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System Administration Guide: Oracle Solaris Containers-Resource Management and Oracle Solaris Zones     Oracle Solaris 10 1/13 Information Library
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Part I Resource Management

1.  Introduction to Solaris 10 Resource Management

2.  Projects and Tasks (Overview)

3.  Administering Projects and Tasks

4.  Extended Accounting (Overview)

5.  Administering Extended Accounting (Tasks)

6.  Resource Controls (Overview)

7.  Administering Resource Controls (Tasks)

8.  Fair Share Scheduler (Overview)

9.  Administering the Fair Share Scheduler (Tasks)

10.  Physical Memory Control Using the Resource Capping Daemon (Overview)

11.  Administering the Resource Capping Daemon (Tasks)

12.  Resource Pools (Overview)

13.  Creating and Administering Resource Pools (Tasks)

14.  Resource Management Configuration Example

15.  Resource Control Functionality in the Solaris Management Console

Part II Zones

16.  Introduction to Solaris Zones

17.  Non-Global Zone Configuration (Overview)

18.  Planning and Configuring Non-Global Zones (Tasks)

19.  About Installing, Halting, Cloning, and Uninstalling Non-Global Zones (Overview)

20.  Installing, Booting, Halting, Uninstalling, and Cloning Non-Global Zones (Tasks)

21.  Non-Global Zone Login (Overview)

22.  Logging In to Non-Global Zones (Tasks)

23.  Moving and Migrating Non-Global Zones (Tasks)

24.  Oracle Solaris 10 9/10: Migrating a Physical Oracle Solaris System Into a Zone (Tasks)

25.  About Packages and Patches on an Oracle Solaris System With Zones Installed (Overview)

26.  Adding and Removing Packages and Patches on an Oracle Solaris System With Zones Installed (Tasks)

27.  Oracle Solaris Zones Administration (Overview)

28.  Oracle Solaris Zones Administration (Tasks)

29.  Upgrading an Oracle Solaris 10 System That Has Installed Non-Global Zones

30.  Troubleshooting Miscellaneous Oracle Solaris Zones Problems

Part III lx Branded Zones

31.  About Branded Zones and the Linux Branded Zone

About Using Zones on an Oracle Solaris System

Branded Zones Technology

Processes Running in a Branded Zone

Branded Zone Device Support

Branded Zone File System Support

Privileges in a Branded Zone

About the lx Brand

Supported Linux Distributions

Application Support

Debugging Tools

Commands and Other Interfaces

Setting Up lx Branded Zones on Your System (Task Map)

32.  Planning the lx Branded Zone Configuration (Overview)

33.  Configuring the lx Branded Zone (Tasks)

34.  About Installing, Booting, Halting, Cloning, and Uninstalling lx Branded Zones (Overview)

35.  Installing, Booting, Halting, Uninstalling and Cloning lx Branded Zones (Tasks)

36.  Logging In to lx Branded Zones (Tasks)

37.  Moving and Migrating lx Branded Zones (Tasks)

38.  Administering and Running Applications in lx Branded Zones (Tasks)



About the lx Brand

The lx brand uses the branded zones framework to enable Linux binary applications to run unmodified on a machine with an Oracle Solaris system kernel.

The machine must have one of the following supported processor types:

Supported Linux Distributions

The lx brand includes the tools necessary to install a CentOS 3.x or Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3.x distribution inside a non-global zone. Versions 3.5 to 3.8 of each distribution are supported. The brand supports the execution of 32-bit Linux applications on x86 and x64 machines running the Oracle Solaris system in either 32-bit or 64-bit mode.

The lx brand emulates the system call interfaces provided by the Linux 2.4.21 kernel, as modified by Red Hat in the RHEL 3.x distributions. This kernel provides the system call interfaces consumed by the glibc version 2.3.2 released by Red Hat.

In addition, the lx brand partially emulates the Linux /dev and /proc interfaces.


Caution - Note that you must maintain a supported configuration if you add packages to an lx branded zone. See About Maintaining a Supported Configuration for more information.

Application Support

The Oracle Solaris system imposes no limit on the number of Linux applications you can run in an lx branded zone. Sufficient memory must be available. Also see System and Space Requirements.

Regardless of the underlying kernel, only 32-bit Linux applications are able to run.

The lx zone supports only user-level Linux applications. You cannot use Linux device drivers, Linux kernel modules, or Linux file systems from inside an lx zone.

See How to Install an Application in an lx Branded Zone for an example of installing an application.

You cannot run Oracle Solaris applications inside an lx zone. However, the lx zone enables you to use the Oracle Solaris system to develop, test, and deploy Linux applications. For example, you can place a Linux application in an lx zone and analyze it using Oracle Solaris tools run from the global zone. You can then make improvements and deploy the tuned application on a native Linux system.