opening Scorecard Objects".

  3. Ensure that the values that are displayed in the point of view area reflect the desired context for the comment. (For example, you might want to comment on a KPI status for the Eastern region.)

  4. To add a new comment:

    1. Click the Options button on the right side of the node to which you want to add the comment and select Add Comment from the "Node Options Menu". The "New Comment dialog" is displayed.

    2. Complete the Add Comment dialog and click OK.

  5. To work with the comments that were previously added to an object, hover the mouse pointer over the Comment button in the upper-right corner of the node.

    The "Status window" is displayed with all the comments that are attached to the initiative, objective, or KPI. From this window, you can:

    • Read the comments that were previously added.

    • Display the "New Comment dialog" to add a new comment by clicking New Comment.

    • Display the "Reply dialog" to reply to a comment by clicking the Reply link.

    • Pin the window so that it stays open by clicking the Pin button.

Troubleshooting

In solving problems that you might encounter while using Oracle Scorecard and Strategy Management, you might find the following information helpful:

PK-t-PKִo@OEBPS/bicomposer.htmE1 Using BI Composer to Work with Analyses

14 Using BI Composer to Work with Analyses

This chapter describes how to use BI Composer to work with analyses. It contains the following topics:

What Is BI Composer?

BI Composer is a simple-to-use wizard that allows you to quickly and easily create, edit, or view analyses without the complexities of the "Analysis editor".

The main components of the "BI Composer wizard" are as follows:

Figure 14-1 shows an example of the BI Composer wizard as it is displayed in Oracle BI EE.

For more information on the availability of BI Composer, see "Where Is BI Composer Available?"

Where Is BI Composer Available?

BI Composer is available in:

For more information on BI Composer, see "What Is BI Composer?"

Availability of BI Composer in Oracle BI Enterprise Edition

When users work with analyses in Oracle BI EE, BI Composer may be displayed in place of the "Analysis editor", depending on the preferences users make as follows:

  • BI Composer is displayed in regular mode in place of the Analysis editor, when users have specified that they want to use the BI Composer wizard as the analysis editor and have turned off accessibility mode in Oracle BI EE.

  • BI Composer is displayed in accessibility mode in place of the Analysis editor, when users have turned on accessibility mode in Oracle BI EE.

Users:

  • Specify that they want to use the BI Composer wizard as the analysis editor by selecting the Wizard (limited functionality) option for the Analysis Editor component in the "My Account dialog: Preferences tab".

  • Turn accessibility mode on or off by selecting or deselecting the Accessibility Mode box in the "Sign In page" or by selecting On or Off for the Accessibility Mode component in the My Account dialog: Preferences tab.

What Are the Steps for Creating or Editing an Analysis in BI Composer?

The steps for creating or editing an analysis in BI Composer are as follows:

  • Select Columns — In this step you select the columns that are to be included in the analysis. You can also:

    • Specify column interactions

    • Specify a column formula

    • Rename a column

    • Hide a column

  • Select Views — In this step you select the views that are to be included in the analysis, such as a title, table, pivot table, bar graph, and so on. (Note that not all views available in Oracle BI Enterprise Edition are supported in BI Composer.) You can also preview the results.

  • Edit Table — In this step you edit the layout of the tabular view (if you have included a tabular view). For example, you can create prompts, use a column to section the analysis, and exclude certain columns from the tabular view. You can also preview the results.

  • Edit Graph — In this step you edit the properties and layout of the graph (if you have included a graph view). For example, you can create prompts, use a column to section the analysis, and exclude certain columns from the graph. You can also preview the results.

  • Sort and Filter — In this step you apply sorting and filters to the views. You can also preview the results.

  • Highlight — In this step you apply conditional formatting to the tabular view (if you have included a tabular view). You can also preview the results.

  • Save — In this step you save the analysis with the same name or with a different name. You can also:

    • Create new folders in which to save the analyses

    • Rename folders and analyses

    • Delete folders and analyses

    • Expand and collapse folders

Creating Analyses Using BI Composer

In Oracle BI EE, you create a new analysis using BI Composer when you select the Analysis option on the New menu in the global header or Create section of the "Home page".

For more information on BI Composer, see "What Is BI Composer?"

To create an analysis using BI Composer:

  1. In Oracle BI EE:

    1. In the global header, click New, then Analysis.

    2. Select a subject area. The "BI Composer wizard" is displayed in a new window.

  2. In other applications (such as an ADF application):

    1. Click the Subject Areas tab.

    2. Select a subject area.

    3. Click Create. The "BI Composer wizard -- Create Analysis: Select Columns panel" is displayed.

  3. Use the Select Columns panel to select the columns to include in the analysis. For each column that you want to add:

    1. Select the column in the Subject Area list.

    2. Click Add to move it to the Selected Columns list.

    If you want to add or remove subject areas from which to select columns, click the Add button in the Subject Area: Subject_Area_Name area to display the "Add/Remove Subject Areas dialog".

    For a column in the Selected Columns list, if you want to:

    • Change the column name or specify a formula for the column, select the column and click Column Properties to display the "Column Properties dialog for BI Composer".

    • Specify what happens when you click either the column heading or a value in the column or hierarchy level, select one of options in the Interaction list for the column.

    • Hide the column in the view, select the Hidden box for the column.

    • Remove the column from the list, select the column and click Remove.

    • Remove all columns from the list, click Remove All.

  4. Click the Select Views button in the BI Composer train at the top of the wizard. The "BI Composer wizard -- Create Analysis: Select Views panel" is displayed.

  5. Use the Select Views panel to specify the views to include.

  6. (optional) If you included a tabular view in the analysis, click the Edit Table button in the BI Composer train. The "BI Composer wizard -- Create Analysis: Edit Table panel" is displayed.

  7. (optional) Use the Edit Table panel to edit the layout of the tabular view.

  8. (optional) If you included a graph view in the analysis, click the Edit Graph button in the BI Composer train. The "BI Composer wizard -- Create Analysis: Edit Graph panel" is displayed.

  9. (optional) Use the Edit Graph panel to edit the properties and layout of the graph.

  10. (optional) Click the Sort and Filter button in the BI Composer train. The "BI Composer wizard -- Create Analysis: Sort and Filter panel" is displayed.

  11. (optional) Use the Sort and Filter panel to apply sorting and filters to the views.

  12. (optional) If you included a tabular view in the analysis, click the Highlight button in the BI Composer train. The "BI Composer wizard -- Create Analysis: Highlight panel" is displayed.

  13. (optional) Use the Highlight panel to apply conditional formatting to the tabular view.

  14. Click the Save button in the BI Composer train. The "BI Composer wizard -- Create Analysis: Save panel" is displayed.

  15. Use the Save panel to save the analysis with the same name or with a different name by specifying the save criteria and then clicking Submit.

Editing Analyses Using BI Composer

In Oracle BI EE, you edit an analysis using BI Composer when you:

  • Edit an analysis from the Catalog page or from the Recent section or the Most Popular section of the Home page

  • Edit an analysis from within a dashboard

In other applications (such as an ADF application), you select an analysis to edit directly from the "BI Composer wizard".

For more information on BI Composer, see "What Is BI Composer?"

To edit an analysis using BI Composer:

  1. Edit the analysis in one of the following ways:

    • From the Catalog or Home page in Oracle BI EE, navigate to the analysis and click Edit. The BI Composer wizard is displayed.

    • From the BI Composer wizard, click the Catalog tab, select the analysis, and click Edit.

  2. Make the changes to the analysis by navigating the steps of the wizard using the buttons in the BI Composer train at the top of the wizard.

  3. Click the Save button in the BI Composer train. The "BI Composer wizard -- Create Analysis: Save panel" is displayed.

  4. Use the Save panel to save the edited analysis with the same name or with a different name by specifying the save criteria and then clicking Submit.

Viewing Analyses in BI Composer

If you are working in BI Composer in an application other than Oracle BI EE (such as an ADF application), then you can display an analysis for viewing in BI Composer. (In Oracle BI EE, you view an analyses in the same manner as an analysis created using the Analysis editor.)

For more information on BI Composer, see "What Is BI Composer?"

To view an analysis in BI Composer:

  1. Click the Catalog tab.

  2. Select the analysis.

  3. Click View. The analysis is displayed for viewing to the right of the Catalog tab.

PK-EEPKִo@OEBPS/prompts.htm Prompting in Dashboards and Analyses

6 Prompting in Dashboards and Analyses

This chapter explains how to construct prompts and use them to specify the data that is displayed in dashboards and analyses. This chapter contains the following topics:

What Are Inline and Dashboard Prompts?

The two differences between inline prompts and dashboard prompts is where they are stored and their run-time behavior.

A prompt that is created at the analysis level is called an inline prompt because the prompt is embedded in the analysis and is not stored in the Oracle BI Presentation Catalog and, therefore, cannot be added to other analyses. Inline prompts allow the end users to specify the data values that determine the content of the analysis. An inline prompt can be a column prompt, variable prompt, image prompt, or currency prompt. When you create an inline prompt, you select the columns and operators for the prompt and specify how the prompt is displayed to the users and how the users select the values. The user's choices determine the content of the analyses that are embedded in the dashboard. An inline prompt is an initial prompt, meaning that it only displays when the analysis is rendered. After the user selects the prompt value, the prompt fields disappear from the analysis and the only way for the user to select different prompt values is to re-run the analysis.

A prompt that is created at the dashboard level is called a dashboard prompt because the prompt is created outside of a specific dashboard and is stored in the catalog as an object, which can then be added to any dashboard or dashboard page that contains the columns that are specified in the prompt. Dashboard prompts allow the end users to specify the data values that determine the content of all of the analyses and scorecard objects contained on the dashboard.A dashboard prompt can be a column prompt, variable prompt, image prompt, or currency prompt. Dashboard prompts are reusable, because you can create one prompt and use it many times. When the prompt object is updated and saved, those updates are immediately displayed in all dashboards where the prompt is used. A dashboard prompt is a specific kind of filter that, when created, saved, and applied to a dashboard or dashboard pages, can filter all or some of the analyses and scorecard objects that are embedded in a dashboard or analyses and scorecard objects that are embedded on the same dashboard page. A dashboard prompt is interactive and is always displayed on the dashboard page so that the user can prompt for different values without having to re-run the dashboard. Users can create and save dashboard prompts to either a private folder or to a shared folder.

For more information about creating a column prompt, see "Creating or Editing a Column Prompt".

What are Column Prompts?

This topic describes column prompts; however, Oracle BI Enterprise Edition also enables you, as the content designer, to create currency prompts, image prompts, and variable prompts. For more information about these types of prompts, see "Other Prompt Types".

A column prompt is the most common and flexible prompt type. A column prompt enables you to build very specific value prompts to either stand alone on the dashboard or analysis or to expand or refine existing dashboard and analysis filters. Column prompts can be created for hierarchical, measure, or attribute columns at the analysis or dashboard level.

You can create intelligent prompts that are specialized for the user's business needs and roles so that the user can quickly and accurately find the appropriate data that is needed to make a key business decision.

How Do Column Prompts and Selection Steps Interact?

Selection steps allow the user to provide or refine the data from attribute columns and measures columns and to provide a kind of filter for hierarchical columns. Note that selection steps are applied after data aggregation. When you create selection steps for a column, you have the option of overriding one step of the selection with a dashboard or analysis column prompt. All selection steps before and after the override step are processed as specified, and the override step is processed using the user-specified data values that are collected by the column prompt. Column prompts that are created for hierarchical columns allow you to include only the Choice List input option.

For more information about selection steps, see "What are Filters and Selection Steps?" and "Working with Selections of Data". For more information about creating a prompt that works with selections, see "Overriding a Selection Step With a Column Prompt".

Other Prompt Types

In addition to column prompts, you can create currency prompts, image prompts, and variable prompts. The following list contains information about these prompt types.

For information about column prompts, see "What are Column Prompts?"

What Types of User Input Options Can I Use With a Column or Variable Prompt?

At design time, you must specify the prompt's user interface component. This component enables the user to enter a prompt value at run time. You can select from several user input options. The Radio Button option enables the user to specify only one prompt value. The Check Boxes, Choice List, List Box, and Text Field options allow the user to select either one or multiple prompt values. The Slider option enables the user to select multiple values by specifying a range of values, or all values that are lesser than or greater than a specified value (for example, include everything equal to 200 and greater). Note that the input option types that are available depend upon the column type that you are working with. The following sections provide information about each input option.

Check Boxes

The Check Boxes input option provides the user with a visible list of all prompt values where a small, selectable box displays before each value item. This input option is suitable for a prompt that contains a smaller set of data. Note that the List Box input option is suitable for a prompt that contains a larger set of data. This user input type automatically enables the user to select one or more prompt values. To select a specific prompt value, the user scans the list and clicks the box that corresponds to a particular item.

Figure 6-1 shows an example of the Check Boxes user input option for a column or variable prompt. The column being prompted is Region, and each value option (Central Region, Eastern Region, Southern Region, and Western Region) is displayed next to a small box. To select a value, the user clicks the small box that is adjacent to the prompt value. This example shows that the Eastern Region and Western Region are selected, which illustrates that the user can select multiple prompt values.

Choice List

The Choice List input option provides the user with a collapsed list of all prompt values. This option is useful for a long list of values where you want to provide the user with the ability to search for a specific value. You can set up this user input type to accept only one prompt value or multiple prompt values.

This input option provides a field and list that, when the user clicks the down-arrow button, expands and contains a list of all prompt values. To select a specific prompt value from the expanded list, the user scrolls through the list (or searches the list) and clicks the box that corresponds to a particular value. If you are using this input option with hierarchical columns, then a search dialog is displayed where the user can search for the prompt values.

The number of choices that display in the Choice List is determined by the MaxDropDownValues configuration setting. The administrator can modify the setting. For information about this configuration setting, see "Manually Changing Presentation Settings" in Oracle Fusion Middleware System Administrator's Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition.

Figure 6-2 shows an example of the Choice List user input option for a column or variable prompt. The column being prompted is Region. The user accesses the list of values by clicking the down-arrow button next to the Region field. After accessing the list of values, each value option (Central Region, Eastern Region, Southern Region, and Western Region) is displayed next to a small box. To select a value, the user clicks the small box that is adjacent to the prompt value. This example shows that the Eastern Region and Western Region are selected, which illustrates that the user can select multiple prompt values. The user can also click the Search icon next to the Region field or at the end of the list of values to search for a specific value.

List Box

The List Box input option provides the user with a visible list of all prompt values. This input option is suitable for a prompt that contains a large set of data. Note that the Check Boxes input option is suitable for a prompt that contains a smaller set of data. You can set up this user input type to allow the user to select only one prompt value or multiple prompt values by using Ctrl+ click or Shift+ click.

To select a specific prompt value, the user scans the list and selects the prompt value name (for example, Chicago), similar to how a user would click a hyperlink. The List Box option is very similar to the Check Boxes option, but the List Box option does not include a box before each value item.

Figure 6-3 shows an example of the List Box user input option for a column or variable prompt. The column being prompted is Region. The list contains each value option (Central Region, Eastern Region, Southern Region, and Western Region). To select a value, the user clicks a value. This example shows that the Eastern Region is selected.

Radio Buttons

The Radio Buttons input option provides the user with a visible list of all prompt values where a Radio Button is displayed before each prompt value. This option type is useful for short lists of values where the user is to select only one prompt value. To select a prompt value, the user scans the list and selects the radio button that corresponds to a particular item.

Figure 6-4 shows an example of the Radio Buttons user input option for a column or variable prompt. The column being prompted is Region. The list contains each value option (Central Region, Eastern Region, Southern Region, and Western Region). To select a value, the user clicks a radio button that corresponds to the value. This example shows that the Eastern Region radio button is selected.

Slider

This option is not available for Variable Prompts. Note that the Prompt Width option, which sets the prompt's field size, and the "Wrap Label to Fit" Prompts page setting option cannot be specified for or applied to this user input type.

You can use the Slider input option for numeric data values only. Depending upon the operator that you select, this option enables the user to select multiple values by specifying a range of values, or all values that are lesser than, greater than, or equal to a specified value. You select the Slider option to provide the user with a number line representation of the range of prompt values. The number line displays the prompt values in a range, for example 10,000 to 20,000. To select a prompt value, the user can either click a value on the number line or click and drag the thumb to select the desired value. A spinner box is also provided with up and down-arrow buttons that the user can click to select the desired value. If you selected the Slider option and the is between operator for the prompt, then the user can click and drag two thumbs to select the desired range of values for the prompt. Two spinner boxes are provided where you can either type or use the up and down-arrow buttons to specify a range of values.

Figure 6-5 shows an example of the Slider user input option that accepts a range of values for a column or variable prompt. The column being prompted is Units. The slider itself is a number line and on the left end is the number label zero, in the middle is the number label 50, and on the right end is the number label 100. There are also two spinner boxes above the number line. From these spinner boxes, the user can specify either a single number (for example, 40 in the first spinner box and 40 in the second spinner box) or two numbers to specify a range of numbers (for example, 5 in the first spinner box and 40 in the second spinner box). To specify numbers in the spinner boxes, the user can either type the value or use the box's up and down arrows to scroll to the desired value. To select a value from the number line, the user clicks and drags the thumb to the desired value or clicks and drags both thumbs to specify the desired range of values. This example shows that value of 25 is selected.

Text Field

The Text Field input option provides the users with a field into which they can type a specific prompt value. You cannot use this option for multiple prompt values. Only the field and the field label display for this option. This option is useful in instances where the user knows the prompt value and does not have to search for it, or for prompts with numeric values. Note that the prompt value that you enter must match the column's value. For example, if a column's data values include EASTERN REGION (in all capital letters), then the user must type EASTERN REGION into the text field. Numeric values cannot contain commas. If your repository is configured for double columns, and you are creating a prompt on a display column and specify Text Field, then filtering occurs on display values, not on code values.

Figure 6-6 shows an example of the Text Field user input option for a column or variable prompt. The column being prompted is Region. The field next to the Region label is blank. In this field, the user enters the name of the Region (for example (central, eastern, southern, and western Region). This example shows that the Eastern region was entered into the text field.

How Will Prompts Created in Previous Versions Be Upgraded?

In previous versions of Oracle BI EE (prior to 11g), prompts had slightly different appearance and behavior. For example, you could not specify a prompt field's width or whether to wrap the prompt labels on the prompt page. If you upgrade prompts from a previous version, then see "Upgrading Prompts" in Oracle Fusion Middleware Upgrade Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence.

Can Dashboard Prompts and Analysis Prompts Interact?

You can combine and wire prompts in various ways to create dashboards and reports that allow users to quickly and easily request precise, meaningful data. Combining and wiring prompts enables you to specify how dashboard prompts interact with analysis prompts. Note that currency prompts and variable prompts cannot be combined or wired.

For example, you can create analysis A that contains information about the amount of product that is sold by region and to the Region column add the Is protected option and then add a Region prompt. You can then create analysis B that contains information about sales person by region and analysis C that contains information about city by region. You then create and save a dashboard prompt for Region. When you create a dashboard and add analyses A, B, and C and the Region dashboard prompt and run the dashboard, the dashboard prompt input drives only what is displayed in analyses B and C. In this scenario, analysis A does not use the Region value that is specified in the dashboard prompt because you set analysis A's Region column filter value to Is protected. Therefore, the only way that analysis A accepts a prompt value is if the user specifies a prompt value in Region A's prompt fields.

There are various ways that you can combine and wire prompts. Table 6-1 describes each method.

Table 6-1 Methods of Combining and Wiring Oracle BI EE Analysis and Dashboard Prompts

Wiring MethodDescription

Auto wiring

Oracle BI Enterprise Edition's auto wiring functionality assumes that you intended to create a functioning prompt for the column and, therefore, activates and applies the prompt. Oracle BI EE applies the auto wiring method when you create an analysis and add a column prompt or image prompt. This auto wiring method does not require the is prompted filter operator. Any unprotected filter can be used.

Note that setting the filter operator to is prompted provides a more precise level of control between prompts and filters than the auto wiring method. For more information, see the "Filter value is set to *Prompt User" row in this table.

Constrained Prompts

Use this method with several columns in a prompt to constrain the user's prompt choice based on subsequent choices. Constrained prompts can be set up on the "Prompt options dialog" to specify which prompt narrows the choices. For example, if one column filters on region and the next column filters on city, then the city column can be constrained to show only cities in the selected region.

Filter operator is set to is prompted

Use this method to build complex prompts that interact with filters. When you use this method, you have full control over how the dashboard prompts, inline prompts, and filters are applied to the embedded analysis.

Selection Steps Override with Prompts Option

Use this method to use an analysis or dashboard column prompt to provide the data choices for a specific member selection step on a hierarchical or attribute column. Since you cannot use filters with hierarchical columns, selection steps are the only way that you can use prompts with hierarchical columns. Only one selection step per column selection step set can be overridden with a prompt. All selection steps before and after the overridden step are processed as specified.

For more information about selections steps, see "What are Filters and Selection Steps?" and "Working with Selections of Data". For more information about creating a prompt that works with selections, see "Overriding a Selection Step With a Column Prompt".

Protected versus Unprotected filters

Use this method to determine whether the dashboard prompt can supply the inline prompt's value when the corresponding column's filter value is set to something other than Is prompted. The unprotected and protected filter settings can be used when a dashboard prompt and inline prompt reside on the same dashboard and both prompts were created for the same column.

When the column's filter value is unprotected, the dashboard prompt value determines the analysis' results. If the filter value is set to something other than Is prompted (for example, Is equal to/is in) and the filter is set to protected filter, then the dashboard prompt cannot determine the report results.

For more information about protecting a filter, see "Filters pane".


In What Order Does Oracle BI EE Apply Prompts with Default Values?

Because prompting enables you to build flexible dashboards and analyses, it is important to understand how Oracle BI EE initiates a complex dashboard's prompts. The following list presents the order in which, at run time, Oracle BI EE applies prompts with default values:

  1. Hidden prompts whose scope is the dashboard page.

    For more information about hidden prompts, see "Adding a Hidden Dashboard Prompt to a Dashboard or Dashboard Page".

  2. Hidden prompts whose scope is the whole dashboard.

  3. Prompts whose scope is the dashboard page. The precedence order of dashboard page prompts is unspecified.

  4. Prompts whose scope is the whole dashboard.

  5. Prompts, either inline or named, whose scope is the analysis.

What Is Auto-Complete?

Oracle BI EE provides auto-complete functionality for prompts, which, when enabled, suggests and highlights matching prompt values as the user types in the prompt selection field.

Auto-complete is only available for the Choice List prompt type when the prompt designer selected the "Enable User to Type Value" option in the "New Prompt dialog". Note that auto-complete is not available for hierarchical prompts.

The administrator configures the auto-complete functionality to be case-sensitive or case-insensitive, and then specifies the matching level. The matching level determines how Oracle BI EE matches the column's values to what the user types. There are three different ways that the administrator can set up auto-complete matching:

When the administrator properly configures the prompts setting in the Oracle BI EE instance configuration file, the auto-complete functionality highlights matching values when the user accesses the "Select Values dialog" to search for a prompt value. However, the matching level is not determined by the preference set by the administrator. Instead, the user selects the matching level in the "Select Values dialog."

The prompts auto-complete functionality is enabled by the administrator at the system level, but the dashboard designer can exclude the auto-complete functionality from dashboards, and user can turn auto-complete off by using the "My Account dialog". Note the following relationships between auto-complete settings:

Creating or Editing a Column Prompt

A column prompt enables users to select the values to populate a column in a dashboard or analysis. Use the following procedure to create or edit a named column prompt that you can apply to one or more dashboards, or to create or edit an inline column prompt that is embedded in an analysis. This procedure does not include information about selection steps or hierarchical columns. For information about column prompts and selection steps, see "Overriding a Selection Step With a Column Prompt".

To create or edit a column prompt:

  1. To create a dashboard prompt, use the following sub-procedure.

    1. Navigate to the Oracle BI Enterprise Edition Home page, locate the global header, hover the mouse pointer over the New menu to access the menu, and select Dashboard Prompt. From the Select Subject Area menu, select the subject area for which you want to create a prompt. The "Definition pane" is displayed.

    2. Click the New toolbar button in the Definition Pane to access the prompt type selection list. From the list, select Column Prompt. The "Select Column dialog" is displayed.

    3. Select a column and click OK. The "New Prompt dialog" displays.

      If your repository is configured for double columns, then ensure that you select the correct display column. For information on double columns, see "Understanding the Double Column Feature".

      The number of columns that you include in a prompt can affect performance. In general, you should limit the number of columns to as few as possible.

      If you are creating a dashboard prompt and want to add or remove related subject areas, then click the Select subject area button in the "Select Column dialog" to display the "Add/Remove Subject Areas dialog".

  2. To create an inline prompt, use the following sub-procedure.

    1. Create a new analysis or access an existing analysis for which you want to create a prompt. Click the Prompts tab. The "Definition pane" is displayed.

    2. Click the New toolbar button in the Definition Pane to access the prompt type selection list. From the list, select Column Prompt. The analysis' selected columns are displayed in the cascading menu that is adjacent to the Column Prompt selection item.


      Note:

      If the appropriate column is not available from the list, then you can click the More Columns options in the cascading list and select the appropriate column from the "Select Column dialog".


    3. Select a column. The "New Prompt dialog" displays.

      If you want to create the prompt for a column that is not displayed in the column list, then select the More Columns... option. The "Select Column dialog" is displayed where you can browse for and select a column.

      If your repository is configured for double columns, then ensure that you select the correct display column. For information on double columns, see "Understanding the Double Column Feature".

      The number of columns that you include in a prompt can affect performance. In general, you should limit the number of columns to as few as possible.

      If you are creating a dashboard prompt and want to add or remove related subject areas, then click the Select subject area button in the "Select Column dialog" to display the "Add/Remove Subject Areas dialog".

  3. (Optional) Click the Edit Formula button to display the "Edit Column Formula dialog: Column Formula tab" where you can modify the formula for the column.

  4. In the Label field, change the default label, if necessary, by entering a caption for the column filter prompt. The caption displays as the prompt's field label. You can include HTML markup tags in the caption, such as <b>, <font>, and <table>.

  5. In the Description field, enter a short description for the prompt. This description is displayed as tooltip text, which is displayed when the user hovers the mouse pointer over the prompt's label in the dashboard or analysis.

  6. From the Operator list, select the operator to use.

  7. In the User Input field, select how you want the prompt interface to ask the user for input (for example, prompt the user with a radio button to select only one prompt value). Note that the column type determines the user input options from which you can select.

  8. Within the Options section, select prompt options to specify how you want the list values to be displayed to the user, and how you want the user to interact with the prompt. The prompt options vary depending on the user input type and list values type that you selected. For more information about the individual prompt options, see "New Prompt dialog".

  9. In the Default selection field, select the prompt value or values that users see initially. If you select a default type, then a field is displayed where you can either select specific values, or specify how you want the default values to be determined. For example, if you select SQL Results, you must then supply a SQL statement to generate the list of values.

  10. Click OK. The prompt is displayed in the "Definition pane".

  11. Save the prompt. Note the following options:

    • If you are creating a dashboard prompt, then click the Save button in the Prompt's Editor, specify the folder in which you want to save the prompt, and give the prompt a descriptive name. Note that dashboard prompts that are saved in personal folders are available only to you. Dashboard prompts that are saved in shared folders are available to other users that have permission to access the object.

    • If you are saving a dashboard prompt for use with an Oracle BI Publisher report that receives its data from the Oracle BI Server or SQL Server, then the dashboard prompt's name must match the name of the report's parameter.

    • If you are creating an inline prompt, then save the analysis.

  12. Use the arrow buttons in the Definition Pane to reorder the selected prompt. Reordering the prompts controls the order in which the choices are displayed to users at run time, so ensure that the order is logical, especially if you are creating constrained prompts.

  13. Select the type of layout you want on the prompts page by clicking either the New Row button or New Column button in the Definition pane's toolbar. In the Definition table, click the check box corresponding to the prompt item that you want to display in a new row or column.

  14. To preview how the prompt is displayed on the dashboard, either use the "Display pane" to preview the prompt with sample data, or click the Preview button (if available) in the Definition Pane toolbar to view the prompt with actual prompt values.


    Note:

    If the Preview button is not available, then the administrator has suppressed its display.


Overriding a Selection Step With a Column Prompt

Use the following procedure to create a selection step with a column prompt override. You can override a selection step with either a dashboard or an analysis prompt. The following list provides examples of overriding selection steps with prompts when the user selects groups or column members:

  • One or more groups, such as My Regions and My Cities, can override a selection step only of the Add type.

  • One or more members, such as Central and Eastern, can override a selection step of any type.

  • One or more groups and one or more members, such as My Regions and Central, can override a selection step of any type. However, groups are ignored and members are supported.

For more information about using a column prompt to override a selection step, see the following topics:

To create or edit a column prompt to override a selection step:

  1. To create an analysis with selection steps, either create a new analysis or access an existing analysis to which you want to add selection steps. The Analysis Editor is displayed.

    For more information about creating an analysis, see "Specifying the Criteria for Analyses".

  2. After you have specified the columns for the analysis, navigate to the Selection Steps pane and specify the selection steps for the analysis.

    For information about specifying selection steps, see "Working with Selections of Data".

  3. Determine which selection step you want to override with a column prompt and click its Edit button. The New Member Step dialog is displayed.

  4. Select the Override with prompt box. Click OK and save the analysis.


    Note:

    The Override with prompt box is not available in certain circumstances. It is unavailable for a rank template (for example, is ranked first or is ranked last) within a conditional selection step. It is also unavailable for a match template for a hierarchical column.


  5. If needed, create either a named or inline prompt. For information, see "Creating or Editing a Column Prompt".

Creating or Editing an Image Prompt

An image prompt provides users with an image that contains sections or areas that they can click to select a specific prompt value. For example, an image prompt can be a map of the United States with sections that represent the North, South, East, West, and Central sales divisions. Users can then click the divisions that correspond to the sales information that they want to view in the dashboard or analysis.

You can apply image prompts to one or more dashboards, or embed them in analyses. Use the following procedure to create or edit an image prompt.

To create or edit an image prompt:

  1. To create a named image prompt, use the following sub-procedure.

    1. Navigate to the Oracle BI Enterprise Edition Home page, locate the global header, hover the mouse pointer over the New menu to access the menu, and select Dashboard Prompt. The Select Subject Areas menu is displayed.

    2. From the Select Subject Area menu, select the subject area for which you want to create the prompt. The "Definition pane" is displayed.

  2. To create an inline prompt, either create a new analysis or access an existing analysis for which you want to create a prompt. In the "Analysis editor", click the Prompts tab. The "Definition pane" is displayed.

  3. Click the New button in the Definition Pane. From the list, select Image Prompt.

    The "Image Map Prompt Properties dialog" is displayed.

  4. Enter a caption for the image prompt in the Caption field. The caption is displayed as the prompt's field label.You can include HTML markup tags in the caption, such as <b>, <font>, and <table>.

  5. In the Description field, enter a short description for the prompt. This description is displayed as tooltip text, which is shown when the user hovers the mouse pointer over the prompt's label in the dashboard or analysis.

    The descriptions are also displayed when administrators view the stored prompt object from the Catalog Manager.

  6. Enter the location and name of the image in the Image URL field.

    The image file must reside on a web server. Oracle recommends that you put the image files in the directory that contains all web resource files (for example, app\res\region3.jpg). Placing the image files with the web resource files prevents a security warning message from displaying when the user accesses the image from the dashboard or analysis.

    However, if you are using a web server, such as WebLogic, where the resource files are located in the deploy directory, you must put the image file in the deploy directory and the directory that contains all web resource files.

  7. Enter the appropriate HTML <map> tags and data in the HTML field. In the map tags, indicate the map region's shape, X and Y coordinates, and region name. For example:

    <MAP Name="mymap">
    <AREA Shape="poly" Coords="70,84,51,300,455"
       Href="http://www.map.com/region1.html">
    <AREA Shape="poly" Coords="25,180,125,280,485,668"
       Href="http://www.map.com/region2.html">
    <AREA Shape="poly" Coords="152,106,186,225,340,193"
       Href="http://www.map.com/region3.html">
    <AREA Shape="poly" Coords="675,763,929,286,10,908"
       Href="http://www.map.com/region43.html">
    </MAP>
    <IMG Src="../images/imagemap.gif" Width="500" Height="300"
       Alt="Image Map" Usemap="#mymap" Ismap>
    
  8. To extract the image map information from the HTML, click Extract Image Map from HTML.

    The Image Map Prompt Properties dialog expands to show the area titles, shapes, and coordinates that were entered in the HTML field.

    • For each area, in the Column field, enter the name of the column to pass when a user clicks it, and the value to use.


      Note:

      The column must be a fully qualified column name in the format Folder.Column Name.


    • Place double quotes around any column names that contain spaces. For example:

      • "Country name"

      • "Units shipped"

  9. Click OK. The prompt is displayed in the "Definition pane".

  10. Save the prompt. Note the following options:

    • If you are creating a dashboard prompt, then click the Save button in the prompt's editor, specify the folder in which you want to save the prompt, and give the prompt a descriptive name. Note that dashboard prompts that are saved in personal folders are available only to you. Dashboard prompts that are saved in shared folders are available to other users that have permission to access the object.

    • If you are saving a dashboard prompt for use with an Oracle BI Publisher report that receives its data from the Oracle BI Server or SQL Server, then the dashboard prompt's name must match the name of the report's parameter.

    • If you are creating an inline prompt, then save the analysis.

  11. Use the arrow buttons in the Definition Pane to reorder the selected prompt. Reordering the prompts controls the order in which the choices are displayed to users at run time, so ensure that the order is logical, especially if you are creating constrained prompts.

  12. If you want to add a new row or column to the prompts page, then click the New Row button or New Column button in the Definition pane's toolbar. In the Definition table, click the check box corresponding to the prompt that you want to display in a new row or column.

  13. To preview how the prompt is displayed on the dashboard, either use the "Display pane" to preview the prompt with sample data, or click the Preview button (if available) in the Definition Pane toolbar to view the prompt with actual prompt values.


    Note:

    If the Preview button is not available, then the administrator has suppressed its display.


Creating or Editing a Currency Prompt

A currency prompt enables users to change the currency type that is displayed in the dashboard or analysis. When applied to a dashboard or embedded in an analysis, the prompt provides users with a list where they can select a currency. The currency types in this list are specified by the administrator in userpref_currencies.xml. The same list of currencies is displayed in the "My Account dialog: Preferences tab".

Use the following procedure to create a currency prompt that you can apply to one or more dashboards, or to create a currency prompt that is embedded in an analysis.

To create or edit a currency prompt:

  1. To create a named currency prompt, use the following sub-procedure.

    1. Navigate to the Oracle BI Enterprise Edition Home page, locate the global header, hover the mouse pointer over the New menu to access the menu, and select Dashboard Prompt. The Select Subject Areas menu is displayed.

    2. From the Select Subject Area menu, select the subject area for which you want to create the prompt. The "Definition pane" is displayed.

  2. To create an inline prompt, either create a new analysis or access an existing analysis for which you want to create a prompt. In the "Analysis editor", click the Prompts tab. The "Definition pane" is displayed.

  3. Click the New button from the Definition Pane. From the list, select Currency Prompt.

    The "New Prompt dialog" is displayed.


    Note:

    The Currency Prompt option is available only if the administrator has configured the userpref_currencies.xml file as described in "Configuring Currency Options" in Oracle Fusion Middleware System Administrator's Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition.


  4. Enter a label for the currency prompt in the Label field. The label is displayed as the prompt's field label. You can include HTML markup tags in the caption, such as <b>, <font>, and <table>.

  5. In the Description field, enter a short description for the prompt. This description is displayed as tooltip text, which is displayed when the user hovers the mouse pointer over the prompt's label in the dashboard or analysis.

    The descriptions are also displayed when administrators view the stored prompt object from the Catalog Manager.

  6. Click OK. The prompt displays in the "Definition pane".

  7. Save the prompt. Note the following options:

    • If you are creating a dashboard prompt, then click the Save button in the prompt's editor, specify the folder in which you want to save the prompt, and give the prompt a descriptive name. Note that dashboard prompts that are saved in personal folders are available only to you. Dashboard prompts that are saved in shared folders are available to other users that have permission to access the object.

    • If you are saving a dashboard prompt for use with an Oracle BI Publisher report that receives its data from the Oracle BI Server or SQL Server, then the dashboard prompt's name must match the name of the report's parameter.

    • If you are creating an inline prompt, then save the analysis.

  8. Use the arrow buttons in the Definition Pane to reorder the selected prompt. Reordering the prompts controls the order in which the choices are displayed to users at run time, so ensure that the order is logical, especially if you are creating constrained prompts.

  9. If you want to add a new row or column to the prompts page, then click the New Row button or New Column button in the Definition pane's toolbar. In the Definition table, click the check box corresponding to the prompt that you want to display in a new row or column.

  10. To preview how the prompt is displayed on the dashboard, either use the "Display pane" to preview the prompt with sample data, or click the Preview button (if available) in the Definition Pane toolbar to view the prompt with actual prompt values.


    Note:

    If the Preview button is not available, then the administrator has suppressed its display.


Creating or Editing a Variable Prompt

Use the following procedure to create a variable prompt that you can apply to one or more dashboards, or to create a variable prompt that is embedded in an analysis. For more information about variable prompts, see "Other Prompt Types". For more information about variables, see "Using Variables".

To create or edit a variable prompt:

  1. To create a named variable prompt, use the following sub-procedure.

    1. Navigate to the Oracle BI Enterprise Edition Home page, locate the global header, hover over the New menu to access the menu, and from the menu select Dashboard Prompt. The Select Subject Areas menu is displayed.

    2. From the Select Subject Area menu, select the subject area for which you want to create the prompt. The "Definition pane" is displayed.

  2. To create an inline prompt, either create a new analysis or access an existing analysis for which you want to create a prompt. In the "Analysis editor", click the Prompts tab. The "Definition pane" is displayed.

  3. Click the New button in the Definition Pane. From the list, select Variable Prompt.

    The "New Prompt dialog" is displayed.

  4. In the Prompt for field, select the variable type that you are creating and then enter the name of the variable.

  5. I(An the Label field, enter a caption for the variable filter prompt. The caption is displayed as the prompt's field label. You can include HTML markup tags in the caption, such as <b>, <font>, and <table>.

  6. In the Description field, enter a short description for the prompt. This description is displayed as tooltip text, which is displayed when the user hovers the mouse pointer over the prompt's label in the dashboard or analysis.

    The descriptions are also displayed when administrators view the stored prompt object from the Catalog Manager.

  7. In the User Input field, select how you want the prompt interface to ask the user for input. For example, prompt the user with a radio button to select only one prompt value.

  8. If you selected either the Choice List, Check boxes, Radio buttons, and List box user input type, then you must also specify the prompt's list of values. For more information, see "New Prompt dialog".

  9. Within the Options section, select the prompt options. The prompt options vary depending on the user input type that you selected. The prompt options allow you to further specify how you want the user to interact with the prompt (for example, whether user input is required).

  10. In the Default selection field, select the prompt value that users see initially. If you select a specific value, then the Default Value field is displayed in which you can enter a value.

  11. Click OK. The prompt is displayed in the "Definition pane".

  12. Save the prompt. Note the following options:

    • If you are creating a dashboard prompt, then click the Save button in the prompt's editor, specify the folder in which you want to save the prompt, and give the prompt a descriptive name. Note that dashboard prompts that are saved in personal folders are available only to you. Dashboard prompts that are saved in shared folders are available to other users that have permission to access the object.

    • If you are saving a dashboard prompt for use with an Oracle BI Publisher report that receives its data from the Oracle BI Server or SQL Server, then the dashboard prompt's name must match the name of the report's parameter.

    • If you are creating an inline prompt, then save the analysis.

  13. Use the arrow buttons in the Definition Pane to reorder the selected prompt. Reordering the prompts controls the order in which the choices are displayed to users at run time, so ensure that the order is logical, especially if you are creating constrained prompts.

  14. If you want to add a new row or column to the prompts page, then click the New Row button or New Column button in the Definition pane's toolbar. In the Definition table, click the check box corresponding to the prompt that you want to display in a new row or column.

  15. To preview how the prompt is displayed on the dashboard, either use the "Display pane" to preview the prompt with sample data, or click the Preview button (if available) in the Definition Pane toolbar to view the prompt with actual prompt values.


    Note:

    If the Preview button is not available, then the administrator has suppressed its display.


Adding a Dashboard Prompt to a Dashboard or Dashboard Page

Use the following procedure to add a dashboard prompt to a dashboard or dashboard page.

To add a dashboard prompt to a dashboard or dashboard page:

  1. Create a new dashboard or open an existing dashboard and click the Edit Dashboard button. For more information about creating or editing a dashboard, see "Creating Dashboards".


    Tip:

    When adding a column object to a dashboard, you can drag and drop the column to display vertically on the dashboard. You can then add dashboard prompts to this column, and at run time, the dashboard's prompts displays in a pane on the side of the dashboard.


  2. In the Dashboard builder's Catalog pane, locate and drag and drop an object such as an analysis or KPI watchlist onto a section in the dashboard.

  3. In the Dashboard builder's Catalog pane, locate and drag and drop the dashboard prompt onto a section in the dashboard.


    Tip:

    If you do not want a new browser window to open after the user selects prompt values, then click the dashboard section's More Option button and select Drill in Place.


  4. Hover the mouse pointer over the prompt object in the Page Layout area to display the object's toolbar, click the Properties button, and select Scope. Note the following options:

    • If you select Dashboard, then the prompt affects all dashboard pages that contain the prompt. The prompt value that the user selects for the dashboard level prompt overrides values for page level dashboard prompts.

    • If you select Page, then the dashboard prompt affects only the page or pages to which you add the prompt.

  5. Hover the mouse pointer over the prompt object in the Page Layout area to display the object's toolbar, click the Properties button, and select Prompt Links.... The "Prompt Links dialog" displays where you specify whether to display the Edit and Copy links with the prompt at run time

Adding a Hidden Dashboard Prompt to a Dashboard or Dashboard Page

Use the following procedure to add a hidden dashboard prompt to a dashboard or dashboard pages. At run time, the hidden dashboard prompt sets the default values for all of the corresponding prompts on the dashboard or dashboard page, and the unprotected inline prompts that are located on the analyses on the dashboard or dashboard page.

To add a hidden dashboard prompt to a dashboard or dashboard page:

  1. Create and save a dashboard prompt, which contains specific data values, to use as a hidden prompt. For more information about creating prompts, see "Creating or Editing a Column Prompt".

  2. Create a new dashboard or open an existing dashboard and click the Edit Dashboard button. For more information about creating or editing a dashboard, see "Creating Dashboards".

  3. In the "Dashboard builder", click the Tools button and select Dashboard Properties. The "Dashboard Properties dialog" is displayed.

  4. If you want to add the hidden prompt to the whole dashboard, then click the Filters and variables Edit button. The "Dashboard Filters and Variables dialog" is displayed.

    If you want to add the hidden prompt to a dashboard page, then select the page from the "Dashboard Pages" table and click the Select a prompt to capture default filters and variables button, which is located above the "Dashboard Pages" table. The "Filters and Variables - page dialog" is displayed.

  5. Click the Embed New Hidden Dashboard Prompt button to browse for and select the dashboard prompt. Click OK.


    Note:

    You can add one or more hidden dashboard prompts to the dashboard or dashboard page.


  6. In the Dashboard Properties page, click the OK button to save the dashboard's properties.

PK"R;((PKִo@OEBPS/conditions.htmlX Working with Conditions

9 Working with Conditions

This chapter describes conditions and explains how you work with them. It contains the following topics:

What Are Conditions?

Conditions are objects that return a single Boolean value based on the evaluation of an analysis or of a Key Performance Indicator (KPI).

What a condition evaluates depends on whether it is based on an analysis or on a KPI, as follows:

  • For an analysis, it evaluates the row count of the analysis.

  • For a KPI, it evaluates the status of the KPI.

For example, a condition might evaluate whether the results of an analysis return a number of rows greater than 0:

  • If the analysis returns at least one row, then the condition evaluates to true.

  • If the analysis does not return any rows, then the condition evaluates to false.

For What Do I Use Conditions?

You use conditions to determine whether:

  • Agents deliver their content and execute their actions

  • Actions links (which when clicked run actions) are displayed in dashboard pages

  • Sections and their content are displayed in dashboard pages

For example, a sales manager wants to deliver a Monthly Sales Report to his direct reports only when sales drop below $2 million. You might create a condition that is based on an analysis that shows sales that are below $2 million and add it to an agent whose delivery content is the Monthly Sales Report. When the condition evaluates to true (that is, the analysis contains rows where sales are below $2 million), the agent is triggered to deliver the Monthly Sales Report.

You can also use a different kind of condition to determine whether action links are enabled in analyses. For information, see "About Conditionally Enabling Actions Added to Analyses".

What Are the Elements of a Condition?

A condition consists of the following elements:

  • An analysis or KPI.

  • The criteria to use when evaluating the condition:

    • For an analysis, the criteria is a row count and an operator to apply to the row count; for example, the row count equals 100.

    • For a KPI, the criteria is a KPI status, for example, the KPI status is OK.

  • Values for any prompted filters that are associated with the analysis or values for KPI dimensions that were set to Set in watchlist in the KPI.

What Are Named Conditions?

A named condition is a condition that you define and then save by name in the Oracle BI Presentation Catalog so that you can reuse it in agents and dashboard pages.

You create a named condition when you create a new condition from the:

  • New menu in the global header by selecting Condition under Analysis and Interactive Reporting

  • Home page by clicking the More link under Analysis and Interactive Reporting in the Create area and selecting Condition

You also create a named condition from the "Agent editor: Condition tab" when you save an inline condition to the catalog. For information on inline conditions, see "What Are Inline Conditions?"

What Are Inline Conditions?

An inline condition is a condition that you define at the point of use and do not save by name in the catalog. Instead it is saved as part of the dashboard page or agent.

An inline condition is automatically deleted when the dashboard page or agent that contains it is deleted. This simplifies catalog management for conditions that make sense only within particular Oracle BI content.

You can create an inline condition when you:

Who Creates Conditions?

Generally:

  • Administrators create the named conditions for an organization, which are then used by content designers (providing they have the appropriate permissions to the conditions or the folders in which the conditions are saved) as they create dashboards and agents.

    The ability to create or edit named conditions is controlled by the Create Conditions privilege, which is managed by the administrator.

  • Content designers create inline conditions.

For information about privileges, see "Managing Catalog Privileges" in Oracle Fusion Middleware Security Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition.

For information about permissions, see Chapter 13, "Managing Objects in the Oracle BI Presentation Catalog."

Creating Named Conditions

You can create named conditions that you can reuse in agents and dashboard pages. See "What Are Named Conditions?"

To create a named condition:

  1. In the global header, click New and then select Condition.

    The "New Condition dialog" is displayed.

  2. Complete the New Condition dialog. For more information, see "Specifying the Settings for Conditions".

Using Conditions to Determine Whether Agents Deliver Their Content or Execute Their Actions

You can use conditions to determine whether agents deliver their content or execute their actions. For information on agents, see Chapter 8, "Delivering Content."

To use a condition to determine whether an agent delivers its content or executes its actions:

  1. Edit the agent.

  2. Click the "Agent editor: Condition tab".

  3. Select the Use a condition box.

  4. If you want to:

    1. Create a new condition, click Create to display the "Create Condition dialog" and then complete the dialog.

      For information on completing the dialog, see "Specifying the Settings for Conditions".

    2. Select an existing condition, click Browse to display the "Select Condition dialog" and then complete the dialog.

    3. Save the agent.

Using Conditions to Determine Whether Action Links Are Displayed in Dashboard Pages

You can use conditions to determine whether action links are displayed in dashboard pages. For information on adding actions links to dashboard pages, see "About Adding Actions to Dashboard Pages".

To use a condition to determine whether an action link is displayed in a dashboard page:

  1. Edit the dashboard. For information, see "Editing Dashboards".

  2. Click the tab of the page that contains the action link to display conditionally.

  3. Hover over the action link object in the Page Layout area to display the action link object's toolbar and click the Properties button, or, if the action link is in an action link menu:

    1. Hover over the action link menu object in the Page Layout area to display the action link menu object's toolbar and click the Properties button.

      The "Action Link Menu Properties dialog" is displayed.

    2. Select the action link to conditionalize and click the Edit button.

    The "Action Link Properties dialog" is displayed.

  4. In the Show component, click the Conditionally box.

    The Condition component is displayed.

  5. If you want to:

    1. Create a new condition, click the New Condition button to display the "New Condition dialog" and then complete the dialog.

      For information on completing the dialog, see "Specifying the Settings for Conditions".

    2. Select an existing condition, click the Select Condition button to display the "Select Condition dialog" and then complete the dialog.

  6. Click OK in the Action Link Properties dialog.

  7. If the action link is in an action link menu, then click OK in the Action Link Menu Properties dialog.

  8. Save the dashboard.

Using Conditions to Determine Whether Sections Are Displayed in Dashboard Pages

You can use conditions to determine whether sections are displayed in dashboard pages. For information on adding sections to dashboards, see "Adding Content to Dashboards".

To use a condition to determine whether a section is displayed in a dashboard page:

  1. Edit the dashboard. For information, see "Editing Dashboards".

  2. Click the tab of the page that contains the section to display conditionally.

  3. Hover over the section in the Page Layout area to display the section's toolbar, click the Properties button for the section, and select Condition. The "Section Condition dialog" is displayed.

  4. If you want to:

    1. Create a new condition, click the New Condition button to display the "Create Condition dialog" and then complete the dialog.

      For information on completing the dialog, see "Specifying the Settings for Conditions".

    2. Select an existing condition, click the Select Condition button to display the "Select Condition dialog" and then complete the dialog.

  5. Click OK in the Section Condition dialog.

  6. Save the dashboard.

Specifying the Settings for Conditions

You must specify the settings for a condition in either the New Condition, Create Condition, or Edit Condition dialog, when you create or edit a condition as described in the following sections:

To specify the settings for a condition in the New Condition dialog, Create Condition dialog, or Edit Condition dialog:

  1. In the Create condition based on box, select whether the condition is to be based on an Analysis or KPI.

  2. For:

    • (optional) An analysis, edit any prompted filters, as desired.

    • A KPI, specify the values for any KPI dimensions.


    Note:

    If you specify values for any prompted filters, then these values cannot be overridden at the point of use.


  3. Specify the evaluation criteria as follows:

    • For an analysis, in the Condition true if number or rows area:

      • In the Operator box, select the operator to apply to the row count.

      • In the Row Count box or boxes, specify the row count to be evaluated.

    • For a KPI, in the Condition true if KPI box, select the KPI status.

  4. (optional) Click Test Condition to test the condition.

  5. If you want to save the condition as:

    • An inline condition, click OK.

    • A named condition, click Save As to display the "Save As dialog", where you can save the condition by name to the catalog.


      Note:

      If a condition is based on an analysis or KPI that is private, you cannot save it in the /Shared Folders folder.


Editing Named Conditions

To edit a named condition:

  1. Navigate to the condition in the catalog.

  2. Click the Edit link to display the "Edit Condition dialog".

  3. Make the desired changes.

    For more information on completing the Edit Condition dialog, see "Specifying the Settings for Conditions".

Editing, Customizing, Testing, Saving, and Disabling Conditions Used in Agents

You can:

  • Edit inline conditions

  • Customize named conditions by editing prompted filters

  • Test conditions to see whether the conditions evaluate to true or false

  • Save inline conditions to the catalog as named conditions

  • Remove conditions

To edit, customize, test, save, or remove a condition used in an agent:

  1. Edit the agent.

  2. Click the "Agent editor: Condition tab".

  3. To:

    • Edit an inline condition, click Edit Condition to display the "Edit Condition dialog", and make the desired changes. For more information on completing the Edit Condition dialog, see "Specifying the Settings for Conditions".

    • To customize the prompted filters of a named condition, click Customize to display the "Customize Condition dialog", and make the desired customizations.

    • To test a condition, click Test. The evaluation results are displayed.

    • To save an inline condition to the catalog as a named condition, click Save To Catalog to display the "Save As dialog".

    • To disable a condition, click Do not use a condition (always deliver content and run actions).

