9.4. VMware vCenter Desktop Provider

9.4.1. I Cannot Log into My VMware Virtual Machine
9.4.2. Users Cannot Log Into Their VMware Provided Windows desktop
9.4.3. Why Does My VMware Virtual Machine Have an Invalid IP Address Or Cannot Be Pinged?
9.4.4. I Am Unable to Get a MS RDC Connection on My VMware Virtual Machine
9.4.5. Creating a vCenter Desktop Provider Fails With "Unable to Contact VMware VirtualCenter - Host Not Reachable at Port 443" Errors
9.4.6. In My VMware Desktop Pool, New Virtual Machines Are Created Automatically, But They Are Not Made Available
9.4.7. The VMware Virtual Machine Cloning Process Is Not Operating As Expected
9.4.8. The Window Displaying the VMware-Hosted Virtual Desktop Is Freezing
9.4.9. I Have Created a New Pool in My VMware Desktop provider and Virtual Machines Are Not Created Automatically
9.4.10. How Do I Use VMware Virtual Machines With Multiple Network Adapters?
9.4.11. Unused VMware Virtual Machines Are Not Being Recycled

9.4.1. I Cannot Log into My VMware Virtual Machine

This issue could be seen if the snapshot of the machine is older than 30 days. For more information, see http://support.microsoft.com/kb/154501

9.4.2. Users Cannot Log Into Their VMware Provided Windows desktop

Verify that the users are configured for remote access and are allowed to perform a remote access.

9.4.3. Why Does My VMware Virtual Machine Have an Invalid IP Address Or Cannot Be Pinged?

  1. Verify that your networking interface is properly configured for your ESX server in the Virtual Infrastructure Client.

  2. If the network interface is properly configured for your ESX server:

    Verify that the network adapter is enabled in the template and is connected to the correct network.

    Verify that there is a properly configured DHCP server with enough leases running on the subnet your virtual machine will run on.

    See the VMware documentation, available online at http://www.vmware.com/support/pubs/vi_pubs.html

9.4.4. I Am Unable to Get a MS RDC Connection on My VMware Virtual Machine

  1. Verify that it has been enabled in the Remote tab of the System Properties dialog.

    If this is enabled, the issue probably has to do with your network settings.

  2. Verify that the virtual machine's subnet can be reached from the Windows machine from which you run the Remote Desktop Connection client.

    If you have set up a private network for your virtual machines, it might not be accessible from a machine not on that network.

9.4.5. Creating a vCenter Desktop Provider Fails With "Unable to Contact VMware VirtualCenter - Host Not Reachable at Port 443" Errors

This error occurs when the VMware vCenter server has an expired certificate.

For more information about how to regenerate an expired certificate, refer to the VMware Knowledge Base article ID 1009092.

Once the certificate is regenerated, you should be able to successfully create a desktop provider.

9.4.6. In My VMware Desktop Pool, New Virtual Machines Are Created Automatically, But They Are Not Made Available

  1. Verify that you still have enough disk space for your virtual machines.

    Depending on the recycle policy settings for your pool before a newly created virtual machine is made available for users, a snapshot is taken. This operation requires sufficient disk space.

  2. Verify that the RDP port (typically 3389) of the Windows guest OS instance is open.

    Before a newly created virtual machine is made available, the Virtual Desktop Connector verifies whether RDP communication can be established to the virtual machine. The following issues might prevent a successful test:

    • The virtual machine is on a private network and cannot be accessed by the Virtual Desktop Connector. Verify your network configuration.

    • Remote access is disabled on the Windows guest OS.

    • Firewall settings of the Windows guest OS do not allow RDP connections.

9.4.7. The VMware Virtual Machine Cloning Process Is Not Operating As Expected

To determine whether a new virtual machine is ready for use, Oracle VDI tries to open an RDP connection to it. In certain cases, especially if you use a customized VM template for Vista, RDP can become available before the build process has completed; however, a virtual machine made available before the build process has completed cannot be used.

The following procedure describes how to set up a customized virtual machine template VMware customization specs to correct this problem. It requires that RDP is disabled in the virtual machine template and that RDP is not blocked by a firewall when cloning is completed.

Preparations for manual Sysprep for Windows XP VMs (Step 3) and Windows Vista or Windows 7 VMs (Step 4) are also included.

  1. Disable RDP by making sure the Remote Desktop checkbox on the Remote section of the System Preference dialog on the Windows Control Panel is unchecked.

Note

If you are using the Windows Firewall, make sure that the Remote Desktop item is checked under Firewall Exceptions.

  1. Create a registry file called enableRdp.reg at C:\ with the following content:

    REGEDIT4
    [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Terminal Server]
    "fDenyTSConnections"=dword:00000000

    The enableRdp.reg file is used at the end of the Sysprep process to enable RDP in the Windows registry.

