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JD Edwards World Equipment/Plant Maintenance Guide
Release A9.3.x

E21566-03
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14 Overview to Preventive Maintenance Cycle

This chapter contains these topics:

14.1 Objectives

  • To understand the process of events in a typical preventive maintenance cycle

  • To set up preventive maintenance (PM) schedules for equipment

  • To update PM schedules with current equipment information

  • To track completed maintenance tasks

14.2 About the Preventive Maintenance Cycle

Use Equipment/Plant Maintenance to plan, monitor, and complete routine maintenance operations. When you use Equipment/Plant Maintenance, you can minimize equipment breakdowns and unscheduled repairs.

When you use Equipment/Plant Maintenance to manage your equipment maintenance needs, you define the type and frequency of each maintenance task for each piece of equipment in your organization. The preventive maintenance cycle refers to the sequence of events that make up a maintenance task, from its definition to its completion. Since most preventive maintenance tasks are commonly performed at scheduled intervals, parts of the preventive maintenance cycle repeat, based on those intervals.

The preventive maintenance cycle consists of the following tasks:

  • Creating a PM schedule

  • Working with meter readings

  • Updating PM schedule information

  • Changing the status of PMs to complete

14.2.1 Before You Begin

14.3 Terms and Concepts

You should be familiar with the following terms and concepts related to the preventive maintenance cycle:

Term Description
Service type You define service types to describe individual preventive maintenance tasks. You can define as many service types as you need. You can set up service types to apply to a particular piece of equipment or a class of equipment. Examples of service types include:
  • 250-hour inspection

  • Clutch adjustment

  • Lubricate ventilation fan

  • 10,000-hour engine rebuild

Preventive maintenance schedule You create one preventive maintenance schedule for each piece of equipment for which you want to perform PMs. The PM schedule defines which service types should apply to a piece of equipment. The PM schedule also defines the service interval for each service type. A service interval refers to the frequency at which the service types will be performed.

For example, you could create a PM schedule for a piece of equipment that schedules a belt inspection every 5,000 hours, and a mandatory belt replacement every 20,000 hours.

PM A PM refers to one or more service types that are scheduled to be performed for a piece of equipment. You typically specify that a PM be performed at a predefined point in time. The point in time can be based on days, date, or when a piece of equipment accumulates a predefined number of statistical units, such as hours, miles, and so on. You identify how many units have accumulated for each piece of equipment by periodically entering equipment meter readings.
PM status When the system creates a record for a PM, it assigns an initial status of 01 (Maintenance Task Defined). You define other statuses to indicate the particular steps that a PM goes through before it is completed.

When you complete a PM, the system assigns it a status of 99 (Maintenance Complete).


Although the level of complexity of the preventive maintenance cycle differs from company to company, a typical preventive maintenance cycle includes the following procedures:

  • Creating PM schedules for each piece of equipment

  • Scheduling PMs

  • Completing PMs

14.3.1 Creating PM Schedules for Each Piece of Equipment

When you create a PM schedule, you include the service types that the equipment requires and the intervals at which the service types must be performed.

14.3.2 Scheduling PMs

You schedule maintenance by periodically updating PM schedule information. When you update PM schedule information, the system determines which service types are due to be performed, based on meter readings, dates, and other user defined criteria. If service types are due to be performed, the system updates the PM status. In addition, depending on how you set up your system, the system generates a PM work order.

14.3.3 Completing PMs

You indicate when maintenance has been performed by completing PMs and PM work orders. When you complete a PM, the system creates a historical record of it. For most service types other than warranty service types, the system then generates a new PM based on statistical information that you gather when you perform the maintenance. The system does not generate a new PM for warranty service types.

14.3.4 Preventive Maintenance Cycle

The following graphic shows the progression of events in a typical maintenance cycle.

Figure 14-1 Progression of Events in a Typical Maintenance Cycle

Description of Figure 14-1 follows
Description of "Figure 14-1 Progression of Events in a Typical Maintenance Cycle"

14.3.5 Preventive Maintenance Process Flow

The following graphic shows the progression of a typical preventive maintenance process.

Figure 14-2 Progression of Events in a Typical Preventive Maintenance Process

Description of Figure 14-2 follows
Description of "Figure 14-2 Progression of Events in a Typical Preventive Maintenance Process"