  4. Save the agent.

Editing, Testing, Saving, and Removing Conditions Used in Action Links in Dashboard Pages

You can perform the following tasks on conditions that are used in action links in dashboard pages:

  • Edit conditions

  • Test conditions to see whether the conditions evaluate to true or false

  • Save inline conditions to the catalog as named conditions and save named conditions to the catalog by other names

  • Remove conditions

To edit, test, save, or remove a condition used in an action link in a dashboard page:

  1. Edit the dashboard page that contains the action link.

  2. Hover over the action link object in the Page Layout area to display the action link object's toolbar and click the Properties button, or, if the action link is in an action link menu:

    1. Hover over the action link menu object in the Page Layout area to display the action link menu object's toolbar and click the Properties button.

      The "Action Link Menu Properties dialog" is displayed.

    2. Select the action link that contains the condition and click the Edit button.

    The "Action Link Properties dialog" is displayed.

  3. Click the More button to the right of the Condition field and then:

    • To edit a condition, select Edit Condition to display the "Edit Condition dialog" and make the desired changes. For more information on completing the Edit Condition dialog, see "Specifying the Settings for Conditions".

    • To test a condition, select Test Condition. The evaluation results are displayed.

    • To save an inline condition to the catalog as a named condition, select Save Condition As to display the "Save As dialog".

    • To remove a condition, select Remove Condition.

  4. Click OK in the Action Link Properties dialog.

  5. If the action link is in an action link menu, then click OK in the Action Link Menu Properties dialog.

  6. Save the dashboard.

Editing, Testing, Saving, and Removing Conditions Used in Sections in Dashboard Pages

You can perform the following tasks on conditions that are used in sections in dashboard pages:

  • Edit conditions

  • Test conditions to see whether the conditions evaluate to true or false

  • Save inline conditions to the catalog as named conditions and save named conditions to the catalog by other names

  • Remove conditions

To edit, test, save, or remove a condition used in a section in a dashboard page:

  1. Edit the dashboard page that contains the section.

  2. Hover over the section in the Page Layout area to display the section's toolbar, click the Properties button for the section, and select Condition. The "Section Condition dialog" is displayed.

  3. Click the More button to the right of the Condition field and then:

    • To edit a condition, select Edit Condition to display the "Edit Condition dialog" and make the desired changes. For more information on completing the Edit Condition dialog, see "Specifying the Settings for Conditions".

    • To test a condition, select Test Condition. The evaluation results are displayed.

    • To save an inline condition to the catalog as a named condition, select Save Condition As to display the "Save As dialog".

    • To remove a condition, select Remove Condition.

  4. Save the dashboard.

PKϬllPKִo@OEBPS/appuserinfo.htm Basic Information to Tell Your Users

A Basic Information to Tell Your Users

This appendix describes the major features and functions that most end users typically work with. This appendix contains the following topics:

Exporting and Copying Results

As you work with analyses, you might want to export them to various formats or copy the results into Microsoft Office applications such as Excel and PowerPoint.

Copying Results to Microsoft Applications

You can copy the results of analyses to either Microsoft Excel or PowerPoint, in which Oracle Business Intelligence Add-in for Microsoft Office has been installed and configured. You can also copy a dashboard prompt's definition and default or selected values to either Microsoft Excel or Word, in which Oracle Business Intelligence Add-in for Microsoft Office has been installed and configured.

The content designer can include the Copy link with analysis results or a prompt and its default or selected values in dashboards. For information on installing and configuring Oracle BI Add-in for Microsoft Office, see Appendix B, "Integrating with Microsoft Office."

To copy a result to Microsoft Excel, Microsoft PowerPoint, or Microsoft Word:

  1. Navigate to the analysis or prompt in a dashboard.

  2. Click the Copy link, which copies the XML code for the analysis in its current state (that is, with the current context, for example, with applied filters, prompts, and so on) or for the prompt in its current state (that is, its definition and default or selected values) to the Windows Clipboard.

  3. For results copied from an analysis, open Microsoft Excel or PowerPoint. For results copied from a prompt, open Microsoft Excel or Microsoft Word.

  4. From the Oracle BI menu in Microsoft Excel, PowerPoint, or Word, select Paste.

    For information about the Oracle BI menu, see the Help for Oracle BI for Microsoft Office that is available within Microsoft Excel or PowerPoint.

Sorting Values in Table Views and Pivot Table Views

You can sort values in table views and pivot table views. You can sort on members, measures, and rows (where you see sideways triangles). You cannot sort on page or section edges. For more information on sorting, see "Sorting Data in Views".

Drilling in Results

Many of the results that are displayed in views represent hierarchical data structures. The metadata specifies these hierarchies, and this enables you to access the different levels of detail within them. For example, information in a sales graph might be categorized by region. Clicking a specific region in the graph might display each country within that region, if the country is the next level within the hierarchy of the metadata. Such clicking is referred to as "drilling."

If the content designer has set up views for drilling, then you can drill in them on dashboards.

Where Can I Drill?

You can drill in the following types of views:

Drilling in Tables and Pivot Tables

When you drill down in a table or pivot table, the detail level data is added to the current data. For example, when you drill from a continent, the table displays data for the continent and for the countries in that continent.

The way that you drill in tables and pivot tables depends on the column type, as described in the following sections.

Drilling in Hierarchical Columns

To drill in a hierarchical column, click the Expand and Collapse icons beside the members. Click to expand or collapse one level. For example, expanding from Total Products to Products inserts the Product members while retaining the value for Total Products.

When you drill in a hierarchical column, you expand and collapse the nodes of data that are in the view. Drilling in a hierarchical column affects only that particular view. No other views are affected.

Drilling in level-based hierarchies and value-based hierarchies works the same. Each time you drill in a hierarchy, you expand or collapse one level. For example, if the hierarchy has a level for continents, regions, and cities, and the view shows continent data, you can expand from Australia down one level to display regions in Australia. From there, you can expand one level from a region, to cities in that region, or you can collapse one level, back to continents.

When you drill, the drill state is preserved. If you collapse at a higher level and re-expand, then the members are re-displayed at the same drill point.

When you click the Collapse icon, you collapse back to the current level any levels in the hierarchy that are present in the analysis, regardless of whether they were added by drilling down or by adding the levels from the Subject Areas pane.

You can perform asymmetric drilling, which enables you to drill various members to different levels. For example, if you expand World, then you might see Americas, Asia, and Australia at the same second-level for continents. You can then drill Americas to expand it and see its regions, while Asia and Australia are not expanded.

You can expand and collapse the members of a group for hierarchical columns. For example, if you have a group that includes cities and the group is included in a view, then you see the cities when you click the group name.

You can also use the "Right-Click Menu for Tables and Pivot Tables" to expand and collapse hierarchical columns.

Drilling in Graphs

When you drill down in a graph, the detail level data replaces the current data. For example, when you drill down from a continent, the graph displays data for the countries in that continent, but not for the continent itself.

You can drill down in the following ways:

  • You can click a label (for which drilling is available) on any axis or in the legend to drill down. (A change in the mouse pointer indicates that drilling is available.)

  • If the graph contains only attribute columns and measure columns, then you can click a data point to drill all columns.

  • If the graph contains multiple columns including at least one hierarchical column, then when you click a label or a data point, you see a menu from which you can select which columns to drill down. If there are action links available, then the menu also displays those links.

You do not drill up in a graph. Use the Back button on the browser to return to a previous graph.


Note:

The time series line graph does not support drill down on a time column where data types other than data or date-time are used.


About Running Actions Using Action Links and Action Link Menus in Analyses and Dashboards

As you analyze data in analyses, view dashboards, or view content delivered by agents, you might want to take some action because of the business insight you gained from the data. You can do so by using action links and action link menus, if available:

Running Actions Associated with Action Links in Analyses and Dashboards

To run an action associated with an action link:

  1. Do one of the following:

    • If the action is associated with a standalone action link, then click the action link.

    • If the action is associated with an action link on an action link menu, then click the action link menu and then select the action link option.

  2. Respond to any request for more information or any confirmation prompt that is displayed.


    Note:

    A successful invocation message indicates only that the action that is associated with the action link ran successfully. It does not indicate that the process or operation that the action represents ran successfully.


Using Section Sliders in Graphs and Gauges

Some graphs and gauges include section sliders. Section sliders let you limit the data that is shown in a graph or gauge. For more information on section sliders, see "Defining Section Sliders in Graphs and Gauges".

To use a section slider in a graph or gauge:

  1. Use the components of the section slider to select a value as follows:

    • To select a particular value, move the slider thumb to that value.

    • To move the slider thumb to a value to the left of the current value, click the decrease button (the second button from the left on the slider).

    • To move the slider thumb to a value to the right of the current value, click the increase button (the right-most button on the slider).

    • To sequentially move the slider thumb through all the values, click the play button (the left-most button on the slider). The play button changes to a pause button to allow you to stop on a particular value.

    The data in the graph or gauge is limited by the current value as indicated by the slider thumb.

Working with Map Views on Dashboard Pages

A content designer can include map views on dashboard pages. A map view presents data in spatial form. Through location context, map views allow you to easily discover trends and transactions across regions that might not be obvious in tables or graphs. For example, a map view can show a map of the United States with the states color-coded by sales performance.

This section provides the following information on working with maps on dashboard pages:

For information on creating maps, see "Editing Map Views".


Note:

Bear the following in mind when working with map views:

  • When you download a map view to a Microsoft PowerPoint document, you might notice that some map format images and sliders might not be downloaded correctly or completely.

  • The map view can include a background map that is configured to fetch its tiles from an external provider, such as Google Maps. If you print such a map view, then the output includes the formats that were applied but not the background map.


Zooming in Map Views

Zooming the map adjusts the detail of the geographic data that is shown on the map. Zooming in from a country level might show state and city details. Zooming out from a street-level view might show cities but not street-level information.

When you zoom, you can do the following:

  • Click on the map background. To zoom by clicking, you must first select the zoom mode from the toolbar. The default mode is pan, which is indicated by a hand cursor. When you are in zoom mode, the mouse pointer changes to a magnifying glass and you can click-zoom directly on the map itself.

    When you are zooming in, you can either single-click or click and drag to use marquee zoom. You can draw a box that delineates the area in which you want to zoom.

  • Hover over a region of the map to display an information window for that region for the data that is directly below the mouse cursor.

  • Click to zoom in and out. When you click, the map zooms in one "increment" using the click location as the center point.

Zooming and drilling are not synonymous. When you zoom, no drill is performed (that is, no new query is issued). However, if you drill on a map layer, that drill likely results in a new zoom level being displayed, if a new layer is added to the map. If a new layer is not added, then the zoom level does not change.

You can zoom using either the buttons on the toolbar or the zoom slider. When you use the zoom slider, you zoom in or out of the map as it is currently displayed. When you hover over the zoom slider, the names of the map layers are displayed beside their mid-range zoom level. Click the names to zoom the map to that level. When you zoom, a new query is not issued.

To zoom using the Zoom In and Zoom Out tools:

  1. Click the Zoom In or Zoom Out button in the toolbar.

  2. Click the map background to zoom in that spot. If you are zooming in, you can click and drag to draw a rectangle to specify the area in which to zoom.

To zoom using the buttons on the zoom slider:

  1. Click the plus or minus sign on either end of the slider. You can also hover over the slider, then click the name of the level to zoom to.

Drilling in Map Views

Drilling in a map enables you to navigate through the data. Drilling is available when the Pan tool is selected, as indicated by a hand cursor. If you hover over map data, then an information window is displayed with various information about that location.

When you click a region or a point on the map, one of the following occurs:

  • If the column is configured as a master for another view, then that view is updated with the latest information.

  • If the column or map is configured to drill into a column or to perform a single action, then the drill or action is immediately initiated.

  • If the column is configured to perform multiple actions or if multiple drills are possible, then the information window that is displayed contains a list of the actions or links for the multiple columns.

All columns in which you can drill are displayed in the information window as link text. When you click the link for a simple drill, you drill in the data, the map is redrawn with a different layer, and the information window is dismissed. If action links are defined, then you see a popup window that shows additional links. For information, see "Running Actions Associated with Action Links in Analyses and Dashboards".

Drilling updates map formatting to reflect the newly drilled data. For some drills (such as drilling on a State), the map zooms to the specified region while simultaneously updating the formatting. How you zoom and the formats and geographic levels that the map contains affect what is displayed. Formats have particular "zoom ranges" and are visible at different zoom levels. Zooming back up might display a new format, if you zoom out past the zoom level of the drilled format.

After you have drilled down, use the zoom slider to drill back up. Use the Return button on a dashboard page to display the original map view at the zoom or drill level that was in place before you started drilling.

Modifying Thresholds for Formats on a Map View

The content designer can give you the ability to modify the thresholds that are used for displaying formats on the map view. You know that you have this ability if you see a slider under a format name in the Map Formats pane. Modifying thresholds is a type of visual analysis of the data, which is sometimes referred to as "what-if analysis."

Format ranges are displayed as color fills on the slider background, with a "thumb" for each threshold that can be edited. Users can manipulate the slider to specify their own threshold values, as follows:

  • Hovering over a thumb displays the value under that thumb.

  • Dragging the thumb adjusts the threshold.

  • Clicking a section on the slider moves the thumb to that section.

  • Right-clicking the slider displays a menu with the following options:

    • Edit Color — Displays a dialog, in which you select a predefined or custom color for the threshold.

    • Add Threshold — Adds another threshold to the slider, including a thumb to indicate the threshold. This addition creates a new formatting bin with a new color. For example, if three bins exist (with colors red, yellow, and green) and you create a new threshold, then four bins now exist. A maximum of 12 bins is supported.

    • Remove Threshold — Removes the threshold above where you right-clicked, including removing the thumb from the slider and a formatting bin.

  • Clicking on a slider thumb number value displays a text box in which you can edit the number that corresponds to the threshold value. Press Enter or click outside the box to update the threshold value and the thumb position.

Showing or Hiding Formats on a Map View

Content designers can superimpose multiple layers of information (sometimes known as themes) on a single map view. They can create formats to enhance the layers. You can display or hide the formats for a map.

To show or hide the formats of a map view:

  • In the Map Formats pane, from the View menu, select either View All Formats or View Visible Formats.

  • In the Map Formats pane, deselect the box beside a format's name.

Zooming and Scrolling in Graphs

If zooming and scrolling has been enabled for a graph, then the graph includes a Zoom icon. The zoom icon enables you to zoom in and out of a graph's plot area using its axes. Once you zoom in on an axis, you can scroll the axis.

To enable zooming and scrolling in a graph, the content designer sets the zoom and scroll properties in the "Graph Properties dialog: General tab".

When you zoom an axis, a zoom and scroll slider is displayed. Figure A-3 shows an example of a zoom and scroll slider.

A zoom and scroll slider consists of the following components:

  • Left or bottom button — Scrolls to the left on the X axis or to the bottom on the Y axis, revealing portions of the graph that are out of view.

  • Right or top button — Scrolls to the right on the X axis or to the top on the Y axis, revealing portions of the graph that are out of view.

  • Scroll thumb — Represents the visible portion of the graph in relation to the full graph. You drag the scroll thumb to dynamically scroll the graph, revealing portions of the graph that are out of view.

  • Resize handles — Are displayed at each end of the scroll thumb when you hover over the thumb. You use the resize handles to zoom in and out an axis.

  • Tooltip — Is displayed only when a user hovers over either the thumb or a resize handle and describes the data that is currently displayed in the scroll thumb.

To zoom and scroll in a graph:

  1. Hover the mouse over the graph to display the Zoom button.

  2. Click the Zoom icon and then:

    • If only one axis has zoom and scroll enabled, then select either Zoom In or Zoom Out.

    • If both axes have zoom and scroll enabled:

      • To zoom in and out and scroll on J3the X axis, select Horizontal Axis and then either Zoom In or Zoom Out. A zoom and scroll slider is displayed on the X axis.

        To unzoom the X axis and display the actual graph size, select Actual Size.

      • To zoom in and out and scroll on the Y axis, select Vertical Axis and then either Zoom In or Zoom Out. A zoom and scroll bar is displayed on the Y axis.

        To unzoom the Y axis and display the actual graph size, select Actual Size.

    • To unzoom both the X and Y axes and display the actual graph size, select Actual Size.

    You can now zoom and scroll as desired by:

    • Using the Zoom button to zoom in and out incrementally

    • Dragging the scroll thumb on an axis to dynamically scroll the graph, revealing portions of the graph that are out of view

    • Clicking the scroll buttons on an axis to scroll left and right (on the X axis) or up and down (on the Y axis)

    • Using the resize handles to zoom in and out on an axis

Working with Views that Are Linked in Master-Detail Relationships

Views can be linked in master-detail relationships. When views are linked in such a relationship, you can click values in designated columns in one view (called the master view) and effect a data change in another view (called the detail view). For more information on master-detail relationships, see "What is Master-Detail Linking of Views?" and "Linking Views in Master-Detail Relationships".

In Figure A-4, Regional Sales Master View and Regional Sales Detail View are linked in a master-detail relationship such that clicking a dollar value in Regional Sales Master View effects a data change in Regional Sales Detail View. For example, clicking the dollar value for the Eastern Region in the Regional Sales Master View, updates the Region prompt in Regional Sales Detail View to EASTERN REGION and refreshes the entire view.

Modifying Data in a Table View in a Dashboard Page or Analysis

As a user of a dashboard page, you might have the ability to modify the data that you see in a table view. This ability is often referred to as "write back" and is available if you have the appropriate privileges and if the administrator has configured it. You can update a value in the view that is written back to the record in the data source.

If your user name has the appropriate privileges and if the administrator has configured for the modification of data values, then a write back button (often labeled Update) is displayed on the table view. After clicking the button, you can update or write to the data source. For example, you can enter sales targets for the current quarter in a Sales dashboard. The name that is displayed on the write back button depends on how the content designer prepared the view for write back.

To update records in table views:

  1. Display the dashboard and the view in which you want to modify values.

  2. Click the button that is labeled Update or a similar name that indicates that write back is enabled to switch to Edit mode, in which you can modify values.

    If you know that you can modify the values in the view but do not see an Update button or similar button, then the content designer has specified that the view always be in Edit mode. You can begin modifying values immediately and you never see an Update button or similar button.

    The updating capability is not available for hierarchical columns.

  3. When you are in Edit mode, you can type a value in the appropriate field. Fields to which you can write back have the appearance of a text box in a dialog.

  4. After you have modified values, click one of the following buttons (or buttons with similar names):

    • Apply: By clicking this button, you modify the values in the data source and keep the view in Edit mode with the modified values being displayed.

    • Revert: By clicking this button, you restore the data to its original values if you have not yet clicked Apply or Done to save the modifications. Once you have written a modified value back to the data source, you cannot revert to its original value.

    • Done: By clicking this button, you modify the values in the data source and return the view to View mode (if the content designer has indicated that the view is not always in Edit mode).

    When you click the Apply or Done button, the entire dashboard is refreshed from the data source, because other analyses on the dashboard might depend on that data.

    If filters are enabled in the table view and you enter a value in a record that is affected by the filter, then that record might no longer be displayed in the view after the data is refreshed from the data source.

About Handling Errors for Write-Back

As you modify data values, you might encounter various errors. For example, you might enter an invalid value in a field and attempt to write it back to the data source, or the administrator might have specified the incorrect write-back template to use. If a problem occurs, then you see a basic error message. To obtain additional information about the problem, an administrator can increase the logging level of the session to create detailed log files. The administrator can search the log files for Presentation Services for a string such as "saw.writeback.action.executeimpl".

If you are writing back multiple values simultaneously and accidentally enter invalid values, then the results depend on the rows that are affected, as described in the following list:

  • If you are updating multiple values on one row and at least one of the values is invalid, then no values are written to the database.

  • If you are modifying values in multiple rows and some values are invalid, then some values might not be written back while some write back successfully.

Accessing BI Publisher Reports in Dashboards

As a user of a dashboard page, you have the ability to access reports that were created in Oracle BI Publisher. The report might be embedded in the dashboard page, or you might see a link that opens the report in BI Publisher.

To access a BI Publisher report:

  1. Display the dashboard page that contains the report to access.

  2. Perform the following tasks:

    • If the report is embedded in the page, then use the functions from the BI Publisher toolbar to affect the report.

      If prompts are included on the dashboard, then use those prompts to specify parameters that affect the display of data in the report. Depending on the design of the report, certain prompts do not affect the display of data in the report.

    • If the page contains a link for the report, then click the link to open the report in BI Publisher.

Using the Oracle BI Publisher Toolbar on a Dashboard Page

The Oracle BI Publisher toolbar is displayed on the dashboard that contains a BI Publisher report. The options that you see depend upon your permissions. The toolbar functions are described in the Table A-1.

PKⰲTJPKִo@OEBPS/mancat.htm Managing Objects in the Oracle BI Presentation Catalog

13 Managing Objects in the Oracle BI Presentation Catalog

This chapter provides information about using the Oracle BI Presentation Catalog to store and managing business intelligence objects. It contains the following topics:

What is the Oracle BI Presentation Catalog?

The Oracle BI Presentation Catalog (the catalog) stores business intelligence objects and provides an interface where users create, access, and manage objects, and perform specific object-based tasks (for example, export, print, and edit). The catalog is organized into folders that are either shared or personal.

If Oracle BI EE is integrated with other Oracle applications, then the objects that are created within those applications are also stored within the catalog. For example, if Oracle BI Publisher is integrated with Oracle BI EE, data models, reports, and style templates and sub-templates are also stored in and accessible from the catalog.

Many of the operations that you can perform in the Oracle BI Presentation Catalog can also be performed in the Catalog Manager, which resides outside of Oracle BI Presentation Services. For more information, see "Working with Objects in Catalog Manager" in Oracle Fusion Middleware System Administrator's Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition.

Who Uses the Catalog?

Within Oracle BI EE, there are three primary users: content consumers, content designers, and catalog administrators. Each user performs different tasks within the catalog, and, therefore, each user sees a different version of the catalog interface. Functionality that is available for one user might not be available for another. Furthermore, the catalog functionality and objects that are available to a user depend upon the privileges that are specified by the Presentation Services Administrator and the object's individual permissions, which are usually set by the content designer.

Content consumers can use the Catalog page to view the business intelligence objects that are necessary to perform their day-to-day tasks. For example, a sales manager must access an analysis that monitors the weekly sales of a specific brand of beverage in the Central and Eastern regions. The permissions that are set by the content designer and catalog administrator determine what tasks the content consumers can perform both on an individual piece of content and within the catalog. For example, content consumers at Company A can search for, view, and interact with only those objects that have been assigned to them, but content consumers at Company B can search for and interact with content as well as create content and store it to their personal folders.

Content designers are the individuals who create the content for the content consumers. Content designers need broader access to the catalog to efficiently create, edit, test, and troubleshoot objects. Their access to the catalog's functionality is more comprehensive than that of the content consumers. However, like the content consumer, the content designer's permissions are set by the administrator. For example, a content designer must store content in and retrieve content from the public folders for the Sales functional area, but not the Operations functional area. Or a content designer must be assigned to several groups so that the content designer can sign in to Presentation Services as different users to test the new or revised content.

Administrators need the most comprehensive access to the catalog; however, their access is still determined by the privileges that are assigned to their role by the Presentation Services administrator. In general, the catalog tasks that the administrator performs include setting permissions on catalog objects and folders, archiving the catalog, creating and managing directory structures, and managing system and user data.


Note:

Over time, inconsistencies can develop in the catalog as links are broken, users are deleted, or NFS file system issues are encountered. You can periodically validate the catalog, to be informed of and to take corrective action on inconsistencies. For information on validation, see "Validating the Catalog" in Oracle Fusion Middleware System Administrator's Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition.


How Will Hidden Dashboards Created in Previous Versions be Upgraded?

In previous versions of Oracle BI EE (prior to 11g), you could specify that a dashboard be hidden. For information about how hidden dashboards are handled when upgrading to Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition 11g, see "Upgrading Hidden Dashboards" in Oracle Fusion Middleware Upgrade Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence.

Saving Business Intelligence Objects

You can save objects that you create in folders in the catalog. For complete information on naming conventions, see "Guidelines for Object Names" in Oracle Fusion Middleware System Administrator's Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition.

Use the following procedure to save objects to the catalog:

To save an object to the catalog:

  1. Create or edit a business intelligence object and click Save or Save As from the editor's toolbar. The Save As dialog is displayed.

  2. Select the catalog location to which you want to save the object. Note the following items:

    • You can create sub-folders for storage within your My Folders folder or within the system folder for which you have the permissions to modify.

    • Oracle BI EE enables you to save any type of business intelligence object to any location within the catalog. However, for some object types, Oracle BI EE's Save As dialog suggests the best catalog location. For example, if you are creating a named filter, then it should be saved to a subject area folder (/My Folders/Subject Area Contents/Paint) so that it is available when you create an analysis using the same subject area and to which you want to add the saved filter.

    • You can save the following objects to any location within the catalog: actions, agents, analyses, BI Publisher objects, briefing books, conditions, KPIs, and prompts.

    • Oracle recommends that you save the following objects to the subject area folder: calculated items, custom groups, and filters. If a subject area folder does not exist in your /My Folders folder or within the /Shared Folders folder, then Oracle BI EE creates a subject area folder and the Save As dialog defaults a save path to /My Folders/Subject Area Contents/<subject area>. Saving these objects to the subject area folders ensures that they are available when you build an analysis for the same subject area.

    • Dashboards can be saved to any catalog location. However, if you want the dashboard to display in the global header's Dashboards menu, then you must save the dashboard to a first level dashboard folder. For example, save the dashboard to the following location to include the dashboard in the Dashboard menu: /Shared Folders/Sales Projections/Dashboards. Save the dashboard to the following location to exclude the dashboard from the Dashboard menu: /Shared Folders/Sales Projections/Dashboards/Design Time. For more information about saving dashboards, see "Saving Dashboards By Other Names and In Other Locations".

  3. Click OK.

Use the following procedure to create a sub-folder within your My Folders or, if you have the required permissions, to create a sub-folder.

To create a folder or sub-folder:

  1. On the "Catalog page", go to the desired location in the "Folders pane".

  2. In the catalog toolbar, click New and select Folder. The New Folder dialog is displayed.

  3. Enter the folder name and click OK.

How Can I Search for Objects?

Depending upon how your system has been configured, you will use either the basic catalog search or the full-text catalog search to find objects in the Oracle BI Presentation Catalog.