  2. For Windows XP manual Sysprep, include the following under Additional Commands in the Setup Manager tool:

    regedit /s C:\enableRdp.reg

    The Setup Manager tool is used to create answer files for Sysprep.

  3. For Windows Vista or Windows 7 manual Sysprep and customization specs, create a batch file called SetupComplete.cmd in the %WINDIR%\Setup\Scripts directory with the following content:

    regedit /s C:\enableRdp.reg

    Windows Vista looks for %WINDIR%\Setup\Scripts\SetupComplete.cmd and executes it at the end of every setup process, including Sysprep. The default setting for %WINDIR% is C:\Windows.

9.4.8. The Window Displaying the VMware-Hosted Virtual Desktop Is Freezing

If you suspend or power down your virtual machine without first closing the RDP connection, the guest OS dies, but the RDP connection remains active. The result is a non-responsive window displaying the last known state of your Windows session. The following steps show how to set the Run VMware Tools Scripts panel on both the Virtual Infrastructure Client and the guest OS to avoid this problem.

  1. Configure the Run VMware Tools Scripts panel on the Virtual Infrastructure Client.

    1. Select Edit Settings of a particular VM to bring up the Virtual Machine Properties page.

    2. Click the Options tab.

    3. Select VMware Tools.

      This is where you can modify the behavior of the Power Controls (Start, Stop, Suspend, and Reset).

    4. Next to the Power Off switch (red rectangle), select Shut Down Guest.

      This allows the guest OS to shut down gracefully when the Power Control button is pressed.

    5. In the Run VMware Tools Scripts panel, check the Before Powering Off checkbox.

  2. Repeat steps a. through e. above to configure the Run VMware Tools Scripts panel on the guest OS.

  3. Modify the poweroff-vm-default.bat script on the guest OS.

    The install location on the guest OS, typically C:\Program Files\VMware\VMware Tools, contains the following default scripts:

    poweroff-vm-default.bat
    poweron-vm-default.bat
    resume-vm-default.bat
    suspend-vm-default.bat
  4. Add tsdiscon.exe to the poweroff-vm-default.bat script.

    The poweroff-vm-default.bat script is the first to execute when the VM is powered off from the VMware Infrastructure Client. It now calls tsdiscon.exe, which closes all open RDP connections.

9.4.9. I Have Created a New Pool in My VMware Desktop provider and Virtual Machines Are Not Created Automatically

  • You have not defined a template for the pool. Make sure that your pool configuration points to a virtual machine or template.

  • There is not enough disk space available to create copies of the template.

9.4.10. How Do I Use VMware Virtual Machines With Multiple Network Adapters?

Using virtual machines with more than one network interface can be problematic. Oracle VDI expects RDP to be available on the primary interface. If RDP is actually running on a different interface, then the machine may not be prepared successfully or assigned to users.

The problem arises in determining which exactly is the primary interface. The VMware documentation would lead us to believe that it is the primary interface listed in Windows. But, this is not the case. In fact, the primary interface is determined by the order of the network adapters in VMware vCenter. The network adapter with the highest number, usually the one which was added most recently, is the primary network adapter.

To change the network of the primary adapter:

  1. Edit the virtual machine settings in VMware vCenter.

  2. Select the network adapter with the highest number, for example Network Adapter 3.

  3. This is the primary network interface. Change the network label to the appropriate network for RDP.

  4. You may need to adjust the other network adapters so that the virtual machine is assigned to all the correct networks.

Figure 9.1. Virtual Machine Network Settings in VMware vCenter

Screenshot of the network settings for a virtual machine in VMware vCenter.

9.4.11. Unused VMware Virtual Machines Are Not Being Recycled

  1. Verify that the Power Options on the Windows guest OS have been configured to go into standby when it is idle.

  2. Verify that the VMware Tools and the Virtual Desktop Connector Tools are installed and running on the Windows guest OS.

    Check the Windows Event Log for any problems with the tools.

    If you imported desktops from a previous release of Oracle VDI, verify that the desktop is using the latest version of the Oracle VDI tools. Open the desktop console, go to Control Panel > Add or Remove Programs. Open the support information for Oracle VDI Tools. The version number of the tools must match your Oracle VDI release number.

  3. Verify that the virtual machine is configured to suspend when it is in standby.

    Check the virtual machine settings (Options/Power management), and make sure that the Suspend the Virtual Machine item is selected.

  4. Verify that the Windows guest OS actually enters standby and the virtual machine suspends when the machine is not in use.

Note

If you experience problems with the standby feature in Windows XP, see http://www.terranovum.com/projects/energystar/ez_gpo.html. EZ GPO includes a group policy for power options.