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Developer's Guide to Oracle Solaris 10 Security     Oracle Solaris 10 1/13 Information Library
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Document Information


1.  Oracle Solaris Security for Developers (Overview)

Overview of Oracle Solaris Security Features for Developers

System Security

Network Security Architecture

2.  Developing Privileged Applications

3.  Writing PAM Applications and Services

4.  Writing Applications That Use GSS-API

5.  GSS-API Client Example

6.  GSS-API Server Example

7.  Writing Applications That Use SASL

8.  Introduction to the Oracle Solaris Cryptographic Framework

9.  Writing User-Level Cryptographic Applications and Providers

10.  Using the Smart Card Framework

A.  Sample C-Based GSS-API Programs

B.  GSS-API Reference

C.  Specifying an OID

D.  Source Code for SASL Example

E.  SASL Reference Tables

F.  Packaging and Signing Cryptographic Providers



System Security

For system security, the Oracle Solaris OS provides process privileges. Process privileges are an alternative to the standard, superuser-based UNIX model for granting access to privileged applications. The system administrator assigns users a set of process privileges that permit access to privileged applications. A user does not need to become superuser to use a privileged application.

Privileges enable system administrators to delegate limited permission to users to override system security instead of giving users complete root access. Accordingly, developers who create new privileged applications should test for specific privileges instead of checking for UID = 0. See Chapter 2, Developing Privileged Applications.

For highly stringent system security, consider using the Oracle Solaris' Trusted Extensions feature. The Trusted Extensions feature enables system administrators to specify the applications and files that a particular user can access. The Trusted Extensions feature is outside of the scope of this book. See for more information.

The Oracle Solaris OS provides the following public interfaces for security: