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System Administration Guide: Security Services     Oracle Solaris 10 1/13 Information Library
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Part I Security Overview

1.  Security Services (Overview)

Part II System, File, and Device Security

2.  Managing Machine Security (Overview)

3.  Controlling Access to Systems (Tasks)

4.  Controlling Access to Devices (Tasks)

5.  Using the Basic Audit Reporting Tool (Tasks)

6.  Controlling Access to Files (Tasks)

7.  Using the Automated Security Enhancement Tool (Tasks)

Part III Roles, Rights Profiles, and Privileges

8.  Using Roles and Privileges (Overview)

9.  Using Role-Based Access Control (Tasks)

10.  Role-Based Access Control (Reference)

11.  Privileges (Tasks)

12.  Privileges (Reference)

Part IV Cryptographic Services

13.  Oracle Solaris Cryptographic Framework (Overview)

14.  Oracle Solaris Cryptographic Framework (Tasks)

15.  Oracle Solaris Key Management Framework

Part V Authentication Services and Secure Communication

16.  Using Authentication Services (Tasks)

17.  Using PAM

18.  Using SASL

19.  Using Secure Shell (Tasks)

20.  Secure Shell (Reference)

Part VI Kerberos Service

21.  Introduction to the Kerberos Service

22.  Planning for the Kerberos Service

23.  Configuring the Kerberos Service (Tasks)

24.  Kerberos Error Messages and Troubleshooting

25.  Administering Kerberos Principals and Policies (Tasks)

26.  Using Kerberos Applications (Tasks)

27.  The Kerberos Service (Reference)

Part VII Auditing in Oracle Solaris

28.  Oracle Solaris Auditing (Overview)

29.  Planning for Oracle Solaris Auditing

30.  Managing Oracle Solaris Auditing (Tasks)

31.  Oracle Solaris Auditing (Reference)




System Administration Guide: Security Services is part of a multivolume set that covers a significant part of the Oracle Solaris operating system (Oracle Solaris) administration information. This book assumes that you have already installed the current release, and you have set up any networking software that you plan to use. The Oracle Solaris operating system is part of the Oracle Solaris product family, which includes many features, such as Secure Shell.

Note - This Oracle Solaris release supports systems that use the SPARC and x86 families of processor architectures. The supported systems appear in the Oracle Solaris OS: Hardware Compatibility Lists. This document cites any implementation differences between the platform types.

In this document, these x86 related terms mean the following:

For supported systems, see the Oracle Solaris OS: Hardware Compatibility Lists.

Who Should Use This Book

This book is intended for anyone who is responsible for administering one or more systems that run Oracle Solaris. To use this book, you should have more than two years of UNIX system administration experience. Attending training courses in UNIX system administration might be helpful.

How the System Administration Guides Are Organized

Here is a list of the topics that are covered by the System Administration Guides.

Book Title
User accounts and groups, server and client support, shutting down and booting a system, and managing services
Terminals and modems, system resources (disk quotas, accounting, and crontabs), system processes, and troubleshooting Oracle Solaris software problems
Removable media, disks and devices, file systems, and backing up and restoring data
TCP/IP network administration, IPv4 and IPv6 address administration, DHCP, IPsec, IKE, IP filter, Mobile IP, IP network multipathing (IPMP), and IPQoS
DNS, NIS, and LDAP naming and directory services, including transitioning from NIS to LDAP and transitioning from NIS+ to LDAP
NIS+ naming and directory services
Web cache servers, time-related services, network file systems (NFS and autofs), mail, SLP, and PPP
Printing topics and tasks, using services, tools, protocols, and technologies to set up and administer printing services and printers
Auditing, device management, file security, BART, Kerberos services, PAM, Oracle Solaris Cryptographic Framework, privileges, RBAC, SASL, and Oracle Solaris Secure Shell
Resource management topics projects and tasks, extended accounting, resource controls, fair share scheduler (FSS), physical memory control using the resource capping daemon (rcapd), and resource pools; virtualization using Solaris Zones software partitioning technology and lx branded zones
ZFS storage pool and file system creation and management, snapshots, clones, backups, using access control lists (ACLs) to protect ZFS files, using ZFS on an Oracle Solaris system with zones installed, emulated volumes, and troubleshooting and data recovery
System administration that is specific to the Oracle Solaris' Trusted Extensions feature
Starting with the Solaris 10 5/08 release, describes how to plan for, enable, and initially configure the Oracle Solaris' Trusted Extensions feature

Related Third-Party Web Site References

Third party URLs are referenced in this document and provide additional, related information.

Oracle is not responsible for the availability of third-party web sites mentioned in this document. Oracle does not endorse and is not responsible or liable for any content, advertising, products, or other materials that are available on or through such sites or resources. Oracle will not be responsible or liable for any actual or alleged damage or loss caused by or in connection with the use of or reliance on any such content, goods, or services that are available on or through such sites or resources.

Access to Oracle Support

Oracle customers have access to electronic support through My Oracle Support. For information, visit or visit if you are hearing impaired.

Typographic Conventions

The following table describes the typographic conventions that are used in this book.

Table P-1 Typographic Conventions

The names of commands, files, and directories, and onscreen computer output
Edit your .login file.

Use ls -a to list all files.

machine_name% you have mail.

What you type, contrasted with onscreen computer output
machine_name% su


Placeholder: replace with a real name or value
The command to remove a file is rm filename.
Book titles, new terms, and terms to be emphasized
Read Chapter 6 in the User's Guide.

A cache is a copy that is stored locally.

Do not save the file.

Note: Some emphasized items appear bold online.

Shell Prompts in Command Examples

The following table shows UNIX system prompts and superuser prompts for shells that are included in the Oracle Solaris OS. In command examples, the shell prompt indicates whether the command should be executed by a regular user or a user with privileges.

Table P-2 Shell Prompts

Bash shell, Korn shell, and Bourne shell
Bash shell, Korn shell, and Bourne shell for superuser
C shell
C shell for superuser