Full-Text Catalog Search

Full-text catalog search enables users with the proper privilege to conduct a search for an object using Oracle BI Search. The full-text catalog search is available if your administrator configured Oracle BI Enterprise Edition to use Oracle Secure Enterprise Search. The version of Oracle Secure Enterprise Search with which Oracle BI Enterprise Edition is integrated determines the location from which you conduct a full-text search. If you are using the fully integrated version, you will conduct your search from the global header or the Catalog page. If you are using the partially integrated search, you will conduct your search from a URL or a full-text search link on the Home Page. Ask your administrator which method you must use. For more information, see "Making the Partially Integrated Full-Text Catalog Search Available to End Users".

You can use the full-text search to find objects by various attributes, such as name, description, author, and the names and values of columns of data that the object references. Only those objects to which you have the appropriate permissions are found. When the search is initiated and the desired object is located, you can click it to display it for viewing. For more information about permissions, see "What Results are Returned from a Full-Text Catalog Search?"

You can search for nearly all types of objects in the Oracle BI Presentation Catalog, with a few exceptions such as Marketing Segmentation objects. You can also search for attachments to objects, such as a PDF file that is contained on a dashboard page. You can search for objects such as dashboard prompts that are saved within other objects.

Searching with the Basic Search or Fully Integrated Full-Text Search

Depending upon how your system is configured, you will use the basic search or the fully integrated full-text search to quickly find an object within the catalog. You can use the basic search to access objects by name or description from the global header, locate objects through the search shortcuts located on the Home page, or conduct a formal search for objects from the Catalog page. You can use the fully integrated full-text search to search for objects from the global header or from the Catalog page. For more information, see "How Can I Search for Objects?"

Note that for the fully integrated full-text search, a newly created object that is included in the index cannot be located until a crawl of the catalog has occurred. See "Creating the Data Source for Full-Text Catalog Search" in Oracle Fusion Middleware System Administrator's Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition for information.

To search for objects from the global header:

For the basic search and fully integrated full-text search, you can use the global header to quickly access objects by type and name or description from anywhere in Presentation Services.

  1. In the global header's Search field, click the down arrow and select the object type for which you want to search.

  2. Place your cursor in the field next to the Search field and enter part or all of the object's name or description.

  3. Click the arrow button to begin the search. The Catalog page is displayed with the results that match your search criteria. For more information about how to search, see "Search pane".

To access objects through search shortcuts:

Use the Browse/Manage... pane located on the Home page to perform quick searches by object type, or to access the Catalog page. Go to the Home page and perform one of the following actions.

Use the Catalog page's functionality to provide search criteria. This searching method is useful when you know the object's name, location, or type. Use the following task for the basic search and the fully integrated full-text search.

To search the catalog from the Catalog page:

Use this task for the basic search and the fully integrated full-text search.

  1. In the global header, click Catalog. The "Catalog page" is displayed.

  2. Click the binoculars button to display the Search pane.

  3. In the "Search pane", specify the search criteria. Consider the following options:

    • Name: All objects and folders whose names contain the letters that you enter are displayed. For more information about how to search, see "Search pane".

    • Location: Select the folders to search. Administrators and users with administrative permissions can search the catalog root folder. However, before you can search the root folder, you must be in Admin View.

    • Type: Select the kind of object for which you are searching (for example, KPI, Scorecard, or Filter).


    Note:

    To search for Hidden Items, you must select the Show Hidden Items box, which is located on the Catalog Page's header.


  4. Click Search.

    Folders or objects that satisfy the search criteria are displayed. For more information, see "Catalog area".

What Results are Returned from a Full-Text Catalog Search?

When you use the fully integrated or partially integrated full-text catalog search, it locates those objects that have been crawled and indexed and for which you have the appropriate permissions. To prohibit an object from being indexed, make the appropriate setting in the object's "Properties dialog".

The list of full-text search results includes any objects that match the criteria, for which you have at least the "Open" permission. If an object is stored in a folder, then you must have the "Traverse" folder and "Open" object permissions. Note that objects with the "No Access" permission are not available. The string that you are searching for is displayed in a highlighted manner, such as bold font or a colored background.

In some cases, you might not see the string in the list of results. This happens when the string is used by the object but is not part of its object name or path name. The string is included in the definition of an object, such as in the columns that are specified as part of the analysis.

For example, suppose that the Oracle BI Presentation Catalog contains an analysis that uses a dashboard prompt that accepts Central Region as a value. Suppose you search for "Central" with the full-text catalog search. The returned list includes the analysis that uses the prompt that accepts Central Region as a value. If you click that analysis in the list, then you see that analysis open so that it is filtered by Central Region using the prompt, because that is what you searched for.

Making the Partially Integrated Full-Text Catalog Search Available to End Users

Because the partially integrated full-text search is not available from the Oracle BI Enterprise Edition global header or catalog page, the content designer or administrator must make the full-text catalog search available to users through the following means:

Searching Using Partially Integrated Full-Text Catalog Search

You can use the partially integrated full-text catalog search, which uses a search page that displays in a separate browser window, to perform an in-depth search for a business intelligence object. For more information, see "How Can I Search for Objects?" and "What Results are Returned from a Full-Text Catalog Search?"

A newly created object that is included in the index cannot be located until a crawl of the catalog has occurred. See "Creating the Data Source for Full-Text Catalog Search" in Oracle Fusion Middleware System Administrator's Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition for information.

To search using the partially integrated full-text catalog search:

Use the following procedure to search for objects.

  1. Display the search page by clicking the Secure Enterprise Search for Oracle BI menu on the Oracle BI EE Home page, if one is available.

    Otherwise, in a new browser window, enter the URL for the Oracle Secure Enterprise Search page. If you are unsure of the URL, then contact the administrator.

  2. Click Login and enter your login information for Oracle BI EE.

    You must log in to see search results of those objects that you have permission to see. If you do not log in, then you are likely to see nothing in the search results, because it is likely that no objects in the catalog are visible to unnamed users.

  3. In the box, enter the text for which you want to search.

    For example, to find analyses that include the Sales measure column, enter sales in the box.

    Note that above the box is a list of links the provide groups that can help limit the search results.

  4. Click Search.

Object-Specific Tasks

The tasks that you can perform for an object that you select from the "Catalog pane" are determined by both the selected object's type (for example, a dashboard or KPI) and the permissions that were set for the object. The list of available tasks is displayed in the "Tasks pane", which is located within the "Catalog page" or from the object's More link.

Figure 13-1 shows the available tasks for the analysis that was selected from the catalog. This graphic illustrates that the object's available tasks are: Open, Edit, Print, Export, Add to Briefing Book, Schedule, Delete, Copy, Rename, Add to Favorites, Create Shortcut, Archive, Properties, and Permissions.

In most cases, you can open or copy an object. However, if you selected an analysis, then you can create an agent for the analysis or export the analysis. If you selected a dashboard, then you can publish the dashboard or archive it, depending upon the permissions that were assigned to the object.


Note:

If you upgrade to a newer version of Oracle Business Intelligence and work with objects in the catalog, then you might notice that certain objects are not being accessed as quickly as in the previous release. This change can occur if objects were not upgraded properly. See "Updating Catalog Objects" in Oracle Fusion Middleware System Administrator's Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition for information on upgrading objects.


What Are Favorites?

The favorites functionality allows you to bookmark as favorites the catalog objects that you view regularly or want to view again at another time. After you flag objects as favorites, you can use the "Manage Favorites dialog" to organize your favorites by creating categories and rearrange your favorites into the order that you find most intuitive. You can access a list of the objects that you marked as favorites and any categories that you created by clicking Favorites in the global header.

Adding Objects to Favorites

Use the following tasks to add an object to your favorites list. After you add an object to your favorites list, the object's icon is updated to include a gold star.

To add an object to your favorites list by using the Home Page or Catalog Page:

  1. Go to the "Home page" or "Catalog page" and browse for the object that you want to add to your favorites list.

  2. Click the More link, and then click Add to Favorites. The object is added to your favorites list.

To add an object to your favorites list while viewing or editing the object:

  1. Open the object in its designated viewer or editor.

  2. In the global header, hover over Favorites and click Add to Favorites. The object is added to your favorites list.

Accessing Favorite Objects

After you tag objects as favorites, you can use the Favorites menu in the global header to view your list of favorites and browse for and select a favorite object. For information about adding objects, see "Adding Objects to Favorites".

To view your favorites list:

  1. In the global header, hover over the Favorites menu. The list of the objects that you marked as favorites displays.

  2. Scroll through the list of objects and categories to find a specific object. Click the object to select it.

    Oracle BI EE displays the selected object based on your permissions. For example, if you open an analysis to which you have write permission, then Oracle BI EE opens the object in the "Analysis editor".

Organizing Favorites

Use the following tasks to organize the items on your favorites list.

To create a favorites category:

  1. In the global header, hover over the Favorites menu. The list of the objects that you marked as favorites displays.

  2. Click Manage Favorites. The "Manage Favorites dialog" displays.

  3. In the Category Tree area, browse to the location where you want to add a new category. When you select a category in the Category Tree, any subcategories or favorite objects nested in that category display in the Selected Category area.

  4. In the toolbar, click New Category. The "New Category dialog" displays.

  5. Enter a unique name for the category. Click OK.

  6. The new category displays in the Category Tree.

To rearrange your favorite objects:

  1. In the global header, hover over the Favorites menu. The list of the objects that you marked as favorites displays.

  2. Click Manage Favorites. The "Manage Favorites dialog" displays.

  3. In the Category Tree area, browse to the location of the categories or objects that you want to rearrange. When you select a category in the Category Tree, any subcategories or favorite objects nested in that category display in the Selected Category area. You can perform any of the following actions to rearrange your favorites.

    • Select an object or category and click the move buttons to move the object up or down in your favorites list.

    • Drag and drop objects into categories. Drag and drop categories into other categories to nest them. Note that depending on how you want to nest categories, you can drag and drop categories within the Category Tree or the Selected Category area.

    • Copy objects or categories from one location and paste them into another location.

    • Rename categories.

    • Sort the selected categories or objects within a category by ascending or descending alphabetic order.

    For more information, see the "Manage Favorites dialog".

  4. Click OK. Your rearranged objects and categories are saved and display in your favorites list.

Removing Objects From Favorites

Use the following tasks to remove an object from your favorites list. Note that if you have flagged an object as a favorite and you or someone else deletes that object from the Catalog, then the object will be removed from your favorites list.

After you remove an object from your favorites list, the object's icon changes from an icon with a gold star to the object's standard icon.

To remove an object from your favorites list by using the Home Page or Catalog Page:

  1. Go to the "Home page" or "Catalog page" and browse for the object that you want to remove from your favorites list.

  2. Click the More link, and then click Remove from Favorites. The object is removed from your favorites list.

To remove an object from your favorites list while viewing or editing the object:

  1. Open the object in its designated viewer or editor.

  2. In the global header and hover over the Favorites menu. The list of the objects that you marked as favorites displays.

  3. Click Remove from Favorites. The object is removed from your favorites list.

To remove an object from your favorites list by using the Manage Favorites dialog:

  1. In the global header, hover over the Favorites menu. The list of the objects that you marked as favorites displays.

  2. Click Manage Favorites. The "Manage Favorites dialog" displays.

  3. Browse for and select the object that you want to remove.

  4. Click Delete.

  5. Click OK. The object is removed from the list.

Exporting Reports, KPIs, and Analysis Prompts Data

To leverage your data and use it in other applications, you can export report, KPI, and analysis prompt values and data as a PDF, MHTML, XLS, and CVS file.

To export data:

  1. In the global header, click Catalog. The "Catalog page" is displayed.

  2. Search for the object to export. For more information about searching, see "Searching with the Basic Search or Fully Integrated Full-Text Search".

  3. In the "Folders pane", select the object to export.

  4. Select the object and perform a task:

    • Below the document, select More and then Export

    • Select the Export button in the "Tasks pane".

  5. Select the format. Note that the Data list contains the CSV Format, Tab delimited Format, and XML Format options.

Accessing Properties

Administrative users can access the properties of any object or folder to perform tasks such as view system information or change access levels. Users can access and modify the properties of the objects that they create or own.

To access properties:

  1. In the global header, click Catalog. The "Catalog page" is displayed.

  2. Search for the object to which you want to assign properties. For more information about searching, see "Searching with the Basic Search or Fully Integrated Full-Text Search".

  3. In the "Folders pane", select an object or folder.

  4. Perform a task:

    • Below the document, select More and then Properties

    • Click the Properties button in the "Tasks pane".

  5. Review or change the settings displayed in the "Properties dialog".

Levels of Oracle BI EE Security

Oracle BI EE supports security mechanisms that allow users to access only the data for which they are authorized. For specific information about setting up and maintaining security, see Oracle Fusion Middleware Security Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition. The following types of security are typical:

The security mechanisms in Oracle Business Intelligence can use security hierarchies that are defined in operational applications, such as Siebel CRM applications, which minimizes the need for administrators to manage multiple security systems. The security mechanisms also allow a high degree of control over access to elements in Oracle Business Intelligence applications.

What Are Permissions?

An object's owner or a user who has been given the proper privileges and permissions can assign permissions to catalog objects. Permissions are authorizations that you grant to a user or role to perform a specific action or group of actions on a catalog object. For example, if you work in the sales department and created a dashboard that contains quarterly sales projections, then you can give read access to this dashboard to all sales people, but give read, write, and delete access to sales directors and vice presidents.

