3.6. Managing SGD

In the Administration Console, the Global Settings tab is where you configure the settings that apply to SGD as a whole. See Figure 3.34, “The Global Settings Tab”.

Figure 3.34. The Global Settings Tab

Screen capture of the Global Settings tab

The Global Settings tab contains other tabs for configuring and managing SGD. For example, the Secure Global Desktop Authentication tab is where you configure how users authenticate to SGD.

In the Administration Console, the Secure Global Desktop Servers tab is where you manage individual SGD servers. See Figure 3.35, “The Secure Global Desktop Servers Tab”.

Figure 3.35. The Secure Global Desktop Servers Tab

Screen capture of the Secure Global Desktop Servers tab

The Secure Global Desktop Servers tab shows you the status of an SGD server, whether it is running, how many user sessions there are, and how many application sessions the server is hosting.

When you click on the name of an SGD server in the Secure Global Desktop Servers List table, the Administration Console displays further tabs in Object View. You use these tabs to configure and manage the selected SGD server. See Figure 3.36, “The General Tab for an SGD Server”.

Figure 3.36. The General Tab for an SGD Server

Screen capture of the General tab for an SGD server

On the command line, you use the tarantella config command to configure global settings and SGD servers. The Oracle Secure Global Desktop Administration Guide for Release 4.7 has details of all the command-line arguments.

3.6.1. Arrays

The Secure Global Desktop Servers tab enables you to group SGD servers together to form an array. An array is a collection of SGD servers that share configuration information.

An array contains the following:

  • One primary server – This server is the authoritative source for global SGD information, and maintains the definitive copy of the organizational hierarchy

  • One or more secondary servers – The primary server replicates information to these servers

A single, standalone server is considered to be the primary server in an array with no secondary servers.

SGD servers in an array might run different operating systems. However, all the array members must run the same version of SGD.

While you are evaluating SGD you are limited to an array containing a maximum of two SGD servers. Once you install a license key, this restriction is removed.

Arrays have the following benefits:

  • User sessions and application sessions are load-balanced across the array. To scale more users, simply add more SGD servers to the array.

  • With more than one server, there is no single point of failure. You can decommission a server temporarily with the minimum of disruption to your users.

  • Configuration information, including all the objects in your organizational hierarchy, is replicated to all array members. All array members have access to all information.

Users see the same webtop and can resume applications no matter which SGD server they log in to.

You add an SGD server to an array by clicking Add in the Secure Global Desktop Servers List table.

3.6.2. Monitoring Users

You can keep track of what your users are doing by monitoring the user sessions and application sessions in progress. User sessions and application sessions are always associated with a user identity and a user profile. The user identity is the unique authenticated identity of the user. The user profile is the SGD user profile object that contains the user's settings.

3.6.2.1. How to Shadow a User's Application Session

If a user is having difficulty with an application, you can use the Administration Console to find the user's application session and then shadow it.

  1. Find the user's application session.

    In the Administration Console, do one of the following:

    • Go to the Application Sessions tab for the user profile object.

      This tab lists the application sessions for a user.

    • Go to the Application Sessions tab for the application object.

      This tab lists the users who are currently running the application.

  2. Select the application session in the Application Sessions List table.

  3. Start shadowing of the application session.

    Click the Shadow button.

    The user sees a dialog box, asking whether to allow you to shadow the session. If the user agrees, a new window appears on your screen, showing the running application. Both you and the user can control the mouse pointer and use the application.

  4. After fixing the user's problem, end shadowing of the application session.

    Close the shadowing window, but do not close the application.

    The user sees a dialog box, saying that nobody is currently shadowing the session.

3.6.2.2. User Sessions

A user session begins when a user logs in to SGD and ends when a user logs out. User sessions are hosted by the SGD server the user logs in to. User sessions can be standard sessions or secure sessions. Secure sessions are only available when SGD security services are enabled.

If a user logs in and they already have a user session, the user session is transferred to the new SGD server and the old session ends. This is sometimes called session grabbing, or session moving.

In the Administration Console, you can list user sessions as follows:

  • The Sessions tab, in Navigation View, shows all the user sessions that are running on all SGD servers in the array.

  • The User Sessions tab for an SGD server shows all the user sessions that are hosted by that server.

  • The User Sessions tab for a user profile shows all the user sessions associated with the user profile.

On the Sessions tab and the User Sessions tabs, you can select and end user sessions. On the User Sessions tabs, you can view further details about the user session, for example the information the SGD Client detects about the client device.

On the command line, you use the tarantella webtopsession command to list and end user sessions.

3.6.2.3. Application Sessions

An application session begins when a user starts an application and ends when the application exits. Each application session corresponds to an application currently running through SGD. Application sessions can be running or suspended.

An application session can be hosted by any SGD server in the array. This might not be the same SGD server that the user logged in to.

In the Administration Console you can list application sessions as follows:

  • The Application Sessions tab for an SGD server shows all the application sessions that are hosted by that server.

  • The Application Sessions tab for a user profile shows all the application sessions associated with the user profile.

  • The Application Sessions tab for an application server shows all the applications that are running on that application server.

On the Applications Sessions tabs, you can view further details about an application session. You can also end and shadow application sessions. With shadowing, you and the user see and interact with the application at the same time.

Note

You can only shadow Windows applications and X applications, and the application sessions must not be suspended.

See Section 3.6.2.1, “How to Shadow a User's Application Session” for details of how to shadow an application session.

On the command line, you use the tarantella emulatorsession command to list, end, and shadow application sessions.