8.3. Checking Oracle VDI Services and Logs

8.3.1. How to Check the Status of the Oracle VDI Center
8.3.2. How to Check the Oracle VDI Log Files
8.3.3. How to Change Logging for Oracle VDI
8.3.4. How to Check the Status of the Oracle VDI Database
8.3.5. How to Check the Status of the Oracle VDI Service
8.3.6. How to Check the Status of the Oracle VDI RDP Broker
8.3.7. How to Check the Status of the Oracle VDI Center Agent
8.3.8. How to Check the Status of the Oracle VDI Manager
8.3.9. How to Check the Status of Cacao and the Oracle VDI Modules
8.3.10. How to Restart Cacao

This section describes how to check the status of the various services provided by Oracle VDI and how to check the log files for troubleshooting purposes. On Oracle Solaris platforms, some services also run under the control of the Service Management Facility (SMF).

The Oracle VDI Service and Center Agent run as modules in the Common Agent Container (Cacao). If you encounter any issues, check the status of Cacao and the modules, as well as the status of the Oracle VDI services.

8.3.1. How to Check the Status of the Oracle VDI Center

Use the vda-center status command to check the status of an Oracle VDI Center. This command obtains information from the individual hosts in the Oracle VDI Center. For each host, the status of the host, the database role of the host (if the embedded MySQL Server database is used), and the status of the Oracle VDI Center service is shown.

  • Run the following command as root:

    # /opt/SUNWvda/sbin/vda-center status

    For example:

    # /opt/SUNWvda/sbin/vda-center status
    HOST NAME                          HOST STATUS    SERVICE                  SERVICE STATUS
    primary.example.com                Up             VDI Database Replication Up
    secondary.example.com              Up             VDI Database             Up
    
    2 host(s) in center.

    In case of problems, check the log files for messages beginning com.sun.vda.cluster, see Section 8.3.2, “How to Check the Oracle VDI Log Files”.

8.3.2. How to Check the Oracle VDI Log Files

Events for Oracle VDI events are logged in the Cacao log files in the following locations:

  • Oracle Solaris platforms: /var/cacao/instances/vda/logs/cacao.0

  • Oracle Linux platforms: /var/opt/sun/cacao2/instances/vda/logs/cacao.0

Log messages at SEVERE or WARNING level are also forwarded to the syslog daemon.

8.3.3. How to Change Logging for Oracle VDI

By default, all Oracle VDI events are logged in the Cacao log files. The default maximum log file size is 95 megabytes. When the limit is reached, the current log file is closed and a new one created. By default, Oracle VDI retains ten log files. You can change the logging level, the number of log files, and the log file size limit.

Changing the Logging Level

  1. Display a list of the available log filter levels.

    Run the following command as root:

    # cacaoadm list-filters -l -i vda

    On Linux platforms, the cacaoadm command is in /opt/sun/cacao2/bin.

    The logging levels are from SEVERE (shows the least detail) to FINEST (shows the most detail).

  2. Change the logging level.

    Run the following command as root:

    # cacaoadm set-filter -p com.sun.vda.service=<log-level> -i vda
    

    For example, to decrease the logging level to log informational messages:

    # cacaoadm set-filter -p com.sun.vda.service=INFO -i vda

    For example, to reset the logging level to the default for the Oracle VDI service:

    # cacaoadm set-filter -p com.sun.vda.service=ALL -i vda
  3. Restart Cacao.

    After changing the logging level, you must restart Cacao for the change to take effect.

    Run the following command as root:

    # cacaoadm stop -f -i vda 
    # cacaoadm start -i vda

Changing the Log History and Log File Size

  1. Stop Cacao.

    Run the following command as root:

    # cacaoadm stop -f -i vda 
  2. Change the number of log files Oracle VDI retains.

    Run the following command as root:

    # cacaoadm set-param log-file-count=<num> -i vda
    

    where <num> is the number of log files to retain. The default is 10.

  3. Change the log file size limit.

    Run the following command as root:

    # cacaoadm set-param log-file-limit=<size> -i vda
    

    where <size> is the maximum size of the log files in bytes. The default is 100000000. The maximum allowed is 2147483647.

  4. Check that the configuration changes have taken effect.

    Run the following command as root:

    # cacaoadm list-params -i vda
  5. Restart Cacao.

    Run the following command as root:

    # cacaoadm start -i vda

8.3.4. How to Check the Status of the Oracle VDI Database

With Oracle VDI, you can use the embedded MySQL Server database, or connect to your own remote MySQL database. Use the vda-db-status command to check the status of either database type.

  • Run the following command as root.

    # /opt/SUNWvda/sbin/vda-db-status

    For example:

    # /opt/SUNWvda/sbin/vda-db-status
    Ip/Hostname Database host                               Role    Status
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------
    primary.example.com                                     Master  up
    secondary.example.com                                   Slave   up

    On Oracle Solaris platforms, you can also check the status of the Oracle VDI database using the Service Management Facility. This only checks the status of the database on the local host and is only available if you are using the embedded MySQL Server database. The master database runs on the primary host. The slave database service runs in the first secondary host added to the Oracle VDI Center.

    On the primary host or the first secondary host, run the following command as root.

    # svcs svc:/application/database/vdadb:default

    For example:

    # svcs svc:/application/database/vdadb:default
    STATE          STIME    FMRI
    online         Sep_30   svc:/application/database/vdadb:default

In case of problems on Oracle Solaris platforms, check the log file at /var/svc/log/application-database-vdadb:default.log. There is no equivalent log file on Oracle Linux platforms.

8.3.5. How to Check the Status of the Oracle VDI Service

Use the vda-service status command to show whether the Cacao management daemon is enabled or disabled, its process numbers, and its uptime.

  • Run the following command as root:

    # /opt/SUNWvda/sbin/vda-service status

    For example:

    # /opt/SUNWvda/sbin/vda-service status
    vda instance is ENABLED at system startup. 
    Smf monitoring process: 
    11761
    11762
    Uptime: 2 day(s), 23:22

    In case of problems, check the log files, see Section 8.3.2, “How to Check the Oracle VDI Log Files”.

8.3.6. How to Check the Status of the Oracle VDI RDP Broker

Use the brokeradm status command to check if the Oracle VDI RDP broker and proxy services are running.

  • Run the following command as root. 

    # /opt/SUNWvda-rdpb/bin/brokeradm status

    For example:

    # /opt/SUNWvda-rdpb/bin/brokeradm status
    broker is running (PID 18204)
    proxy is running (PID 18223)

    On Oracle Solaris platforms, the RDP broker and proxy services also run under the Service Management Facility. Run the following commands as root.

    # svcs svc:/application/rdpb-broker:default
    # svcs svc:/application/rdpb-proxy:default

    For example:

    # svcs svc:/application/rdpb-broker:default svc:/application/rdpb-proxy:default
    STATE          STIME    FMRI
    online         Sep_30   svc:/application/rdpb-broker:default
    online         Sep_30   svc:/application/rdpb-proxy:default

In case of problems, check the log files:

  • On Oracle Solaris platforms:

    • /var/svc/log/application-rdpb-broker:default.log

    • /var/svc/log/application-rdpb-proxy:default.log

  • On Oracle Linux platforms:

    • /opt/SUNWvda-rdpb/var/log/broker<PID>.log

    • /opt/SUNWvda-rdpb/var/log/proxy<PID>.log

8.3.7. How to Check the Status of the Oracle VDI Center Agent

Use the vda-center agent-status command to check whether the Oracle VDI Center Agent is running (and for how long) and to display the MD5 fingerprint of the host's SSL certificate.

  • Run the following command as root:

    # /opt/SUNWvda/sbin/vda-center agent-status

    For example:

    # /opt/SUNWvda/sbin/vda-center agent-status
    Agent is up for 2 day(s), 23:32.
    MD5 fingerprint is 07:A0:6C:4C:1D:5F:5B:20:A0:2A:FE:EA:1F:DB:B2:24.

    In case of problems, check the log files for messages beginning com.sun.vda.cluster, see Section 8.3.2, “How to Check the Oracle VDI Log Files”.

8.3.8. How to Check the Status of the Oracle VDI Manager

Use the vda-webserver status command to check whether the Oracle VDI Manager is running.

  • Run the following command as root.

    # /opt/SUNWvda/sbin/vda-webserver status

    For example:

    # /opt/SUNWvda/sbin/vda-webserver status
    Oracle Virtual Desktop Infrastructure Manager is running (pid 18106).

    In case of problems, check the log file at /var/opt/SUNWvda/log/webserver0.log.

8.3.9. How to Check the Status of Cacao and the Oracle VDI Modules

You use the cacaoadm command to check the status of Cacao and the individual Oracle VDI modules. On Oracle Solaris platforms, Cacao is included with the operating system. On Oracle Linux platforms, Cacao is installed as part of Oracle VDI. On Oracle Linux platforms, the cacaoadm command is in /opt/sun/cacao2/bin.

When you check the status of Cacao, the command shows whether the Cacao management daemon is enabled or disabled, its associated process numbers, and its uptime.

When you check the status of the individual modules, the commands report the following information about the module:

  • Operational State: either ENABLED (the module is able to offer service) or DISABLED (the module is unable to offer service). The DISABLED state indicates that Cacao has detected an error for the module and the module is not operational.

  • Administrative State: either LOCKED (the module must not offer service) or UNLOCKED (the module must offer service).

  • Availability Status: the availability status is empty unless the operational state is set to DISABLED. If this is the case, the values are either DEPENDENCY (the module cannot operate because another resource on which it depends is unavailable), OFF_LINE (a routine operation is needed to bring the module back into use), or FAILED (the module has an internal fault that prevents it from operating).

In case of problems, check the log files, see Section 8.3.2, “How to Check the Oracle VDI Log Files”.

How to Check the Status of Cacao

  • Run the following command as root.

    # cacaoadm status -i vda

    For example:

    # cacaoadm status -i vda
    vda instance is ENABLED at system startup. 
    Smf monitoring process: 
    11761
    11762
    Uptime: 2 day(s), 23:22

    The vda-service status command shows the same information, see Section 8.3.5, “How to Check the Status of the Oracle VDI Service”.

    Alternatively, use the Oracle Solaris Service Management Facility.

    # svcs svc:/application/management/common-agent-container-1:vda

How to Check the Status of the Oracle VDI Service Module

  • Run the following command as root.

    # cacaoadm status -i vda com.sun.vda.service

    For example:

    # cacaoadm status -i vda com.sun.vda.service
    Operational State:ENABLED
    Administrative State:UNLOCKED
    Availability Status:[]
    Module is in good health.

How to Check the Status of the Oracle VDI Service Center Agent Module

  • Run the following command as root.

    # cacaoadm status -i vda com.sun.vda.center

    For example:

    # cacaoadm status -i vda com.sun.vda.center
    Operational State:ENABLED
    Administrative State:UNLOCKED
    Availability Status:[]
    Module is in good health.

8.3.10. How to Restart Cacao

  • Run the following command as root.

    # cacaoadm stop -f -i vda
    # cacaoadm start -i vda

    On Linux platforms, the cacaoadm command is in /opt/sun/cacao2/bin.

    The cacaoadm command also has a restart subcommand. However, the restart subcommand does not support the -f option, which is the only way to make sure that all Oracle VDI services are shut down.