Permissions are a part of the Oracle BI EE security model, and how permissions are initially assigned is based on how users, roles, and groups were set up on your system, and which privileges the Oracle BI EE administrator granted those users, roles, and groups. For example, the administrator removes the BIAdministrator role from the Admin:Catalog, Change Permissions privilege. This removal means that no one included in the BIAdministrator group can change permissions for any catalog objects other than the objects that the individual users who are included in the BIAdministrator group create or own.

How Are an Object's Permission Assigned?

The permissions for a folder, Oracle BI Publisher object, or other objects are assigned by either the object owner, the content designer, or the catalog's administrator. Before someone other than the content designer can assign permissions to an object, that person must have been given ownership of the object, granted the Change Permissions privilege by the Presentation Services administrator, and have been given the Change Permissions object permission, which is listed in the "Custom Permissions dialog". For more information about setting the Change Permissions privileges, see "Managing Catalog Privileges" in Oracle Fusion Middleware Security Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition.

When the content designer creates an object and saves it to a folder, the object inherits the permissions that are set on the folder. After the object is saved, the content designer can display either the catalog's "Tasks pane" or the object's More... link, locate the object, access the "Permission dialog", and modify the object's permissions. If the object's Read-Only property, which is set on the "Properties dialog", is selected, then no one other than the owner can modify the object's permissions. This read-only setting essentially trumps any permissions that are set in the Permission dialog.

When working with an object, you use the Permissions dialog to assign who gets which object permissions in the following ways:

Access Control Lists and Permissions

Access control lists define the ability of an account to access a shared object in the Oracle BI Presentation Catalog. An account is an Application role, a Catalog group, or an individual user. Permissions describe the type of access to an object that an account is permitted. Examples are Open and Full Control.

Each catalog object has an access control list that defines which accounts have which permissions to access the object. The access control list is stored in the object's corresponding attribute (.atr) file. An access control list has the general form that is shown in Table 13-1.

Permission Definitions

To control access to objects (such as a folder in the catalog or a section in a dashboard), you assign permissions to Application roles, Catalog groups, and users. The permissions that you can assign vary depending on the type of object with which you are working.

The permissions that are available from the "Permission dialog" are usually parent permissions, meaning that each parent permission contains several child permissions (for example, if the Open permission is applied to a folder, the users of that folder can read, traverse, and run Oracle BI Publisher reports located in that folder). Applying parent permissions, rather than building custom permissions for ever object, is an easy way to consistently assign and maintain permissions. The available parent permissions differ based on the object type with which you are working: folders, BI Publisher objects, or business intelligence objects. BI Publisher objects include reports, data models, sub templates, and style templates. Business intelligence objects include analyses, dashboards, KPIs, scorecards, filters, and prompts.

If in the "Permission dialog" you select the Custom permission, then the "Custom Permissions dialog" is displayed where you can select the permissions to apply to the object. For example, if you are working with a folder object, then you can select the traverse, read, and delete permissions.

Table 13-2 includes the name of each permissions and its definition. For more information about the parent permissions that you can assign to an object and what the parent permission includes based on the type of object with which you are working, see "Permissions Available by Object Type".

Table 13-2 Permission Descriptions

PermissionDescription

Read

Use this option to give authority to access, but not modify, the object.

Write

Use this option to give authority to edit the object.

Delete

Use this option to give authority to delete the object.

Traverse

Use this option to give authority to access objects within the selected folder when the user does not have permission to the selected folder. Access to these objects is required when the objects in the folder, such as analyses, are embedded in a dashboard or WebCenter Portal application page that the user has permission to access.

For example, if you grant users the Traverse permission to the /Shared Folders/Test folder, then they can access objects, through the Catalog or embedded in dashboards or WebCenter Portal application pages, stored in the/Shared Folders/Test folder and stored in sub-folders, such as the /Shared Folders/Test/Guest folder. However, users cannot access (meaning view, expand, or browse) the folder and sub-folders from the Catalog.

Run Publisher Report

Use this option to give authority to read, traverse the folder that contains the object, and regenerate the report so that it includes the most recent data.

Schedule Publisher Report

Use this option to give authority to read, traverse the folder that contains the object, and schedule the report.

View Publisher Report

Use this option to give authority to read, traverse the folder that contains the object, and view, but not regenerate, the report.

Execute

Use this option to give authority to run an object, such as an action, agent, or a briefing book.

Change Permissions

Use this option to give authority to change the object's permissions.

Set Ownership

Use this option to give authority to reassign ownership of the object.

Full Control

Use this option to give authority to perform all tasks (modify and delete, for example) on the object.

No Access

Use this option to deny access to the object. Explicitly denying access takes precedence over any other permission.

Modify

Use this option to give authority to read, write, and delete the object.

Open

Use this option to give authority to access, but not modify, the object. If you are working with an Oracle BI Publisher object, this option enables you to traverse the folder that contains the object.

Custom

Use this option to display the "Custom Permissions dialog", where you grant read, write, execute, and delete permissions.

Granted

Use this option to give authority to access a section in a dashboard. This permission can be set in the dashboard, only. This permission overrides any catalog permissions set on the section's objects that would prevent the corresponding roles, Catalog groups, and users from accessing them (for example, No Access). For more information, see "Changing the Properties of a Dashboard and its Pages".

Denied

Use this option to deny access to a section in a dashboard. This permission can be set in the dashboard, only. This permission overrides any catalog permissions set on the section's objects that would allow the corresponding roles, Catalog groups, and users to access them (for example, View). For more information, see "Changing the Properties of a Dashboard and its Pages".


Permissions Available by Object Type

The permissions that are available from the "Permission dialog" are usually parent permissions, meaning that each parent permission contains several child permissions. For example, if the Open permission is applied to a folder, then the users of that folder can read, traverse, and run the BI Publisher reports that are located in that folder. The available parent permissions differ based on the object with which you are working.

Table 13-3 includes a listing of the parent permissions and the corresponding child permissions by object type. For a description of each permission, see "Permission Definitions".

Recommendations for Setting Permissions

Follow these recommendations when setting permissions:


Tip:

To provide a place for all users within an Application role to share analyses with each other, create a folder under the Subject Area folder called, for example, Share or Publish, and give the entire role Change/Delete permission to just that folder.


Assigning Permissions

Permissions determine who can access folders, BI Publisher objects, or other catalog objects. The permissions that you can assign vary depending on the type of object with which you are working. To change permissions, you must have been granted the Change Permission privilege.


Note:

To access an object in the catalog, users must have appropriate ACL (Access Control List) entries for that object. All objects in the catalog except for alerts use ACL entries. See "Working with Objects in Catalog Manager" in Oracle Fusion Middleware System Administrator's Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition for information on ACL entries.


Use the following procedure to assign permissions to an object. For more information about permissions, see "Permission Definitions", "Permissions Available by Object Type", and "Recommendations for Setting Permissions".

To assign permissions to an object:

  1. In the global header, click Catalog. The "Catalog page" is displayed.

  2. Search for the object to which you want to assign permissions. For more information about searching, see "Searching with the Basic Search or Fully Integrated Full-Text Search".

  3. Go to the "Catalog area" and locate an object or folder.

  4. Select More and then Permissions, or go to the "Tasks pane" and click Permissions. The "Permission dialog" is displayed.

  5. Click the Add users/roles button to access the "Add Application Roles, Catalog Groups, and Users dialog" to add any required accounts.

  6. In the "Permissions dialog," click the Permissions list to select permissions. Most of the items that are displayed in the list are parent permissions and contain several child permissions. To build a specific list of permissions, click Custom. The "Custom Permissions dialog" is displayed.

  7. Click OK.

Who Owns an Object?

Ownership of an object can either be granted by the user who created the object or taken by a user who has been granted the proper privileges. Note that the owner of an object or folder cannot automatically access the object or folder. To access an object, the user must have the proper permissions assigned in the object or folder's "Permission dialog".

By default, the user who creates and saves a catalog object to either My Folders or a Shared folder owns the object. An object in My Folders cannot be assigned to another owner unless the object is moved to a Shared folder and the Administrator assigns the privilege allowing the owner to reassign ownership. After this privilege has been granted, the ownership of the object can then be assigned to another user, group, or role that displays in the "Permission dialog". For example, suppose Employee A is a content designer and has created a dashboard for the Marketing department. Employee A completes the dashboard, saves it to the Marketing Department's Shared folder, and assigns ownership of the dashboard to Employee B, who is a marketing manager and responsible for updating the dashboard. For more information about assigning ownership, see "Assigning Ownership of Objects".

In some situations a user or member of a group or role must take ownership of objects located in a Shared folder. In this case, the user who wants to take ownership must be assigned the proper privilege to complete this task. After these privileges are granted, the user sees the "Take Ownership of this Item" and the "Take Ownership of this item and all subitems" options in the "Properties dialog". For example, suppose that Employee A has been granted the proper privilege to take ownership of objects and folders. When Employee B, who owns several catalog objects, leaves the company, Employee A can now access the "Properties dialog" for these objects, take ownership of the objects, and reassign ownership of the objects to Employee C. For more information about taking ownership, see "Taking Ownership of Objects".

Assigning Ownership of Objects

Use the following procedure to assign ownership of an object or folder that is saved to a Shared folder. You must have the proper privilege to access the "Permission dialog" where you can then assign ownership of an object or folder.

For more information, see "Who Owns an Object?" and "Taking Ownership of Objects".

To assign ownership of an object:

  1. In the global header, click Catalog. The "Catalog page" is displayed.

  2. Search for the object to which you want to assign ownership. For more information about searching, see "Searching with the Basic Search or Fully Integrated Full-Text Search".

  3. Go to the "Catalog area" and locate an object or folder.

  4. Select More and then Permissions, or go to the "Tasks pane" and click Permissions. The "Permission dialog" is displayed.

  5. In the Permissions table, go to the Owner column and click to specify the owner.

  6. Click OK.

Taking Ownership of Objects

Use the following procedure to take ownership of an object or folder that is saved to a Shared folder. You must have the proper privilege for the take ownership options to display in the "Properties dialog".

Note that the owner of an object or folder cannot automatically access the object or folder. To access an object, the user must have the proper permissions assigned in the object or folder's "Permission dialog". For more information, see "Who Owns an Object?" and "Assigning Ownership of Objects".

To take ownership of an object:

  1. In the global header, click Catalog. The "Catalog page" is displayed.

  2. Search for the object to which you want to assign ownership. For more information about searching, see "Searching with the Basic Search or Fully Integrated Full-Text Search".

  3. Go to the "Catalog area" and locate an object or folder.

  4. Select More and then Properties, or go to the "Tasks pane" and click Properties. The "Properties dialog" is displayed.

  5. In the Ownership area, do one the following:

    • If you are working with an object, click the "Set Ownership of this item" link.

    • If you are working with a folder or an object that contains sub-objects (for example, a dashboard or scorecard), click the "Set Ownership of this item" link to take ownership of the object only, or click the "Set Ownership of this item and all subitems" to take ownership of the object and sub-objects.

  6. Click OK.

What is Archiving?

Archiving enables you to bundle the entire catalog, specific folders, or multi-component objects (for example, scorecards) as a .catalog file and upload the .catalog file to unarchive the data to another location in the catalog. This process enables you to transfer specific data across environments. For example, you can use this feature to transfer data from a development environment to a production environment.

If you have the necessary privileges, then you can use the Oracle BI EE Catalog Manager to archive and unarchive catalog objects and perform other Catalog maintenance tasks. For more information about Catalog Manager, see "Working with Objects in Catalog Manager" in Oracle Fusion Middleware System Administrator's Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition.

Archiving Objects

Before you can archive, you must have been granted the proper privilege.

To create an archive file:

  1. In the global header, click Catalog. The "Catalog page" is displayed.

  2. Search for the objects to archive. For more information about searching, see "Searching with the Basic Search or Fully Integrated Full-Text Search".

  3. Go to the "Folders pane" to select the object.

  4. Select More, then Archive below the object. The "Archive dialog" is displayed.

  5. Specify to maintain or omit the permissions and timestamps for the folder or object. For more information, see the "Archive dialog".

  6. Click OK.

To unarchive an archive file:

  1. Locate the archive file to upload. The archive file contains the.catalog extension (for example, _portal.catalog).

  2. Go to the "Folders pane" and select the location where you want to upload the archive file.

  3. Go to the Tasks pane and click Unarchive. The "Unarchive dialog" is displayed.

  4. Enter the name of the archive file or browse for the archive file. Select the archive file.

  5. Click OK.

PKpGGPKִo@ OEBPS/toc.ncx Oracle® Fusion Middleware User's Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition (Oracle Fusion Applications Edition), 11g Release 1 (11.1.1) Cover Table of Contents Oracle Fusion Middleware User's Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition (Oracle Fusion Applications Edition), 11g Release 1 (11.1.1) Preface New Features for Oracle Business Intelligence Users Introducing Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition Creating Analyses Adding Views for Display in Dashboards Building and Using Dashboards Filtering and Selecting Data for Analyses Prompting in Dashboards and Analyses Formatting Analyses, Views, and Dashboard Pages Delivering Content Working with Conditions Working with Actions Using KPIs and KPI Watchlists Scorecarding Managing Objects in the Oracle BI Presentation Catalog Using BI Composer to Work with Analyses Basic Information to Tell Your Users Integrating with Microsoft Office Accessibility Features Logical SQL Reference User Interface Reference Glossary Index Copyright PKQbPKִo@OEBPS/cover.htm  Cover

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