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Compartmented Mode Workstation Labeling: Encodings Format     Oracle Solaris 11.1 Information Library
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Document Information


1.  Introduction

2.  Structure and Syntax of Encodings File

3.  Classification Encodings

4.  Information Label Encodings

5.  Sensitivity Label, Clearance, Channels, and Printer Banner Encodings

6.  Accreditation Range and Name Information Label Encodings

7.  General Considerations for Specifying Encodings

The Minimum Information Label

The Maximum Sensitivity Label

Consistency of Word Specification among Different Types of Labels

Mandatory Access Control Considerations When Encoding Words

Encoding MAC Words

Encoding MAC-Related Words

Encoding Non-MAC-Related Words

Using Initial Compartments and Markings to Specify Inverse Compartment and Marking Bits

Using Prefixes to Specify Special Inverse Compartment and Marking Bits

Choosing Names

Specifying Aliases

Avoiding "Loops" In Required Combinations

Visibility Restrictions for Required Combinations

Relationships between Required Combinations and Combination Constraints

Restrictions on Specifying Information Label Combination Constraints

Modifying Encodings Already Used by the System

Consistency of Default Word Specification

8.  Enforcing Proper Label Adjudications

A.  Encodings Specifications Error Messages

B.  Annotated Sample Encodings

C.  CMW Labeling Software C1.0 Release Notes, 6/8/93



Avoiding “Loops” In Required Combinations

Extreme care must be taken in specifying required combinations to ensure that there are no “loops” in the specifications. A “loop” occurs when, through a series of required combination specifications, a word requires itself. The simplest case of a loop is:


whereby word A requires word B, which in turn requires word A. Such a specification makes no sense. If words A and B must always appear together, why are they encoded as separate words? A more complex case of a loop occurs in the following specification:


whereby word A requires word B, which in turn requires word C, which in turn requires word A.