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Oracle Solaris 11.1 Administration: Security Services     Oracle Solaris 11.1 Information Library
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Part I Security Overview

1.  Security Services (Overview)

Part II System, File, and Device Security

2.  Managing Machine Security (Overview)

3.  Controlling Access to Systems (Tasks)

4.  Virus Scanning Service (Tasks)

5.  Controlling Access to Devices (Tasks)

6.  Verifying File Integrity by Using BART (Tasks)

7.  Controlling Access to Files (Tasks)

Part III Roles, Rights Profiles, and Privileges

8.  Using Roles and Privileges (Overview)

9.  Using Role-Based Access Control (Tasks)

10.  Security Attributes in Oracle Solaris (Reference)

Part IV Cryptographic Services

11.  Cryptographic Framework (Overview)

12.  Cryptographic Framework (Tasks)

13.  Key Management Framework

Part V Authentication Services and Secure Communication

14.  Using Pluggable Authentication Modules

15.  Using Secure Shell

16.  Secure Shell (Reference)

17.  Using Simple Authentication and Security Layer

18.  Network Services Authentication (Tasks)

Part VI Kerberos Service

19.  Introduction to the Kerberos Service

20.  Planning for the Kerberos Service

21.  Configuring the Kerberos Service (Tasks)

22.  Kerberos Error Messages and Troubleshooting

23.  Administering Kerberos Principals and Policies (Tasks)

24.  Using Kerberos Applications (Tasks)

25.  The Kerberos Service (Reference)

Part VII Auditing in Oracle Solaris

26.  Auditing (Overview)

What Is Auditing?

Audit Terminology and Concepts

Audit Events

Audit Classes and Preselection

Audit Records and Audit Tokens

Audit Plugin Modules

Audit Logs

Storing and Managing the Audit Trail

Ensuring Reliable Time Stamps

Managing a Remote Repository

How Is Auditing Related to Security?

How Does Auditing Work?

How Is Auditing Configured?

Auditing on a System With Oracle Solaris Zones

About the Audit Service in This Release

27.  Planning for Auditing

28.  Managing Auditing (Tasks)

29.  Auditing (Reference)



How Is Auditing Related to Security?

Auditing helps to detect potential security breaches by revealing suspicious or abnormal patterns of system usage. Auditing also provides a means to trace suspect actions back to a particular user, thus serving as a deterrent. Users who know that their activities are being audited are less likely to attempt malicious activities.

To protect a computer system, especially a system on a network, requires mechanisms that control activities before system processes or user processes begin. Security requires tools that monitor activities as the activities occur. Security also requires reports of activities after the activities have happened.

Best practice requires that audit parameters be set before users log in or system processes begin, because most audit activity involves monitoring current events and reporting the events that meet the specified parameters. How the audit service monitors and reports these events is discussed in detail in Chapter 27, Planning for Auditing and Chapter 28, Managing Auditing (Tasks).

Auditing cannot prevent hackers from unauthorized entry. However, the audit service can report, for example, that a specific user performed specific actions at a specific time and date. The audit report can identify the user by entry path and user name. Such information can be reported immediately to your terminal and to a file for later analysis. Thus, the audit service provides data that helps you determine the following: